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Saturday, January 13, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B18


ROBERT A.W. BARR B.Comm.,C.P.A.,C.A.

Bob left us on January 5, 2018, after 92 years of living, laughing and loving. Born in 1925 in Ayr, Scotland, Bob came to Canada when he was four years old and was raised in a very Scottish, very religious, very loving family.

He was an outstanding student in the Toronto school system and attended the University of Toronto where he received his degree in Commerce and Finance (1950) after standing first in First Class Honours and winning the Clarkson Prize in accounting. His father had been Assistant Chief Accountant in the Toronto office of the Aluminum Company of Canada and he followed in his father's footsteps, qualifying as a chartered accountant in 1953.

When WWII started, Bob was 14 but, as soon as he turned 18, in 1943, he enlisted in Air Crew in the Royal Canadian Air Force.

Before the war ended, he had graduated from Wireless School in Calgary, Alberta, and Air Observaters School in Ancienne Lorette, Quebec. On graduation as a Wireless Navigator, he received his Commission and, in due course, was posted to an Operational Training Unit in Nova Scotia, for "Mosquito" aircraft. En route, Bob was advised that his posting had been cancelled. As a result, he summarized his military career thus - "never saw a shot fired in anger".

Bob had an exceptionally satisfying career in taxation, which included more than five years in Ottawa, as a Senior Tax Policy officer with the Department of Finance of the Government of Canada, and many years as a Tax Specialist, Partner, in the Toronto office and in the Canadian head office of the world's largest firm of chartered accountants, where he was appointed as the first Partnerin-Charge of Professional Practice - Tax in 1971.

Bob loved spending time with his family. It didn't matter if it was a Saturday night at his parents' home; weekends during the 60s, around his backyard pool with various family members; the numerous holidays and parties, of all sorts, that he hosted; spending time at the cottage; or any number of visits with family and friends.

He especially enjoyed spending time with his grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He loved having people around so much that when he first retired and moved to Kingston to be near his daughter, Debra, and her sons, he and his first wife, Doreen, operated a bed and breakfast. He used to say how much he enjoyed running the bed and breakfast that it was like having friends over except he got paid to do it.

Bob also loved to travel the world, seeing new places, taking photographs, experiencing new adventures, eating out and meeting new people. This from a man, who in his early career, refused to take vacation but once he started, never looked back.

Bob was blessed to have a second chance at happiness when he married Joan in 2000 and extended his family with her two daughters, Emily and Julia.

This opportunity brought much joy and love to Bob's later years, especially with the addition of Emily's two daughters, Mattie and Ivy. Bob is survived by his wife, Joan; his son, George; his daughter, Debra Barr (Jim Swalm); his stepdaughters, Emily (Arlen Sternberg) and Julia Myer; grandchildren, Sandy (Trina Snider), Sean (Nikki Snider) and Mattie and Ivy Sternberg; as well as five great-grandchildren, Gillian, Abby, Georgia, Cooper and Brynn. He was predeceased by his siblings, Nellie Peat, Jean Pike, George (Sylvia Barr) and Margaret Alter; and his first wife, Doreen (nee Clark).

A celebration of Bob's life will take place at The Faculty Club at the University of Toronto, 41 Willcocks Street, on Monday, January 15, 2018 from noon to 2:30 p.m.

If you wish, donations may be made in Bob's name to The Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care or Regeneration Community Services (regenerationcs.org).

DAVID J. BEESLEY October 2, 1948J anuary 6, 2018

It is with great sadness that David's family announces his passing after a courageous battle with lung cancer. He will be deeply missed by his loving wife and partner of 35 years, Mary Opper; his three children and their spouses, Simon (Monica), Matthew (Lesia) and Dan (Lynda); his three grandchildren, Emily, Madeline and Isabella; his two brothers and their spouses, Michael (Margaret) and Mark (Margaret); his brother-in-law and sisters-in-law, Tom (Jennifer), Carol and Jane; as well as his many nieces and nephews.

David was born in London, England and immigrated to Canada 41 years ago to build a better life for his family.

After working many years in advertising, sales and marketing he hit his stride at The St. Clair Group where he embraced the sport of curling, eventually taking over the sponsorship sales and marketing. In 1996, David and his partner, John Dunlop formed the Canadian Sponsorship Group, fulfilling a 25 year association with Curling Canada and the World Curling Federation. David was widely respected and loved by the many colleagues and friends he made along the way.

David remained remarkably optimistic throughout his illness, maintaining his usual positive attitude, good humor and generous spirit. He had great enthusiasm for life, including his cars, fine wines and leisurely meals, his time at the family cottage on Lake Muskoka, playing golf with his friends and years as a member of the Metro Toronto Dart League. David loved his life and spending time with family and his many friends. Those who know him well will raise a glass of Macallan in his honour.

There will be a private family service: a celebration of life for friends and colleagues will be announced later in the spring. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation where David was very grateful to the nurses, doctors and staff that took care of him as well as UHN.

COLL BLACK

Passed away suddenly on Tuesday, December 26, 2017 at the age of 91. He will be greatly missed by his daughter, Allison Fleming (Scott); and his longtime companion, Kin Martin; as well as his surviving family overseas and many friends.

Coll enjoyed a professional career as a CGA. He will be remembered as someone with a lifelong passion for fitness and health. In the early 1950's, he began the Wilket Creek running group and taught fitness classes at the YMCA. During this time, he also taught Scottish Country Dancing at St. Paul's Bloor Street. Coll was an avid skier and was a ski instructor with the High Park Ski Club for many years. Over the past 20+ years, he was a member of the Glendon Athletic Club and participated in fitness classes everyday.

A celebration of life will be held at Mount Pleasant Funeral Centre - 375 Mount Pleasant Road (East gate entrance) on Saturday, January 20, 2018 at 11 a.m.

CATHERINE ELIZABETH GORDON MATHESON CARTY Thursday, August 18, 1921, Cornwall, ON - Thursday, January 11, 2018, Mississauga, ON

Beloved mother of Kenneth (Elaine), Vancouver, BC, Donald (Ana), Dallas, TX, Robert, Montreal, QC, William (Carolyn), Burlington, ON, Douglas (Suzanne), Glen Ellyn, IL, and Carolyn (Ron Tayler), Mississauga, ON; grandmother to 22 adoring grandchildren; and great-grandmother to a continually growing number of great-grandchildren.

Catherine grew up in the manse of Chalmers Wesley United Church in Quebec City, the third child of the Rev. A. Dawson and Gertrude Matheson. Predeceased by her brother. John R. Matheson; she is survived by sisters, Dorothy Parnell of London, ON and Margaret Slemon of Toronto, ON.

Leaving Quebec as a young woman she attended Queen's University where she was a proud and loyal member of the class of Arts 42. At Queen's she lost her heart to one of the university's commerce student / football stars and married R. Kenneth Carty in September 1942. After the war they quickly settled into a happy family life that took them back and forth between Toronto and Montreal. Ken's early death in 1972 left her with long years as the heart and soul of her growing and spreading family. Over those decades her birthdays were the occasion for big summer reunions in locations as varied as Vancouver, Hawaii and Hurd's Lake that knit siblings and cousins together around her.

