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Torture, abuse still rife in Afghan prisons, U.S. human rights report says

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U.S. government document freely states what Canadian government censors ...Read the full article

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  1. Daniel Cunningham from Victoria, writes: Surprise surprise. Well I'm waiting for the Theo-Con apologists. Please explain why the US would release the entire report, unredacted, yet we can't get the same information here in Canada? Mmmmm?
  2. aging oldtool from Canada writes: Canada didn't report these abuses because Stephen Harper said don't do it.

    Once again we see what sneaky means. Let me qualify that; "dumb and sneaky" as our Conservative brain trust wrongly assumed the US was still being run by a pack of liars, theives and war crimes suspects.

    Why would our PM deny that rapes, torture, false imprisonment and various other sorts of nasty human rights voilations are just part of the package in Aghanistan's justice system?

    But, of even more concern, why is Canada continuing to prop up a corrupt government?

    Seems like ordinary Afghani citizens are victims whether it's a western-backed regime or the Taliban, so just why are we there?

    Bring our troops home before more of them get hooked on drugs.
  3. Chris E. from Canada writes: I am only interested in reading about what is happening in Syrian prisons, Saudi prisons, and prisons in Mugabes Africa.

    These stories about Afghan prisons are attempts to lay responsibility at the feet of the West.
  4. Gilles Hudicourt from Montreal, Canada writes: How about Iraqi prisons. We were showcased the new and improved Abu Gharib prison recently.

    However, the Iraqi shoe thrower was so badly beaten and mistreated by his Iraqi jailers, than he still has not been seen by anyone since his arrest, months ago.

    And we use Iraq and Afghanistan as examples of the positive effects of the "west" on "non-civilized " people.
  5. John Kanuck from Canada writes: Daniel Cunningham from Victoria, writes: Surprise surprise. Well I'm waiting for the Theo-Con apologists.
    ------------------------------
    I hope you plan to wait a while.

    I do not think there are very many Theo-cons here in Canada, and what few there may be, it is highly unlikely they post here.

    But don't worry, if any read your post, they will either pray for your forgiveness, or pray for your eternal damnation.
  6. Daniel Cunningham from Victoria, writes: Oh please. Have you been hanging out on this forum much? Theo-Cons = Regressive Conservative Party of Canada - and their merry band of thugs.
  7. Loki Peterson from Toronto, Canada writes: This story must be wrong. Harpo assured us that the human rights situation in Afghanistan has been cleaned up. Surely, Harpo must know that, if he is ordering Canadian troops to turn over detainees to be abused, he may be criminally liable. He certainly would not enjoy prison life. I hear that terrible things happen in prison.
  8. Catherine Medernach from Winnipeg, Canada writes: Why would the US do this? to get some of the heat off of themselves for all their 'black site' prisons in various countries. Of course, we could always hand over prisoners to the US - they have a large facility for prisoners at Bagram - I am sure that they could handle those captured by Canadians. BTW I believe it was a NATO decisions for NATO forces (which includes Canada) to hand over prisoners to Afghan authorities. If they are Afghans and are apprehended in Afghanistan then they should be turned over to Afghan authorities. Unlike the US, we do not have the personnel to establish and run a detention facility - our troops are busy working to train ANA and ANP - and mentor them. It would make sense that working with Afghan troops would mean prisoners would be turned over to Afghan authorities because they fall under Afghan law. Efforts were taken to try to ensure humane treatment and red cross access to prisoners turned over by Canadian troops.
  9. Jeff T from Canada writes: First, one can not bring prison conditions to a state that is better then what the local population is livining in here (yep, I said here). So ya, decrepit conditions will prevail for a while... Dirty, unsanitary, without power... Blah blah blah... Guess what? The average Afghan citizen is living in worse conditions, many without a roof over their demolished home. Second, change in attitudes towards the handling of people will not change over night... It took the west thousands of years to become "civilized". Beatings, torture, and all that good stuff have existed in Canadian jails up until the mid point of last century. Reality, not a friend of the naive idiot children poking their collective heads in the sand.
  10. Michael Powers from Canada writes: The conditions may be bad but it is still better than being a prisoner of the Taliban - but then no-one posting here will comment on that.
  11. Richard Roskell from Naramata, Canada writes:

    Jeff T and Michael Powers- apologists for the torture of prisoners and the rape of women and children.

