stats
ctvnews.com
The Globe and Mail
globeandmail.com
spaceHome   spaceHomespace
spacer
spacer
Attack on the U.S. For the latest breaking news go to globeandmail.com or ctvnews.com
spacer
space
The Globe and Mail

  Article Search
space
  
space
   Quick Searches     Tips
space
space
MAIN PAGEarrow
Line
STRIKING BACKarrow
Line
HOMEFRONTarrow
Line
BIOTERRORISMarrow
Line
CANADA'S ROLEarrow
Line
FROM THE FRONTLINEarrow
Line
ANALYSISarrow
Line
COMMENTarrow
Line
HUMAN IMPACTarrow
Line

VIDEO ARCHIVEarrowLine
INTERACTIVEarrowLine
PHOTOSarrowLine
RESOURCESarrow
Line
HAVE YOUR SAYarrow
Line

THE AFTERMATH
Line
Business Impactarrow
Suspectsarrow
Builduparrow
Recoveryarrow
The Investigationarrow
Line

HOW IT BEGAN
Line
What happened?arrow
In New Yorkarrow
In Washingtonarrow
In Canadaarrow
Around the worldarrow
Eyewitness accountsarrow
Wall St. paralyzedarrow

Line



THE HUMAN IMPACT

Saturday, Feb. 4, 2006

Washington unfurls the Stars and Stripes

By BARRIE MCKENNA
Thursday, September 13, 2001

WASHINGTON -- Residents of the U.S. capital are displaying a mix of patriotism and anger in the aftermath of the deadly terrorist strike on their city.

Throughout Washington's leafy residential neighbourhoods yesterday, people draped U.S. flags over balconies, out of windows and on car antennas.

Elsewhere in the city, the Stars and Stripes -- a symbol of freedom to most Americans -- flew at half-staff outside government buildings, hotels and office towers.

"This was a very overt action against our people, everyday people," said Marsha Moore, an early-childhood educator from Atlanta.

Standing outside the White House, Ms. Moore said the deadly attacks won't change the way she lives.

"I'm a little scared, [but] I'm not going to live in fear," said Ms. Moore, who is in Washington for an education conference. "If these are acts of terrorism, it doesn't matter where we are. We've got to keep going. Keep our government going, keep our economy going. We have to be strong. We can't be petrified."

Nonetheless, it was clear that life is only slowly returning to normal. Ms. Moore's conference, like many events here, has been cancelled.

Most schools and many businesses remained closed. Early in the day, it was difficult to find a cup of coffee because many restaurants and coffee shops remained closed. More than 24 hours after the attack on the Pentagon, normally clogged streets were nearly deserted.

"There seems to be an eerie silence," said Anthony Duggan, a hotel worker. "You don't hear sirens, no one yelling for cabs."

The regional transit authority reported that the number of passengers on buses and subways was at nearly a third of normal weekday levels.

Meanwhile, federal and local police, backed by the National Guard, patrolled downtown streets in a symbolic gesture to reassure people the city is safe. Outside the White House, dozens of machine-gun-toting Secret Service agents patrolled the grounds with explosives-sniffing dogs. "All the camouflaged guards on street corners is both comforting and disconcerting," said David Fischer, a Washington lawyer. "I'm not used to seeing guys with assault rifles here."



 PHOTOS

Life Goes On
space

SPECIAL
Voices From After the Fall, The Facts Behind the Fear, and the preview of a new Discovery documentary filmed at Ground Zero.


VIDEO






spaceTHE LATEST:
(RealPlayer required)

space
  • Six-month Memorial for Sept. 11 - U.S. President George Bush speaks from the White House. "The terrorists will remember Sept. 11 as the day their reckoning began," he said.

  • In Canada - Relatives of Canadian victims of the World Trade Centre attacks wonder why there's no six-month memorial here at home.

    CTVNEWS.com video reports



  • Copyright 2001 Globe Interactive, a division of Bell Globemedia Publishing Inc.
    Help & Contact Us | Back to the top of this page


    spacer
    [an error occurred while processing this directive]