stats
The Games, Salt Lake, 2002link to globeandmail.com home page
Link to games home


space
Search
space

space


News



Hockey 
Curling 
Figure skating 
Bobsled, luge 
Skiing 
Snowboarding 
Speed skating 




Statistics



Medal standings 
Schedule 
Canada's roster 
Canada's medal winners 




Games poll


See our poll results 



Have your say



Read what others said 




Visuals



Video 
Photo galleries 




Salt Lake



Venues 
Weather 
Postcards 
About the city 




TSNMAX.ca



Home page 




    
Postcards from Salt Lake
Saturday, Feb. 4, 2006


A disquieting moment on an endless Olympic walkabout

By BEVERLEY SMITH

All you do at the Olympic Games is walk miles and miles.

You walk down long fenced chutes that end somewhere you aren't supposed to go anyway. You walk up multiple flights of stairs only to find that an entrance you could go in yesterday is out of bounds and the new entrance is on the other side of the building. You line up and wait. And when you're finished with that, you walk back the way you came. Maybe.

But always the long walks have a side benefit.

They are teaming with examples of unusual life forms. One chilly Salt Lake City day, a baby cried loudly at a stoplight that never seemed to change. She was covered with a blanket to protect her from the cold. Her father, dressed in large, tight jeans, wearing hair cut shorter than a worn wire brush, comforted her.

"We're almost there, just another block," he said with a southern accent.

A soldier in full camouflage, helmet and all, stood in the middle of the blocked-off street and when he saw the child, his face brightened.

"She's putting up a real protest," the father yelled to the soldier.

Smiling, the soldier joked that maybe she should head for the area that Games organizers have set aside for protesters.

"Only thing I want to do with those protesters is fire a shell at them,'' snarled the father over the baby's head.

The soldier didn't bat an eye. He didn't flinch at the remark. On the surface, the father seemed like everyman, the ordinary man. Under the surface, he was fundamentally frightening.

So was the soldier.

Back to main postcards page


    
Salt Lake Weather 

space
Standings
Final

Country
G
S
B
TTL

GER
12
16
7
35
USA
10
13
11
34
NOR
11
7
6
24
CAN
6
3
8
17
FULL STANDINGS 




space
space
space

Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space

© 2003 Bell Globemedia Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Help & Contact Us | Back to the top of this page