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Canada placed on copyright blacklist

Globe and Mail Update

Move reflects new, tougher line from Washington over Ottawa's repeated broken promises to introduce new legislation ...Read the full article

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  1. Sask Langer from Canada writes: Oh, goody. Another kick at the can for Harper to introduce 'Made in America' legislation to entrench the business model of the dinosaurs that are the RIAA and MPAA at the expense of sanity. I'll just call up my MP and... wait... he doesn't know anything. Just like last time. Where's Charlie Angus when we need him?
  2. Another vicious kick right in the face from Obama to his own myth., writes: Canada placed on copyright blacklist

    Just catching up to the rest of the world, eh?
  3. a voice in the wilderness from Canada writes: maybe we should agree to deal with the flow of illegal DVDs going across the border if they agree to do something about the flow of illegal guns going the other way.
  4. Winston Smith from Canada writes: So what. Canada is still a soverign country last time I checked.
  5. Jim Howard from Canada writes: Finally!
    Its difficult to understand why and how in a country where we have so much responsible regulation (Banking) and over regulation (CRTC/Television-Cable) that we have done so little to protect the legitimate rights of owners and developers of intellectual property.
    Glad to see this move by the U.S. Administration
  6. George Smiley from Canada writes: Why don't we wait for the big players like China to comply, then we will follow suit?
  7. Hobby Statistician from United States writes:

    'The Obama administration added Canada Thursday to a notorious blacklist of countries where Internet piracy flourishes, reflecting a new, tougher line in Washington over Ottawa's chronic failure to deliver on promises of new copyright laws'.

    Good move for all concerned. And with Obama's support levels around 90 percent amongst Canadians the past year, likely to be welcomed there too as a prudent move by a wise leader standing up for change Canadians can believe in.
  8. Mark Shore from Ottawa, Canada writes: Maybe - like the Harper's notorious Iraq speech while leader of the opposition - Washington already has the appropriate laws drafted for us?

    It's sad that Canada falls so short of the lofty US standards for integrity in business, finance , banking and the law.

    Or maybe, just maybe, our politicians haven't all been utterly co-opted and bought by corporate interests?
  9. D Burns from Toronto, Canada writes: The blacklist means very little. Unless the US wanted to enact trade sanctions, in which case we might end up in a trade war very quickly...there's no way we're going that way.

    Lets face it -- the US wanted to put us on that list for a long time, just because of the CRTC.

    Amusing that they want border officials to have search and seizure rights w/o court oversight... disgusting.
  10. Mikey Gault from The Moral Highground, Canada writes: If Obama is okay with this move, then Canada should immediately take all corrective action to make Obama happy. Obama is our de facto leader. He is so awesome. When will Canada find its own Obama? We need Prime Minister Obama. Obama!
  11. Lloyd Hawkeye from La Ronge, Sask., Canada writes: 'Intellectual Property Rights,' isn't that a code phrase for supporting Bill Gates' predatory capitalism and giving him more billions?
  12. Nick Simmons from Canada writes: What this article failed to point out was that this list was essentially drawn up by American movie studios, record labels etc, rather than elected officials of the country.
  13. A. Nonymous from Job Ville, United States writes: Eventually, under the North American Union, copyright laws will merge. Effectively, American interests will be put first and foremost, as they should be.

    Levys, like the 'private copying' levy will be abolished, since they are unfair to consumers, and a barrier to trade.

    Only when we have a unified system of laws, can we enter into a new world order.
  14. Still Surfing from Los Angeles, United States writes:

    Hobby Statistician from USA writes: 'And with Obama's support levels around 90 percent amongst Canadians the past year, likely to be welcomed there too as a prudent move by a wise leader standing up for change Canadians can believe in.'

    Yes, indeed - or, as Jim Howard from Canada wrote: 'Finally!
    We have done so little to protect the legitimate rights of owners and developers of intellectual property - glad to see this move by the U.S. Administration.'

    GO OBAMA GO!
  15. Pickman's Modem from Canada writes: Gee, I'd love to adopt the American model of copyright that forbids me from shifting format on my media, or backing up my software. I'm sure students will also enjoy having their fair useage restrictions cutailed for their research.
  16. Jim Howard from Canada writes: Finally!
    It is difficult to understand how in a country that has so much responsible regulation (eg: Banking), over regulation ( CRTC Television/Cable) that we have done so little to protect the rights of legitimate owners and developers of intellectual property.
    Likely, most readers don't know that China has done a fabulous job of pretty well destroying our Ice Wine industry by copying labels including the 'Made in Canada' bit and putting them on bottles filled with Made in China 'swamp water- mediocre wine'.
    The only ones tryoing to protect that industry are the Canadian wine producers.
    Canada doesn't have a right to complain internationally because we have willingly contributed to practices that fly in the face of protecting intellectual property.
    In a nutshell , I am pleased to read of this move by the U.S.
    Maybe, just maybe we'll start to protect some of our people and companies properly.
  17. Steph C from Ottawa, Canada writes: Geez, I wonder if the lack of new legislation has anything to do with the Conservative Party constantly playing chicken with opposition parties, proroguing Parliament when they get chicken and the disruptive behaviour at committee. Shenanigans!
  18. al-naskh wa al-mansukh from Canada writes: The US DMCA law criminalizes fair use. Canada is not going to get a copycat law. Forget it. With Jim Prentice shuffled off of the Industry portfolio, it will be interesting to see what the Harperites do next.

    On drug policy, on copyright, you name it, the US government is controlled by corporate interests that have nothing to do with good sense.
  19. Robert Lepage from Canada writes: That surprises me quite a bit. I was expecting to see Sweden far ahead of Canada on that blacklist.

    Heh
  20. Tetchy Citizen from Canada writes: First the Homeland Security head repeats the 9/11 highjacker myth and now this. Sounds like those Harper slaps at Obama during the campaign are coming home to roost.
  21. Hee Hoo Sai from Canada writes: Business is business, black, purple or mauve, whatever colour the list is, if there is green involved, it dosen't matter.
  22. John S. from Toronto, Canada writes: Good for Canada! Don't enact silly legislation that limits the know of words, ideas, creativity and art just because the United States has put as many corporation-friendly rules on theirs as possible.
  23. Polly Sci from Brampton, Canada writes: The states bans our lumber, we give their auto industry millions. The states screws our pork industry, we give their auto industry hundreds of millions. The states goes after our copyright laws, we give their auto industry billions.

    We must look sooooo stupid to the rest of the world - and I'm beginning to think they are right.

    We need to impose some illegal tariffs on our oil, clean water, lumber, pork, beef, technology, and crossing the border. Thank God we are working on a new agreement with the EU that will hopefully reduce our dependence on the Americans. They know they are basically our only trading partner, so screw us every chance they get.
  24. Kevin Sutton from Toronto, Canada writes: Not particularly worried. I doubt our numbers match some of the others on the blacklist, and I'm not thrilled about enacting greater protections on indefensible 'intellectual property' at the cost of our freedoms.
  25. Omnibot 2000 from Toronto, Canada writes: Now I see how Obama will create 4 million jobs.... More border guards?
  26. David Demchuk from Toronto, Canada writes: I think we should wear it as a badge of honour. There is no reason for us to develop legislation designed to appease American corporations, American media and American interests. The proposed laws do nothing for the consumer and, truthfully, nothing for the artist. They do far more to limit creativity than to protect or free it.
  27. Clark Kent from Canada writes: What about that huge den of piracy called the United States? That is to say, have a gander at how effective their laws are. (Sort of like their 'war on drugs'.)
  28. Let me tell You How It Is from United States writes: Then Canadians get all upset when other people in other countries counterfeit Canadian intellectual property and Canadian Ideas and Canadian patents like.....mmmmm....like.......trying to think.......like.........mmmmmmmm..........can't even think of any. That's funny Canadians don't have any except maple syrup, Mounties and fanatical religious terrorists.
  29. Edmond Dusablon from United States writes: If you actually created anything worth copywriting you'd understand.
  30. grand puba from Canada writes: 90% of the people I know talk about downloading for free.
    This decision is long overdue
    I hope Harper catches on

    I tip at dinner & the bar
    I expect the owner of any copyright to always get thier share.

    It is disheartening how many Canadians think this form of theft is OK
    Just as we expect honesty & integrity from our politicans & police
    We should also expect it from ourselves.
  31. St Fort from victoria, Canada writes: I don't know why they don't give customs the right to seize this stuff when it comes in. Why do they need a court order if they have a box full of DVD's of a movie that has not been released in the stores yet? Perhaps there are political reasons why this has not happened. Maybe there is a certain section of our society that would be 'offended' it the sales of these goods were banned.
  32. Another vicious kick right in the face from Obama to his own myth., writes: Jim Howard from Canada writes: Finally!
    Its difficult to understand why and how in a country where we have so much responsible regulation (Banking) and over regulation (CRTC/Television-Cable) that we have done so little to protect the legitimate rights of owners and developers of intellectual property.
    Glad to see this move by the U.S. Administration

    =================

    Puke.
  33. Reasonable Man from Toronto, Canada writes: I guess that our border guards are too busy trying to keep American guns out of our country to worry about a few pirated DVDs.

    Bought a copy of 'Wolverine' for $3 the other day - I had already watched it online weeks ago, but I wanted a hard copy... This whole 'piracy' thing really is working out just fine for me, actually...
  34. Funk Mode from Oakville, Canada writes: This blacklist has the force and effect of what exactly? All the repeated US pearl clutching around this issue is so overdone. Current intellectual property law ie: DMCA in the US (the same law that we nearly ported to Canada some months ago) is not in place for the benefit of the creators of works, but to preserve revenue streams of antiquated and monopolistic business and delivery models. Current IP protections are more than nominally related to why we are force-fed tripe like Britney, According to Jim and endless Matthew McConahey romantic comedies on mainstream radio, television and film - the same tripe I bet many of you 'IP crusaders' frequently rail against in other forums. They ensure the power - and profit - of media distribution remains in a limited pool of hands and shrink your rights, even as a legitimate consumer of these works. The issues go so far beyond 14 year olds downloading albums and tv shows in the basement, but that's not what the RIAA and MPAA would have you believe. Many forward-thinking artists have seen the writing on the wall and have embraced technologies to their advantage. Musicians have built loyal followings without the benefit of a label, filmmakers get distribution outside the studio system. Why, just think, with more widespread, cost effective avenues to the distribution of artistic works many of you 'law and order' champions of IP reform might live to see the end of something else you despise - the need for arts subsidies! Read up and connect the dots, folks. You really think these industry associations - made up of the likes of Sony, Time-Warner, et al - are really pushing and effectively authoring these pieces of legislation for the benefit of artists or consumers? Pssh.
  35. A. Nonymous from Job Ville, United States writes: This comment is my intellectual property, (c) A.Nonymous 2009. Please remit compensation for reading.

    I expect $0.25 per read per poster.

    All rights reserved, permission is NOT granted to copy, extract, quote any or all part of this comment.
  36. Another vicious kick right in the face from Obama to his own myth., writes: Edmond Dusablon from United States writes: If you actually created anything worth copywriting you'd understand.

    =================

    Yeah, we should keep our dirty paws of your precious 'Survivor' re-runs.
  37. Michele K from Ottawa, Canada writes: 'On drug policy, on copyright, you name it, the US government is controlled by corporate interests that have nothing to do with good sense.'

    Exactly, al-Naskh - reminds me of when Mulroney acquiesced to big pharma, extending drug patent protection by many years and allowing them to unjustifiably start the protection clock running all over again by doing nothing more significant that changing the colour of a pill (or something akin to that).

    And yet it is Conservatives, most of whom LOVE Mulroney, who are always screaming that public healthcare is unaffordable, while it is actually drug costs rising more than any other component of healthcare that are responsible for that, thanks to their beloved Mulroney.

    Now just imagine how much our taxes are going to rise so that libraries can pay these copyright holders their undeserved due. And, make no mistake that we'll pay the cost of border guards rummaging through our iPods too - while we all wait hours to cross.

    And how come governments are only too happy to legislate these 'principled improvements' that consumers and taxpayers will be forced to pay for anyway?

    Especially with this Con gov't, their principles only seem to extend as far as my chequebook.
  38. Vancouver Viaduct from Canada writes:
    what do they think billions of blank dvds cds and mp3 players are for

    not one person has 80gb of songs from the store to fill it up with?

    US is just as bad
  39. Richard V from Calgary, Canada writes: Tetchy Citizen from Canada writes: First the Homeland Security head repeats the 9/11 highjacker myth and now this. Sounds like those Harper slaps at Obama during the campaign are coming home to roost.

    ===

    Hey, I hate Harper as much as the next guy but let's not pin this on him.

    It's time for us to admit that it's better to be ignored under a Republican administration than get 'attention' from Democrats. Boo Obama.
  40. Jimmee's Place from Canada writes: And I thought the Americans didn't know we existed.

    It does seem to me that the powers that be should come up with a better mousetrap so the 'intellectual property' cannot be copied so easily.
  41. Allen G = from BobcaygeonMazatlan, Canada writes: Wake up Canada !
    This is not about 'intellectual property rights', no,
    it's about protectionism of the worst type. The United States patent Office is the worst case scenario.
    Ask RIM. Why did RIM pay out in excess of $450 million (U.S.) to settle with a 'patent troll' ?
    This is not about music or movies, that's a small part. no.
    Microsoft and Apple with a myriad of useless patents, and Canada must be stopped. Ask RIM.
    Canadians are being pushed around by the 'bully-boys' from the U.S.
    If you agree with the bullies, then move to the U.S.of A.
  42. Stephen Harrington from Toronto, Canada writes: Net neutrality is under attack - and the Harper government is soon to oblige. This wolf is dressed in sheep's clothing. Beyond the copyright issue are ISPs that want to control content, and control what we the users can access and what we can't.

    Call your MP. Say no.
  43. Darrin Duell from Canada writes: Seems like whenever the Cons make a move towards more regulation on this front, the backlash from the public is severe and plays into the hands of the whole 'the cons are the puppets of big business,' crowd. The reality is that the Liberals will have to pass Bill C-61 down the road, but because of some fuzzy reality that fogs the minds of the average Voter, it will be an easier pill to swallow if the Liberals introduce the legislation and not the Cons, reason doesn't come into play somehow.
  44. Pickman's Modem from Canada writes: Edmond Dusablon from United States writes: If you actually created anything worth copywriting you'd understand.

    =====

    I've yet to hear an outcry of Canadian artists, musicians or authors clamouring for us to adopt U.S. copyright legislation. Canadian librarians also have a few pointed things to say about the DMCA.

    It's important to protect IP -- but the DMCA is primarily geared towards a corporate-friendly atmosphere for civil suits. Existing Canadian copyright law tries to strike a balance between individual liberty, artist's needs and a corporation's ability to generate revenue.
  45. Sask Resident from Regina, Canada writes: Most of the problem is the copying of movies in Quebec which are then distributed. Remember that Time Warner & Disney tried to not allow their movies to be shown in Quebec to reduce the copying. And lots of Obama's supporters are from California.

    Not strictly Harper's fault, Chretien/Martin (the treaty was in 1997) promised new copy right legislation and the Bloq has been against the new copy right laws discussed in committee over the ten years. Where is the investigative journalism by Koring?

    BTW, if Canadians don't invest in Canadian companies, like RIM, we will remain just a branch plant. Except for oil/nat gas, most of our exporting companies are foreign owned. Cutbacks at Everez, close the plants in Canada.
  46. John Doe from Canada writes: Congratulations Canada!

    With all seriousness I am very pleased that we have not caved yet and hopefully we'll be on the blacklist for a very long time.
  47. Sun Ra from Canada writes: Steve has been downloading films almost as long as I have. It's gonna be a drag if we can't do that any longer :-(
  48. Stan L from Canada writes: Harper has tried to introduce the same laws that the US has passes....problem is, the new proposed laws don't pass the smell test, they never did in the states and they don't here becuase all the new laws do is allow the record and movie companies to 'sue' into profitability their failed business models......Harper will cave, he is all too keen to simply copy US legislation after all it is his solution to 'becoming better friends' with the US because apparently to differ with them means that you are not 'friends' or worse a Canadian.
  49. Chris S. from Kitchener-Waterloo, Canada writes: BLAME CANADA!
  50. Sask Resident from Regina, Canada writes: al-naskh wa al-mansukh from Canada wrote: 'The US DMCA law criminalizes fair use.'

    What do you consider fair use? If I buy a CD, should I be able to make copies for everyone in my family? Neighbourhood? Community?