Those who knew her recall a math whiz, a prodigious knitter who produced multiple sweaters for every grandchild each Christmas, an active and involved member of Mount Royal United Church, an enthusiastic golfer who captured the Niners championship at the Royal Montreal Golf Club, and a faithful and caring friend. In her last years in Montreal she delighted in living next door to Eleanor Côté with whom she had gone to elementary school decades earlier in old Quebec.

The last few years were difficult and she moved to Mississauga where Bill and Care provided constant support and help.

Visitation will take place at Dodsworth & Brown, Burlington Chapel (2241 New Street, Burlington ON, 905-637-5233) on Tuesday, January 16, from 3 p.m.- 5 p.m. and again from 7 p.m. 9 p.m. A private family service will remember her and she will finally lie with her husband in the picket fence cemetery in Georgeville, Quebec where they spent many happy years together. Remembrances in the form of gifts to the R. Kenneth and Catherine Elizabeth Carty scholarship at Queen's University would be appreciated.

ALEXA MARIA DeWIEL

Born Hamburg, Germany, January 11, 1949; died at home in palliative care, Toronto, Ontario, December 22, 2017.

A message for my family and friends.

My life has been an interesting one, at least to me, and throughout it I've taken many snapshots, most of which are digitalized. During the 1950s and 1960s, my mother always had the radio on. My adolescent life was inspired and informed by stories of the Civil Rights movement, the Vietnam War, and the music of the day. I was lucky to grow into young adulthood during the 1970s, which for me was a highly active time in all regards, including social justice work in the women's movement and the environmental and aboriginal rights movement of the times.

I was one of the founding members of Nellie's Hostel for Women in Toronto. I co-hosted a women's community radio program (Radio Free Women) in Toronto, and later in Ottawa (The Ottawa Rose Show). I published a book of poetry, Conversations with Bibi, (Canadian Women's Educational Press, 1975) housed in the Thomas Fisher Rare Book section of the University of Toronto Library.

My interest in community radio landed me a job with the federal government and brought travel across the near-North from coast to coast, gathering information with which to fund First Nations indigenous language community radio stations.

In 1979, I met Kathy Vance who has been my sole partner and companion in life ever since. We married on November 29, 2008, the same month that Barack Obama became President in the U.S. Kathy and I have faced both births and deaths as well as illnesses among our friends and family and have had many wonderful times and celebrations. We are as different as night and day in superficial ways yet shared a common core philosophy of life and approach to people and animals.

I hope Kathy will be blessed with old and new friendships and the love that she deserves. She has taught me much about the appreciation of being alive. I have loved her family dearly as she has loved mine.

xxooxx Alexa was asked not too long ago why she, as a shy and private person, would agree to appear in a feature film in the 70s about two women being in love with each other. "I wanted to stand up for lesbians. I did it for love."

Alexa counted herself in the "me too" movement and was thrilled that men but especially women were standing up with women - to expect a life without abuse.

Alexa was an agent in home sales in Toronto and juxtaposed this with decades of volunteer years advancing the integrity of non-equity co-op housing.

Cancer kills people in many ways, gradually taking away their ability to eat is one of them - Atul Gawande on Being Mortal was her guide through this, and her desire for the choice of Medical Assistance in Dying was unfulfilled.

Those wishing to make donations: Democracy Now Radio with Amy Goodman; Farm Radio International; the Donkey Sanctuary of Canada.

Remember Alexa in your own way. Condolences may be offered via Aftercare at http://www.aftercare.org.

A celebration will take place at her home January 20, 2018 - 2-4 p.m.

Burial will take place in the Eastern Townships in the springtime.

Alexa showed me chanting Nam myoho renge kyo, tender love without fear or jealousy, grace under fire, how to swim like a fish through troubled waters, how to release a grudge, and how to be loved deeply.

NATHALIE HELOISE DOIRON

Passed away at the West Island Palliative Care Residence in Kirkland (Montreal) on December 31, 2017 at only 53.

She will be sorely missed by her loving husband, Don Stroub; her parents, Henri and Joan Doiron; aunt, Leona Graham-Elen; uncles, Robert and Ralph Graham; cousins, Laura, John, Bruce, Lila, Alex, Lara, Daniel and Kim-Ellen Hurst; as well as Doiron relatives. Her many friends from across North America and the world will miss her regular phone calls, emails and Christmas cards.

She was born in Ottawa, raised in Toronto, and spent many years in and around Montreal. She studied history and social work at McGill University, law at the Université du Québec à Montréal, and received her Masters and PhD in social work from the University of Toronto. She loved her work and her colleagues at the Centre francophone de Toronto, and later was an instructor for Dalhousie University.

She had struggled with multiple chemical sensitivities for years before her cancer diagnosis in 2014. On June 27, 2015, she married the love of her life, Don Stroub. He was her best friend, her confident, her staunch supporter and her unfailing caregiver. She could not have lived so long and so well without Don and he was with her until the end.

If desired, donations in memory of Nathalie can be made to the West Island Palliative Care Residence.

JEAN GRIFFIN ELLIOTT

Born in Hartford, Connecticut on September 17, 1929, died peacefully at home in Toronto on December 19, 2017 at the age of 88. The daughter of the late Samuel and Florence (née Smith) Griffin, she is survived by her loving daughter, Jean Smith Elliott (Robert Williams); her brother, William Griffin (Shirley); her sister, Bette Forbes (Bruce); and predeceased by her brother, Samuel Griffin, and his wife, Mary. She also leaves nieces and nephews, Sam Griffin (Marcia), Martin Griffin (Alyson), Martha Hennig, Victoria Ford, Bruce Forbes, and their respective families.

Jean received her A.A. from Hartford College for Women, where she served as President of the Student Council. She earned her B.A. with First Class Honours in Modern History at Trinity College at the University of Toronto, and her A.M. from Harvard University. She enjoyed pursuing her interest in history with the Friends of Franklin and the group's numerous trips to Europe and the United States.

Her career was a rewarding creative and social outlet. Early on, she enjoyed her work as a telephone company business office supervisor, a department store service manager, and an academic dean. Years later she applied herself at the Royal Canadian Institute (1982-84) and at the University of Toronto (198495). She loved finding answers to the most unusual questions, meeting and connecting interesting people, and developing extremely popular courses for Later Life Learning.

Jean pursued volunteer opportunities at the U of T with vigor, particularly as Founding President of the Friends of the Library, Trinity College in 1975.

She was a longstanding member of the Corporation of Trinity College and the Soldiers' Tower Committee. She also served as President of the University Arts Women's Club and the University College Faculty Wives. In 1997, Jean was a proud recipient of the Arbor Award.

The family is deeply grateful to Veronica Silva for providing many years of devoted care with support from Jocelyn Ocio, Cristy Flores, Joan De Los Santos, and Ria Ruiz.

A service will be held in Trinity College Chapel, 6 Hoskin Ave., Toronto on Monday, January 22, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. followed by a reception. As she wished, Jean will be buried next to her parents in St. James' Cemetery in Glastonbury, Connecticut. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in her memory to The Friends of the Library, Trinity College, 6 Hoskin Avenue, Toronto, M5S 1H8.

