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IN NEW YORK

Saturday, Feb. 4, 2006

New Yorkers say they want terrorists brought to justice

By LISA PRIEST, The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 20, 2001

NEW YORK -- They're devastated and they often go to the makeshift memorials, but some New Yorkers want the terrorists who brought down the World Trade Center to face justice, not a gory death.

"I don't want a lot of people hurt; I don't even want a war," Lucinda Henry, a 34-year-old homemaker, said yesterday. "They should be brought to justice, but a war, that's pretty scary."

Mrs. Henry was one of hundreds who passed by the old armoury, a brown brick building where those with missing family members filled out forms and received counselling.

Now, it is lined with makeshift shrines and posters seeking people lost in the wreckage of the World Trade Center, but the candles lit there have burned out.

The desire for justice has not.

Wanda Luke, a 29-year-old who works in sales, said she believes those suspected of involvement in the worst terrorist attacks in U.S. history should face trial.

"I believe whoever did this deserves the death sentence," Ms. Luke said yesterday. "But I don't want civilians hurt. I just want the individual people caught."

But Charlie Hendricks, a 62-year-old paint contractor, is one who believes wholeheartedly that the United States must go to war.

While "innocent people shouldn't die for the hell of it," he said, civilians may have to die so the terrorists can be caught.

"We have to fight back," said Mr. Hendricks, who had just held a coffee-shop door open for a woman in her 80s. "Right now, anything goes. We have to go out and get them."

The New York Post, a splashy tabloid, put "Wanted: Dead or Alive" posters of Saudi dissident Osama bin Laden, suspected of masterminding the attacks, in its papers on Tuesday.

Announcing its poster on Page 2, it said: "Stick it up at home, in your office, in the street, or in your storefront window . . . and don't take it down 'til the man believed to be responsible for the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center is dead -- or has been captured."



 PHOTOS

Life Goes On
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SPECIAL
Voices From After the Fall, The Facts Behind the Fear, and the preview of a new Discovery documentary filmed at Ground Zero.


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  • Six-month Memorial for Sept. 11 - U.S. President George Bush speaks from the White House. "The terrorists will remember Sept. 11 as the day their reckoning began," he said.

  • In Canada - Relatives of Canadian victims of the World Trade Centre attacks wonder why there's no six-month memorial here at home.

    CTVNEWS.com video reports



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