    If I think the MS charges too much for Office (which they do), I should be able to buy one copy and load it on the four computers in my house, the 5 computers in my small business and on the computers used by the not for profit group I belong to.

    What is fair use? Use only one copy at a time? (listen to a song off the CD or on the iPod, but not both?
  51. jeff giles from Hamburg, Germany writes: The truth of the matter is, do we really care if a corrupt society places us on a blacklist? Allowing our citizens more freedom is something that I will never have a problem with. I don't think many people will feel very outraged when such a society as the USA will do something so silly as this. I say keep the strongly worded letters rolling :)
  52. Alistair McLaughlin from Canada writes: Ah yes, Harper's 'repeated failure' to pass copyright legislation. That isn't a torqued headline at all. Last time a copyright bill was before the House, Canadians freaked in large numbers over the intrusions such a bill would lead to. Hopefully we'll react the same way to the next attempt, and it will 'fail' as well. Quite rightly, Canadians are not interested in draconian copyright laws that will make it easier for the government to subject us to prosecution over the files we have on our hard drives. Obama can get stuffed.
  53. Janet Fisher from Canada writes: Many of the better US TV shows (& some bad ones) have been nicked (plagiarized) from Britain; The Office, Life on Mars, All in the Family (Til Death Us Do Part), Sandford & Son,Who wants to be a Millionaire etc etc etc etc etc

    Many good movies have been based on books from other countries

    Hope the US can be squeaky clean here
  54. Michael Manning from Mississauga, Canada writes: All I can see in my mind is the image of Jack Valenti with all ten of his fingers plugging holes in a dyke.

    I guess I'm dating myself.

    However, if we signed a treaty ten years ago and the three governments we've had since then have done nothing then I guess there should be a slap up the side of the head. Why bother signing a treaty if you aren't going to live up to it's provisions?
  55. Alex Deo from Canada writes: So, from what i know and real piracy starts within the studios. Example their Unreleased copy of XMEN, unreleased music that first hits the web. maybe the studios should have better security of their own people and then talk.

    The difference between canada and the USA is that when bill c61 was introduced the people got together and formed groups etc etc and our opinion was made aware in the house;

    Unlike the USA you can have as many protests you want, but the opinion of the public will never count nor will it matter.

    thats the difference.

    The Government as we know in the USA doesn't work for the people it works for the corporation and allows any movement to happen to protect any industry even in fair copying cases.

    Its what generates money therefore you have to protect money.
  56. Matt S from Canada writes: I don't like this move by the US, but in one sense it is very much a badge of honor for Canadians. Here's why:

    Our laws are different. We're a soverign country, and a democracy to boot. We may have outdated copyright laws, but until we opt to change them, they are our laws.

    Quite frankly our patent system is not as messed up as the one to the south. Our copyright system functionally is very similar, following Berne/Rome Convention rules. Our fair use policy is a little different, but it is there, and still effective. The only (!!) blackmark on our IP scheme is WIPO compliance, but even that is a topic for legal debate.

    Compared to the US, I think Canada's IP protection is immensely better. We aren't as far along that spectre of indefinite monopoly periods. Copyright is intended to confer a temporary monopoly. Everything must eventually enter the public domain. That's the condition of the agreement. Monopoly for a time, then its open to all.

    The US, and now the EU keep extending copyright terms. This horrendously breaks the copyright concept, and the value. The monopoly is wasteful, but recognized as necessary to encourage the value of the creation.

    I fully agree with Lawrence Lessig who warned that we're entering into a culture consuming society, not a culture creating society. Read Only access.

    That said, I also agree that copyright is necessary. It has value, and should be protected. However, the current applications and enforcement ideas are so wrong and ineffective, that it is a badge of honor to refuse (albeit by doing nothing) to follow the very bad example of our neighbors to the south.

    That Blacklisting is an honor, showing we will not blindly leap over a cliff to creative decay and cultural domination.
  57. web warlock from Canada writes: Yep, these laws restrict your rights to copy and share the media you paid for. These laws make your children criminals for sharing and listening to music.

    Clearly what we need is more corporations suing our children for millions of dollars

    Everybody in Canada who buys blank cds/DVDs pays a levy. If you DON'T download or share music, you are being ROBBED by the levy you pay on blank cds. Who is the criminal now?

    These laws are the last gasp of a dying industry

    buh bye, all you music industry middle men, maybe when you're gone and people just buy music online the artists will actually get their fair share. The biggest pirates and robbers in this picture are the RIAA; that would be the people who made this list.

    Take note RIAA; you are blacklisted by the people of Canada
  58. Sebastian Cobe from Calgary, Canada writes: Aren't we also on their list of most illicit drug producers?

    I'd be curious to see if the stats comparing Canada with America before I repent at The Obamas finger wag.
  59. A. S. from Canada writes: I have created things worth copyrighting, and I hope we stay on that blacklist forever.

    Whatever copyright is, enforcing it for 99 years is just $^%#$%^Y.
  60. Nathan Weatherdon from Canada writes: I like the idea put forward by 'a voice in the wilderness'.

    If the US is going to try to interfere in Canadian law, then Canada has every right to do the same. It is amazing that the right to bear arms, intended to ensure that the people had the capacity to overthrow corrupt government, has been bastardized to fill US, Canadian and Mexican cities with deathly capacity to violence among organized crime.

    They allow coporate interests (companies that sell guns) to hijack common sense and Canada and Mexico suffer. I'm not talking about a flat out ban, but the idea that it should be a constitutional right for just anyone with a drivers license to walk into just any gun shop and buy a wide assortment of deadly weapons is madness.
  61. Cheap Skate from Canada writes: St Fort from victoria, Canada writes: I don't know why they don't give customs the right to seize this stuff when it comes in. Why do they need a court order if they have a box full of DVD's of a movie that has not been released in the stores yet? Perhaps there are political reasons why this has not happened. Maybe there is a certain section of our society that would be 'offended' it the sales of these goods were banned.
    -----------------------------------------------------------
    I don't think the pirates actual print on the label, 'This is a boot legged copy of an unreleased film'. That being the case, how do you know that the next package you have shipped from the U. S. won't be held up without a court order?
  62. Another vicious kick right in the face from Obama to his own myth., writes: Sask Resident from Regina, Canada writes: al-naskh wa al-mansukh from Canada wrote: 'The US DMCA law criminalizes fair use.'

    What do you consider fair use? If I buy a CD, should I be able to make copies for everyone in my family? Neighbourhood? Community?

    =================

    Why not? You paid for it, didn't you?
  63. mike strecker from Toronto, Canada writes: So, how do you like me now, B*tches?

    Obama is nothing more then the conventional American leftist Democrat. Free trade means exporting stuff to us. Imports, not so much..... if it might cost a political supporter their job.

    Next up, is the auto industry. Do you really think that Obama is going to allow the Canadian auto plants to stay open - at the expense of US workers? Especially after all the votes they delivered? Not going to happen.

    Dreams die hard.
  64. Nathan Cool from Vancouver, Canada writes: This is really laughable. They want us to change our search and seizure laws so we can prevent pirated DVDs coming across THEIR porous border.

    Are they going to stop letting guns come into our country then?

    GET YOUR PRIORITIES STRAIGHT. What a joke.
  65. Red Ruffensore from Port Coquitlam, Canada writes: Yeah, and probably with about the same effect as when we placed the U.S. on the softwood lumber tariff watch list.
  66. can I vote again from around-Kingston, Canada writes: oh yeah, this from a country that just ripped off Billions $$ from it's own citizens.

    U.S. - go get yourselves another lap dog somewhere else.
  67. Whitney Dodman from Waterloo, Canada writes: Does this mean we're no longer friends? If I thought they were not my friends, I just don't think I could bare it!

    Guarantee, there will be a high profile case after they pass the law with some poor kid going to jail for 5 years for downloading one stinking movie.
  68. pants 7 from Japan writes: I propose that Canada enact legislation that requires all photocopiers to save and image of what was copied and record either the access code of who made the copy or take a photo of who made the copy and upload all the data to a central authority so that 'pirates' can be jailed

    Besides the DCMA, American patent laws are so outdated that even Microsoft is getting tired of being sued by patent squatters and is demanding reform.

    There is a famous case of an American company that holds a patent on a certain string of human DNA associated with a particular disease. It is really easy and cheap to do a genetic test for the disease but the company that holds the patent does not allow anyone else to work with the bit of DNA because they also hold a patent for the only other available test for the disease and that test costs a heck of a lot. The company is very profitable but society is getting ripped off.
  69. Never Impressed from Canada writes: The United States began as a pirate nation, it couldn't afford to honor Europe's copyrights, but now that they're the ones rolling in the dough, they want poor countries to pay.

    Next US corporations went around to poor nations learning their traditional medicines and getting the genetic codes of their agriculture, then patented them and claim profits from their theft, even pursuing those same countries they learned from.

    Poor countries on the list should just give them the finger. Canada, being well off enough that we should be supporting intellectual creativity, should curb some of the actual piracy, while guaranteeing that that protection does not interfere with competition (companies claiming copyright to prevent you from buying other brands of toner, garage door openers, etc), free speech (Apple and other companies claiming copyright against complaint sites), the right of first sale (companies claiming copyright to eliminate the second hand market), and fair use rights.
  70. Fractional Reserve Banking from Canada writes: Why not just cancel the treaty.

    No more arguments.
  71. Dick Smyte from Toronto, Canada writes: What a horrible report on this story.

    For a real report, check out http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/3912/125/

    'Not only is Canada not even remotely close to any other country on the list, it has the lowest software piracy rate of any of the 46 countries in the entire Special 301 Report. Moreover, it is compliant with its international IP obligations, participates in ACTA, has prosecuted illegal camcording, has the RCMP prioritizing IP matters, has statutory damages provisions, features far more copyright collectives than the U.S., and has a more restrictive fair dealing/fair use provision.'
  72. Jim Howard from Canada writes: Finally!
    It is difficult to understand how in a country that has so much responsible regulation (eg: Banking), over regulation ( CRTC Television/Cable) that we have done so little to protect the rights of legitimate owners and developers of intellectual property.

    The issue goes far beyond Copyright.
    Likely, most readers don't know that China has done a fabulous job of pretty well destroying our Ice Wine industry by copying labels including the 'Made in Canada' bit and putting them on bottles filled with Made in China 'swamp water- mediocre wine'.
    The only ones trying to protect that industry are Canadian wine producers.
    Something tells me they use a little concrete help.
    Canada doesn't have a right to complain internationally because we have willingly contributed to practices that fly in the face of protecting intellectual property.
    I am pleased to read of this move by the U.S.
    Maybe, just maybe we'll start to protect some of our people and companies properly.
  73. Angry West Coast Canuck from Canada writes: The only thing Canada hasn't done is introduced a DMCA style legislation. Legislation that in the USA has proven to be completely anti-copyRIGHT, completely anti-ethical to the very nature of copyright, and heavily abused not by the artists who created the works but by the corporations who managed to mainly steal it from them.

    Instead, we have a somewhat more rational system where people pay a small fee on certain media, and that money goes to the artists (eventually). In exchange, we get to download for personal use. Legally, so far. Of course, the RIAA/MPAA and their Canadian counterparts are angry at this, because it means they don't get THEIR 90% cut before it gets to the artists.

    Expect Harper to cave and introduce legislation soon. Who knows how the spineless Liberals and NDP will react?
  74. Ziad Fazel from Calgary, Canada writes: US needs to place Canada on a few more blacklists:
    - banking
    - health care
    - public education
    - water quality
    - handgun control
    - drug trafficking
    - use of military power

    They're sooo much better than us at these things, and we need to stay on such blacklists until we harmonize all out laws and policies to be like theirs.
  75. Rudy H from Canada writes: Makes you think fondly of the Bush era.
  76. Steve Church from Canada writes: Maybe it's understandable that the knee-jerk anti-American rant, and nationilistic chest-thump, should be the common comment here. But how about this?:- do some basic cleanup. Add a respect surcharge to DVD platters similar to CD platters. Fingerprint hubs like BitTorrent. The US is in a protectionist mood - best to reduce the excuse to take it out on Canada.
  77. ichabod plain view from Canada writes: Maybe they would have moral ground if they enforced the regulations that wall street operated under.
  78. Norm Jom from Petawawa, Canada writes: No big deal, when the USA decides to put fairness back into patent laws that are ridiculously protectionist, perhaps we'll do something they want. Anyone that has had to deal with the US patent office on intellectual property that was stolen from anyone outside the USA knows how protectionist they are.

    There are many law suits that have been dragging on for years where a US company was given rights to something developed elsewhere, often people give up unable to pay the outrageous legal costs. My brother has been going through this with the US department of defence for several years over his inventions.

    As for the poster who wonders how people feel about their work being ripped off, well we don't like it at all if someone is profiting from it. This isn't about profiting from IP though, it's about copying and big corporations maintaining outrageous pricing demanding infinite protection. It's about getting the government to do the legwork for private lawsuits. Intellectual property is to be protected by the owner, not by the government.

    There's a lot more to this than artists getting their fair share, the biggest threat to the artists are the production and distribution companies.
  79. Whitney Dodman from Waterloo, Canada writes: I'd like to see them put their money where their mouth is. If my son's Call of Duty DVD gets a big scratch (caused by a crappy xbox), he has to buy a whole new game. Why is that? He already paid for the Intellectual Property and should only be charged for the cost of producing the media if he takes it in for exchange. This is similar to every product.

    I can buy a DVD and show it to my family and friends, but I cannot make a copy for them to watch? WTF? I am not profiting.
  80. Justin Webster from Left Coast, Canada writes: Who cares? The rest of the world blacklisted the US a long time ago...
  81. Sask Resident from Regina, Canada writes: Another vicious kick right in the face from Obama to his own myth., wrote: 'Why not? You paid for it, didn't you?'

    You agree (in the fine print when you buy it) not to copy it for anything but personal use.

    You can buy a book but not make copies for others. Writer and publishers make income from the copies sold, so if you can't make money, why write.

    Same for singers, songwriters and publishers. If you buy the song off the internet, the singer and song writer both get paid, but if only a few songs are sold, why sing, why write, why get bands together?

    What if the US ignored copy rights, a company in the US could make an exact replica of a Blackberry and sell them everyplace in the world except Canada, market of 5 billion or 30 million! The US gov't could even make all government workers use the US version, just like they did for POTUS.

    Don't forget the $s that comeback into Canada for horizontal drilling throughout the world (even from China), technology developed in Canada.

    I'm not saying to copy the US legislation, but update it to deal with today's issues. We have to live, work and trade with the world so the rules should be consistent.
  82. The Last Honest Conservative from Western, Canada writes:
    Yes,
    Just another Harper government chronic failure ...............
  83. Laughing Loudly from Vancouver, Canada writes:

    Sometimes a subset of my fellow Vancouverites, the constant America-basher type, well, in their rush to bash America, they say things that are so stupid it is just amazing.

    Example: Nathan Cool from Vancouver writes: 'This is really laughable - they want us to change our search and seizure laws so we can prevent pirated DVDs coming across THEIR porous border.'

    W-T-F?

    Um, Nathan, dude, that border is not THEIR border, it is OUR border.

    But if you weirdly want Washington to take control and make 'THEIR' border less porous, well, I am sure Washington would be fine with your implied preference: Washington could post armed units a hundred yards SOUTH of our Canadian-staffed 'Welcome to Canada' border crossing posts, and the American units there could decide FOR CANADA what trucks do not get to drive into Canada, and decide FOR CANADA what cars do not get to drive into Canada, and decide FOR CANADA what people do not get to drive into Canada.

    Sure, Nathan, yup, good idea - let's have the AMERICANS be the ones who get to decide, in strong arm fashion, who and what is not allowed to drive up to our 'Welcome to Canada' border crossing posts. We'll let the Americans use power that way make OUR border less porous.

    Sheesh!

    I swear, some Canadians are afflicted with a refex anti-Americanism that is as debilitating to their thinking as a big brain tumour: It takes away their ability to reason!
  84. The Last Honest Conservative from Western, Canada writes:
    Rudy H from Canada wrote:
    Makes you think fondly of the Bush era.