DANNY FILIPOVIC DECEMBER 7,1927- JANUARY 2, 2018

As we recall a glorious and a truly extraordinary life, we announce the peaceful passing of our dear partner, father, grandfather and greatgrandfather, uncle and friend, Danny Filipovic, on Tuesday, January 2, 2018.

Danny (Dragoljub or Drasko) Filipovic was born in the village of Bare, Gruza, Serbia on December 7, 1927, in a closely-knit family, the only son with three sisters. His name, Dragoljub, signified happiness, joy, pride, compassion, gratitude - qualities that defined his life. He was brought up to be strong and brave, capable and ready to face life's challenges. In short, he was expected to be a pillar of his family. He was barely 11 years old when his father sent him on his first business trip selling lime in a neighbouring village market. As a young man, having survived the Civil War of Yugoslavia during World War II, and after several unsuccessful attempts, he was able to escape to France in 1952, clinging to the bottom of a Paris-bound train. In Paris he met his first wife and welcomed the arrival of his only daughter Nathalie, named after his mother. He also became very close to Boris Spremo, the accomplished award-winning photographer who became a lifelong friend.

Restless and driven by ambition, he emigrated with his family, to Canada, by ship, meeting some of his future business partners and friends. He was hard working and industrious, and able to make the best of his circumstances.

Never abandoning his goals, his drive for new opportunities continued to expand his horizons.

Danny was an inventor and idea man, from producing Victorian pottery in the 60's to making recommendations at GM for name badges and logo advertising, he was often ahead of his time. He launched a successful decals business, designing and producing a series of branded automobile decals. In the 1980's he also invented and patented his beloved Sea Beauty, a beautifully crafted mermaid shaped shoe horn that is functional, durable and timeless.

In the 1970's he met Veneta Elieff, a remarkable and highly spirited lady of Bulgarian origin who became his wife, partner and soulmate for almost 39 years, together right up to her passing at the age of 102. Even in the last years of his life, Danny remained active and continued to work hard.

One of Danny and Veneta's most defining legacies is their philanthropic work in support of children, hospitals, culture and education. In 2015, he established the Veneta Elieff and Danny Filipovic Awards in Balkan Studies at the University of Toronto.

Danny's memoir, One of a Kind, was completed in 2016 and will soon be published. The book is his life story, capturing adventure and memorable people who shared his passions and formula for happiness.

His book traces his remarkable life path, overcoming incredible odds, from his humble origins in Serbia to become a respected citizen of Canada, a successful businessman, a world traveler, a visionary, an inventor, a patentholder and a philanthropist. He counted amongst his friends, business partners and acquaintances many famous politicians, country leaders and businessmen. The formula has served Danny well in his remarkable 90 years of life - work hard and love deeply.

Those who knew Danny have had the unique pleasure and privilege to hear many of his stories in person, and have witnessed firsthand the incredible energy, dedication, and passion this man had for life, for his work, and for his loves. He considered himself a truly lucky man, because he had accomplished everything he ever dreamed of, both in his personal life and in business.

Danny will be fondly remembered by his partner, Lisa; daughter, Nathalie; grandchildren, Kyla and Dylan; and great-granddaughter, Emily. Also, his nieces, Natasha, Maja and Mirjana; and grandniece, Mila; and many business partners and friends both in Canada and abroad.

A private funeral will be held at the Humphrey Funeral Home A.W. Miles - Newbigging Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue) on Saturday, January 20. Interment to follow at Mount Pleasant Cemetery.

Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through http://www.humphreymilesnewbigging.com. In lieu of flowers, contributions to the Veneta Elieff and Danny Filipovic Awards at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (CERES) at the Munk School of Global Affairs would be appreciated. Cheques should be made out to the University of Toronto and mailed to CERES at 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3K7. Online donations may be made at https://donate.utoronto.ca/ceres to the CERES Fund.

"My life was like a dream," Danny used to say, "and I have lived all of my dreams." How many of us can say that?

FRANCINE ROBYN FOGEL

On January 12, 2018 at Toronto Grace Hospital after a lengthy battle with cancer.

Beloved wife of Gary Bowmile.

Loving daughter of the late Eleanor and Max Fogel. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Richard and Alison Fogel, Bruce and Renee Fogel and Penny and Chris Trenton. Devoted aunt of Jordan, Alanna, Cory, Jayda, Genevieve, Mariel, Michael and Alexander.

Great-aunt of Madison, Brooke and Bennett.

A graveside service will be held at Mount Sinai Memorial Park in the Pride of Israel section on January 14, 2018 at 1:00 p.m. Shiva at 2607-320 Tweedsmuir Avenue, Toronto.

If desired, memorial donations may be made to your charity of choice.

ROBIN W. W. FRASER

Born September 23, 1929 in Calgary, the only child of James Otis Fraser and Elsie Grey Wright Fraser, Robin died January 2, 2018, at home in Toronto with his beloved wife by his side.

His life is celebrated and his passing mourned by his loving family, Mary Ellen Hebb, his wife of 16 years; children, Morna, Kirsten (Gordon), Jeffrey, Donal, and Elizabeth (Scott). Adoring Grampa to Fraser, Stella, and Kelsey; and loving Appy to Malcolm and Sean.

He was predeceased in 1998 by his cherished wife and partner, the extraordinary Helen Victoria (Tory) Fraser (nee Ketcheson).

Growing up in Minnedosa, Manitoba, and in Trenton, Toronto and Oakville, Ontario, Robin attended Upper Canada College and Trinity College (5T2).

He adored his time at Trinity: a conscientious student, he nonetheless never let his studies get in the way of boisterous shenanigans with friends (a mischievous spirit that remained intact throughout his life). After studying law at Osgoode Hall, Robin joined Fraser, Beatty, Tucker, McIntosh & Stewart (now Dentons) in 1956. In 1963, he became a partner and remained there until retirement in 1995. He was appointed Queen's Counsel in 1983, and in 2000 his beloved Trinity College honoured him with a Doctorate of Sacred Letters honoris causa.

Robin brought passion to whatever he undertook, and his interests were as varied as they were intensely pursued. He loved playing the bagpipes, Scottish country dancing, bird-watching, cross-country skiing, kayaking, and most of all, wilderness canoeing. With Tory and some equally intrepid friends, over decades he covered thousands of miles on wilderness lakes and rivers in Labrador, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and the Northwest Territories.

Accounts of some of Robin and Tory's adventures are on permanent display at the Canadian Canoe Museum in Peterborough, Ontario and were documented in the book Canoeing North Into the Unknown by Bruce Hodgins and Gwyneth Hoyle (1997).

Widely admired for his passionate commitment to environmental causes, Robin's contributions were considerable. He served on the boards of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, Wildlands League of Ontario, and The Nature Conservancy of Canada to which he was particularly devoted. He also donated his time, expertise, and dedication to the Huntington Society of Canada, the Smile Theatre Company, Artscape Inc., The Frederick Harris Music Co.

Ltd; he was a member of the Corporation of Trinity College (he was instrumental in drafting their incorporation papers), and also served as a director of Bird Studies Canada.

