stats

globeinteractive.com: Making the Business of Life Easier

   Finance globeinvestor   Careers globecareers.workopolis Subscribe to The Globe
The Globe and Mail /globeandmail.com
Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space






  Where to Find It


Breaking News
  Home Page

  Report on Business

  Sports

  Technology


Read and Win Contest


Print Edition
  Front Page

  Report on Business

  National

  International

  Sports

  Arts & Entertainment

  Editorials

  Columnists

  Headline Index

 Other Sections
  Appointments

  Births & Deaths

  Books

  Classifieds

  Comment

  Education

  Environment

  Facts & Arguments

  Focus

  Health

  Obituaries

  Real Estate

  Review

  Science

  Style

  Technology

  Travel

  Wheels

 Leisure
  Cartoon

  Crosswords

  Food & Dining

  Golf

  Horoscopes

  Movies

  Online Personals

  TV Listings/News

 Specials & Series
  All Reports...



Services
  Where to Find It
 A quick guide to what's available on the site

 Newspaper
  Advertise

  Corrections

  Customer Service

  Help & Contact Us

  Reprints

  Subscriptions

 Web Site
  Advertise

  E-Mail Newsletters

  Free Headlines

  Help & Contact Us

  Make Us Home

  Mobile New

  Press Room

  Privacy Policy

  Terms & Conditions


GiveLife.ca

    


Afghanistan at 'crossroads,' study warns

  
  



space
Interactive
 • Web Sites: realtime/websites.cfg 
space
Related Stories
 •  U.S. rejects more troops for Afghanistan

ANNE FLAHERTY
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Afghanistan risks sliding into a failed state and becoming the "forgotten war" because of deteriorating international support and a growing violent insurgency, according to an independent study.

The assessment, co-chaired by retired Marine Corps general James Jones and former UN ambassador Thomas Pickering, serves as a warning to the Bush administration at a time when officials are debating how best to juggle stretched war-fighting resources.

The administration wants to re-energize anti-terrorism efforts in Afghanistan and Pakistan, where al-Qaeda is regenerating. But the United States remains heavily invested in Iraq, and officials are sending strong signals that troop reductions there will slow or stop altogether this summer.

"Afghanistan stands at a crossroads," concludes the study, an advance copy of which was obtained by The Associated Press. "The progress achieved after six years of international engagement is under serious threat from resurgent violence, weakening international resolve, mounting regional challenges and a growing lack of confidence on the part of the Afghan people about the future direction of their country."

A major issue has been trying to win the war with "too few military forces and insufficient economic aid."

Among the group's nearly three dozen recommendations: increase NATO force levels and military equipment sent to Afghanistan, decouple U.S. management of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, establish a special envoy to co-ordinate all U.S. policy on Afghanistan, and champion a unified strategy among partner nations to stabilize the country in five years.

Defence Secretary Robert Gates said he was not familiar with the study's findings. He said more troops are needed in Afghanistan, but "certainly not ours." When asked how many more NATO troops might be needed, he said that number should be determined by ground commanders.

The Jones-Pickering assessment, scheduled for public release today, says the United States should rethink its military and economic strategy in Afghanistan, in large part because of deteriorating support among voters in NATO countries.

If international forces are pulled, the fragile Afghan government would "likely fall apart," the report warns.

While the Afghanistan study has not created the same buzz as the Iraq assessment, the centre's latest findings still are likely to wield political clout because of those involved.


space
Interactive
 • Web Sites: realtime/websites.cfg 
space
Related Stories
 •  U.S. rejects more troops for Afghanistan
Back to Home Page


Subscribe to The Globe and Mail
Sign up for our daily e-mail News Update





    

Breaking News



Today's Weather


Globe Poll









What's New



e-INSIDER
Technology news for your business



Health Care: The Romanow Report



Iraq Backgrounder





Morning Smile
Why did the magician's inquiry get nowhere? Too much smoke and mirrors. Jerry Kitich, Hamilton, Ont.