stats
ctvnews.com
The Globe and Mail
globeandmail.com
spaceHome   spaceHomespace
spacer
spacer
Attack on the U.S. For the latest breaking news go to globeandmail.com or ctvnews.com
spacer
space
The Globe and Mail

  Article Search
space
  
space
   Quick Searches     Tips
space
space
MAIN PAGEarrow
Line
STRIKING BACKarrow
Line
HOMEFRONTarrow
Line
BIOTERRORISMarrow
Line
CANADA'S ROLEarrow
Line
FROM THE FRONTLINEarrow
Line
ANALYSISarrow
Line
COMMENTarrow
Line
HUMAN IMPACTarrow
Line

VIDEO ARCHIVEarrowLine
INTERACTIVEarrowLine
PHOTOSarrowLine
RESOURCESarrow
Line
HAVE YOUR SAYarrow
Line

THE AFTERMATH
Line
Business Impactarrow
Suspectsarrow
Builduparrow
Recoveryarrow
The Investigationarrow
Line

HOW IT BEGAN
Line
What happened?arrow
In New Yorkarrow
In Washingtonarrow
In Canadaarrow
Around the worldarrow
Eyewitness accountsarrow
Wall St. paralyzedarrow

Line



NEWS

Saturday, Feb. 4, 2006

War talk unsettles several leaders

By ALAN FREEMAN
With reports from Associated Press, Agence France-Presse and Reuters
Wednesday, September 19, 2001

LONDON -- U.S. President George W. Bush began a series of face-to-face meetings with world leaders yesterday as efforts to build a global antiterrorism coalition gained momentum. However, there were still signs that some governments are reluctant to give their unqualified backing for military action.

As French President Jacques Chirac met Mr. Bush for dinner at the White House last night, a whirlwind of top-level meetings was continuing around the globe to put in place a coalition that is as wide as possible to back what Mr. Bush has called his "war against terrorism."

Mr. Chirac will be followed by Indonesian President Megawati Sukarnoputri, the foreign ministers of Russia, China and Germany, plus British Prime Minister Tony Blair, who will meet Mr. Bush tomorrow. Prime Minister Jean Chrétien will travel to the White House next week for talks.

Saudi Arabia, birthplace of fugitive Osama bin Laden, has promised the United States full co-operation in its antiterrorist battle, but King Fahd could risk alienating those Muslims in his country who sympathize with Mr. bin Laden's goals, if not his methods.

European governments, who are to meet Friday in a special antiterrorism summit called by the 15-nation European Union, have expressed support for the U.S. government, but several have shied away from the U.S. plans for a "war" against terrorism.

Mr. Chirac, who has already pledged that France will be "totally supportive" once those responsible are identified, said last night in Washington that France "stands in total solidarity."

But French Prime Minister Lionel Jospin made it clear yesterday that despite Paris's declared solidarity with Washington, France retains full sovereignty over any actions that are eventually decided.

"It's not a war," Belgian Foreign Minister Louis Michel declared earlier this week, expressing similar sentiments. "You can't just use words like that. There needs to be a 'mobilization' against terrorism."

Italian Defence Minister Antonio Martino has "categorically excluded" any "extraordinary call to arms."

Johannes Rau, Germany's largely ceremonial President, has called for the United States to respond to the terrorist attacks "with civil means," but Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, Germany's leader, hasn't ruled out the possibility of German military backing for a U.S. strike. "You can't have a position of 'wash my skin, but don't get me wet,' " he said.

Mr. Blair, who remains Washington's most stalwart European ally, has begun his own round of coalition building. Yesterday, at a special meeting held at his Chequers retreat, he joined six African leaders in vowing to "rid the world of terrorism."

A joint statement by Mr. Blair and the presidents of Botswana, Ghana, Mozambique, Nigeria, Senegal and Tanzania said they promise "to strengthen international co-operation, to cut off financial support to terrorists and to dismantle terrorist networks wherever they exist."

India, Pakistan's powerful neighbour and rival, said it is part of the antiterrorism coalition but made it clear it thinks the campaign should be broadened to include the fight against terrorist actions India says are the work of Islamic terrorists alleged to have received Pakistani backing.

But India's top Muslim cleric said yesterday that the attacks in New York and Washington were signs of "divine wrath," warning that Americans must change their "anti-Muslim" policies.

"In my opinion, it is a reaction to the oppressive activities of the U.S. on Muslims in Palestine, Iraq and Afghanistan."





 PHOTOS

Life Goes On
space

SPECIAL
Voices From After the Fall, The Facts Behind the Fear, and the preview of a new Discovery documentary filmed at Ground Zero.


VIDEO






spaceTHE LATEST:
(RealPlayer required)

space
  • Six-month Memorial for Sept. 11 - U.S. President George Bush speaks from the White House. "The terrorists will remember Sept. 11 as the day their reckoning began," he said.

  • In Canada - Relatives of Canadian victims of the World Trade Centre attacks wonder why there's no six-month memorial here at home.

    CTVNEWS.com video reports



  • Copyright 2001 Globe Interactive, a division of Bell Globemedia Publishing Inc.
    Help & Contact Us | Back to the top of this page


    spacer
    [an error occurred while processing this directive]