It was in this latter role that Robin met fellow birder Mary Ellen Hebb, and for the second time in his life, he had found his perfect match. She brought laughter and love into his later life, and steadfastly kept the nursing home beds at bay while helping him navigate his ongoing battle with Parkinson's. Robin was scrupulously principled, as intelligent as he was affable, and always curious; he would never turn down a chance to debate political issues or difficult moral quandaries. Above all, he had a playful and charming sense of humour and wit that was uniquely his. It was this quality that put him in the vanguard of the delightfully quixotic Republic of Rathnelly of the 1970s (a role for which he was recognized in 2017 when the lane behind the family home was named in his honour).

His adamant optimism and keen sense of the absurd enabled him to highlight the humour in things, to frame life's vagaries in ways that brought everything into smiling perspective. It was all but impossible to resist the charm of his great open-mouthed hoots of laughter, and his generosity was unparalleled. These qualities made him a wonderful husband, father, grandfather, friend, and mentor to so many, and he will be sorely missed.

A memorial celebrating this funny and gentle man will be held (where else?!) at Trinity College Chapel, 6 Hoskin Ave., on Saturday, May 12th at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, a donation in his name to The Nature Conservancy of Canada would be most fitting and appreciated. Those who loved him would like to thank the many healthcare professionals involved in his care during the last few years, especially Rinzin Lhamo for her great kindness and dedication to Robin's welfare.

DOUGLAS RALPH FRAYNE

On December 19, Doug passed away suddenly, at home, aged 66 years. He is survived by his sisters, June Anne Frayne, and Jeanne (Pete) Hill; and was predeceased by his parents, Ralph and Beulah (Honsberger) Frayne.

In 1981, Doug was awarded his PhD in Near Eastern Languages and Literatures from Yale University. Since 1980 he worked as a Professor for the University of Toronto's Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations, until 2006 as Researcher and Editor on the Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia Project and subsequently on a number of other research projects. He was a passionate teacher and held positions with the Oriental Club of Toronto and the Canadian Society for Mesopotamian Studies. He will be fondly remembered by family, friends, students and colleagues.

A memorial service will be held on Friday, January 19 at 12:30 p.m. at Bloor Street United Church, 300 Bloor Street West, Toronto.

Memorial donations in memory of Doug may be made to The MS Society of Canada, mssociety.ca, 1-800-268-7582.

FRANCES ALICE GALLOWAY

On January 11, 2018 at the age of 90 years. Dearly beloved wife of Charles T. P. Galloway, formerly Chief Actuary and President of the National Life Assurance Company of Canada. Mrs. Galloway was the daughter of David and Tilda Mackiy and was born in Richmond Hill.

The family lived in Nobel when her father worked at munitions plants during the war, after which they returned to Richmond Hill.

She later attended the University of Toronto. When she first walked into the office of National Life, Mr.

Galloway took notice and later when he saw her radiant smile fell immediately in love.

Mrs. Galloway worked as a calculator in the Actuarial Department and subsequently processed claims. After retiring to raise a family she became the mother of Charlene Galloway (Steve Middleton), Pamela Watkin (Fred Watkin), Deborah Galloway (Frank Petty); grandmother of Michelle Watkin (Steve Borenstein), Stephanie Watkin (Jesse Brown), Eric Watkin, Jennifer Goslett, and Andrew Goslett. The Galloways married on October 26, 1956 and they were partners, pals, lovers and friends for 61 years.

Visitation will be held on Sunday, January 14 at The Simple Alternative, 275 Lesmill Rd., Toronto from 7:00-9:00 p.m.

Funeral will be held on Monday, January 15 at The Simple Alternative at 11:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Alzheimer Society of Canada.

RICHARD PAUL GEISLER

Passed away peacefully on January 3, 2018 at Providence Healthcare in his 75th year.

Beloved husband to Yolanda Galsim and the late Brenda Geisler (nee Jones); cherished father of Christina and Tanya (Greg); grandfather of Lauren; guiding stepfather to Rhoda, Randy (Rory), Ronald and Ryan Galsim; brother-in-law to Norma Bennetts; and uncle to Linda (Dave) and Lori (Peter).

Born in Tomaszow, Poland, Richard spent his formative years in Karlsruhe, Germany before immigrating to Toronto at age 13. A commanding and nurturing father figure, renaissance man, artisan and storyteller, he fueled his passion for cuisine, world travel and carpentry through a series of successful careers in engineering, contracting, home renovation and real estate.

As per Richard's wishes, cremation has taken place and he will be remembered in a private family memorial and at a celebration of his life to be announced later this year.

In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation in his memory to the Temmy Latner Centre at http:// http://www.tlcpc.org/.

DR. JACQUES GENEST SR.

1919-2018 The IRCM and its foundation are united in offering our deepest condolences to Dr. Genest's family.

A great visionary and clinical research pioneer, he founded the Institute in 1967 and will forever be associated with it.

An incredible humanist, this eminent scientist is an inspiration to us all.

MAUREEN KATHERINE GIBBS (neeConnolly)

It is with deep sadness that we announce the very sudden passing of our cherished mother, grandmother, and greatgrandmother on Wednesday, January 10, 2018 at the St.

Joseph's Health Centre in her 88th year. Predeceased by her beloved husband of 63 years, Edward Sr. Wonderful; mother to Gerry (Flo), Cathy (Dale), Dan (Lancy), Chris (Nancy), Patricia (Albert), Joe (Katherine) and Edward (Colleen); loving grandmother to 16 grandchildren; and 19 greatgrandchildren. Dear sister of Lally (Michael) Foxwell.

Maureen will be fondly remembered by her many friends at Weston Golf and Country Club, Victoria Harbour and Florida.

Mom was very passionate about her family times spent at Georgian Bay and Florida and her vast world travels.

Friends will be received at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Road (North of Lawrence Ave. W.) Weston, on Monday, January 15, 2018 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at All Saints Catholic Church, 1415 Royal York Road on Tuesday, January 16 at 10 a.m. Interment will take place in the spring at St. Michael's Cemetery in Orillia.

Please visit our Book of Memories at http://www.wardfuneralhome.com

DR. FRANK MURRAY HALL MD, FRCP (C)

Born January 31, 1926 in Toronto to Frank Gladstone Hall and Winnifred Dorothy (nee Marshall).

Murray died in Aurora on January 8 and is survived by his loving wife of 63 years, Beverly (nee Lynch); children, Peter (Ann), Stephen (Suzanne), Janet and Cathy HallKemp (Chris); and grandchildren Andrew, Cameron, Stephanie, Sarah, Robert and Emily.

A graduate of the University of Toronto Medical School (1949), Murray was a pioneer in preventative medicine in Toronto.

As President of IMPCO Health Screening, later Laurentian Health, he spread the gospel of physical fitness, smoking abstinence and moderation in diet long before it became main stream. His many patients confessed to enjoying their appointments in spite of his good natured lectures about healthy living. His humour and genuine compassion extended to everyone he met and to countless CFRB listeners who heard his colourful weekly health and fitness commentaries.

Murray began spending summers in Algonquin Park as a senior staff member at Camp Ahmek in 1946 and not a summer has gone by without him visiting the Park either by canoe or by foot.