    Rudy,
    Are you still trying to peddle torture apparatus ?
  85. d c from somewhere hiding out in canada, Canada writes: Here's what's ridiculous. The RIAA and the American entertainment industry in general are completely behind the times when it comes to marketing and income on the internet. Sorry that I don't feel like getting some executives rich @ Disney, Columbia, Paramount, Sony, etc. How about you smucks sell your crap @ fair prices, like say 25 to 50 cents a song not 1 dollar on ITUNES, which by the way is crap. I'll gladly pay for reasonably priced entertainment. If anyone has stolen from artists its the above mentioned companies. Give me a break, are we going to introduce new surveillance laws for downloading illegal music? Wake up Canada, Britney Spears, Miley Cyrus, Kayne, Nickel Back and even the notorious Metallica are not starving! But then again don't we need more of our rights taken away. I just can't sleep at night thinking about poor Lars in his mansion, with only 15 bathrooms and not 20, cause you know Metallica is just that good.
  86. Andrew Pakula from Canada writes: American might as well put itself on the list as there is just as many internet pirates and copyright violators in the U.S. if not more.
  87. Phil T from Quebec City, Canada writes: Sask Resident from Regina, Canada writes:

    What do you consider fair use?

    ---

    I know you are trolling, but I'll bite.

    Taking Stock of My Fair Copyright for Canada Principles
    http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/3104/329/

    Among other things, if I buy a CD, I should be able to rip it and listen to it on my computer, my MP3 player or any damn device I want without having to pay each time. I should also be able to make a copy in case the original copy gets destroyed.

    Sounds like common sense, doesn't it?
  88. Terry Peach from writes: Doesn't that place Canada in good international company - right in there with Algeria, China, Russia, Pakistan, Indonesia and Venezuela. Not North Kprea? Makes me proud to be a Canadian!
  89. Jean M. from Canada writes: I hope Washington will also raise a ruckus about Google making digital copies of copyrighted books which it (apparently) plans to sell. It's like me borrowing music CD's from a library, making copies and selling them.
  90. John __ from Westy, Canada writes: Other than having 'our' name on a piece of paper I fail to see what this blacklist does? Are the Americans going to stop sending us crappy Hollywood movies?

    I suppose the US isn't the source of any pirate material.
  91. Don Quixote from the wet warming Blackfly Belt, Ont., Canada writes: From my experience in technical fields the ones who scream loudest after copyrights are the ones who copy the most and build up on the shoulders of inventions and knowledge of others.

    They then claim legally their propriety which is in most cases pure B.S. as any textbook in school, high school, university, any education, any acquired experience could with sufficient twisting of existing laws can be claimed by whoever.
  92. Voice of Reason from Canada writes: Americans trying to tell other countries how to manage their affairs.
  93. Point Blank from Vancouver, Canada writes: There is a problem in Canada. But we need to act responsible in terms of the safeguards we put in place. Corporations should not be able to sue individuals for huge amounts for downloading a couple of songs like south of the 49th. Instead our government should impose its own system of fines to reduce illegal downloading.
  94. albertaclipper Alberta from Canada writes: The empty suit strikes again. Hope all the lefties are enjoying the manure your man is heaping on you. Obama for Prime Minister. Yeeaaaaa. Pffft.
  95. Laughing Loudly from Canada writes:

    Ziad Fazel from Calgary sarcastically writes that the US needs to place Canada on a blacklist for water quality because they're sooo much better than us at that.

    Um, I'm not sure why there's any sarcasm in your tone there, Ziad, given Ontario's deadly Walkerton water catastrophe (the bad drinking water killed 7 people and sickened thousands) and given the drinking water catastrophes of the third-world variety that have happened in Inuit communities in recent years.

    Is there anything about the policy in question (copyright matters) that you think should be handled differently?

    Or did you just have a mood to dump on America generally?

    If so, why?

    Insecurity?
  96. Bob Loblaw from Canada writes: .

    Jim Howard from Canada writes: Finally!
    It is difficult to understand how ...................In a nutshell , I am pleased to read of this move by the U.S. Maybe, just maybe we'll start to protect some of our people and companies properly
    ........................................................
    This guy has posted the same comment all the way thru this thread.

    Do you think he works for the record industry, movie industry or own of their law firms ? Probably wont post anymore tonight. 6 oclock time to punch out

    .

    .
  97. parklane 47 from Washington, D.C., United States writes: This has got nothing to do with copyright and everything to do with lobbyists. Washington has no idea about us down here. We are not part of Europe, we are not some medieval kingdom, we have our own government and history. Canada is right to pursue what it's courts have said and how Parliament has conducted itself. The Canadian courts have clearly decided on the merits for the arguments put forth. It is wrong to submit to lobbyists and their positions. Canada should never submit to threats and lobbying down here in Washington.
  98. Bob Loblaw from Canada writes: .

    What is worse
    illegal dvds or illegal guns

    What is worse
    a kid copying a movie
    or Sony and Microsoft Price fixing and being anticompetative

    .
  99. André P from Montreal, Canada writes: I think it is pretty pathetic if anyone one is downloading US movies or TV series. Maybe that could work out for everybody - we get paid to watch your propaganda... Wait a second, isn't that just like television?

    Face it studios, if you want people to pay for your products, make them accessible and practical.

    As for the blacklist, of course Harper should say yes, then have the bill, like the rest of them, sit around for a couple years, until technology has changed once again.
  100. Kevin de Montreal from Canada writes: Oh, Canada! The true north strong a free! I love this country more than ever. Where can I get a copyright blacklist t-shirt?
  101. Jah Nee Kah Sun from Canada writes: Yikes...no more cheap chips to increase the horsepower of my car
  102. Phil M from Toronto, Canada writes: I love the part where Canada is chastised for having a porous border, and letting in pirated material, because it then makes it's way into the states. Hi Kettle? It's Pot, I just wanted to say you're black.
  103. M B_tok from Windsor, Canada writes: I think that dictator President Obama should mind his own business in his own country! Canadians do not wish to live in the dark ages with our casette players as what we would have been left with had the Jim Prentice Bill been passed! Basically an RIAA lobbyist Bill created by Recording Industry Association of America created for the good of the RIAA Corporation, without anything to offer to Canadian citizens or Canadian artists! This president is a real work let me tell you, he's a smooth big winded, slick salesman who has won the adoration of the koolaid drinkers, who are more in love and hypnotized by his smooth talking tactics of offering less for more! He is presently working on taking away Americans 1st. amendment rights of Freedom of Speech and American citizens 2nd amendment rights of gun ownership, basically the same type of political agendas that Hitler applied in Germany! Believe it or not the koolaid drinkers are lapping it up! lol, lol,lol! We don't need elitist offshore bankers running our music business! Lets see if our Canadian Government has the intestinal fortitude to stand up to this tyrant, in favor of the Canadian people as opposed to the foreign corporation? The least the Canadian Government could do should comprimise be necessary come with policies that are beneficial to Canadian people and artists, that is a better deal than our lumber and cattle and agriculture industry receive! They should get Michael Geist to examine any proposal before any agreement is even ever considered! Let the Canadian people decide what we will accept or not accept! Harper don't let this facist dictator counterfeit American president push you and us around!
  104. Lynn from TO from Canada writes: Sask Resident from Regina, Canada writes: ...You can buy a book but not make copies for others. Writer and publishers make income from the copies sold, so if you can't make money, why write.... My response: While you're correct in principle, so much of the price of media (whether print, electronic, whatever) doesn't go to the artist, rather the recording company, the publisher, the agent. I don't have a problem with people having jobs and earning money, but in an industry where the recording companies earn more off of artists than the artists do themselves, I think there's something wrong. I don't mind paying for the music, movies, and books that I buy, but I don't think it's reasonable, when the true cost of production is $5, that I should pay $20. I think if I want to share the media that I buy with others outside my household, I should pay a nominal licensing fee - as one pays a fee to SOCAN to play music at events and such - but I shouldn't incur that fee if I intend to use the media only for myself. And frankly, where two songs on a CD of 14 are worth buying, I'm not going to buy the whole CD. The recording industry should know by now that their artists don't lay golden eggs all the time; they shouldn't expect to get paid so for krypton.
  105. Angry West Coast Canuck from Canada writes: Odd how a county that is completely unwilling to deal with or police companies abusing their monopoly positions (Microsoft, Autodesk to name but two) are so hot to try to force other countries to enforce copyright 'laws' that are nothing more than blatant giveaways to certain copyright owners. It's no mystery why copyright hasn't ended for anything produced after 1923, that being when a certain Disney stole a mouse from one guy, stole some Buster Keaton moves, and put them together to create Mickey Mouse. Yet somehow that gives the US the 'right' to impose a broken copyright model on the rest of the world?

    Let's mention their completely broken patent system, where people can patent things THAT DON'T EXIST, such as anti-gravity machines. Patents were meant to give people a limited time monopoly on new inventions in exchange for revealing, in detail, how that invention was created. They've turned it into a circus where even mathematical equations (in the form of software) can be patented. Where even IDEAS can be patented, contrary to their own laws on the subject! The US has thrown that concept right out the window, then run over it with a large truck. Repeatedly.

    So between breaking everything about copyright that makes it 'copy RIGHT', and breaking everything about patents that made them useful as well, the USA has a lot of gall putting anyone on any 'blacklist'.

    If being on that blacklist means we're no longer American shills for their broken 'intellectual property' system that they've then managed to force on everyone else through their outright control of WIPO, then I for one am very, very happy that our country has finally joined that list.
  106. Sidney M from Toronto, Canada writes: I'm not sure how to feel about this. On the one hand, I agree with those who say that intellectual property laws, especially with regard to digital media, badly need revising. (That's revising, by the way, not eliminating.) On the other hand, the prospect of Canada being on a blacklist, of any sort, with such countries as Russia and China, is discomfiting. (I mean no offence to the people of such countries; I'm talking about the enormous discrepancy there between the constant draconian crackdowns on freedom of expression and other things the rulers don't happen to like, and the complete lack of creators' rights enforcement or quality control of products.) Also, like it or not the U.S. is by far our largest trading partner, and our being on such a list could adversely affect Canada-U.S. commerce.

    I sure don't envy our federal government for now having to weigh the legitimate concerns of both media users and media producers, not to mention the court rulings on digital media copying, within the last few years.
  107. Kevin Desmoulin from TO, Canada writes: We're such outlaws. lol
  108. Apu Nahasapeemapetilon from Vancouver, Canada writes: Steph C from Ottawa, Canada writes: Geez, I wonder if the lack of new legislation has anything to do with the Conservative Party constantly playing chicken with opposition parties, proroguing Parliament when they get chicken and the disruptive behaviour at committee. Shenanigans!

    Perhaps? Can you explain why no legislation was implemented by the Liberals from 1997 (when they signed on to this international treaty) until 2006?
  109. R E from Toronto, Canada writes: The technological mediums of the world have changed. You cannot police it. These companies need to evolve.
  110. A Mitchell from Canada writes: Canada, home of the pirates! Long live free Canadian Piracy, the last bastion of internet freedom in the civilized world! No way should we give into pressure from these southern swines. Go ahead you silly American fools! Go a head and shut the boarder down over something so silly! And all the entertainment lawyers can go to hell. You can't take my pirated movies and music away from me.
  111. bob gervitz from United States writes: Jim Howard from Canada writes: Its difficult to understand why and how in a country where we have so much responsible regulation (Banking) and over regulation (CRTC/Television-Cable) that we have done so little to protect the legitimate rights of owners and developers of intellectual property.
    ----------
    Well said JH. The myth of Canadians greater integrity has been proven a lie by their disregard for copyright and intellectual property. Make no mistake this black listing should be an embarrassment for Canada, but, as many posters above have revealed, many Canadians are only self-interested in stealing everything they can, ethics be damned.

    Another Canadian self-righteous bubble burst, not unlike Sweden, another world-class thief of intellectual property/creative works. And both countries come up with such brainy arguments like the classic 'but I have the right because the (place artist's name here) is stinking rich', or 'yeah, but I'm actually helping sales by stealing this song and spreading it around' (a real rocket-scientist must have come up with that one), or how about 'yeah, but it's only one copy of a song/movie, where's the harm', or 'well, if they only gave me a better price (like less than 99 cents you mean?) I wouldn't NEED to steal it'. Losers every one.
  112. Hugh Andrew from Canada writes: This is another example of USA arrogance and bullying. The USA thinks that by declaring anything and everything its own, the rest of the world should fall into line or they'll push them around.

    Donald Trump believes that he will have the rights for the phrase 'Your Fired'. B.&%$ if they think that they should be able to claim the English language.

    Wasn't it an American who got copywrite on the tune Happy Birthday, causing many restaurents to be afraid of the tradition of singing the tune to its patrons?

    The greed and idocy needs to stop.

    Harper wil cave in as he always does the Big Brother. It is time that he be replaced as Conservative leader.
  113. Michael Tripper from Canada writes: if this policy is anything like the US's imposition of Prohibition then it is a good thing for us to take a pass.
  114. Frank Castor from ZephyrUxbridgeUdora, Canada writes: HAHAHAHAA......This article is too funny. Piracy is working out great for me too.

    Why would you get ripped off for $25 for a DVD, when you can get 8 for 20 bucks at Pacific Mall, and/or any flea market in Ontario.

    In the early 90's I made 5 bucks an hour, and would have to save up four hours worth of my time to buy 1 measly CD with two songs that I liked. See where I'm going with this? I have a feeling there are lots of people like me that are now recouping some of that loss. BOO HOO!!!!!!
  115. Jeff Werkman from Oakville, Canada writes: Everyone seems to overlook is the fact that if people couldn't access pirated material, either software or entertainment, they would never purchase it at all. The claims by industries affected that they 'lose money' is nonsense. I buy copies of movies because the price is cheap. I'd have to be pretty stupid to rip myself off if I paid full cost as 99% of the time the 'intellectual' property seems produced by a comatose primate.
  116. A Mitchell from Canada writes: first they take away my marijuana, and now this???????
  117. Dear Johnson from United States writes: How can Canada aspire to be a world leader in innovation, alongside the US and other key countries, when it doesn't have the necessary means to protect IP? If you can't hold onto to your IP, then where's the incentive to innovate?
  118. Canarus IV from Canada writes: .
    Canada is the country of immigrants. And people who moved here download the piracy contend not only because they do not wish to pay for that, but because there are not another way to receive it. Telco and Content markets are not truly competitive and highly corrupt.

    Only one way to change the situation is to open the Telco market for competition and support the creation of national digital network where all international content will be available to buy.
  119. Twitchy Libertarian from Calgary, Canada writes: What? You would think the U.S. would be happy with our nonsensical blank media levy. We screw ourselves and this is the thanks we get?
  120. bob gervitz from United States writes: d c from somewhere hiding out in, Canada writes: Bob Gayvitz writes 'well, if they only gave me a better price (like less than 99 cents you mean?) I wouldn't NEED to steal it'. Losers every one.

    Maybe that comment was directed more toward some of the anti American comments here. I'm certainly not anti American and have many American friends and relatives.

    However it's evident that you don't care about that it's actually the American companies that are stealing, or should I saying robbing intellectual property from the artists at their prices. Well excuse me for complaining about highway robbery of the consumer. Dress it in a lobby and blame the public, yeah that's the ticket. You are a loser and anti American.
    -------
    Yet another of the classic excuses I noted in my post. Why is it that the Canadian way (or at least dc's way) is to blame somebody else (american companies, highway robbery, etc, etc.)? Does nobody have any integrity anymore? Does nobody accept responsibility anymore?

    Instead, people like DC whine, 'But they make me steal because I don't like their price'. And what's that crap about me being anti-American? Where'd you dig that up from. I didn't even mention the USA! How about reorganizing your thoughts (if you can) and posting a real rebuttle (with, you know, actual arguments).
  121. S trider from Canada writes: I used to be a farmer, and I made a living fine, I had a little stretch of land along the CP line But times were hard and though I tried, the money wasn't there And the bankers came and took my land and told me 'fair is fair' I looked for every kind of job, the answer always no 'Hire you now?' they'd always laugh, 'we just let twenty go!' The government, the promised me a measly little sum But I've got too much pride to end up just another bum. Then I thought, who gives a damn if all the jobs are gone? I'm gonna be a PIRATE on the river Saskatchewan! And it's a heave-ho, hi-ho, comin' down the plains Stealin' wheat and barley and all the other grains It's a ho-hey, hi-hey farmers bar yer doors When ya see the Jolly Roger on Regina's mighty shores Well, you'd think the local farmers would know that I'm at large But just the other day I found an unprotected barge I snuck up right behind them and they were none the wiser, I rammed their ship and sank it and I stole their fertilizer! A bridge outside of Moose Jaw spans a mighty river Farmers cross in so much fear their stomachs are a'quiver Cause they know that Captain Tractor's hidin' in the bay I'll jump the bridge and knock them cold and sail off with their hay! Well, Mountie Bob he chased me, he was always at my throat He followed on the shoreline cause he didn't own a boat But cutbacks were a'coming and the Mountie lost his job So now he's sailing with us, and we call him Salty Bob! A swingin' sword, a skull and bones and pleasant company I never pay my income tax and screw the GST (SCREW IT!!) Sailin down to Saskatoon, the terror of the seas If you wanna reach the co-op, boy, you gotta get by me!
  122. Herman Nurnmurmer from Victoria, Canada writes: Oh no! Not the dreaded blacklist!

