The Globe and Mail, The Dominion Institute and the government of France launched a national call for letters and photographs from the front lines of the First World War. The submissions were then reviewed by a blue-ribbon panel of Canadian and French historians, including Jack Granatstein, Margaret MacMillan, Charlotte Gray, Christopher Moore and French historian Annie Deperchin. They then picked the 10 most significant artifacts and an additional 85 family artifacts, which were assembled on globeandmail.com


Soldier mailed home shrapnel taken from lip
By GLORIA GALLOWAY
Russell Watson lived through the fiery hell of the French battlefields and had something to show for it -- a splinter of a German shell embedded in his nose and upper lip.
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Acting up helped PoW survive camp
By GLORIA GALLOWAY
First World War soldiers were rarely taken prisoner.
Most of the Allied casualties died in the mud with a German sniper's bullet in their head, or riddled with shrapnel, or drowned in their own mucus after poison gas filled their lungs
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It went to hell and back
By Rod Mickleburgh, Toronto
Ninety years on, it still has the power to move. The legs are missing. So are the eyes. A dark cross-stitch stands in for the nose and mouth. And two unsteady ears curl awkwardly on top.
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The Top 85 artifacts by category

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