Murray watched his children then grandchildren grow and prosper at the family cottage.

The grandchildren learned about nature, campfires, and canoeing from their beloved "Boompa". His annual regatta was the highlight of every summer bringing family and neighbours together. Many on Lake of Bays will also miss the familiar sight of the guy in the yellow canoe on the lake early every morning.

Particularly beloved to Murray was his high school alma mater St. Andrew's College. Here he learned to play the bagpipes and became Pipe Major in the band.

In later years during his annual trips to London he would seek out parades just to watch the Pipe Bands march by.

Murray was someone who was always genuinely glad to see you and took a heartfelt interest in your well-being. His deep integrity will be remembered and continue to inspire his family and all those who were fortunate enough to cross his path.

A Memorial Service will take place on January 20, 11:00 at Forest Grove United Church, 43 Forest Grove Drive, North York.

Donations may be made to Doctors Without Borders.

WHARTON FREDERICK RIDOUT HOOD 1920-2018

Wharton (Tony) passed away peacefully at the Toronto General Hospital on Thursday, January 4, 2018 with his family in attendance, shortly after an enjoyable lunch and bridge game. Loving father of Ginny, Adrienne (Edward Cole) and the late Douglas. Husband of the late Mary (nee Emmett).

Stationed in England during World War II, he returned to Canada and joined the Independent Order of Foresters, ultimately assuming the role of Vice President and Executive Secretary. Retirement brought the joys of country living and travels around the world on a variety of extended voyages as a passenger on cargo ships.

Most recently, Wharton lived at retirement home, Bradgate Arms, where he developed many new friends; the family would like to thank all the Bradgate staff for their compassionate care over the years. We owe particular gratitude to our friend, Mary Musgrave, for her warm and kind assistance in ensuring that he got out to his various appointments and sharing a laugh or two with him over many coffees. Also, special thanks to Veterans Affairs for their support over the years and to the wonderful staff at Toronto General Hospital during his last hours.

Cremation has taken place and we will hold a small gathering for family and friends later in the summer to celebrate what would have been his 98th birthday. If so desired, a memorial donation can be made to the Canadian Hearing Society (271 Spadina Road, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2V3) https://chssco4294.

thankyou4caring.org/donationform-in-memory, or to a charity of your choice. Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

JOHN AVERY LEON LABOW Passed away after a brief illness in Calgary, Alberta on December 11, 2017 at the age of 75. He is survived by his children, Ted, Jennifer and Ben; and Anne Cummins, mother of his children, who he married in 1963 and with whom he shared 28 years of marriage. He was predeceased by his parents, Larry and Claire; and his younger sister, Reva. He was a grandfather to Liv and Leo, children of Ben and Ashley. He was an uncle to Jessica and Sean; and a brother-in-law to Paul (Orlicky); as well as a nephew and cousin to many descendants of the Halperin family.

John was born in Timmins, Ontario on November 28, 1942.

He was a man of many talents and interests, including science, music, literature, film, and the dramatic arts. He sang in the coffee houses in a duo with Bram Morrison, won the Canadian Science Fair in the late 1950s, was a confirmand at Holy Blossom Temple and a graduate of Forest Hill Collegiate. He earned a Bachelor's Degree from U of T and acted frequently on the Hart House stage. He created a notable film role playing Doug in the milestone Canadian film "Winter Kept Us Warm", the first English Canadian film at Cannes.

John had an illustrious career as a documentary film maker, winning many awards. Beginning at the CBC in the early 1960s, he moved to ETV (OECA/TVO) and was a pioneer in educational television.

Notable productions include The Third World, World Religions, The Africa File, The Music Room (with Gene DiNovi), The Edible Woman, The Orford String Quartet and The Middle East (with Bernard Lewis).

As an independent producer, his credits include the musical specials Anne Murray in Jamaica, The Toronto Symphony in Vienna with Sir Andrew Davis, and Perry Como in the Bahamas.

John will be remembered for his love of life and his enjoyment of it, no matter the size of the stage. A memorial service will be held in Toronto in summer, 2018.

Heartfelt thanks go to the caring staff at Bethany Care, Calgary and to Judith Haraldson, for her loving care. Visit http://www.johnlabow.com for further information about the memorial service and charitable donations, or to share memories of John.

EDWIN SALTER LANGDON "Ted"BSc.,PEng.,LLB.

Edwin Salter Langdon, born in Ottawa, Ontario on July 11, 1933, died at home in Scottsdale, Arizona on December 5, 2017, six years after a diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis.

Ted was the best friend and loving husband of Muriel for over 62 years. He was a proud father, father-in-law, and grandpa of daughter, Cathy, her husband, Nick Williams and their children, Geoffrey and Caroline, of Toronto, Ontario; and Carolyn, her husband, Bernard James Zapor and their daughter, Jennifer, of Scottsdale, Arizona.

Family was very important to Ted and Muriel and their lives were closely entwined with the lives of the extended family, including Sunday dinners, backyard pool parties at their home in Toronto, summers at family cottages on the Ottawa River and Blue Sea Lake and family adventures in Arizona.

Ted graduated from Queen's University in 1955 with a degree in chemical engineering. After graduating from Queen's, Ted and Muriel were married and moved to the U.K. where Ted started his engineering career and where they lived for the first two years of their marriage. They returned to Ontario where Ted worked for Shell Oil. Eight years later Ted decided that a legal career was a preferable option to engineering and entered Osgoode Hall Law School as a mature student.

After graduating from Osgoode in 1968 Ted joined Blake Cassels & Graydon where he spent his entire legal career, practicing corporate and international law.

Ted travelled extensively as part of his practice accompanying clients to Russia, Indonesia and various other parts of the world. Ted also guest lectured at University of Toronto teaching law to engineering students and served as a director of numerous companies including UPS and Hawker Siddeley. Ted was liked and respected by his partners, his clients and his colleagues in the legal community.

After retiring, Ted's passion for the law continued. He obtained admission to the Arizona Bar, became a member of the Canadian Arizona Business Council and focused his efforts on generating business from US clients looking to enter the Canadian market.

Ted loved the game of golf and played without hesitation given any opportunity. He loved daily walks and often said that no day was complete without a walk to clear your head.

His love of trees and cottage country in Canada changed to a love of cacti and desert flowers when he and Muriel retired full time to Arizona. A good game of bridge or a quite game of cribbage, ushering at church, sitting on the boathouse steps overlooking his beloved Blue Sea Lake (where he had visited since childhood) or spending time with his family who he always loved and supported describes Ted at his happiest.

Last May life took a cruel turn when Ted was told that he required full time use of oxygen in addition to the medication that only slowed the progression of his disease. Nevertheless Ted maintained his sense of humour, keen wit and positive outlook until the end.

Ted often referred to a quote that serves as a fitting epitaph: "The world will never remember you for what you take from it, but only what you leave behind."

Ted Langdon epitomized that philosophy. We are poorer for his passing.

Cremation has taken place with interment in Scottsdale.