    I think we have other issues that beg for attention. This is comedy relief.
  123. John Keller from Canada writes: These are our friends ???????????????

    As long as everything benefits them !!!!!!!!!!
  124. Tim Segulin from Nova Scotia, Canada writes: I wonder if the concept of copyright has not become obsolete?

    After all it was originally enforced both by laws and by technical obstacles. It was once almost impossible to make pirated books, vinyl albums or pirated 35mm prints. That all changed with inexpensive photocopiers, tape recorders, VCRs the internet, DVD burners etc. Copyright law is still there, but it is EFFECTIVELY UNENFORCEABLE in most cases. Unenforceable law is bad law. It provides an illusion of protection.

    Who's going to know if I pirate music on-line? Sure, there have been efforts to prosecute illegal downloaders via tracking their IP addresses, but this can be rendered near impossible by the careful use of proxies and encrypting.

    Sensational prosecutions of a few kids and single-moms who were caught masks the reality that pirates usually away with it, and makes consumers hostile toward the record companies.

    In my experience every copy protection scheme has eventually been overcome. Piracy is underpinned by many technically capable people who share their tools. At best, new CP schemes buy a only short respite, and alienate real customers.

    Still, there are artists, technicians and producers who laboured and risked a great deal originating these works and must be fairly compensated or this stuff won't get made. I'm just not sure that traditional copyright propped up by intrusive or draconian laws will work, even if the US demands it.

    So how then?

    Sorry, I don't really know, but I hope this issue is being seriously researched in legislative circles, because a modern replacement is needed now. Until then, I see copyright as more of a diplomatic issue than a credible means to safeguard creators' IP.

    So what actually happens if Canada is on some US IP blacklist anyway? I'd rather we and the US devise a practical alternative.
  125. Roger Cooper from Canada writes: More good reasons to diversify our trading base.
  126. Richmond Perry from Edmonton, AB, Canada writes: No problem, I've just placed the American Movie Industry on my personal black list. I will not purchase products from an industry that thinks it can use pressure tactics like this to take away my fair use rights.
  127. Nathan Cool from Vancouver, Canada writes: Laughing Loudly, wow.. you really don't get sarcasm do you?

    Of course it's OUR border. That was the point.
  128. Robert Bland from Calgary, Canada writes:
    'Canada is regarded as a lawless hub for bootleg movies'

    ROTFLOL!!!

    Most Canadians would have no idea of where to find a bootleg movie. Even if you found a technically savvy torrent downloader and examined his shares, most of the P2P sites downloading material to him would be American.

    I must admit, though, that I once bought a Rolex watch in Bankok for $10. It came with a lifetime guarantee - as long as it lived, it was guaranteed.

    Let's face it - we're living in an age where corporations and governments have gone into partnership together with citizens being merely innocent bystanders. It seems that everything you read nowadays has to be taken with a grain of salt because it's been put together by a corporate PR spin doctor.
  129. Mister Canada from Canada writes: jeff giles from Hamburg, Germany....hit the nail right on the head. Who gives a rats posterior if were on any sort of American blacklist. Too bad the good 'ol U.S of A would just move itself from this continent to say, Antarctica......
  130. Raymond S from The West, Canada writes:
    Ha!

    'Glad to see this move by the U.S. Administration'
    'a prudent move by a wise leader'
    'glad to see this move by the U.S. Administration.'
    'GO OBAMA GO!'

    If Canada was placed on this list a year ago, these same posters would be howling for blood.

    Barf.
  131. Randal Oulton from Canada writes: >> Hobby Statistician from United States writes: 'The Obama administration added Canada Thursday to a notorious blacklist of countries where Internet piracy flourishes, reflecting a new, tougher line in Washington over Ottawa's chronic failure to deliver on promises of new copyright laws'. Good move for all concerned. And with Obama's support levels around 90 percent amongst Canadians the past year, likely to be welcomed there too as a prudent move by a wise leader standing up for change Canadians can believe in.

    Agreed, and no doubt they'll support the proposed copyright act here, not that its no longer a Bush initiative and has became a 'Bama initiative instead.
  132. Vote NDP in the next federal/ provincial election from Canada writes: So why does the US want force Canada to enforce/create intellectual property laws when the US wont enforce their own laws properly (i.e wont abide by softwood lumber under NAFTA, detaining peace activists, privacy violations, torture etc.....)
  133. dpk form from Toronto, Canada writes: When the laws of a country are contrary to the wishes of 90% of its citizens, the laws are wrong, not 90% of the people.

    All of the lawyers appointed to be Obama's technology advisors are former media corporation lobbyists. None of them are from organizations like the American Electronic Frontier Foundation which lobbies for consumer protections and rights in the digital age. So much for Obama listening to all sides - he is unacceptably biased.

    Musicians gave their music away for free on radio stations, so they could sell more records. It was easier for the consumer to buy a record, than to try and make their own recordings off radio. That's why sales of records and CDs used to work. It had little to do with copyright law.

    The music labels got into the internet music business, but implemented ridiculous electronic restrictions, that made their 'legal music' much less convenient. They insisted on charging the same money, for much inferior audio quality to a CD, and refused to pass on any savings from distribution, marketing, manufacturing, and retailer profit which the internet eliminated. In fact the RIAA literally has no reason to exist anymore. Artists can easy publish music themselves. Many artists offer their music free on the internet, and make their money by attracting people to their concerts.

    Again with TV shows and movies. Outdated ridiculous business models. Why were they able to offer free TV with shows and movies the last 60 years over the air, and now they complain that they will lose money because people are downloading and watching for free? If they freely offered their programs without restrictions, other than some embedded advertising - they could still make a fortune off ads as consumers would flock to their websites.

    US copyright law PREVENTS innovation, by trying to keep rewards flowing to incompetent, dinosaur organizations, who feel they entitled to business as usual, in a changed modern world.
  134. Randy G from Windsor, Canada writes: Who cares what the US thinks? Did we get a vote on their wars? What about the passports we all had to buy just to go shopping in their cities? Sorry, US, but Canadian laws are decided by Canadians, and large corporations need no additional copyright protection. Indeed, in this digital age, customers and the artists we patronize need more protection than ever from middle-man corporations who stand between us, and who believe they are owed a profit for doing nothing other than pressing 'Copy'.
  135. Richard Killey from Toronto, Canada writes: Tim Segulin wrote: 'Still, there are artists, technicians and producers who laboured and risked a great deal originating these works and must be fairly compensated or this stuff won't get made. I'm just not sure that traditional copyright propped up by intrusive or draconian laws will work, even if the US demands it. So how then?'

    Yes. How? I produce products that I would like to be compensated for. It is not fair to me if customers share my products by copying the disks for their friends or business contacts. What is fair use?

    I do agree that we need an updated set of laws, but leave it up to many people, and it would be fair game to do whatever, because it saves the individual money, at the producer's (I am one of them) expense.
  136. C R from Canada writes: Yes. I agree that we should wear this as a badge of honour. They are too overly zealous in how they protect copyrights south of us. From making it illegal to change formats of media for personal use of material that a person already legally owns a copy of, to excessive punitive measures where they will sue a single mom for hundreds of thousands of dollars just for downloading a single album rather than a more fair fine. All this from an industry that makes huge profits already and where some artists feel some of these regulations actually hinder the exposure they can create that is independent of corporate controlled marketing. Hey, we also still pay more for everything on this side. Don't be suckered on this issue. There is a better middle ground, and it isn't what they are trying to force on us.
  137. d c from somewhere hiding out in, Canada writes: gerbilvitz writes: Instead, people like DC whine, 'But they make me steal because I don't like their price'. And what's that crap about me being anti-American? Where'd you dig that up from. I didn't even mention the USA! How about reorganizing your thoughts (if you can) and posting a real rebuttle (with, you know, actual arguments). Again you are missing the point here which is the consumer. Every person that lives in capitalist country has unfortunately been ripped off by companies for a very long time. If you are calling me a thief, that I am. I would surely steal gas, food, clothes as would the majority of the world's population if they could. No whining here just telling it like it is. IP especially easier to steal because of its digital nature. Having worked for several large companies in my day, some of the biggest in the world, I am at the very least entitled to an opinion. Corporations like Microsoft, Sony, Disney etc are not going under any time soon. However piracy seems to be a major concern for them. Why do you think that is? My opinion is that it's not about IP, it's about greed. If your corporate profits are in the billions, surely you are really not suffering from a IP theft, what you are suffering from is misplaced greed. Knowing full well that you be disatisfied with my rebuttal I say good night. I've got to download some illegal music right now, before I black bagged by my government which is nothing more than a corporate puppet.
  138. donald kennedy from Canada writes: How about a referendum on this? Here? In the United States? In Europe?
    People do not want it! It is amazing what laws you can get through in so-called democracies. Talk about regulation. Talk about the tail wagging the dog. This is the last bit of freedom we have and Sony (Sony?) is getting it snuffed out. Proves the writers and the singers have no more nobility than the corporations when someone waves the prospect of more money in their faces!
  139. mike hunt from Canada writes: you know the americans bullied us on softwood lumber, mad cow, likely the avro too, suckered us into joining their crappy middles eastern campaigns, dragged us along the path of surrendering our rights and freedoms because of 'terrorism'.. and now, theyre gonna tell us how to run our internet... if you read the article, 'washington' wants canada to impose 'domestic' laws -written by obama too perhaps?- upon us... i personally have a problem with intellectual property rights as it is. for one, i think the internet should be declared entirely 'public library domain' and so exempt from copyright laws completely, but what i really have a proble with, is having washington tell our government what laws theyre gonna inflict on canadians... i say pull out of the treaties and sign no more until the US rethinks their position on copyright. i think canada should be looking more at self sufficiency so that international trade tactics cannot be used to usurp the will of canadians and the leaders we elect... support piratebay.org!
  140. fubar speaks from Canada writes: So, lemme get this straight...the country who's TV and movie industries, who have for decades destroyed other nations TV and movie industries by dumping old shows and programs abroad for virtually nothing...who regularly flout all kinds of trade laws and agreements when it suits their purposes...who have such a cultural stranglehold on the various media industries that it borders on the absurd..are now getting all bent outta shape now that technology is destroying all of their bloated profit factory monopolies on the visual and musical arts. Fine. We'll accept legislative dictation from the US just as soon as they force China and Israel to comply. ( Oh, yeah, they're on the list too). We'll go for the trade sanctions just as soon as all trade and commerce stops with those two. In the meanwhile, we'll be reading our CRTC decisions, plotting how to steal the RCMP trademark back, and watching old CBC footage of the Avro Arrow. Oh, yeah, and watching a bootleg copy of 'Valkryie' and feeling SOOOOO guilty we didn't shell out 10 bucks for the priveledge. FORGIVE US TOM CRUISE!
  141. scott thomas from Canada writes: US put on torture blacklist. The US joins countries such as Iraq, Syria, Burma, China that torture with a vigour and a pleasure that belongs in the medieval period. They also execute children. But they are good at moral outrage, particularly if it costs some of their wealthy class some money.
  142. Had e Nuff from Canada writes: Canada should investigate U.S trade representative Ron Kirk and find out who is paying him and who is providing him with information. Make the payola public. Americans have been pushing independant countries around for too long. Follow the money. Mr Kirk, who pays for lunch?
  143. Dan Thomas from Canada writes: Meh...
  144. J R from Vancouver, Canada writes: 'Intellectual Property' is just a way to controlling people. Owning ideas does not lead to innovation. It keeps people from innovating for fear of infringing on 'intellectual property.' Really, how can anyone own the ideas that are in someone's head? The US will tweak its intellectual property laws for its own advantage, and it will loosen them whenever it is convenient for them. It would be best for us to just ignore the US and do what is best for us now, just like they do.
  145. John Peterson from Canada writes: These actions by record industry are spurred by plummetting revenues world wide - which are a result of complex factors.

    If piracy was a bigger problem in Canada then, for example, in France - then one would expect Canadian sales drops to exceed those of France. This is in fact not true.

    So singling out Canada over EU countries is not supported by the hard figures. There is no reason to believe that piracy is more prolific in Canada than elsewhere in the Western world - it is simply not true.

    As well, multi-media sites which were unavailable a few years ago have increased the options that consumers have to obtain LEGAL sources of entertainment online. Maybe consumers are just finding alternatives where they can spend their time.

    Putting Canada on a black list along side China or Russia is absolutely ludicrous. The piracy in China or Russia is several orders of magnitude greater than Canada.

    It's like comparing a flood to a leaky faucet.
  146. David Hersh from TRue NOrth STrong and FRee, Canada writes: I want Canada to stand strong and not bow to US greed. It is greed that they want to force upon our nation, and they have every right to do that in their country but not ours. US policy is not global policy. There is a band from Montreal called 'Archade Fire', they are independent (indie) band, and one of the worlds most famous. They allow free downloading and taping of their performances. They aren't afraid of copyrights not working for them. Let the musicians earn their own security.

    American might is nothing more than American crap. In fact lets keep all American copyrights out of Canada, we will do fine on our own.
  147. Ju Bs from Toronto, Canada writes: David Hersh, I love Arcade Fire. I know this is off topic, but there's so many amazing Canadian bands that don't get nearly enough air on the radio - I really really wish we'd play less Britney/Justin/Hannah Montana crap...I've have had enough of these highly manufactured 'artists'. More support for local artists! Another few great up-and-coming bands are Stars (also from Montreal), the Arkells (from Hamilton), and Metric (another great Indie band based in Canada).
  148. Weary Taxpayer from Canada writes: Does the infamous ' either you are with us or you are with the terrorist....' ring a bell? Or the 'Coalition of the Willing'? Or the 'Axis of Evil'? These are some fine examples of other 'white' and 'black' lists made in US. Ergo, when a self-righteous country like the US -where one is left to die if lacking enough money to pay for health care- puts Canada on any type of black list, I personally consider that an honour for us Canadians.

    As far as I am concerned, they can roll their self-righteous black list. Then, I will give them a good idea of where they can put it.
  149. Graeme Dempster from Canada writes: Copyright does not protect the rich only... Why do posters make reference to wealth and greed?

    Granted, US copyright law is not perfect, but it is about protecting property... from the starving artist (who need the money, by the way) to the executives.

    I have to laugh, though, at the prospect of Canada being put on the blacklist. Does being on the list mean we won't get any more American movies? Music? News? Books? Cable channels? Don't think so.
  150. Jordan Maslyn from United States writes: 'With the U.S. Special 301 Report set for release today, Consumers International has released its own IP Watchlist. This list of 16 countries found that consumers benefit most from the laws in India and South Korea, while the UK is the most restrictive. It also noted that the U.S. applies a double standard, with 'far more flexibility for U.S. consumers than for people in the countries they criticize.' From Michael Geist.
  151. B A from Canada writes: Wow. Talk about long winded arguments. Want to know how long you guys have been spewing this $hit? Check this article out from the NYT: 'Canadian Pirates is what the music dealers call publishing houses across the line who are flooding this country, they say, with spurious editions of the latest copyrighted popular songs. They use the mails to reach purchasers so members of the American Music Publishers' Assoication assert, and as a result the legitimaite music publishing of the United States has fallen off 50 percent in the past twelve months. Their investigation has revealed that all of the most popular pieces have been counterfeited, despite the fact that they are copyrighted, and by unknown publishers are sold at from 2 cents to 5 cents per copy, though the original compositions sell at from 20 to 40 cents per copy...' this particular snippet was from the NYT, dated: June 13, 1897 --This is, of course, absolutely hilarious given the outright cpoyright infringement the Americans were exercising on European and British works at the time. Seriously, after a century of infantile whining, don't you guys get sick of recycling the same old excuses for your own ineptitudes? Aaarrrr, Metis!
  152. B A from Canada writes: Oh yeah, if you guys want to read the full article you can find it here.

    http://www.bestactever.com/2009/04/26/the-long-war-music-piracy-in-1897-nytimes/
  153. B A from Canada writes: So there you have it. Surely copyright piracy will be the death of the music industry just like it was in 1897. Right? No one's been writing a dang thing or turning a profit since Mendelssohn right? Sigh, does it surprise me that the American music industry wanks are lobbying for this $hit? Hell no. Nah a bigger question is how many minuets could a steam powered I-pod hold? And can you imagine how long they'd take to recharge...
  154. Read Acted from Canada writes: If you dont want me pirating your precious 'intellectual' property,
    Keep your bloody satellite signals out of my back yard.

