stats
ctvnews.com
The Globe and Mail
globeandmail.com
spaceHome   spaceHomespace
spacer
spacer
Attack on the U.S. For the latest breaking news go to globeandmail.com or ctvnews.com
spacer
space
The Globe and Mail

  Article Search
space
  
space
   Quick Searches     Tips
space
space
MAIN PAGEarrow
Line
STRIKING BACKarrow
Line
HOMEFRONTarrow
Line
BIOTERRORISMarrow
Line
CANADA'S ROLEarrow
Line
FROM THE FRONTLINEarrow
Line
ANALYSISarrow
Line
COMMENTarrow
Line
HUMAN IMPACTarrow
Line

VIDEO ARCHIVEarrowLine
INTERACTIVEarrowLine
PHOTOSarrowLine
RESOURCESarrow
Line
HAVE YOUR SAYarrow
Line

THE AFTERMATH
Line
Business Impactarrow
Suspectsarrow
Builduparrow
Recoveryarrow
The Investigationarrow
Line

HOW IT BEGAN
Line
What happened?arrow
In New Yorkarrow
In Washingtonarrow
In Canadaarrow
Around the worldarrow
Eyewitness accountsarrow
Wall St. paralyzedarrow

Line



IN NEW YORK

Saturday, Feb. 4, 2006

Ontario representatives ready to aid Canadians at ground zero

By LISA PRIEST, The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 20, 2001

NEW YORK -- Marcel Pelletier travelled all the way from Vancouver to deal with the agonizing process of finding his son Michael, who was in the World Trade Center when two hijacked airliners plowed into the twin towers on Sept. 11.

Although Canadian officials have said that families do not need to make the trip here to help collect material for DNA testing, Mr. Pelletier and other relatives did anyway.

"It's a very painful time," he said yesterday. "We're grieving."

Mr. Pelletier said his son, a trader with Cantor Fitzgerald, was on the 104th floor when the airplane crashed into the tower. He was in Tower One, the first one hit.

"He went up to the 109th floor to assist people instead of coming down," Mr. Pelletier said.

Grieving family members are being sought out by three representatives from Ontario's Office for Victims of Crime who arrived in New York on Tuesday night, to provide assistance.

Yesterday, they put up posters with a photograph of the Canadian flag at the old armoury and other places where families gather to provide information about missing loved ones.

The trio -- a police detective, a victim-support worker, and Sharon Rosenfeldt, chairwoman of the Office for Victims of Crime -- is hoping to assist Canadians whose family members are believed to be among the 5,422 missing. So far, 218 have been confirmed dead in the New York attacks.

"We're here to offer financial assistance," said Detective Sergeant John Muise of Toronto Police, who was looking for Canadians at the family centre at Pier 94 on the Hudson River in Manhattan yesterday.

"People can just call us. We want to hear from them," he said. The number is 1-866-406-HELP.

The Ontario government has set up a $3-million fund to help families from all over Canada who may have lost loved ones in the terrorist attacks. People can spend the money to travel to New York to identify their family members or use it for funeral arrangements.

The number of Canadians who are so far "unaccounted for" was lowered yesterday to between 35 and 60, said André LeBlanc, spokesman for the Canadian Consulate in New York. That number represents the Canadians believed to have been in or near the World Trade Center when it collapsed.

Since last week's attack, 1,025 cases have been opened on missing Canadians, defined as those people whom relatives or friends could not reach after the attacks, Mr. LeBlanc said.

The number was whittled down after some were found by family members, friends or officials of the Canadian Consulate, he said.

"We've been able to be in touch with people in the past few days, including those in emergency shelters or who have stayed with friends," Mr. LeBlanc said.

Consulate officials and Ontario's chief coroner, James Young, are helping families fill out forms, and they assist in the collection of items such as unwashed clothing, toothbrushes and hairbrushes to be used in DNA testing.



 PHOTOS

Life Goes On
space

SPECIAL
Voices From After the Fall, The Facts Behind the Fear, and the preview of a new Discovery documentary filmed at Ground Zero.


VIDEO






space THE LATEST:
   (RealPlayer required)

space
  • Six-month Memorial for Sept. 11 - U.S. President George Bush speaks from the White House. "The terrorists will remember Sept. 11 as the day their reckoning began," he said.

  • In Canada - Relatives of Canadian victims of the World Trade Centre attacks wonder why there's no six-month memorial here at home.

    CTVNEWS.com video reports



  • Copyright © 2001 Globe Interactive, a division of Bell Globemedia Publishing Inc.
    Help & Contact Us | Back to the top of this page


    spacer
    [an error occurred while processing this directive]