As an expression of sympathy, donations to the Canadian Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation would be appreciated. Canadian Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, 47 Squire Bakers Lane, Markham, Ontario L3P 3G8, Canada. http://www.cpff.ca

SUSANNE LAW January 29, 1927 January 11, 2018

Mom died peacefully in her sleep on Thursday, January 11, 2018. She was predeceased by her husband and our father, Robin. She was the loving mother of Madeleine (Dan Welton), Graham and Jennifer (Bruce Fraser), and is survived by her adored four grandchildren, Jack, James, Roslaynd and Sophie.

Born and raised in Winnipeg with an adventurous spirit (and a bit of a temper), mom attended the University of Manitoba. In the summers she worked in the Victoria Dining Room of Chateau Lake Louise, making time to climb the south peak of the restaurant's namesake Mount Victoria. Upon graduation from university she moved to Toronto, starting a career in the securities business where she met Robin. During her spare time in those early Toronto days she obtained her pilots license, flying out of the Toronto Islands.

Mom and dad started dating in earnest after meeting again at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, marrying in 1960. She continued with her career a few more years until the day came (somewhat reluctantly) to set it aside and refocus on starting a family.

Mom held various volunteer board positions and was an active member with the Garden Club of Toronto. One of the notable projects into which she devoted much time, effort and affection was the restoration of the Casa Loma Gardens. At home she passionately cultivated her own garden for over 50 years, the beauty of which enriched all our lives.

Mom and dad were both enthusiastic travelers. As a family we spent many summers visiting Minaki, mom's childhood family cottage built by her grandmother in 1914. We also enjoyed ski vacations to various resorts in Canada and the US. As mom's eyesight started to fail she became even more determined to see as much of the world as possible, and she and dad's adventures took them extensively throughout Europe, the Middle East, North Africa, China, Russia and the United States.

Mom will be dearly missed by her family and many friends.

A funeral will take place at 11:00 a.m. on Thursday, January 18, 2018 at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church - East Chapel, 230 St.

Clair Avenue West, Toronto. A reception will follow.

Special thanks to the wonderful team at The Claremont for making mom so comfortable, to Anne Deacon for her loving care, to the CCAC Palliative Care team and to Drs.

Robert Devenyi and Graham Trope at the Donald K. Johnson Eye Centre at the Toronto Western Hospital for all their care over the years.

In lieu of flowers, please consider a contribution to the Glaucoma Research Society of Canada. Call 416-483-0200 or http://www.glaucomaresearch.ca. Cheques may be mailed directly to: Glaucoma Research Society of Canada, 1929 Bayview Avenue, Suite 215E, Toronto, Ontario M4G 3E8. Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

DOUGLAS LOW

Passed peacefully, on Saturday, December 9, 2017, at the age of 79. Beloved son of the late James and the late Jessie Low. Loving brother of the late Wendy Shirt and the late David Low. Dear uncle of Christine Shirt, Ian Shirt and Roger Shirt. Doug will also be missed by the Bun family, as well as his many cousins and friends.

A private burial service took place in December at Park Lawn Cemetery.

Arrangements entrusted to the Turner & Porter Yorke Chapel, 416-767-3153.

MOLLIE MAIN (nee Wright) 1917-2018

On January 6, 2018 Mollie passed away peacefully at her home in Ottawa in her 101st year. Mollie touched the lives of family and friends in so many ways. Thanks to her warmth and generosity of spirit she became the honorary matriarch of an extended clan.

We recall many wonderful times together, including her 100th birthday celebration last June with family and friends from coast to coast. A volunteer extraordinaire, an adventurous traveller, ardent birder, naturalist, keen skier, tennis and bridge player, lifelong learner, reader, fabulous cook - Mollie Main's Marvellous Munchies says it all.

Mollie lived in Toronto as a young girl, was a teenager and young working woman in Ottawa, married Hardy L. Main in 1941, raised her family in Toronto before "retiring" to Collingwood.

She spent the last 10 years living in Ottawa at Unitarian House and Manotick Place. She and Hardy enjoyed lasting friendships in Toronto and Collingwood where the Craigleith Ski Club and the "Collingwood gals" kept them entertained and engaged.

Predeceased by her husband, Hardy; and her beloved daughter, Susan (Franke Hazewindus); her memory will be cherished by her daughter, Mary Hegan (Dick); and son, Tom (Susan); and her three grandchildren, Larry Hegan (Elisa), Jennifer Hegan (Eamon), and Adam Main (Laura); and her six great-grandchildren, Fiona, Clara, Renée, Hardy, Harper and Hudson. The family would especially like to thank Anna Kyle whose companionship over the past 5 years meant so much to Mollie.

Cremation has taken place. There will be a private interment and life celebration with family and close friends at a later date.

G-G, Mom, Nannie, Mollie - your spirit will live on.

ALAN MIRABELLI 1948-2017 Ottawa, Ontario

Alan Mirabelli left the dance floor and exited the ballroom with gentle grace, smiling goodbye to all who accompanied him on the dance of life on December 20, 2017.

Alan danced with cancer for the past 18 months. Predeceased by his parents, Robert and Lisette; survived by his sister, Marilyn; son, Michel (Alison); grandchildren, Ava, Ben, Tommy, Lucas, and Leah; and so many friendships that he considered family.

For him, life was not about accomplishments (although there were many) his life was about celebrating cherished moments with the ones who chose to accompany him on his journey, for "at the core there is love".

Alan arrived in Canada, the country he loved, as a young child with his parents, Robert and Lisette and his sister, Marilyn (Toronto), following a short time in the U.K.

where he lived with his family after fleeing Egypt as refugees.

As a Communications and student at Loyola College in Montreal he worked at America Express including at the corporate pavilion at Expo 67 in Montreal. After graduating with a Master's Degree in Communication from Fairfield University in Connecticut. Alan becomes a professor at Loyola University in Montreal.

Relocating to Ottawa in the midseventies, Alan made a difference for families in Canada as coExecutive Director with Dr. Robert Glossop at the Vanier Institute of the Family more than 30 years.

Following his 1998 sabbatical, spent in BC, Alan discovered this county's beauty through new eyes and captured the nature of relationship in his powerful and evocative images. Alan's photographs can be found in homes and offices across Canada and at the Ottawa Art Gallery.

While his accomplishments were many, the one he was most proud of was his son, Michel, who with his wife, Alison, are raising his five amazing grandchildren, Ava, Ben, Tommy, Lucas and Leah.

Alan spent the past 40 years in the community of Almonte and village of Appleton where he found joy in his many friendships with neighbours and colleagues in the artist community. He was a mentor to many and to the end of his last chapter he continued to meet with budding artists, young people and children guiding them to become the best of themselves in their creative pursuits.

A Celebration of Alan's life will be held on January 20, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. at the First Unitarian Church located at 30 Cleary Ave.

in Ottawa. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Alan Mirabelli Fund at the Vanier Institute, Almonte Hub Hospice or a charity of your choice that brings you joy and happiness.