    "In its annual compendium of human rights in countries round the world, the U.S. report says Afghanistan's "human rights problems included extrajudicial killings; torture; poor prison conditions; official impunity; prolonged pretrial detention; restrictions on freedom of the press; restrictions on freedom of religion; violence and societal discrimination against women; restrictions on religious conversions; abuses against minorities; sexual abuse of children; trafficking in persons; abuse of worker rights; and child labor."

    But hey! Our Afghanistan is so much better than the Taliban's. The Taliban wouldn't let little girls go to school.
  12. Peter P from good place for criminals, Canada writes: I apologize beforehand for my thoughts, but this really sounds like a good place for REAL criminals who commit serious crimes in Canada. It would be a great deterrent and we would see the crime rate go down very fast if our ARMY instead fighting lost religious fight in Afghanistan could transport criminals sentenced in Canada to the prisons in Afghanistan. That would also be a great tax-savings for each criminal here costs over $150,000 per year to live more comfortably than a single mother with kids on welfare. The people employed in the prison system would of course have to be laid off and go on welfare or join into one of many political parties.... I wonder how many people would support such action. Also, Mexico is much closer and it might have more "human" conditions without pulling your toe nails or fingernails out.
  13. Jeff T from Canada writes: Liar lil dick roskell once again twisting words, and making things up... At no time in my post did I apologize for torture... You on the other hand liar lil dick roskell constantly apologize for the terrorist apostate "taliban's" constant use of torture.
  14. Byron Christopher from Edmonton, Canada writes: It's shameful the Canadian Government wouldn't make the full report public. What doesn't it want the public to know?

    Chalk up the silence from Ottawa as another victory for the Taliban.

    Yet the US -- a convicted terrorist state, according to the World Court -- makes its report public. Weird.
  15. Glynn W from Canada writes: Of course it is...they were taught by the best.
  16. Liam Smith from Canada writes: Chris E. from Canada writes: I am only interested in reading about what is happening in Syrian prisons, Saudi prisons, and prisons in Mugabes Africa.

    These stories about Afghan prisons are attempts to lay responsibility at the feet of the West.
    ***
    And we have no responsibility? Is that what you are saying?

    Absolutely disgusting.
  17. Liam Smith from Canada writes: Jeff T: The general population may live in deplorable conditions and there is something to the idea that those in prison can't be in conditions that are much better than the average citizen. However, I don't think the peasants get broom sticks shoved up their a$$es either. You've got some holes in your argument.
  18. Catherine Medernach from Winnipeg, Canada writes: Liam Smith - the Taliban didn't bother to hide their 'torture' of the Afghans - they did it out in the open - and often put bodies on display after they had been tortured, killed, beheaded etc. Perhaps some of this is payback.

    That is not saying that it is okay, just that everything cannot be fixed right away in a country where war is still being waged. This is also something that has been culturally condoned in the region and we cannot change their culture overnight - it is going to take time. Clearly many have yet to learn about human rights and the rule of law.
  19. Shawn Bull from Canada writes: I simply do not understand why we don't treat the Taliban in the same loving manner they treat us and the Afghan people.
  20. John Ishmael from Canada writes:

    CULTURAL ADDICTION BY THE WEST

    >>>Catherine Medernach from Winnipeg, Canada writes: ...That is not saying that it is okay, just that everything cannot be fixed right away ...This is also something that has been culturally condoned in the region and we cannot change their culture overnight - ... Posted 26/02/09 at 10:33 AM EST >>

    More cold blooded weaseling by this poster who could be an advisor to the IDF.

    "Their culture" is really ours - she forgives Abu Ghraib, Bagram, Guantanamo, the rest of the US-NATO gulags, Arar, Khadr, the Convoy of Death and the torture schools of the US Arms, House of Khiam, Facility 1391.

