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Ontario campaign starts with verbal attacks
Photo   Ontario Liberal leader Dalton McGuinty.
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CAROLINE ALPHONSO
From Monday's Globe and Mail

TORONTO — Voters got a sense of Ontario's election campaign yesterday with Liberal Leader Dalton McGuinty listing his past successes in public education, and his chief opponent labelling him a promise breaker.

The campaign for the Oct. 10 election kicks off today, but party leaders took another opportunity yesterday to attack each other's past records and platforms.

Progressive Conservative Leader John Tory called a news conference at a Toronto hotel, saying that Mr. McGuinty cannot be trusted and any new promises will result in tax increases or a substantial deficit.

"People want to know if you say you're doing something that you're going to do it. Mr. McGuinty's track record in this regard has been pathetic," Mr. Tory said. "There has been no leader in modern times in politics in Canada ... who has this record of saying things."

Mr. McGuinty, who appeared at a rally in his Conservative rival's Toronto riding of Don Valley West, dismissed any suggestion that he has not fulfilled many of his promises.

"The fact of the matter is that we kept the overwhelmingly majority of our promises and that's why we've been able to move forward with better schools and better health care and so many important environmental initiatives," he told reporters.

"I'm going to work as hard as I can to keep this campaign on a positive footing, to talk about what it is we've been able to do and how much more we would like to do on behalf of Ontario families."

Still, he didn't hesitate in criticizing Mr. Tory's plan to extend funding to all religious schools, not just Roman Catholic ones - a topic that has become the dominant election issue.

Mr. McGuinty told about 300 supporters attending a rally at Marc Garneau Collegiate Institute that Mr. Tory's plan would take millions of dollars out of the public education system.

"We want to make our schools healthier, greener and safer. ... The Conservatives want to take us backward to an era of conflict and cuts. They want to take a half a billion dollars out of public schools."

Outside the school, a handful of demonstrators carrying placards and chanting slogans said that Mr. McGuinty's choice to only fund Catholic schools amounts to discrimination. He did not meet with them.

Mr. Tory's controversial education plan escalated last week when he told reporters that religious schools should be allowed to teach creationism if they receive public funding. His office issued a clarification later that day saying creationism should be explored only in religion class and not elsewhere in the curriculum.


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Interactive
 • Web Sites: realtime/websites.cfg 
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Related Stories
 •  As writ drops, McGuinty girds for onslaught
 •  Shifting population splits Ontario
 •  Hold on to something ... the battle for Toronto begins
 •  Liberals, Tories aim for weak spots as campaign nears
 •  Tory takes a leap of faith
 •  McGuinty won't repeal health tax; critics cry foul over 'bogus' promise
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Why did the magician's inquiry get nowhere? Too much smoke and mirrors. Jerry Kitich, Hamilton, Ont.