GEORGE G. MUIRHEAD

George Muirhead died very peacefully on the evening of January 11, 2018 after a brief illness. He was in his 102nd year, and the 75th year of his marriage to his beloved wife, Audrey, who mourns the loss of a wonderful husband. His children were delighted to find the following among his well-documented preparations: "Born in Toronto May 8, 1916, died in Kingston at the age of . Survived by Audrey, his wife of years, children, Ross of Vancouver, Ann (Jamie) of Toronto, Barbara of Kingston, Donald (Deborah) of Kelowna; grandchildren, Robert, Alex, Leah, Kristina, Ross, Daniel, Helena; great-grandchild, Sydney. Prior to World War II he lived and was educated in Toronto. In 1942 he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Artillery and served in Canada, England, France, Belgium, Holland and Germany. In 1943 Audrey and George had a military wedding in Sussex, N.B.

After the war he completed his high school education and graduated from Trinity College and the School of Social Work at the University of Toronto. On a CMHC fellowship he then enrolled in the first Town & Regional Planning course at the U of T. In 1952 he began his professional planning career with Dryden & Smith, Planning Consultants in Kitchener: In 1955 he became the Planning Officer for the City of Kingston and in 1963 Director of Planning for the Township (later Borough) of Etobicoke in Metropolitan Toronto. He was also appointed to the Ontario Environmental Appeal Board as one of their first members. In 1970 he returned to Kingston as Director of Planning & Urban Renewal, and retired from City employment in 1980.

In 1960 he co-authored with Prof. Gordon Stephenson, U of T Planning School, a "Planning Study for Kingston". This study, which was financed by the federal, provincial and municipal governments, was the first comprehensive planning study of Kingston and region and prepared the groundwork for many civic programs in ensuing years, e.g., redevelopment of Rideau Heights, removal of substandard housing, neighbourhood improvements in old parts of the city including new parks and the Artillery Park recreation complex, historic building preservation (especially in old Sydenham Ward), central business district and waterfront improvement.

Upon retirement he established a planning consultant service and for nine years, as an adjunct professor, taught planning to civil engineering students at Queen's University.

In 1972 he was one of the founding members of the Frontenac Heritage Foundation, a group of citizens dedicated to the preservation of the architectural heritage of Kingston and Frontenac County. In 2005 he received the Gabrielle Leger Award from the Heritage Canada Foundation for services in the field of heritage conservation.

George enjoyed his planning career and life with his family. He participated in many recreational sports at various times including tennis, badminton, hiking, canoeing, camping, skiing, sailing and gardening. In 1941 he was a member of the Toronto Boulevard Club crew which won the one-mile war canoe Dominion Championship. Music was also an important part of his life. At the University of Toronto he sang with Hart House Glee Club and in church choirs in Kitchener and Kingston. Later he played tenor recorder with the Kingston Consort and recently struggled with the electronic keyboard.

He departs from this life feeling that he had been fortunate in entering the planning profession which gave him opportunities to serve many communities.

Above all, he felt that he had been blessed with a wonderful wife and family" George told a story about the irony of an obituary saying someone had died "unexpectedly" at age 104. He had evidently prepared his obituary well in advance, before the birth of his great grandchildren Alanna and Harrison and before he was awarded the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012.

Arrangements are entrusted to Robert J. Reid & Sons, "The Chapel on the Corner", 309 Johnson Street (at Barrie Street), Kingston. The funeral service will be held at St. George's Cathedral, 270 King Street East, Kingston on Friday January 19, 2018. Please visit the website as the time will be posted once available. Online condolences may be made at http://www.reidfuneralhome.com.

LAWRENCE J. O'TOOLE (Larry)

Peacefully in Queensway Carleton Hospital, January 9, 2018, ending an uncomfortable 3 months with various respiratory and blood ailments.

Beloved husband of 60 years, best friend and frequent flying partner to Jean (nee McCadden).

Father of David (Julie), Catherine (Ian), John (Elaine Gardner) and Chris (Wendy). Grandfather of 7. Predeceased by his parents, Vincent and Mary O'Toole of Peterborough; and by brothers, Michael and Patrick. Survived by sister, Anna Marie Sherlock (Al); and sisters-in-law, Sandra O'Toole (Patrick) and Maura Bolger (Bill) and many nieces and nephews.

Born on a farm in Otonabee, Ontario in 1930, Dad had no intention of staying on the farm, although he cherished those memories and wrote about them in his final years. He wanted to be a businessman and in the end he was one businessman who could hold his head high, having never deliberately mislead or been cruel to anyone he had dealings with.

After graduating from St. Mike's in 1952 (and a brief sojourn into the ice cream business) Dad went to work for Industrial Acceptance Corporation, opening multiple branches in Southern Ontario and meeting Mom in the process, they married in 1957.

Realizing that he was not reaching his full potential, and with $1,500 in the bank, in 1963 Dad and Mom moved to London so that Dad could get his MBA at Western.

He always said "WE got the MBA" because Mom was a full partner in its acquisition - allowing Dad time away to study and make a few bucks as a TA, as well as doing all the typing for all his essays and reports, while at the same time handling 4 kids under 5 - no small feat. It truly was a partnership.

The effort paid off when Dad was hired into a senior role by Woods, Gordon and Associates in 1965. In 1968 while on an assignment to External Affairs in Ottawa, Dad was lured away from the private sector and into the public sector. He was hired as Assistant Undersecretary of State at External Affairs and moved the whole clan to Kanata in January 1968. He worked at External until 1977 and then moved to Treasury Board from 1977-1982.

He then worked on projects like the Federal Privatization Initiative and the FEDC program until being appointed Deputy Minister of Public Works in 1990.

Dad retired from the Public Service in 1992 and went to work for the OECD in Paris, France. He followed that with years of consulting to the OECD and The World Bank.

He only really stopped working at age 83 (2013) when he closed his office on Holland Avenue in Ottawa. Dad was a quiet, steady and compassionate person.

He cared deeply for his family and for his cherished friends to whom he was known as honest and forthright and above all, a really good listener. He was a voracious reader but he took his greatest joy (and frankly his bewilderment) at the diversity of his 4 children - all distinctly different and each so interesting in the eyes of he and Mom. He will be missed, but his lessons and values are safely ensconced in his children and grandchildren. If, as St. Augustine said, "The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page" then, Dear Dad, you were a scholar.

The family would like to thank the generous and supportive staff at QCH - Dad felt secure in your care and had nothing but respect and admiration for the physicians, nurses and staff who cared for him. Cremation has taken place.

At Dad's request, a family (only) mass will be held at St. Isidore's Church, 1135 March Road, South March, at 2 p.m. on January 19th.

For colleagues, co-workers and friends, a celebration of Dad's life will take place in spring.

DOUG OVERHILL July 5, 1928 January 11, 2018

Tom Douglas Overhill was born in Nelson, British Columbia, and passed away in Etobicoke, Ontario. Named by his Swiss mother in honour of the magnificent Douglas fir tree, Doug became an avid skier, engineer, wood carver, and world traveler.

He outlived his beloved wife of 60 years, Daphne Caroline (née Hicks); and is survived by sister, Patricia Harvey; daughters, Heidi and Kirstie Overhill; sons-inlaw, Alan Rosenthal and John MacDonald; and grandchildren, Nora Rosenthal, Brian Sokolowski, Matthew MacDonald, Rhobie MacDonald, and Clara MacDonald.

Friends are invited to a private wake to be held on Tuesday, January 16th.