    It's as simple as that.
  155. Rain Couver from Canada writes: What a dubious distinction, to be placed on a blacklist with the likes of China, and so many posters support this.

    If you created something, you would want fair compensation for its consumption, or are all Canadians thinking that all art should be free to use at any time? Really, as a Canadian in an artistic field, I would be pretty pissed if someone where benefiting from my creativity without paying a fair price.

    On the other hand, when it comes to American music and films, Washington should not get their panties in a bunch since they still make millions, if not billions, off of Canadians. To my fellow US citizens (yeah, ain't dual citizenship grand), you have way more important things to worry about than losing a few thousand dollars from shtty DVDs that only a few really buy, like piracy in the new Wild West known as China. Or how about that economy? Shut the f*k up before you make the rest of us Americans look like spoiled little children whining at the smallest thing.
  156. Prairie Boy from Canada writes: Sooo is the new Microsoft OS revenge?
  157. Dear Johnson from United States writes: Most of these responses show the inferiority complex that is so prevalent amongst Canadians when it comes to anything to do with the US. If this was an EU blacklist instead of a US blacklist, the posts would be totally different - but Canadians become extremely defensive whenever it's the US that voices concern with anything up north. Even if it's for your own good... Last time I checked, the US film industry was very active in major Canadian cities - So yes, you do have something to lose economically if the entertainment industry decides to retaliate against lax copyright laws in Canada.
  158. Norm Jom from Petawawa, Canada writes: B A from Canada, don't kid yourself, the New York Times should look out the window from time to time. You don't have to mail order pirated discs from Canada, you can buy it on almost any corner of the street in their fine city and any US centre.

    The US patent and copyright system is a mess and extremely protectionist. The major entertainment corporations are the real problem, both for the artists and the public. What the US really wants us to do is act on internet file sharing, in other words have our law enforcement do the dirty work for the entertainment industry.

    It's not about protecting individual artists, as a photographer my only recourse is to find inappropriate uses of my material myself and it's the same in the states. This is all about video and music sharing on the internet and making sure the corporations get restitution, not the artists.
  159. Stan Dupp from Uzbekistan writes:
    B A from Canada writes: Wow. Talk about long winded arguments. Want to know how long you guys have been spewing this $hit? Check this article out from the NYT: 'Canadian Pirates ....Assoication assert, and as a result the legitimaite

    =========================================

    If that is a quote, and you imply it is, from the NY Times, then they are now spelling at the level of a ...oh...six year old. If you can't provide a link then a copy-paste will suffice.

    .
  160. Norm Jom from Petawawa, Canada writes: Dear Johnson from United States writes: So yes, you do have something to lose economically if the entertainment industry decides to retaliate against lax copyright laws in Canada.

    ---------------------

    Not really, they shoot here because it's cheaper. They aren't going to stop shooting over a principle, money is their prime motivation. If they can save a dime by shooting in Canada they will.
  161. Selina T from Victoria, Canada writes: Just like China.
  162. Frank The Tank from Argentina writes: And Canada will respond by putting the US on its terrorist list.
  163. Soon-to-be Canuck from Cambridge, MA, United States writes: Copyright law is vestigial when applied to the corpus of digital media. A couple of years ago, the Microsoft corporation copyrighted the modulus function. Disgusting. The copyright system is terribly askew and this is a horrible time to cater to it. True innovation and creativity dynamically change with the environment. I agree with those of you who label this as a move that is largely situated within corporate interests. Very disappointing move by my country's leader. Maybe this is why I read Canadian news.
  164. donald kennedy from Canada writes: I read for free, not because I have bought the book,although I have a library which I bought. I listen to music for free , although I have an extensive library which I bought going back to 78's and continuing through 45's and vinyl. The best books are not covered by copyright in any event, and the best music?( Why do movies steal from the classics.) Do this. It is a ridiculous reason for a revolt, but do it. Within five years , you will get what you deserve, and it is not money!
  165. GMW INBC from Canada writes: The more we disengage with that particular country the better. Tell them we'll do exactly what CANADIANS, not greedy American corporations want to do about copyright. Nothing more, nothing less.

    You know, Artists used to be willing, or so it seemed, to do almost anything to get their music played on radio. It was free to the listener there, why not have it on the internet as well. Make your money from live performances. Screw the RIAA and Sony. They've done nothing but stifle innovation for the last 40 years anyway.
  166. Republic of Saturn from Canada writes:
    Chinese piracy brings tremendous benefit to their consumers. Aermcian companies sell DVDs and music CDs at the fraction of Canadian price, google even provides free music for downloading.......

    It will be worth on the list if Canadians can get all those...........
  167. Read Acted from Canada writes: You yanks just keep your bloody 'culture' to yourselves.

    I'd rather listen to Canadian artists anyway.
  168. Read Acted from Canada writes: The CRTC should mandate equal time for all foreign film producing countries.
  169. tygh oiuyn from Canada writes: US, corporate suck hole undermining every most basic ethical, common sense and moral ground you can possibly imagine for the sake of a dollar, and psycho-pseudo-freedom-of-convenience illsusions in the name of god almighty. 'just ripped off their own citizens of billions'. That's just their standard business day, they just ripped off the entire world of trillions and counting for probably all time. Brought light to the term 'trickle down economics'. Another one for the list of Canadian Special Achievements wrt to the US is False Flag Ops, and how about setting forth a plague on their own people, crack, heroine. With the state of the world today, thanks to the US, it's baffling this should get a moments focus, but that's the point isn't it? It's all just a distraction, from allllll the rest going on now, which is just your standard operating procedure. It's a divisive distraction, it's punitive measures for Canada standing up for itself in the latest meat dispute, it's Obama dancing like a puppet tethered to the same strings Bush was as he before them and he who'll follow them and all the while Harper taps his foot to the beat of their drums as will he who follows him. This two faced corruption word game evasion soup you try to mold the world by and beat us down with makes a mockery of you in the era where the flow of information happens faster than your back room meetings convene. Push us a little more... if you can't tell, our back's are up against the wall, and we aren't dropping the soap.
  170. Todd Temple from A Big One, writes: I'm good with this I kinda like being blacklisted by the most unpopular country in the World. I say let it ride, we've got the oil, we've got the lumber and all the natural resources. Our beer kills theirs and oh hey we've even got the uranium for the nukes. I say Harper lets Obama know...........this is how we roll here in Canada.
  171. Republic of Saturn from Canada writes:
    This is the Warner Chinese site

    http://www.cavwarner.com/web/product/product.jsp

    See how much they sell? $2-3 a DVD!!!!

    Bring that to Canada since we're on the same list, and should be treated same.......
  172. G SL from Canada writes: I wonder, how many discs go into landfill? And, why even stock the shelves in Canada with music, movies or software? We're a nation of unrepentant, intellectual property pirates- we don't need the packaging- just the e-booty will do...
  173. James Tee from Calgary, Canada writes: Uh, perhaps the US should be put on the human rights 'blacklist' for their barbaric continuation of executing human beings and their second-class treatment of gays? (still barred from being able to serve their country in the military). 'copyright' issues pale in comparison to these, but well, what do you expect from a country like the US where capitalistic gains reign over social equalities?
  174. Stan Dupp from Uzbekistan writes:
    Republic of Saturn from Canada writes:
    This is the Warner Chinese site

    http://www.cavwarner.com/web/product/product.jsp

    See how much they sell? $2-3 a DVD!!!!
    =========================================

    Well...uh...Mama Mia for three bucks is about right. Or 22 Yuan as the site has it.

    Thanks for the link.

    .
  175. david graham from halifax, Canada writes: and washington should tell us how to introduce, what to introduce and when to introduce legislation? go home and see to your own house. harper should make that perfectly clear to them. US legislation is becoming more protectionist because of the current economics....two can play that game and we are not playing nearly hard enough.
  176. Republic of Saturn from Canada writes:
    The American DVD sold in China is always bilingual, English and Chinese translation.

    So if you buy from there, you can always switch to English to watch. Save you a lot and they're the genuine ones.
  177. tom g from upper ottawa valley, Canada writes: More and more, Obama appears to be just more of business as usual. Of course, that seemed fairly likely months before the election. How typical and how american to claim law as the embodiment virtue and moral superiority and require universal compliance for anything in law..

    It was good to see that India won back the rights for its farmers to use the name Basmati rice, since they have been cross-breading rice and making Basmati for centuries. The Texas Rice company patented their own hybrid and the name Basmati along with it. India won. One victory among thousands of U.S. patents for items traditionally produced and used in the developing world--stolen under law without compensation.

    Welcome to the moral world of the globalized producer, where it is immoral for a farmer to have crops that contain genes from patented GM crops that were carried by wind blown pollen from corporate farms to contaminate the crops of small farmers. Only California has enacted legislation that prevents such suits by corporate farms and the owners of GM patents. I wonder when a person will be jailed for having a gene that is patented. There are hundreds of human genes patented. Oh well, parents will just have to pay royalties at birth.

    Welcome to the moral world of music where musician and their corporations threaten to sue people because they incidentally recorded background music playing in their own homes and corporations breath life into long dead musicians and their rights. Don't sing Happy Birthday without paying now.

    The IPR legislation and related GATT agreements are fine examples of asymmetrical morality, which disgrace the law itself. Make just law and then complain about law breakers, and by all means enforce just law.
    Oh well, some good might come of it. Maybe our PM could become a jailbird for failing to pay royalties for several speeches.
  178. D B from Canada writes: That's absolute, 100% garbage. The only reason Canada is being singled out is because we are seen to respond to this kind pressure. Mr. Harper: find a backbone and let's modernize copyright so that it benefits ALL Canadians and not just American Content Providers.
  179. B A from Canada writes: Stan Dupp from Uzbekistan writes:

    If that is a quote, and you imply it is, from the NY Times, then they are now spelling at the level of a ...oh...six year old. If you can't provide a link then a copy-paste will suffice.

    Uh, Stan, I did that already. As for my spelling, well, some of us don't have the time to bother with spellchecks on comment boards we have these funny things called lives. Chill.
  180. Elmo Harris from Niagara, Canada writes: I find it hard to take the US concern for copyright and patent infringement seriously given that there exist companies in the US that fake patents. Remember the fiasco that Research In Motion had with NPT over a patent used by RIM for their push technology? Fake. But in order to protect RIM's Blackberry customers from imminent shutdown RIM paid up - a total of $612.5-million (U.S.). This in spite of the fact that a judgment came down a few days later in favour of RIM. Later on, NPT pulled the same stunt with Apple and Palm. NPT's business is faking patents and it is getting very rich doing it.
  181. B A from Canada writes: Norm Jom from Petawawa, no, no, the point I was trying to make was that the US has been accusing us of pirating their material for over a century. This is nothing new between our two countries. Every time they fall on economic hard times they blame everybody else. It's just their way and, apparently, has a long standing tradition.
  182. J Nigh from Toronto, Canada writes: Perhaps Canada would be willing to stop flooding the U.S. with pirated movies when the U.S. is willing to stop flooding us with illegal firearms that are used in crimes where Canadians get killed. Perhaps the U.S. should look in the mirror before it tries to lecture other countries about lax laws.
  183. B A from Canada writes: Oops, sorry. That should have read: 'Uh, Stan, I did that already. As for my spelling, well, some of us don't have the time to bother with spellchecks on comment boards AS we have these funny things called lives. Chill.' Multitasking. 'Sigh...'
  184. Whitney Dodman from Waterloo, Canada writes: This is so retarded! These dinosaurs have no idea how to join them when you can't beat them.

    There are plenty of ways to make money with the internet and digital media. I am currently downloading some Bluray movies and I am only getting 15-17kb/s. If they want my money, they could charge me $2-$3/ download and make it fast. I might even pay $5 for the time savings. It costs them nothing for me to make a copy of their media and they could profit. I did get over 700kb/s downloading Valkyrie though. That was cool.

    Blockbuster could have gone with a similar model. Imagine going to the video store and just taking a flash drive with you. You pay $5 and they put the movie right on the drive. You never have to bring it back and it's much easier than downloading. They could keep a bank of servers right on site or in some centrally located area. Making it proprietary would work and they could have the movie self destruct after a week or so. Somebody would find a way around this, but it would not be worth the hassle.

    My friend lent me a book that I am reading and Robert Pirsig is not going to get a dime from me. My other friends may read it and my daughter may read it. He is stuck with his money from the original purchase.

    Like I said, there are plenty of opportunities to make money. Nobody has a patent on tables and chairs but people still (amazingly) make money off them. Who do the car companies pay their royalties to for making cars? Benjamin Franklin invented several cool things but turned down patents. He did not want to make a profit; only to make people's lives better!
  185. Craig Cooper from Toronto, writes: Wow.

    You can really tell who the unimaginative, never-had-an-idea-in-their-lives crowd are.

    They're the one's against protecting copyright and intellectual property.
  186. Omnibot 2000 from Toronto, Canada writes: The concept of 'intellectual' property emanating from a country with 1/4 of its population in prison, the remainder unable to locate their own country on a map of the earth, ruled by a former cocaine-user, is truly classic. Not that the US hasn't made its contribution to the world; exporting such 'intellectual' property as crack, porn, gangsta rap, and Windows ME.
  187. Whitney Dodman from Waterloo, Canada writes: Craig Cooper from Toronto, writes: Wow.

    You can really tell who the unimaginative, never-had-an-idea-in-their-lives crowd are.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Craig,

    Check out the free software movement. Ever heard of copyLEFT? These people create great things and give them away. Richard Stallman and Linus Torvalds are two of the greatest software developers to ever walk the planet and they gave it away! They still make money and they still get laid. They just work for a living.

    I'm typing this in Firefox (free) running on Fedora 10 (free). I watch my 'pirated' movies on VLC (free) or MythTV (free) which uses several (free) Linux libraries and has a MySQL backend (free).
  188. Mike Potter from hamilton, Canada writes: Copyright is a great idea. The problem with the particular version of copyright that the American's push , is that it protects bean counters and lawyers not the creative people.
  189. Craig Cooper from Toronto, writes: Yes, Whitney, I know about those things.

    I use MySQL on several sites.

    Did you know that the Mozilla (FireFox) folks make their money on the back end?

    How about Google, do you think that is 'free,' too?

    Where are your ideas?

    Apart from the idea that it's okay for you to watch movies in which others have invested millions even though you haven't paid.

    There is a difference between people giving their work away and other people stealing work that is not given away.
  190. William Scott Lee III from Vancouver, Canada writes: I am not surprised an Obama Administration would do this. The one thing about Bush and the Republicans is they never really cared too much for Hollywood.

    Canada is on list and should have been on it along time ago. America did not put Canada on the list because Canadians are going to ethnic Chinese malls or flea markets and buying pirated DVDs, you can do that in the UK also. Nor is it for the pirating of business software, which is very low in Canada.

    They put Canada on the list because Canadians are the tip of the spear when it comes to TV and movie pirating. The victims, the movie and TV industry, happen to be big donors for the Democratic Party. If you download any new American TV show (Desperate Housewives etc) on bittorrent sites (Isohunt - based in Richmond, BC, the second largest bittorrent site in the world after Pirate Bay) 90% of time it is uploaded from Canada. Canada is the lead distributor for piracy of TV shows. How does one know - well often it has a CityTV, CTV, CBC watermark in the corner. The crappy pirated movies that one can downloaded within days of the release are usually filmed in Canada. Where else does one get to see a copy of the latest movie with French subtitles within days of its release in America. In fact the Americans can trace it to several Cinemas in downtown Montreal.
  191. Deskof Reason from Canada writes: Agree with the posters that point out that americans are largely responsible for all the illegal guns that make it here and do not belong here. If they had any sense, they would realize they do not belong there, either.

    And to the american poster that claims we do not have anything worth copywriting, I would submit that for being only 10% the size of the US, Canada produces far in excess of 10% of the best musicians and actors they enjoy, whether or not those artists live in the US. They seem to think anyone that is white and speaks english (passably) in a movie must be american.

