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MARKET REACTION

Saturday, Feb. 4, 2006

U.S. brokers need time to heal
By KAREN HOWLETT, The Globe and Mail
With files from reporter Richard Blackwell
Thursday, September 13, 2001

TORONTO -- U.S. stock markets will be shut today for a third consecutive session but even when trading resumes it will take a long time for the shattered brokerages that feed the system to be fully operational

FULL STORYarrow
TV ad industry grinds to virtual standstill
By JOHN HEINZL, The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 13, 2001

The television advertising industry has ground to a virtual standstill as major Canadian and U.S. networks pre-empt commercials to devote non-stop coverage to the terrorist assault.

FULL STORYarrow
Central banks inject billions
By JOHN PARTRIDGE, The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 13, 2001

Central banks and governments fought back with lofty rhetoric and billions of dollars Wednesday in an effort to keep global payments systems functioning and stem fears of a worldwide recession, following Tuesday's devastating terrorist attacks on New York and Washington.
FULL STORYarrow Business is anything but usual
By ELIZABETH CHURCH in TORONTO and WENDY STUECK in Vancouver, The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 13, 2001

On the first day after the horrific terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, it was anything but business as usual at companies across Canada.

Events were cancelled, meetings delayed and deals put on hold. Most people returned to work Wednesday, but many who did admitted that their minds were not entirely on their jobs.


FULL STORYarrow Amid gloom, there's still reason to hope
By DOUGLAS GOOLD, The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 13, 2001

In the eye of a storm, it looks and feels like the world will never again be the same. And no wonder, in the current crisis.

The United States and the world are still in shock. That's not only because of the scope of the disaster - the destruction of the World Trade Center and part of the Pentagon, and the massive loss of life - but also because of the element of surprise.


FULL STORYarrow BMO economist sees U.S. recession
By MARIAN STINSON, The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 13, 2001

One of Canada's best known economists predicts that Tuesday's terrorist attacks will tip the U.S. economy into recession, although most experts are more optimistic about the resilience of consumer confidence.


FULL STORYarrow Gold gives tepid response to attacks
By ALLAN ROBINSON, The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 13, 2001

Gold is not the barometer of fear it once was, observers say, citing the relatively short-lived, tepid response of bullion markets to the horrific terrorist attacks on the United States, which closed down the heart of the U.S. financial system.


FULL STORYarrow Insurers see loss topping $10-billion
By GUY DIXON, The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 13, 2001

The world's largest insurers have placed early, tentative estimates of at least $10-billion (U.S.) to $20-billion on losses related to terrorist attacks on New York's World Trade Center and the Pentagon in Washington.


FULL STORYarrow Mortgage bonds held on trade center could be in danger of default
Bloomberg News
Thursday, September 13, 2001

New York's World Trade Center, which was destroyed Tuesday by a terrorist attack, was collateral for $946-million (U.S.) in mortgage bonds that may now be in danger of default, analysts say.


FULL STORYarrow Oil falls on eased supply concerns
By LILY NGUYEN, The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 13, 2001

Calgary - Oil prices retreated further from the highs they reached in the wake of terror attacks on the United States, as fears about supply disruptions were eased by official reassurances.


FULL STORYarrow Canadian exchanges to open
By RICHARD BLACKWELL , The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 13, 2001

Canada's equity markets will reopen this morning after a day when the brokerage community sat on its hands even though most companies' trading systems were capable of full operations.


FULL STORYarrow Fortune in bullion buried in rubble
By LEN ZEHR, ALLAN ROBINSON and ANDREW WILLIS, The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 13, 2001

Buried under tons of rubble in the basement of New York's World Trade Center is a king's ransom in gold and silver.

The bullion is stored in underground vaults owned by Comex, a division of the New York Mercantile Exchange, where five big metals players, including ScotiaMocatta, the metals trading arm of Bank of Nova Scotia, clear their trades.


FULL STORYarrow Collapse unlikely to stop SEC probes
Reuters News Agency
Thursday, September 13, 2001

Washington - The destruction of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's field office in New York is likely to hinder, but not halt, major investigations by America's top market regulator, former SEC officials and lawyers said Wednesday.


FULL STORYarrow Special closings
Thursday, September 13, 2001


FULL STORYarrow Global markets remain in turmoil
By CAROLINE ALPHONSO, The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 13, 2001

Global financial markets were in turmoil again Wednesday as investors struggled to find firm ground in the aftermath of the catastrophic destruction of the World Trade Center.


FULL STORYarrow Nasdaq skyscraper to survive, owner says
By JACQUIE MCNISH AND KAREN HOWLETT, The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 13, 2001

The Canadian-owned Wall Street office tower that houses the Nasdaq stock exchange is expected to survive the fallout from the two collapsed World Trade Center towers despite earlier fears that it might collapse.


FULL STORYarrow Financial firms try to find Trade Center workers
Bloomberg News, The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 13, 2001

Morgan Stanley Dean Witter & Co. chairman Philip Purcell said "the vast majority" of its 3,500 World Trade Center employees survived the terrorist attack on the buildings, as other firms searched for missing workers.


FULL STORYarrow Nasdaq posts confidence note
Thursday, September 13, 2001

Notice from Nasdaq Stock Market chief executive officer Hardwick Simmons on its Web site.


FULL STORYarrow Thomson says most workers are safe
By KEITH DAMSELL, The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 13, 2001

The "vast majority" of Thomson Corp.'s more than 200 employees working at New York's destroyed World Trade Center are safe, the Toronto information services company said Wednesday.


FULL STORYarrow Shipping costs seen rising
By PETER KENNEDY, The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 13, 2001

VANCOUVER - Tighter border security in the wake of deadly terrorist attacks in the United States is expected to lead to sharply higher costs for Canadian companies shipping everything from auto parts to softwood lumber into the key U.S. market.


FULL STORYarrow Travel sector already hurt by attacks
By SIMON TUCK, The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 13, 2001

OTTAWA - The slumping travel industry is bracing for dwindling sales and higher costs in the wake of this week's terrorist attacks in the United States, with the first corporate casualty already being claimed.


FULL STORYarrow Attacks put heat on Talisman
By LILY NGUYEN, The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 13, 2001

Calgary - The terrorist attacks on U.S. targets on Tuesday have turned the heat back up on Talisman Energy Inc. and its controversial oil play in Sudan, the North African country with a radical Islamic government that has been accused in the past of providing a safe haven for terrorists.


FULL STORYarrow

arrowRead Market Reaction articles from Sept. 12



 PHOTOS

Life Goes On
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SPECIAL
Voices From After the Fall, The Facts Behind the Fear, and the preview of a new Discovery documentary filmed at Ground Zero.


VIDEO






space THE LATEST:
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  • Six-month Memorial for Sept. 11 - U.S. President George Bush speaks from the White House. "The terrorists will remember Sept. 11 as the day their reckoning began," he said.

  • In Canada - Relatives of Canadian victims of the World Trade Centre attacks wonder why there's no six-month memorial here at home.

    CTVNEWS.com video reports






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