    Such is the evil that must have permitted the activities of the Third Reich.

    What may stop our complicity in torture and in outsourcing torture is if a few occupiers were Abu Ghraibed and video tapes released.

    Be well.
  21. Brian Sexsmith from Canada writes: What a feeble attempt by our government to cover-up the fact that billions of our tax dollars ultimately support institutions which practice child rape, finger nail extraction, sodomy and various other tortures.
  22. Richard Roskell from Naramata, Canada writes:

    'We're no worse than the torturers, murderers and child rapists and heroin traffickers that were here before.'

    The eternal cry of the human rights abuser, no? "I'm not really so bad. Remember the [insert brutal regime here]? They were much worse."

    First off, no regime can use that excuse. It's like standing in front of a judge and asking him to let you off because he's seen worse criminals in the past.

    Second, despite their failings the Taliban were NOT that bad. Their movement was against the kinds of gross injustices described in the US report. Ironically, the people who the Taliban fought against (Northern Alliance war criminals, warlords, etc) are now running the Kabul government. That's why we see a return to the same kind of abuses.

    The claim that the current Afghan regime is an improvement over the Taliban fails on moral, legal and historic grounds. It's certainly no better, and arguably far worse. Furthermore, it's a regime imposed and propped up by foreign powers. And finally, the cost to Afghans of maintaining that regime isn't neutral. Only through making war in Afghanistan is US/NATO able to keep that regime in power.

    NO PEOPLE ANYWHERE will long submit to the kind of injustices detailed in the US State Deparment report. Rebellion is guaranteed when abuses of the sort described occur. GUARANTEED.
  23. Richard Roskell from Naramata, Canada writes:

    One wonders what those who fail to condemn these abuses would say if it were their own children being raped in a prison?

    Would Catherine still be saying, as she says above, "That is not saying that it is okay, just that everything cannot be fixed right away."

    Oooh, such condemnation of a brutal crime!

    And if Jeff T's mother was in an Afghan prison, would he still be saying, "The average Afghan citizen is living in worse conditions..."?

    Riiight, like the average Afghan is having her nails pulled out and being raped on the street.

    And if Michael Powers' family were being subjected to the pleasantries of the National Security Directorate, would he be reminding them that, "The conditions may be bad but it is still better than being a prisoner of the Taliban."?

    The above posters are an example of how ideology can so easily triumph over decency. Taliban - bad. US/NATO - good. And even when US/NATO is bad, we're better than the Taliban. And even when we're worse, it's all in a good cause.
  24. Ivan Gumilev from L.A., United States writes: I am absolutely agreed with Richard Roskell.

    Certain Canadians, as I seeing from above commentaries, are the complicity to the torture of human beings.

    I am outraged by U.S. and Canada complicities to governmental tortures of Afghanistani citizens. It is terrible what the U.S. and the Canada, and the U.K. and other governments permitting in Afghanistan. As private person, I do not know what I can do to prevent such crimes against humanity, which the U.S. and Canadian governments committed. But I do protesting against it, and I do think that all participants in such crimes shall be punished by International Court of Justice.
  25. Roman Spears from St. Catharines, Canada writes:

    Is it any wonder that we have so much difficulty pacifying the region when we build schools and abuse children, build courts and torture suspects, encourage democarcy and ignore human rights?

    Rhetorical question guys and girls. Just wondering what it is our youth is dieing for in Afghanistan?
  26. Ivan Gumilev from L.A., United States writes: U.S. State Department Report stated the following:

    "During the year human rights organizations reported that local authorities in Herat, Helmand, Badakhshan, and other locations continued to torture and abuse detainees. Torture and abuse included pulling out fingernails and toenails, burning with hot oil, beatings, sexual humiliation, and sodomy. On March 15, the UN Secretary-General released a report noting that in a significant portion of cases ill-treatment and torture had been used to force confessions, and on September 21, released another report stating that the government must investigate allegations of torture of detainees by authorities, especially by the National Directorate of Security (NDS)."