    DoR
  192. David Gibson from Hamilton, Canada writes: The Americans are to be thanked for showing leadership, in trying to protect the creative people of the world from the leeches and thieves, who possess computers, but no conscience.
  193. andrew lawton from Canada writes: Uh-Oh .... the yanks are taking the 'moral high ground' again!! Hmmm, last time they did that, in Iraq, on Wall Street, on the 'War On Drugs', at Guantanamo etc., they pretty much screwed up the whole world ...

    and this from a country who thinks someone should be able to patent the Human Genome ... yeah, I think we should ask God about that.
  194. Whitney Dodman from Waterloo, Canada writes: Hey guys, The Fast and the Furious is out (R5 Line). I'm getting 300Kb/s.

    Craig,

    I have developed an entire suite in PHP with a MySQL backend for tracking Moneris inventories. I have also developed a grade reporting system and a modified web version of the Myers Briggs Type Indicator at UWO . I developed perl scripts for the Big Brother monitoring software. I did it for free and I gave it to the people I developed it for. I was not paid for any of them and don't wish to be.

    I work for a living installing licensed, proprietary IBM software on AIX systems.

    Oh, and I also had 25% of my retirement savings stolen from me by Wall Street bankers but I am only slightly bitter.
  195. Whitney Dodman from Waterloo, Canada writes: I also invented the portable hole, the fluff muffler and am considering patenting the word Piracy so I can get my money from Jonny Depp
  196. One Who Knows from Canada writes: Dear Johnson from United States writes: 'How can Canada aspire to be a world leader in innovation, alongside the US and other key countries, when it doesn't have the necessary means to protect IP? If you can't hold onto to your IP, then where's the incentive to innovate?'

    >> Sadly most Canadians don't see the bigger picture on this issues. They don't grasp how much bigger it is than 'their God given right to download music (or movies) for free' and can't see overall effect that lax copyright protections have on discouraging innovation. Without any means of protecting their investment in development why would anyone choose Canada in which to innovate when they can locate in a country that will protect their intellectual property? We need to find a middle ground that recognizes fair use but compensates copyright holders as well.
  197. One Who Knows from Canada writes: D Burns from Toronto, Canada writes: 'Lets face it -- the US wanted to put us on that list for a long time, just because of the CRTC.'

    The CRTC has no mandate regarding copyright.
  198. Whitney Dodman from Waterloo, Canada writes: Five of my seven sources for Fast and Furious are from the US, one is from Canada and one from France.
  199. One Who Knows from Canada writes: Vancouver Viaduct from Canada writes: 'what do they think billions of blank dvds cds and mp3 players are for'

    There is no levy on mp3 players.
  200. One Who Knows from Canada writes: Sask Resident from Regina, Canada writes: 'Among other things, if I buy a CD, I should be able to rip it and listen to it on my computer, my MP3 player or any damn device I want without having to pay each time. I should also be able to make a copy in case the original copy gets destroyed.'

    You are currently able to do all of these things.
  201. Whitney Dodman from Waterloo, Canada writes: He is also currently allowed to download the CD from the internet. There is no law against it.
  202. crafty kd from Canada writes: Oh, S trider, I haven't heard that song in absolute ages! Busting up all over again... Silly pirates. ;-)
  203. David Hersh from Kelowna, Canada writes: Well Mr Kirk appears to be a pirate himself...http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601103&sid=aoBBPjInzvLg&refer=us
  204. Steve Church from Canada writes: This Comment thread looks like Exhibit A for the US claim.
  205. Lawrence Russo from Mississauga, Canada writes: This is absolutely ridiculous. These people have got to get their priorities straight.
  206. Geoff I from Canada writes: One Who Knows from Canada writes: They don't grasp how much bigger it is than 'their God given right to download music (or movies) for free' and can't see overall effect that lax copyright protections have on discouraging innovation.

    So you think the downloading of crappy music and derivative, bad hollywood remakes is what is discouraging innovation.

    That's funny.
  207. Brian Bishop from Brantford, Canada writes: WIPO, what a wonderful treaty!

    Did anyone read it before signing on?

    Of course not, just as Chretien signed Kyoto without reading or even caring what it was about, he did the same with WIPO & dozens of other such documents during his time as PM.

    That's just the kind of guy Chretien was while PM, he wanted to be the first to sign any international treaty or agreement, he loves the limelight!

    Why do you think nothing was ever done on either WIPO or Kyoto, Chretien didn't care!

    Why has nothing happened since Chretien, nobody in Canada cares about discriminatory copyright laws.

    It's part of our culture, it's enshrined in our Charter of Rights, we refrain as much as possible from creating laws & enforcing laws that are discriminatory in nature. This began in earnest in 1982 & has been our way ever since.

    Any Canadian government that passes into law legislation that enables the type of lawsuit actions that have occurred in the USA over the past several years. Will have passed into law their last piece of legislation.

    The first such lawsuit & the Conservative party of Canada will look back on October 25 1993 as an election victory, following the next election!
    -
  208. Steve Church from Canada writes: Brain Bishop, trying to turn mass illegal behavior into a Cretien glory-hunt is so lame it'll qualify for vaccine research. What's second prize, two eye-patches?
  209. Mickey Hickey from Toronto, Canada writes: America's right to rule the world will soon be confirmed by the Harper gang as they move to get in the good graces of their masters in Washington. American politicians have been bought by big business. Instead of producing new products American business now relies on politicians and lawyers to bully the world for their benefit. It is the beginning of the end for the American economy.
  210. D F from Toronto, Canada writes: True north strong and free > land of the free home of the brave.
  211. If I had a Trillion Lobsters (a Million is now a trillion due to QE) from canbabwe, Canada writes: What is really interesting is how in the last 3 months we have seen hints of protectionism in obamasan's policies.

    When you connect the dots you can see that protectionism is in vogue as special interest lobbyists pressure these pussies into blocking trade.

    Boy is this bad for them and us, smoot hawley here we come
  212. Allan b from Canada writes: I keep thinking about the old (mission imposable series) when they get there instructions of what they are to do the suit case that they got there instructions from burns up. Maybe they will build that technology into pirated movies, music etc........ Laughs.
  213. Allan b from Canada writes: Another funny thing that just accurd to me, here I am working on an american computer that gave me the technolagy and tools to rip a music CD or movie DVD and copy it. How ironic.
  214. David Simon from Canada writes: Where are those Canadian nationalists? Why aren't they defending Canada's position and bashing Obama instead of Harper?

    STAND UP FOR CANADA
  215. Maureen Tracey from Oakville, Canada writes: As a snowbird living in Barbados, several times a week I walk by several vendors selling contraband DVD's and CD's literally under the eyes of uniformed police officers - when I asked the officers about this, they just considered the buys were 'making a living'!
  216. Common Sense from Canada writes: Erm. No. Obama doesn't get to dictate what laws and norms exist in OUR country. Nice try though. E for effort, truly. And then you look at Europe, where the Pirate party is gaining political strength. It'll happen here...just too bad we as individuals don't have the same capital as the RIAA/MPAA/CMPDA to 'lobby' our politicians for the IP law we Canadians think should be in place. Never did understand how lobbyists get their way...not constituents. Methinks our democracy's broken, eh?
  217. Big John from Canada writes: Sure open the flood gates for more lawyers to make huge cash. They need to put limits on the time copyrights last. 5-10 years not a lifetime!! There should also be large fees to re-register copyrights each year too. Only large companies benefit from copyrights because they are the only ones with cash to fight them in court, the poor suckers that create the work are screwed.
  218. Claude Carriere from Canada writes: Translation: We want to re-open NAFTA, it's not working to our advantage 100% of the time.
  219. The Lord of the Nazgul from Markham, Canada writes: This is excellent news! Fire up those DL-DVD/BD burners! Lets get those Torrent sites jammed with traffic! Patronize your local Chinese malls with their 'DVD' stores! Mod your gaming systems! Put up more 'grey market' dishes!

    Remember to run PG2 and seed seed seed!!!

    Did I miss anything? Welcome to the Wild Wild North...
  220. Bell Boy from Kingston, Canada writes: McCoy...stop your whining about Canada. Your greed-ridden megalomaniacs in the US are the cause of this economic crisis. Fix your own problems buddy and take the log out of your own eye so you can see clearly to tell me to take the speck out of mine. Smarten up!
  221. Timber 'n from Ugh, Canada writes: They are right. Canada doesn't need to adopt US policies like the oppressive DMCA, but it does need rule of law. The current lack of common sense regulation is foolish and hurtful to Canadian Intellectual property owners as well. The government needs to step up and do the right thing before we are forced to overreact later in a knee jerk response to sanctions. There is fair use and there is piracy, we need laws that help clearly define this in a common sense way people can live with and penalties for abusers that are fair, just and appropriate (unlike the DMCA).
  222. M D from GTA, Canada writes: What this article failed to point out was that this list was essentially drawn up by American movie studios, record labels etc, rather than elected officials of the country.

    Good point.

    Who cares about this Blacklist. We're not pleasing large corporations who try to run the White House. Big deal. They can eat it.
  223. Peter Redecopp from Calgary, Canada writes: As an artist I am torn on copyright law; On the one hand p2p and internet trading opens up opportunities for recognition that independent artists could never have dreamed to achieve previously. On the other hand it means you don't get paid. :(

    Ultimately though, this is not about the small independents (though the lobby likes to make us think they are sticking up for the little guy), this is about massive multi-national corporations preserving billions of dollars in revenue.

    And Canada, at least as far as bootlegged DVDs are concerned, is ridiculously lax. A friend of mine worked for DHL and he said a box ripped open once that was filled with hundreds of bootlegged DVDs and that it was known by employees that these shipments were regular (heading to Chinatown coincidentally...), another friend of mine bought over a hundred movies for less than a dollar a piece in Asia and brought them right through customs. Not a peep. I'm not saying we should be doing random house searches but Canada could do more to at least slow the flow of these goods down.
  224. John Santos from Canada writes: Another sad example of how Canada is viewed by the US as being a country that wants to subvert the American way of life. Earlier this week it was former presidential candidate McCain suggesting the 911 terrorists entered through Canada. Now our borders are so unsecured that the American movie industry is being compromised.

    What is next, renegade Canadian beavers damming up the Great Lakes preventing the US industrial heartland from using water?
  225. Smoking Man from Canada writes: Problem is Canadians are the most online addicts and internet savvy people on the face of the earth, we are smart and connected via the net, it is just to easy to find sources for that stuff. It’s usually kids that are into this, you know, like say a 21 year old who needs to work a whole hour to pay for a big Mac, and ½ his disposable income goes toward auto insurance.

    Unless the above changes, piracy will be alive and well in Canada.
  226. Garry Sugden from Richmond Hill, Canada writes: Right! Fight!

    Stand fast Gregarian!
  227. B C from Canada writes: Yay. No really, yay. The last thing we want is the legislation the U.S. is trying to force down our throats.

    America wants to criminalize sharing, and my mom taught me that sharing is a good thing.
  228. Barkley Pollock from Ottawa, Canada writes: This is just another way they try and control the whole internet. Let me put it simply: without file-sharing where would you find books on mind control? They certainly wouldn't be at our more than self censoring bookstores. Thinking you can actually buy all information is a giant lie!
  229. G P from Canada writes: This discussion has been going on for a while. Check out some sites for more info on the negative ramifications if Canada allows the US to bully us into their copyright laws:

    http://www.copyrightvoices.ca

    http://www.faircopyrightforcanada.ca/

    OR on Facebook: www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=6315846683
  230. D K from Calgary, Canada writes: Our 'porous borders'? Was the G&M copying and pasting talking points and passing it off as copy?
  231. L M from Canada writes: I'm more concerned about their guns. Of course the Americans are more worried about further protecting businesses with failing business plans. I'm happy to be on that list. It shows that we're doing something right.
  232. G M from Ottawa, Canada writes: Isn't that ironic, the U.S. blacklisted China but that never stopped them from doing big business with China. And now that they failed to export democracy to Asia they are trying to export copyright laws to Canada. Perhaps it's time Canada extended its economic ties with the European Union and Japan.
  233. Volatility Stalker from Canada writes: Canada cannot remain a country of intellectual property pirates.

    The folks who produce music and entertainment expect to be paid - that's why they do that work.

    If you don't pay - you don't have to listen to their music.
  234. Heather Reynolds from Kitchener, Canada writes: On Letterman the other night, he referred to Obama as 'Leader of the Free World'. Does anyone know where that comes from (post WWll?). Of course, we've all heard it before but what does it mean??? As nice as the man is, he's not my 'leader' and last time i checked we are a 'free country', yes? (free, meaning democratic)
  235. Brian Bishop from Brantford, Canada writes: Steve Church from Canada writes: Brain Bishop, trying to turn mass illegal behavior into a Cretien glory-hunt is so lame it'll qualify for vaccine research.
    -----------------------

    Do you understand copyright, what it's purpose is?

    Primarily it was created to give copyright owners the right to profit from what they created. An empowerment one might call it, the rights owner controlled who could sell, use or distribute their works for profit.

    Those three words, sell, use, distribute are the basic premise of copyright protection & profit is the adjective!

    Current Canadian copyright law protects all three premises of copyright very well.

    I like your phrase 'mass illegal behavior'!

    If memory serves me the same arguement was used back in 1998 when the industry groups lobbied for & got private copying included in our copyright law.

    Sort of backfired on them big time didn't it!
    -
  236. Larry Hill from Canada writes: How about we don't charge the Americans for using the term Canadian bacon and Canada goose and call it even???
  237. dennis cape from United States writes:
    Evil Americans are trying to protect copyrights?

    Serves them right, they got what the deserved on 9/11 and now we Canadians will give Americans more of what they deserve regarding intellectual property rights...ha-ha what an oxymoron, using intellectual and American in the the same sensitive.

    Bunch of hosers, eh?
  238. ss dd from Vancouver, Canada writes:
    Who cares ?

    Eventually, the Americans will place every country on their famous black list, and the rest of the world won't care a bit.
    What are they gonna do ? Send in the Marines and the carriers to 'collect' ?

    Nobody forced the Americans to replaced an economy based on hard assets and manufacturing of physical things, with an IP based one. You can NEVER protect IP, because you cannot defend monopolistically hold information. History is choked full of such failed attempts.

    If your entire economy is IP based then you're royally screw. It will be very easy for anybody to destroy you IP based economy without firing a shot...
  239. dennis cape from United States writes:
    G M from Ottawa, Canada writes: Perhaps it's time Canada extended its economic ties with the European Union and Japan.
    =====================================

    Surrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrre.

    Empty promise?
  240. Stan Dupp from Uzbekistan writes:
    dennis cape from United States writes:
    G M from Ottawa, Canada writes: Perhaps it's time Canada extended its economic ties with the European Union and Japan.
    =====================================

    Surrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrre.

    Empty promise?

    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    Well, given that Canada and the EU are discussing a Free Trade Agreement as we write would tend to put paid to your comment.

    .
  241. Night On Earth from Canada writes: Take your blacklists and shove them where sun don't shine. We're a nation in which the democratic process will not be subverted by corporatist pressure to 'push through' unpopular legislation just because 'everyone else is doing it'.

    Well, at least I hope so.
  242. Serenity Now from Canada writes: Bwahahhahaha.

    What a laugh. These guys have screwed us on softwood lumber, and now want us to change again. They don't want drugs crossing the boarder, but do nothing to stop their guns from coming in.

    Basically bad to get stoned, okay to get shot to death however!

    Ya see, there is no purpose for high speed internet....unless you are downloading a tv show or movie once in a while. I agree the big downloaders go too far, but frankly..the need for high speed internet is about..ZERO...if you were to do away with these things.

    I have no need for uber speed to surf this website or send an email. You can do that for 20 bucks a month instead of 60.

    Ya see, if they could stop all illegal downloads, they would in affect...destroy the public need for high speed. There simply is rarely a need for it.

    I mean honestly, you're telling me your paying 60 bucks a month to watch youtube? Burning your money may be a better option.
  243. Serenity Now from Canada writes: I still don't know why we do this posting.....i mean it's about as useful as standing on s soap box talking about 'jebus' in a downtown city.
  244. dennis cape from United States writes: dennis cape from United States writes:
    G M from Ottawa, Canada writes: Perhaps it's time Canada extended its economic ties with the European Union and Japan.
    =====================================

    Surrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrre.

    Empty promise?

    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    Well, given that Canada and the EU are discussing a Free Trade Agreement as we write would tend to put paid to your comment.
    ======================================

    Like North Korea, Canada just wants America to pay attention to it.

