Skip navigation

The Prairie kid who built The Shack

From Wednesday's Globe and Mail

William Paul Young says he wrote the book as a Christmas gift for his children, who passed it on to their friends and it gained a following. Now, the novel has made Young a very rich man. ...Read the full article

This conversation is closed

  1. Sens Fan from Mississauga, Canada writes: Great book, and what I like about it is that it doesn't replace your belief in God, but rather gives you a new angle to think about God. Once you get into the book, it's a page turner that is hard to put down. Looking forward to his next books!
  2. Akbar M from Saskatchewan, Canada writes: Interesting article. However the name of the group is not "Christian and Mission Alliance Church" but rather the "Christian and Missionary Alliance Church".
  3. MJ Patchouli from Regina, Canada writes: As a novel, the book is frankly crap. Predictable plot and characters, loosely written dialogue, and saying it's not Christian is silly -- it's very Christian and doesn't take other religions into account at all -- which is likely better for the book since its author doesn't know much about other religions.

    If reading it makes you feel better somehow, then I guess it's a good thing. Clearly its popularity points to a populace that seeks something -- some easy fix to the lost people many of us have become. But this is not literature -- this reminds me more of Jonathan Livingston Seagull in the Seventies -- which everyone read and proclaimed as important, but then quickly forgot. Just the flavour of the day, and not a particularly memorable or tasty one at that.
  4. Mark H from United States writes: "MJ Patchouli from Regina, Canada writes: As a novel, the book is frankly crap. "

    Yep. CS Lewis, it is not.
  5. Jim J from Canada writes: MJ, I've read your musings before on things "Religion" based".

    You say it IS Christian and doesn't take other religions in to consideration. One, if it was christian, what forces the author to be inclusive, it's his book?

    Further, I am Christian, and the Shack certainly doesn't represent my Faith nor the Bible for that matter.

    By the way, it's fiction.
  6. M G from Canada writes: Jim J writes "By the way, it's fiction."

    So is the Bible.

    In the article, it is stated that the author is now a rich man. Were it not for the media buying into his publisher's PR campaign, would this be the case? I think not. I saw this guy on The Hour. Young seems to have about four neurons that fire about twice annually.
  7. Jim J from Canada writes: MG, good for you for stating your opinion, that's all it is, no more concrete than my opinion the Bible is truth.
  8. M G from Canada writes: Jim J: Then I suppose you believe all the hatred, intolerance and justification of homicide presented in Leviticus and Deuteronomy. Shame!
  9. Jock Leith from T.O., Canada writes: This is a wonderfully inspiring book. As a Christian it did not challenge my beliefs but it did open up a few new thoughts. Highly recommended. The author deserves all the bucks he's made off it! Enjoy your new house - you've earned it.
  10. Mark H from United States writes: "M G from Canada writes: Jim J: Then I suppose you believe all the hatred, intolerance and justification of homicide presented in Leviticus and Deuteronomy. Shame! "

    You're a little confused, MG. Old Testament is Judaism. New Testament is Christianity - the idea being the Law present in the two books you mention no longer applies. Big, big difference. In short, Christians are not subject to the 600 prohibitions and regulations you find in Deuteronomy and Leviticus (if you'd like some scripture quotes, I'd be happy to provide them). For an obvious example, Christians can eat anything (again, there's scripture for this), while Jews have exemptions like pork, mixing meat and milk, etc. If you wanted to find fault with Christian doctrine, you'd have to confine yourselves to commenting on the Gospels, for example, or the writings of Paul (Romans, Ephesians, and Galatians are good places to start).
  11. Jim J from Canada writes: Actually MG, I do not hold personal shame for what happened in the days of Leviticus etal. Just like I don't hold PERSONAL shame for what happened in Nazi Germany, Vietnam, or present day Guantanimo.

    Violence and mass murder actually sting me through the core, doesn't matter when it happened or happens.

