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By the Numbers
Saturday, Feb. 4, 2006


Total health expenditures as a percentage of GDP among selected OECD countries
Canada ranks fifth, spending just over nine per cent on health.
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Total public health expenditures as a percentage of GDPs
Canada ranks sixth, spending about 6.5 per cent.
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Per capita health expenditures: Total health, provincial-territorial health expenditures, hospital and physician services (constant 1997 $)
Other than a slight decline in 1992-96, these have continued to rise
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Annual rate of change: Public health expenditures as a percentage of GDP
During the deficit-fighting period of 1992-1996, Canada's public health expenditures were cut back more than in other selected OECD countries
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Collecting and spending health dollars: Who does what?
The roles of citizens, the federal government, and the provincial and territorial governments.
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Life expectancy comparisons, in Canada and compared to other OECD countries
Canada outperforms the G7 average.
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Potential years of lost life and disability-adjusted life expectancy
Canada outperforms the G7 in the first category and is average in the second one.
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Infant mortality trends in Canada and OECD comparison
Canada slightly beats the G7 average and outperforms the OECD average.
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Perinatal mortality trends in Canada and the U.S. and an OECD comparison
Canada's perinatal mortality rate slightly outperforms the G7 and is much better than the OECD's.
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Life expectancy in years at birth, by province, territory and Canada, 1996
The life expectancy in Nunavut is shockingly low compared to the Canadian average.
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Percentage of the population reporting 'unmet health care needs' and self-reporting of health condition
People in Nunavut don't report their own health as being much worse than the Canadian average despite their low life expectancy.
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Population projections for Canada, percentage of the population aged 60 and over, 2001 to 2051
The percentage of Canadians aged 80 and over will form a proportionately larger percentage of Canada's population in the coming decades
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Total health expenditures by source of finance, 1999
Seventy-one cents of every dollar in health-care expenditure was paid out of tax dollars
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Share of total health expenditures paid 'out of pocket' among OECD countries, 1998
Canadians paid slightly more than the G7 average but less than the OECD average
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Share of total health expenditures paid by public sector, 2000
Canada pays the OECD average and slightly more than the G7 average.
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Private health care expenditures
Dentistry and prescription drugs are the two biggest expenditures, for both private insurers and individuals
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Historic relationship between rates of growth in per capita health expenditures and that of GDP
Health care expenditures have traditionally outpaced GDP growth, although that trend is slowing.
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Federal contribution to total provincial-territorial health expenditures, 1968/69 to 2000/01
The federal contribution has trended downward, but provincial claims that the federal contribution is only 14 per cent ignores tax transfers.
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One-time bridge funding to the Canada Health Transfer
The commission proposes $8.5 billion in special programs plus an additional $6.5 billion annually to properly fund the health care system.
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Percentage change in the number of selected health professionals (number per 100,000 people), 1991 to 2000
Nurses have declined, physicians have held steady, and the "wellness" professions have grown.
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Total number of general practitioners/family physicians and specialists (per 100,000 people), 1980 to 2001
There has been a steady growth in the number of specialists, but the number of family doctors and GPs has declined from their 1993 peak.
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Selected imaging technologies (number per million people) among OECD countries, 1999
Canada is significantly below the number of MRI and CT scanners in both OECD and G7 countries.
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Health status for populations in predominately urban, intermediate and predominately rural health regions in Canada, 1996
Predominately rural areas fare worse than urban ones in virtually all health indicator categories.
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Percentage distribution of home care expenditures, by source of finance, 2000-01
The provinces and private insurers pay virtually the entire cost. The federal goverment pays only one per cent.
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