    Poking sticks in our eyes, calling us names, usually gets you some attention.

    Keep talking, I hope you get what you want and the EU gets what it wants.

    Be careful what you wish for Canuck.
  245. dennis cape from United States writes:
    Serenity Now from Canada writes: dennis cape

    well canada has never been a big power, but sadly I think you guys have blown your ahem load in a short 200 years...your becoming like the u.k did. I don't say that with enjoyment, it's not great for us either.
    =================================

    The UK? Really? THat's the result of your best analysis - that the USA is like the imperialist GB and subjugates entire nations and steals their wealth?

    Well, that analysis is false on its surface.

    And beneath the surface it's false too. GB is small, economically and population-wise. Not at all like the USA. But if I had my way, we'd pull all our military back to the USA and let the EU take care of peace and prosperity in Europe, the asians deal with Asia and the Africans deal with Africa.

    It's a thankless job where you're damned if you do, damned if you don't.

    The new boy to suck up to is China! If anyone wants to enjoy the next century or two...or three!
  246. Glynn W from Canada writes: Canucks are the pirates of 'Pirate Bay!' ... And that's how we like it...we don't fake them, we just take them!
  247. dennis cape from United States writes:
    Serenity Now from Canada writes: The new boy to suck up to is China! If anyone wants to enjoy the next century or two...or three!
    ====================================

    Corrupt, greedy, totalitarian dictatorship with horribly polluted air, water, groundwater, and soil - which is only getting worse every year.

    Shoddy goods built with cheap labor maintained by currency manipulation.

    Nationalistic citizens that don't know their own shameful past of killing tens of millions of their own citizens and so are ripe to repeat their crimes. You're not free to ask questions about this past or you'll disappear.

    They won't be leading me anywhere. Speak for yourself if you plan to suck up to them.
  248. ty Canada from Canada writes: Lets see the US sign a Arctic Treaty first .
  249. Bob M from Canada writes: The US patent system is broke. The copyright politics in the US promotes clear abuses by corporations. We are helping them as a good neighbour by not going along with their mistakes, just as we did by not supporting them in Vietnam and Iraq. They should be looking up to us, not defending the undefendable. Washington!
  250. Ziad Fazel from Calgary, Canada writes: Laughing Loudly from Canada writes:

    Or did you just have a mood to dump on America generally?

    If so, why?

    Insecurity?


    ---------

    I was in a bad mood at American politicians pointing fingers at Canada. For example, just last week BOTH Homeland Security Director Janet Napolitano, and Senator John McCain, repeated the lie that the 9/11 terrorists came through Canada. Despite the investigations, and the 9/11 Commission!

    You brought up the Walkerton tragedy. That was handled with criminal charges for those that falsified records, an open inquiry that exonerated those that had done the right thing, and recommendations that have been implemented by utilities and governments nation-wide.

    I could have been more specific, but the problem is widespread. American politicians need to do a better job at understanding the root causes, and work on implementing lasting fixes, instead of blaming Canada.

    For specifics on copyright, please feel free to read many of the valid comments specific to that. I saw none in your posts.
  251. Glynn W from Canada writes: The USA is fast becoming the next basket-case with all of their lists and levels...paranoai? Next Obama will be dancing like Zuma and singing 'bring me my machine gun!'
  252. B L from from LooLoo land, Canada writes: A. Nonymous from Job Ville, United States writes: This comment is my intellectual property, (c) A.Nonymous 2009. Please remit compensation for reading. I expect $0.25 per read per poster. All rights reserved, permission is NOT granted to copy, extract, quote any or all part of this comment.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    I'm a Canadian pirate! Arrrrgh!!
  253. John H from Canada writes: Jim Howard:

    Seriously... You do realize we have better copyright then the states. The fact we don't bend over and take orders from the states or the RIAA/MPAA is just cause to celebrate our Sovereignty. If you like the states version of copyright laws why don't you move there.

    Last time I checked the States have more copyright violations then Canada. So I think they should put them self's on their own black list. We should not care what the states thinks. If they want trade sanctions they will lose a huge oil patch they suck from. They thought they had an energy crises now, I say bring on trade sanctions. We will also stop 40% of the power Ontario generates from crossing the border. The States have nothing to stand on with this black list.

    Oh about Obama I used to like him, but the fact he is highering every lawyer/RIAA/MPAA ex-member out there to fill his cabinet is just a complete joke. Ask people from the States about it, they are angry with the choices he is making regarding that.

    The whole blacklist is a bluff, lets call them out on it. Lets impose trade sanctions first until we get removed from it.
  254. dennis cape from United States writes:
    Ziad Fazel from Calgary, Canada writes:
    was in a bad mood at American politicians pointing fingers at Canada. For example, just last week BOTH Homeland Security Director Janet Napolitano, and Senator John McCain, repeated the lie that the 9/11 terrorists came through Canada. Despite the investigations, and the 9/11 Commission!
    ======================================

    Whoops! Ha-ha.
  255. J P from Canada writes: It's interesting to me that whenever things are entering the US from Canada, there is mention of 'Canada's weak border.' If things are going from Canada to US they are passing through US Customs and border guards, not Canadian customs.
    I'd really like to see that question put to an US official who has just cited weak Canadian border policies as a reason for whatever.

    It seems to me that every time I cross the border the US border guards are cheerful, friendly and generally unintimidating. Coming back across, however, their Canadian counterparts are curt, somewhat menacing, don't put up with any nonsense including a friendly smile types.

    That's just been my experience. I don't illegally download, but I know many people who do. However, I don't like the idea of laws, not just Canadian ones, being influenced by corporations, regardless of the country of origin of those corporations. That puts world influencing power into the hands of CEOs and their boards of directors, and we can see how well that has worked with the many financial sector examples currently.
  256. r bruce wareing from Colombia writes: Obama should be more concerned about all the crack,coke etc crossing his southern border than copied dvd s..t comming in to Canada.Price the dvd,low use the Walmart Principle.But you get what you vote for lots of promises but end up getting what comes out of the rear end of horses.
  257. snow crash from Canada writes: For a beginner's guide on how to download torrents, go to:

    http://www.wikihow.com/Download-Torrents

    Go to the following link for the top 10 bittorrent sites.

    http://netforbeginners.about.com/od/peersharing/f/torrentsearch.htm
  258. Jason Gradwell from Canada writes: Hey, here's a novel idea....Stop buying American.... or anything that has a basis of being American.... And if they want to get into a trade war with us, then we just pull the plug on:
    Oil, Grain, Water, Steel, Coal, Uranium, Gasoline and just about anything else we sell to them for 20% of the actual cost!
  259. Digital Taco from Canada writes: Nothing will ever get done in this country if all we ever do in response to annoying-but-true criticism is to criticize back.

    Correct the problem, move on to the next task. Dragging your heels, giving reciprocal criticism is extremely counterproductive.
  260. Vincent Clement from Windsor, Ontario, Canada writes: Hmmm, Canada has weaker fair use provisions. Canada has a blank CD levy. Canada has a camcording law. On and on the list goes. The thing we don't have is a DMCA-style law - and that is a good thing.

    Just remember that the CRIA is not the Canadian recording industry. It is the American recording industry in Canada.
  261. Duane Freemantle from writes: Every nation has a right to decide what laws it has and how to implement those laws. It is Canada's view on copy right the real reason Canada is on this list. American lobby groups in have a huge influence over public policy, this is how the American political system works. First, softwood, now copyright. I think the Obama administration should take a look into lapses in America's obligation in international law, and stop attempting to influencing other countries policies.
  262. capt. peachfuzz from Canada writes: bob gervitz from United States: more dumb comments from the United States of Hypocrisy,where the almighty dollar rules.I could say more but i don't like to sink to that level.
  263. Megan S from Canada writes: Plagiarism is the true enemy of 'intellectual property', not bootlegging or downloading. I'm proud that Canada is on this list.
  264. Brian Pelican from United States writes: capt. peachfuzz from Canada writes: bob gervitz from United States: more dumb comments from the United States of Hypocrisy,where the almighty dollar rules.I could say more but i don't like to sink to that level.
    \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\A Are you kidding, you already have, and I would suspect, in your daily life.
  265. Brian Pelican from United States writes: Jason Gradwell from Canada writes: Hey, here's a novel idea....Stop buying American.... or anything that has a basis of being American.... And if they want to get into a trade war with us, then we just pull the plug on: Oil, Grain, Water, Steel, Coal, Uranium, Gasoline and just about anything else we sell to them for 20% of the actual cost! \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ If canadians stopped buying American, they would sink to the level of a Portugal, where they would be if they didn't live next door to the greatest inventors of all time - don't forget you are using an US invented PC and a US invented internet. And I could go on if I spoke of your hospitals, airports, entertanment etc. Canadains love to dream about themselves being a hell of a lot more important than they are.
  266. Canada First from Canada writes: Go to any ethnic mall and you will see pirated DVDs being openly sold in many stores, the US is right, we are a third world country when it comes to intellectual property rights. To those who say you buy pirated materials because they are too expensive, or not good enough to pay full price, you are no better than the people who steal this material. If you don't want to pay for something don't buy stolen goods, save your money you bunch of lowlifes.
  267. One Ton from T'ranna, Canada writes: I just visited the website of the Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law - Michael Geist (as many above suggested). He is a central figure in this issue, and the facts he presents on his website are incredibly startling. This article falls very short of the mark when it comes to contextualizing the issue. Here are a few nuggets from within his site.

    - Canada's copyright laws are actually, in many cases, more restrictive than those in the US.

    - Canada has complied with every demand made of her, and has had less consultation and more drastic changes to our copyright law in the last 20 years than most countries.

    - The other countries on the watch-list (in most cases) commit 200% or more infractions than Canada does.

    - An enormous number of corporate entities in the USA are against such a move, because it will limit their ability to innovate, and will also complicate dealings with Canadian corporations. Obama's not listening to them - he's listening to Hollywood.

    Canadians deserve to know just how offensive this pressure from south of the border is to our sovereignty, and how un-just and un-democratic it would be to rush headlong into accepting their charges. Why is it we are so quick to assume we are all so wrong, so bad, and so criminal when the USA says it's so, and our own government and laws say we are doing everything we are supposed to.

    Or maybe we could adopt Sweden's new law, and monitor every email and phone call in the country, so our government can pass information to US corporations. From the tone of this article, some might believe that's actually warranted.
  268. maybe later from Calgary, Canada writes: My sister downloads quite a bit but she sends cash money directly to the artists. Imagine if we all did that with the music we 'pirated?' Take that record company big wig! No one could stop that revolution. That's what they are afraid will happen...no more middle men. Obama is now accepting resumes for the copyright police force. Record exec experience required.
  269. Trillian Rand from Canada writes: The real issue is not Canada's laws, but whether we should give in to demands by foreign governments to amend our laws to protect their business interests. Let's be honest here, the US government does not want us to change our laws to better protect Canadians. It is operating as a lobbyist for American business.

    One wonders what the US reaction would be if our government started listing countries that had different laws from ours. For instance, would the US immediately implement a national medical care plan or a national pension plan if we put them on a list?

    If American business feels it is suffering a disadvantage from our laws, it certainly has a right to complain or offer suggestions for change. It can even suggest the US government get involved. It is another thing entirely for any federal government to launch an advertising campaign against another federal government that suggests low morals or other insidious behaviour, as the current administration is doing.

    American companies can, if they believe they are being treated unfairly, stop dealing with those countries they feel have inadequate legislation.
  270. Brian Pelican from United States writes: Trillian says 'American companies can, if they believe they are being treated unfairly, stop dealing with those countries they feel have inadequate legislation.'
    \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\
    And if that we the case Canada would lose 75% of its exports and become a Portugal
  271. Norm Jom from Petawawa, Canada writes: Canada First from Canada writes: Go to any ethnic mall and you will see pirated DVDs being openly sold in many stores, the US is right, we are a third world country when it comes to intellectual property rights.

    ----------------------------------

    What you don't seem to understand is that under Canadian copyright law what you are describing is already illegal and they do prosecute when it's reported. The same thing goes on in any American city BTW.
  272. Old blue from Canada writes: Mikey Gault from The Moral Highground, Canada writes: If Obama is okay with this move, then Canada should immediately take all corrective action to make Obama happy. Obama is our de facto leader. He is so awesome. When will Canada find its own Obama? We need Prime Minister Obama. Obama!

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    There is only one Obamamessiah and the blessed one has told his disciples that Canadians are stealing his intellectual property and that NAFTA should be dismantled because 'the free ride for Canada is over'.
    The blessed one wishes to be judged by his good intentions rather than any tangible results. The great Obama and his media captains attempt to fabricate a moral equivalence with nations such as Iran, North Korea, Sudan, Cuba, Syria and Somalia amongst others by appeasing Communist dictators.
    Using the media he dumbs down and pacifies the masses by increasing the taxes on those that 'have more money than they need'.

    We do need a Canadian Obama who will forcefully inject even more Socialist ideology into our public school curricula. Thought control can be used for good .
  273. Norm Jom from Petawawa, Canada writes: Where are people getting this idea that Canada is a hotbed of crime and somehow it doesn't happen in the USA? Despite US copyright laws there's at least as much if not more violations happening down there. Certainly in shear numbers there's more.
  274. Trillian Rand from Canada writes: Brian Pelican from United States writes: 'And if that we the case Canada would lose 75% of its exports and become a Portugal.'

    Are you suggesting Canada (and perhaps all countries the US trades with) should redraft their laws to align exactly with American laws just to please the entertainment industry or any other group that feels it should receive preferential treatment?
  275. Karen in Canada from Belleville, Canada writes: Perhaps we should blacklist the Americans for violations of the Geneva Convention? I'd rather be a pirate than a torturer any day.
  276. Uri Heuer from Canada writes: this illustrates the power of the Canadian marketplace.
    BUY CANADIAN!
  277. Simon Simon from Canada writes: I'm OK with having my nation on this list. The US's demand that publicly paid customs officers be police, judge, and jury is a non-starter: they have proven over and over that they're not capable of responsibly using the powers they already have under Canada's obscenity laws, as even the Supreme Court has observed. Giving customs additional powers to enforce matters that belong in civil rather than criminal courts is unreasonable.

    In any case, copyright is a voting issue: people who do not pay much attention to politics can be motivated to vote in response to unwelcome, heavy-handed government action in this area.
  278. ab cd from United States writes: Just what I needed. Another reason to hate Canada.
  279. H Akston from Canada writes: Nuh-Nuh... Notorious! Notorious!

    Yeah.
  280. Norm Jom from Petawawa, Canada writes: ab cd from United States writes: Just what I needed. Another reason to hate Canada.

    ---------------------------

    This says a lot about your character and your relevance.
  281. andrew lawton from Canada writes: Brian pelican ... man, you really are a whack job. Utterly deluded into delusionary visions of American gandeur. Did you cry when George Bush became president?

    Notwithstanding that the majority of your scientists and engineers are foreign born, that the US economy is 74% based on consumer spending not innovation and manufacturing and your school system is one of the worst in the western world, you puzzle us all by your obsession with the frozen wasteland to north.

    The USA is great and mighty, because it has borrowed trillions to be so. No other nation has that latitude, and she will remain that way as long as the rest of the world allows her dollar to be the reserve currency. Personally, i think we're all better off with the status quo, let America stay on top of the pile, so to speak. The alternative is a lot worse.

    That said, the USA is living on borrowed time and borrowed money. At one time she was a great, righteous land of innovation, industry and decency. Now, however, she is a bloated has-been, rife with indolence and prurient self-interest. I wish it were not so, but your infantile wishful thinking will not change that fact.
  282. Roman Spears from Canada writes:

    I believe in protecting intellectual property. Having said that I smell a big fat RIAA rat in this decision. Lawyers, can't live with them and its illegal in some provinces and states to shoot them.
  283. Sgt. Slaughter from United States writes: Let's see. Rip us off and then squeal when you're caught. The Chinese and the Russians just pay up when we nail them. Canadians would run a stop sign and give you the finger when you blow your horn at them.
  284. Norm Jom from Petawawa, Canada writes: Sgt. Slaughter from United States writes: Let's see. Rip us off and then squeal when you're caught. The Chinese and the Russians just pay up when we nail them. Canadians would run a stop sign and give you the finger when you blow your horn at them.

    --------------

    No one is ripping you off, Canada has strict copyright laws. We don't make it a criminal issue like in the USA though, it's a civil issue here and enforced by the copy holders.