    Being Christian can mean good things MG. I understand your questioning it. There are many scoundrels on this earth both present day and historically than have hidden under the guise of Christianity. It makes it very hard for someone like me to converse with the secular world and be taken seriously. But that's ok. I am strong in my beliefs, I know what I believe, and you won't have to worry about seeing me in the papers as a kook Christian gone wrong. Having said that, when Christians slide, people attack Christianity as a whole. When a non-Christian slides, you don't hear about all of non-Christian humanity getting blamed.

    I like to think some of us Christians could actually be someone you'd like and would enjoy speaking with.

    We have no beef, we just look at things differently.
  12. M G from Canada writes: Mark H: Are you seriously trying to tell me that Christians don't believe or follow the Old Testament? The King James "Bible" contains the Old Testament, does it not? Fair enough, then, in the New Testament, would you support someone who believes this is 'truth'? From Corinthians: "Be ye not unequally yoked together with unbelievers: for what fellowship hath righteousness with unrighteousness? and what communion hath light with darkness." In my opinion, this is a mild form of hate literature, for it is stating that Christians are righteous, whereas non-believers or those of other religions are not. There are also a variety of anti-semitic passages that would not be appropriate to repeat here. My point was to make Jim J think a little bit harder about his 'Bible as truth' philosophy and to poke fun at his assertion that it is, thus, better than the Shack (which impresses neither of us). From his latest comment, I see that he is a very reasonable person. I just happen to think that religious piety is a form of delusion and that the various personal interpretations of religious texts represent a predictable result of people following a text full of contradictions, fantasies and lies. Young is a case in point - a good man, trying his best to follow the 'good book' and grappling with the problems associated with doctrine. At least he's willing to question the Bible, but he still hasn't given up on the key fairy tales. In theory, most fundamentalist Christians shouldn't find my views particularly radical or illogical, as this is how they would view all other religions (as delusions). Moderate Christians who believe that we're all praying to the same god and that sort of nonsense might be more offended by my statements. Ultimately, everyone is either an atheist-agnostic (rejects gods and/or religion) or very close to being one (rejects all but one or a select few).
  13. Crystal Glass from Over here!, Canada writes: Yeah, as an atheist I'll take a pass on this one, ESPECIALLY if it's poorly written. My in-laws joined the Missionary Alliance church shortly after I married their very normal son; they have some really interesting world views. We don't see them much...
  14. Mark H from United States writes: "M G from Canada writes: Mark H: Are you seriously trying to tell me that Christians don't believe or follow the Old Testament?"

    Believe, in terms of historical veracity, or believe in terms of general principle? Mind you that's not really what I'm arguing at all. I'm merely pointing out, from actual scripture in the Bible, that Christians are not bound to the rules and regulation of the Old Testament Law (the Mosaic Law, as it's referenced). Remember, your original point was that Christians ought to be following the Law of Moses, or at least paying homage to it. So no, in no way, shape or form do Christians "follow" the OT Law. Some choose to believe it literally as a more historical document, others do not.
  15. Lynne McCaughey from Canada writes: I took this useless piece called a novel to Mexico with me...left it on the beach for some poor sucker to read! One of the worst 'books' I have ever spent money on! Should have taken it back to Costco for a refund....
  16. Todd Sandrock from Canada writes: "I'm merely pointing out, from actual scripture in the Bible, that Christians are not bound to the rules and regulation of the Old Testament Law (the Mosaic Law, as it's referenced)."

    ...which includes, I assume, not being bound to the 10 Commandments. Funny how many folks don't get that.
  17. john shantz from Canada writes: After reading this book I find it hard to believe that 2 'pastors' spend over a year editing it. Its edited version is barely readable......... what was the manuscript like?

Comments are closed

Thanks for your interest in commenting on this article, however we are no longer accepting submissions. If you would like, you may send a letter to the editor.

Report an abusive comment to our editorial staff

close

Alert us about this comment

Please let us know if this reader’s comment breaks the editor's rules and is obscene, abusive, threatening, unlawful, harassing, defamatory, profane or racially offensive by selecting the appropriate option to describe the problem.

Do not use this to complain about comments that don’t break the rules, for example those comments that you disagree with or contain spelling errors or multiple postings.

Back to top