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MARKET REACTION

Saturday, Feb. 4, 2006

Markets are paralyzed, banks try to ease jitters
By JACQUIE McNISH, The Globe and Mail
Wednesday, September 12, 2001

The precision strike on the United States' financial nerve centre has paralyzed markets around the world and raised the spectre of a crisis that could plague businesses for months to come.

For the first time since the Depression-era panic in 1933, the New York Stock Exchange will shut its doors for the second consecutive day as Wall Street sifts through the rubble of the destroyed World Trade Center. Also closed today are the American Stock Exchange, the Nasdaq Stock Market and numerous international exchanges, including possibly the Toronto Stock Exchange.

FULL STORYarrow
Business halts as eerie quiet reigns
By GORDON PITTS and SHOWWEI CHU, The Globe and Mail
Wednesday, September 12, 2001

A wide spectrum of Canadian business ground to a halt Tuesday, as people turned their minds to the fate of their counterparts - and in some cases, friends - who worked in Manhattan offices.
FULL STORYarrow Thomson scours city for staff in twin towers
By KEITH DAMSELL, The Globe and Mail
Wednesday, September 12, 2001

Thomson Corp. was searching late Tuesday for about 200 employees who work at company offices in New York's World Trade Center.
FULL STORYarrow Morgan Stanley offices vapourized
By RICHARD BLACKWELL, The Globe and Mail
Wednesday, September 12, 2001

Crucial offices of Morgan Stanley Dean Witter & Co., one of the United States' biggest brokerages and the biggest tenant in the World Trade Center, were vapourized Tuesday by the terrorist attack on the twin towers.
FULL STORYarrow Automotive - Slowdown at border shuts plants
By GREG KEENAN, The Globe and Mail
Wednesday, September 12, 2001

Ford Motor Co. of Canada Ltd. cancelled shifts at several of its plants Tuesday because of snarled border traffic, while DaimlerChrysler Corp. halted production at its U.S. plants because of the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington.
FULL STORYarrow Economy - Terrorism will hit efforts for recovery, experts say
By BRUCE LITTLE, The Globe and Mail
Wednesday, September 12, 2001

If there was anything a struggling economy - quite aside from an entire country - did not need, it was the kind of horrific attacks the United States suffered Tuesday.
FULL STORYarrow Insurance - Sector braces for record payout `Claims will be in the billions'; costs could threaten world's largest firms, experts say
By SIMON TUCK, The Globe and Mail
Wednesday, September 12, 2001

The global insurance industry potentially faces its own disaster following Tuesday's terrorist attacks in the United States, as it braces for what experts say will be the largest payout ever for the effects of a man-made event.
FULL STORYarrow The Airlines - Troubled industry faces new questions
By DAVE EBNER, The Globe and Mail
Wednesday, September 12, 2001

Tuesday's U.S. terrorist attacks - arguably the biggest disaster in global aviation history - leaves an already beleaguered industry facing serious new questions about its security and reliability, industry observers say.
FULL STORYarrow Now is definitely not the time to panic
By ROB CARRICK, The Globe and Mail
Wednesday, September 12, 2001

Money talk seems a bit inappropriate right now, so let's cut to the chase on the matter of your investments. Financial markets are going to be chaotic as they react to the terrorist attacks on the United States and the one sure thing is that a lot of money is going to be lost.
FULL STORYarrow Attacks will shake fragile consumer confidence
By STEPHEN NORTHFIELD, The Globe and Mail
Wednesday, September 12, 2001

The terrorists who launched the waves of attacks on the United States yesterday got exactly what they so desperately craved - a record body count and the undivided attention of the entire planet. And you can be sure that if one of the longer-term impacts of their heinous acts is a wrenching global recession, well, it's pretty safe to assume they'll simply see that as icing on the cake. Terrorists are big on symbolism. It's not simply what they do, it's who they do it to, when they do it and how they go about it.
FULL STORYarrow The TSE - Despite U.S. events, exchange opens on time, shuts down hour later
By ANGELA BARNES, The Globe and Mail
Wednesday, September 12, 2001

Despite the horrific events in New York Tuesday morning, the Toronto Stock Exchange opened on time at 9:30 a.m., but then closed just over an hour later. But by that time, the TSE 300-stock composite index had plummeted more than 4 per cent to its lowest level since late October, 1999, in very erratic, volatile and heavy trading.
FULL STORYarrow The true horror as human face - those left behind
By ANDREW WILLIS, The Globe and Mail
Wednesday, September 12, 2001

People may joke about Manhattan's Masters of the Universe, but there was a real electricity in the World Trade Center and skyscrapers that surrounded the complex. Climbing out of an elevator, you were greeted with floor after floor of open-concept offices filled with vast seas of, say, Cantor Fitzgerald bond traders or Morgan Stanley Dean Witter stock brokers.
FULL STORYarrow U.S. phone networks down, but not out
By BEN KLAYMAN and JEREMY PELOFSKY, Reuters News Agency
Wednesday, September 12, 2001

Millions of Americans jammed telephone lines across the United States to check on friends and relatives Tuesday after devastating aircraft attacks in New York, Washington and Pittsburgh, but despite the traffic the U.S. telephone networks continued to operate.
FULL STORYarrow Tech firms send workers home after U.S. attacks
Bloomberg News
Wednesday, September 12, 2001

Hewlett-Packard Co., Intel Corp. and other computer-related companies are closing offices, boosting security and encouraging employees to work from home after planes hijacked by terrorists destroyed New York's World Trade Center and crashed into the Pentagon.
FULL STORYarrow Terrorist attacks paralyze markets
By JOHN PARTRIDGE and CAROLINE ALPHONSO, The Globe and Mail
Wednesday, September 12, 2001

Central banks quickly move into action, pledge support to avert gridlock in system
FULL STORYarrow eBay bans sale of items from attack
Bloomberg News
Wednesday, September 12, 2001

Internet auction company eBay Inc. has banned the sale of items related to the World Trade Center attack after several auctions for videos and debris from the tragedy appeared on its Web site.
FULL STORYarrow U.S. dollar tumbles as investors flock to safer havens
By MARIAN STINSON, The Globe and Mail
Wednesday, September 12, 2001

The U.S. dollar tumbled and European currencies surged yesterday as investors scrambled for refuge after the World Trade Centre in New York was destroyed.
FULL STORYarrow Fearful traders drive up price of crude
By LILY NGUYEN, The Globe and Mail
Wednesday, September 12, 2001

CALGARY -- Oil prices surged by as much as $4 (U.S.) yesterday on fears that the terrorist attacks in the United States could disrupt supplies worldwide and speculation that the tragic events would be linked to the oil-exporting Middle East.
FULL STORYarrow



 PHOTOS

Life Goes On
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SPECIAL
Voices From After the Fall, The Facts Behind the Fear, and the preview of a new Discovery documentary filmed at Ground Zero.


VIDEO






space THE LATEST:
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  • Six-month Memorial for Sept. 11 - U.S. President George Bush speaks from the White House. "The terrorists will remember Sept. 11 as the day their reckoning began," he said.

  • In Canada - Relatives of Canadian victims of the World Trade Centre attacks wonder why there's no six-month memorial here at home.

    CTVNEWS.com video reports






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