    If you want to talk about rip offs though, look to the USA copy protection. The USA does not recognise foreign copyright, only its own. A Canadian copyright or patent is not recognised by the USA at all, you have to apply for a separate patent, often what happens is someone in the USA will copy protect foreign work and force you to fight for your rights which is weighed against foreigners. It's always been this way and its getting worse.

    It's unfortunate that you don't seem to know much about this subject. Other than placing Canada on a list, there isn't much else they can do, I don't think anyone here is shaking in their boots. Clean up your act at home and maybe you'll get more cooperation abroad.

    BTW, there's no shortage of copyright pirates in the good ol USA, don't pretend that you are a nation of innocents or something.
  285. andrew lawton from Canada writes: Sgt, Slaughter said 'Canadians are easily the worst people I have ever met.'

    yeah ... I'm sure the thousands of Americans, stranded on 9/11 in their grounded airplanes felt the same way, as Canadian families took them in and sheltered them through America's darkest days. We still get thankful birthday and Christmas cards from an Illinois family. Wonderful people.

    As for, IP, canada creates it aplenty while sure enough American money commercializes it. It's always been that way, and probably will be considering the disparity in size between the two nations. The electric light bulb, the cruise missile guidance system , pluri-potent adult stem cells, the java computing language, radiation therapy for cancer all are covered with maple syrup but we're glad to sell them to you.
  286. Fake Name from Canada writes: By all means, nail the ones who are engaged in real piracy.

    But if the Harper government still hasn't managed to learn to write legislation that deals with piracy without making it a $20,000 offense to copy a CD you legally purchased onto your iPod, and empowers music studios to infect consumer computers with spyware to police their new lawsuit rights, that's just not worth it.

    If you give the Hollywood litigation industry such a lucrative loophole, you can't expect them to keep up their promise not to abuse it for long.
  287. Fake Name from Canada writes: ' Sgt. Slaughter from United States writes: Canadians are easily the worst people I have ever met. '

    If that's the kind of generalization you go around spouting, I'm not surprised you're treated with hostility.

    In any case, can anyone provide a rational reason why patented inventions and medicines are only protected for 25-30 years, but a song or a cartoon character is protected in perpetuity? It seems to me like the former category require more technical skill to create, so why do the latter deserve massively more restrictive protection? Just another symptom of how western culture spits on science and engineering, while deifying the likes of Britney Spears.

    IP holdings companies that trade in the right to sue school bands for photocopying the sheet music of a composer who has been dead for two hundred years don't really strike me as protecting anyone's creativity.
  288. Commander Groovechild from Canada writes: I'm not all that concerned about pirated DVDs. I think it is a waste of time messing around with this sort of stuff - except maybe for wholesale distributors of pirated materials. The thing is, legal DVDs are quite cheap these days. To a great extent, those that burn illegally just can't afford to buy the legal stuff. There are also DVDs that are just plain terrible - like Vantage Point - the most terrible movie ever created. People can't just buy something from the trailer. I own hundreds of legal DVDs. There are legal DVDs that I bought that were defective. The studios never sent me replacements. I feel really sorry for a kid who buys a DVD for $25 only to find that it doesn't work and that the store won't take it back if the package is opened. I am much more concerned about companies that scam patented products or just plain take ideas from people and other companies. Because research and development grinds to a halt when we don't protect innovators. I love artists who are letting people pay what they can for music. Because they are in it for the music and for what it can do to benefit or change the world. So it's the same idea. People will pay if they can afford it. I'm sure most adults with steady jobs don't watch pirated DVDs.
  289. AU GT from Long Beach, United States writes: Don't do a thing, Canada, you are doing just fine. I tell my clients 'copyright sucks' and it does. It is hard wired in the US to be a non-asset (except music), it has a loser pays system which favors Hollywood. Copyright is generally useless. Trademark and Patent are a completely different matter......
  290. Brian Pelican from United States writes: Canadians steal US intellectual property because they can't come up with it themselves and don't want to pay for it it. End of story for a sorry nation. And the worst part is they don't seem to realize it is wrong.
  291. Greg Ohio from Cleveland, United States writes: Canada's on a piracy blacklist? I'd view it as a consumer protection whitelist. A badge of honor. Good for Canada.
  292. ty Canada from Canada writes: Home of the Brave Land of the Free .
  293. dennis cape from United States writes:

    wadda u xpect? its canaduh.
  294. Norm Jom from Petawawa, Canada writes: Ah the pelican troll has found another thread to complain about Canadians. Assuming he actually lives in the US, you would think he might look around and realise that intelectual property rights violations are as commonplace there as they are here.

    As for the Canada not being able to come up with anything themselves, well pure trolling. What else is new from this large mouthed fish breathed bird.
  295. Norm Jom from Petawawa, Canada writes: Sgt. Slaughter from United States writes:
    You're meth labs and heavy pot smoking is rotting your brains.

    ------------------------

    As we all know, no one in the USA makes meth or smokes pot, and heck none of them would ever download music without paying.
  296. andrew lawton from Canada writes: Sgt. Slaughter ... have a read of this, from the CIA world Fact book

    'United States: world's largest consumer of cocaine (shipped from Colombia through Mexico and the Caribbean), Colombian heroin, and Mexican heroin and marijuana; major consumer of ecstasy and Mexican methamphetamine; minor consumer of high-quality Southeast Asian heroin; illicit producer of cannabis, marijuana, depressants, stimulants, hallucinogens, and methamphetamine; money-laundering center'

    God help us all when the Yanks take the moral high ground
  297. andrew lawton from Canada writes: And have a look at what the same CIA world fact book says about Canada:

    'Canada: llicit producer of cannabis for the domestic drug market and export to US; use of hydroponics technology permits growers to plant large quantities of high-quality marijuana indoors; increasing ecstasy production, some of which is destined for the US; vulnerable to narcotics money laundering because of its mature financial services sector'

    By comparison to the USA, Canada is nearly angelic ... better not rush out and get me some of that good ol' American morality.

    Blind as bats, you are. No wonder your country is in the bloody sewer.
  298. J S from Canada writes: Canadians exchanging culture FREELY! My goodness, our corporate overlords will be displeased. We should be made to pay for our culture.
  299. Christine M from Canada writes: It's funny, but I don't remember Obama stressing his commitment to RIAA and MPAA positions in his election campaign. Nor even in the hotly contested primary. This must be one of these trojan horse situations -- you bring what looks like a gift in, and it turns out to be a nightmare.
  300. Fake Name from Canada writes: 'Christine M from Canada writes: This must be one of these trojan horse situations -- you bring what looks like a gift in, and it turns out to be a nightmare. '

    Well, at least wait and see what the new legislation looks like. Maybe the third time will be the charm, and they will have finally figured out how to crack down on piracy without criminalizing fair use of legally purchased material.

    I'm not optimistic, we'll have to see what they try to pass.

    Of course, the RIAA probably won't be satisfied until they CAN sue people for fair use, but that's another issue.
  301. John Hancock from Toronto, Canada writes: It doesn't really matter if we're blacklisted. I for one hope that piracy completely obliterates the American film industry and cripples global Hollywood forever. Then maybe we can get people to line up for Canadian films and other regional cinemas instead of hoping against hope that their next export wont be as lackluster and low-com-denom. as everything they put out.

    STOP PAYING TO SEE HOLLYWOOD FILMS.
  302. Timothy Nessus from Somewhere, Canada writes: Developing news!!!

    Canadian people put US in the 'FINGER' list.

    Big F*CK YOU!
  303. andrew lawton from Canada writes: The finger is nice idea. Maybe it's time to put the USA on a nuclear blacklist, since more than 1/2 of all the processed and re-processed nuclear materials they use, in bombs, reactors and hospitals comes from Canadian processing plants.

    ... just imagine bankrupting themselves by borrowing trillions to build up that big old war machine, only to find they got no fuel to run the monster. Yup, thank God for foreign scientists, engineers, money and resources .... without those elements the USA would look like the dumbest dicks on the planet.

    Copyright is the least of their worries. Stupidity is the greatest of their concerns.
  304. maybe later from Calgary, Canada writes: Canadian inventions:
    Anti-gravity suit, basketball, 5-pin bowling, chocolate bar, cystic fibrosis gene, electric range, electric wheel chair, electron microscope,cobalt bomb, green ink, green garbage bag, football goalpost w/single base, Imax film format, instant food, insulin, Java, Jolly Jumper, kayak, kerosene, newsprint, mobile blood transfusion,light bulb, laser sailboat, pablum, pacemaker, paint roller, panoramic camera, Robertson screwdriver, snowblower, snow mobile, speed of sound, standard time, Stol aircraft, synchonized swimming, steam foghorn, velcro walkie-talkie, telegraph, variable pitch propeller, 911 CPR dummy, zipper...and Canadians came up with SUPERMAN! This isn't even the half of it!
  305. Sgt. Slaughter from United States writes: 'Timothy Nessus from Somewhere, Canada writes: Developing news!!!

    Canadian people put US in the 'FINGER' list.

    Big F*CK YOU!
    Posted 04/05/09 at 11:59 AM EDT'

    What a Canadian says when caught stealing American software.
  306. Fake Name from Canada writes: John Hancock - be generous, maybe 1% of hollywood movies don't suck. Having the entire industry fail would mean losing that 1%, which is still a lot better than the 0.01% of canadian movies that don't suck.
  307. Fake Name from Canada writes: Slaughter - do you work for microsoft or something? You seem to care unnaturally much about putting down canada - it's not like the US teenagers aren't world-leaders in BitTorrent use either.
  308. andrew lawton from Canada writes: Fake Name - for sure ... USA is tops by far in BitTorrent download, cocaine consumption, federal debt and ... I mean, for God's sake 35 chicago public school students have been murdered so far this year ... another proud statistic of an upstanding American homeland.

    What a sad sack country, if they had any integrity they'd remove 'In God We Trust' from any national element. The least they could do is to not drag God's name into their moral cesspool.

    copyright blacklist, yeah, you go get 'em Uncle Sam!!
  309. Angry West Coast Canuck from Canada writes: Copyright was invented in 1710 to encourage CREATORS to create more. They got to profit from their creations for a limited time, in exchange for society

    The way the USA has pushed the idea is that the creators get dick all, whereas the corporations that they work for get all the benefits. In fact, it's the people who AREN'T creating anything that are profiting the most - they are currently called 'patent trolls'. The USA has made a farce of what they love to call 'intellectual property' by marginalizing the people who actually CREATE, in favour of the people who wouldn't recognize an original idea if it bit them in the balls.

    Those people who claim that anyone against copyright is (insert insult here), I'll just say that they are the ones who don't understand what copyright was intended for. They are the ones who would continue to allow a few large corporations to profit while the creators mostly die poor - with just enough exceptions to make it look like the system is working as it should.

    Copyright WAS a great idea. What the USA has done to it makes it a farce. An insult. Makes it something that needs to be torn down and rebuilt so that the creators again are encouraged to innovate rather than punished for doing so.
  310. B Lam from Canada writes: George Smiley from Canada writes: Why don't we wait for the big players like China to comply, then we will follow suit?

    ___________________________________

    What, Canada to follow a third world country?
  311. Sgt. Slaughter from United States writes: 'Angry West Coast Canuck from Canada writes: Copyright was invented in 1710 to encourage CREATORS to create more. They got to profit from their creations for a limited time, in exchange for society

    The way the USA has pushed the idea is that the creators get dick all, whereas the corporations that they work for get all the benefits. In fact, it's the people who AREN'T creating anything that are profiting the most - they are currently called 'patent trolls'. The USA has made a farce of what they love to call 'intellectual property' by marginalizing the people who actually CREATE, in favour of the people who wouldn't recognize an original idea if it bit them in the balls.

    Those people who claim that anyone against copyright is (insert insult here), I'll just say that they are the ones who don't understand what copyright was intended for. They are the ones who would continue to allow a few large corporations to profit while the creators mostly die poor - with just enough exceptions to make it look like the system is working as it should.

    Copyright WAS a great idea. What the USA has done to it makes it a farce. An insult. Makes it something that needs to be torn down and rebuilt so that the creators again are encouraged to innovate rather than punished for doing so.
    Posted 04/05/09 at 4:02 PM EDT | Alert an Editor | Link to Comment '

    wouldn't it be easier to just pay for the stuff rather than steal it?
  312. J S from Canada writes: 'Angry West Coast Canuck from Canada writes: Copyright was invented in 1710 to encourage CREATORS to create more. They got to profit from their creations for a limited time, in exchange for society'

    The idea behind copyright law when it was created was to allow the free exchange of culture - something our forefathers thought was more important than profits - while allowing the creator of the property to be compensated for the work for a limited time before it became public. I believe original copyright laws protected property for up to 10 years and then the property became public domain so people could freely exchange it since it makes up a part of the overall culture. Currently copyright law covers property for the life of the artist plus 70 years and has been bastardized over the years to protect the company that markets and sells the property, not the artist. In today's world profit is more important than culture and community.
  313. A Canadian Girl from Canada writes: To those who said that Hollywood/too music industry lacks creativity, etc.....you guys have influenced me to create this video:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C9kWfV5QihQ

  314. Fake Name from Canada writes: 'B Lam from Canada writes: What, Canada to follow a third world country?'

    Er ... news flash: China is not 'third world', and probably hasn't been for the last decade. Within the next five years they'll eclipse America as the world's dominant economy.

    And they're going to remember which arrogant WASP countries slighted them on their way up.
  315. Serenity Now from Canada writes: Here's a suggestion...

    Piss

    off

    usa

    we are not your b u t t boy
  316. Serenity Now from Canada writes: The reason people download online, is well they don't have the money. I actually buy most of my music on itunes now, but I still download when I can't find it on itunes.

    Yeah, I'm going to search 30 some odd servcies for a rare track I need...no not going to happen.

    Besides, this is rightous revenge for ripping us off in the past. Remember how they used to put 11 tracks of GARBAGE with one good song? I hope they caught lymphoma for that dirty trick alone.

    Remember 'best hits' that weren't, and they'd re-release stuff two weeks later, with the songs you actually wanted.

    They played a shell game, and now...I rather enjoy leaving them bleeding on the side of the road.
  317. Serenity Now from Canada writes: And I will summarize....YOU CANNOT STOP DOWNLOADING. They do not have the money, the enforcement, or the time. It would swallow as much money as it claimed, and the people would simply find new technology. Here's an idea...when the U.S. stops all guns from being sent here across the boarder, has provided health care for it's people as civilized countries do....and when it stops meddling in others affairs so it's large people can keep driving SUV's...we can talk... Until then, see you next tuesday!
  318. Karen in Canada from Belleville, Canada writes: Sgt. Slaughter from United States writes: 'Canadians are easily the worst people I have ever met. '

    Speaks well of you that you can't find any enriching American material to read online and choose to haunt one of our sites doesn't it Sarge? Someone should at least give you credit for that.
  319. Sgt. Slaughter from United States writes: "Serenity Now from Canada writes: Here's a suggestion...
    Piss
    off
    usa
    we are not your b u t t boy
    Posted 05/05/09 at 8:48 AM EDT"

    If you won't shell out a buck to pay for a song I guess there's no hope of Canada ever paying it's fair share of it's military defense, is there? Who do you hate more, people who object to you stealing from them or people who won't buy your baby animals that have their brains bashed in by you? Lovely people.
  320. Serenity Now from Canada writes: Sgt. Slaughter is also dated.

    Wasn't that wrestler from 1982?

    Oh he's a blue hair.......that explains a lot....
  321. Peter The Not Quite Great from Canada writes: What, Canada won't copyright Mickey Mouse for four million years? Boo hoo.
  322. Christine M from Canada writes: Fake Name, I agree, it would be nice to see some fair* and reasonable, practical legislation. Unfortunately, the RIAA, the MPAA and a few of these other groups don't seem interested in that. Far from preventing theft, they seem to be looking for ways to mine their markets for new sources of revenue by attempting to slap charges on what we've enjoyed, not for free, but included with our original purchases all along. I also don't believe they're protecting copyrights for poor artists as much as they're trying to maintain the status quo for industries that have become technically obsolete. I, like many others, have no problem paying for what I want -- I just don't like getting ripped off. And let's face it, both the music and the movie industries have been ripping us off for years. (And the software industry is only *slightly better.)
  323. Alex Yaxmos from Canada writes: Canada has a very healthy online marketplace for copyright materials, the US needs to realize they can't just go around bullying people. We will govern our country the way we see fit. Maybe Obama should clean up his country before trying to telling us how to run ours.

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