    As we can see governmental powers in Afghanistan practicing crimes against humanity. The U.S. government doing nothing to prevent it. What this means? That’s means that U.S. government is complicity in such crimes against humanity. If this is not true, I’d like to know why not.
  27. Ivan Gumilev from L.A., United States writes: Report stated the following on conditions in 34 OFFICIAL prisons in Afghgnistan. (No report on UNOFFICAL prisons yet...)

    "Prison conditions remained poor. Most were decrepit, severely overcrowded, unsanitary, and fell well short of international standards. Some prisons held more than twice their planned capacity. Often prisoners were in collective cells, reflecting resource constraints and also cultural preferences for collective housing rather than individual or two-person cells. Where new collective cells were constructed, consideration was given to appropriate square footage per person. In district prisons, shipping containers were used as cells when other structures were unavailable. There were reports of prisoners beaten and tortured. Resource constraints contributed to some prisoners not always having access to an adequate diet, but it was not policy or practice to withhold food to ensure a compliant prison population. The AIHRC continued to report that inadequate food and water, poor sanitation facilities, insufficient blankets, and infectious diseases were common conditions in the country's prisons. Infirmaries, where they existed, were underequipped, and the supply of quality medicine was insufficient. Contagious and mentally ill prisoners were rarely separated from other prisoners. In September, 120 inmates at Pol-e-Charkhi prison undertook a hunger strike lasting two days. The prisoners stated they were protesting conditions at the prison and unfair judicial procedures."
  28. James K from Toronto, Canada writes: I will say it again...for the thousandth time...GET OUT OF AFGHANISTAN NOW!!! AND I MEAN NOW !!!!!!!!
  29. Catherine Medernach from Winnipeg, Canada writes: In a country where the average citizen may not have adequate food or shelter or clothing making new prison facilities would not usually be the top priority. The level of aid provided to Afghanistan has been a fraction of the aid provided to other countries (eg Bosnia, Kosovo) and nowhere near enough to address all of these problems. Are people suggesting that better food, housing etc for prisoners should take priority over concerns such as food, clothes, housing etc for the ordinary people of Afghanistan?

    There is a difference between supporting torture etc. and facing the reality of the situation and acknowledging that everything cannot be fixed instantly and without adequate resources. As for what happens outside of prisons - the Taliban did and continue to do things just as bad to the Afghan people but that does not get covered in these 'reports'. It is easy to jump on the bandwagon when an issue is taken out of the context of the reality of the situation.
  30. John Ishmael from Brampton ON, Canada writes:

    THE READER

    Saw the movie and Medernach could have been the guard.
  31. Ivan Gumilev from L.A., United States writes: Catherine Medernach from Winnipeg, Canada writes:

    "Are people suggesting that better food, housing etc for prisoners should take priority over concerns such as food, clothes, housing etc for the ordinary people of Afghanistan?"

    Of course: prisoners are incapaciated and ill persons, and their life depending on government 100%.
  32. Michael Powers from Canada writes: Richard Roskell from Naramata, You do come across as an idiot. You appear to see the world in very simplistic terms.

    us = bad,

    terrorists = good.
  33. Rob L from Vancouver, Canada writes: Maybe our fine soldiers should do something about the abuses rather than going around handing out candies and soccor balls.
  34. John Ishmael from Brampton ON, Canada writes:

    DISADVANTAGED POSTER

    >>>Michael Powers from Canada writes: Richard Roskell from Naramata, You do come across as an idiot. You appear to see the world in very simplistic terms. us = bad, terrorists = good.
    Posted 26/02/09 at 6:49 PM EST >>>

    Powers, you appear to alck to capacity to interpret the many nuanced and most informative comments from Roskell from Naramata.

    I suspect that that you are projecting your simple mindedness:-

    US GOOD, CHRISTIAN OCCUPIERS vs BAD, OCCUPIED MUSLIMS

    I wonder what your position is on the continued torture by YOUR regime troops when even a nation of torture, the USA, issues such a condemation?

    Be well.

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