RONALD WILLIAM PARK "Ron" FCPA,FCA,CPA (Hon)

Ron passed away on January 1, 2018 at the age of 87. Loving husband of Marjean for 62 years; wonderful father to Randy (Nora Cullen) and Eileen MacDonald (George); proud grandfather to Peter and Cameron MacDonald; special friend to John and Sharan Clark and their children, Ashley and Harrison. Predeceased by brother, Alan.

Ron began his distinguished accounting career as a Chartered Accountant at public accounting firm McIntosh, McVicar and Dinsley in 1949. Next he joined Finning Tractor, quickly rising to the rank of corporate secretary, and forming an integral part of the leadership team as Finning grew from a regional, family owned business to a publicly traded international success. After years involved as a volunteer on the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants research committees, and as President of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of British Columbia (often as the first or only industry representative), he culminated his career as Executive Vice-President of the ICABC (now CPABC) where he remained until his retirement in 1990. Ron was also a longtime, active member of the Financial Executives Institute in Vancouver.

Ron lived most of his life in his beloved West Vancouver. He will be remembered as a genuinely devoted husband, father, grandfather, dog lover, co-worker, neighbour and friend. Ron was an accomplished baritone, and his hobbies included sailing at Hollyburn Sailing Club, gardening, and woodworking. His motto was "there are no problems, only projects".

Thank you to the staff at Evergreen House for making his last few months as comfortable as possible.

In lieu of flowers, donations in Ron's name to the BC SPCA or a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

A celebration of life will be held on February 3, 2018 2:00 p.m. at West Vancouver United Church. Details will be posted at http://www.hollyburnfunerals.com.

MICAJAH ERSKINE PICKETT, III Born in Indianola, Mississippi, January 9, 1944 to Mary Francis (nee Wood) and Micajah Jr. Brother to Patricia (Spedler) and Annie.

Micajah moved to Burlington, Ontario in 1961 where he met Carole Gardiner at Nelson High School. They were married in 1968 after graduating from Western University. Micajah continued his education, going on to earn an CA, MBA, CFA. In 1972, at the age of 28, he began teaching at Ryerson (Polytechnic) University, during that time he and Carole welcomed their two children, Shelby and Courtney.

After 22 years at Ryerson, Micajah left in 1994 to become a Vice-President at the Canadian Securities Institute. His passion for flyfishing and love of the outdoors, music, pottery, photography and books led him to British Columbia and, eventually, to his roots in the South, his greatgrandmother's hometown of Aberdeen, Mississippi.

He passed away peacefully while listening to music in rural Ontario on December 23, 2017. He is survived by his two children and grandchildren, Mika, Maple and Charles Sitchon.

A service will not be held.

Memorial contributions can be sent to his grandchildren's school in Westport, Ontario to help teach future generations of his love of music.

Arrangements are in the care of Blair & Son Funeral Directors, Perth. Donations may be sent Rideau Vista Public School, Music Program, 9921 County Rd., Westport, Ontario K0G 1X0.

SUSAN JANEROGERS (néeBartlett) May 31, 1966 January 9, 2018

It is with an aching sadness that Susan's family announces her passing after a courageous battle with cancer.

She will be profoundly missed by her beloved husband, Eric; her adored children, Ryan and Emma; her parents, Janet and Morris Bartlett; her brother, Peter Bartlett; as well as a great host of friends, neighbors, colleagues, and caregivers.

Respecting Susan's final requests, a private family viewing took place at Turner & Porter's Yorke Chapel on January 11, 2018.

An enthusiastic celebration of Susan's life and work will take place this coming summer in High Park, Toronto, a place of peace and happiness she knew so well and loved so dearly.

DOUGLAS E. SANDERS MD,FRCPC June 10, 1926 January 10, 2018

Douglas was deeply loved by his family who admired and respected the man that he was.

Doug was an academic radiologist.

He loved teaching. He was a major contributor to clinical research in radiology and chest medicine.

He helped develop procedures that are still in use today. He was a graduate of UTS 1944 and U of T Medical School 1949. Those classmates were friends for life.

Douglas is survived by his wife, Joy; sons, Bruce (Tricia) and Jim (Patti Wright). His daughter, Gail, predeceased him in 1978. He will be missed by his grandchildren, Lindsay (Graem), Dave (Elyse), Justine, Heather and Colin. His great-grandson, Hardy, gave him great joy in his final months.

There will be a family service in Stayner in accordance with Douglas's wishes.

MAUREEN (MO) MARGARET SCOBIE

Maureen Scobie (nee Sutherland) passed away peacefully and comfortably under the excellent care of the Bethell House staff in Inglewood, Ontario, on Monday, January 8, 2018.

Maureen was born in Montreal in 1930 but grew up in Sydney, Nova Scotia with her younger sister, Joan. There she met her (late) husband, Tom during her teenage years. After they married in 1953, they eventually settled in Mississauga where they raised their 3 children, Linda (Doug Soules), Marlene (Michael Schroeder) and Barbara (Rick May).

In 1986 Maureen was determined to return "home" during retirement and initiated the move to Ingonish Beach, Cape Breton.

Both she and Tom spent many enjoyable years active in the community and connecting with friends, old and new.

Through her entire life, Maureen applied her unstoppable energy to the things she loved most. She was known as "Scoop" Scobie during her writing career at the Mississauga News and the Cape Breton Post. She volunteered to her favourite causes, she was an avid curler, a passionate bridge player and a loyal Blue Jays fan.

She was adored by her many friends in Ontario and Nova Scotia.

She will be missed by "her girls"; by her grandchildren, Jennifer, Shannon, Paul, Heather and Kristen; her great-grandchildren, Samantha and Max; her nieces; nephews; and extended family.

Maureen's family would like to extend their appreciation to the staff at Mountainview Terrace for their amazing care and service over the past year.

A Celebration of Life will be held at J.S. Jones & Son Funeral Home, 11582 Trafalgar Rd., North of Maple Ave., Georgetown on January 20 at 2:00 p.m. with a visitation at 1:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to the Bethell House Hospice. https:// foundation.bethellhospice.org/ To send expressions of sympathy, please visit http://www.jsjonesandsonfuneralhome.com

CAROL SOLWAY

Carol passed away peacefully on January 9, 2018, aged eighty-four years and one day.

Daughter of the late Alex and Fanny Solway. Beloved sister and sister-in-law of Herb Solway and Ann Shortell; aunt of Gary Solway and Jeilah Chan, Diane Solway and David Resnicow, Michael Solway and Danielle Conway, and Zoe Band; great-aunt of Alex, Rachel, Nicholas, Kyra, and Henry.

Carol was a strong, determined woman, who was loyal, loving, had a great sense of humour and fun - and was known for her ability to keep a secret. After a peripatetic university career at the University of Miami and Brandeis, Carol graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Toronto, and worked for the catering department at the Park Plaza Hotel.

She then stunned her family by suddenly opening an antique store in Yorkville. She specialized in English glass and china, but also imported furniture from England and Europe. Entirely selftaught, she became a leading expert in her field, and ran a successful business for decades.

Carol was also a moving force behind the annual Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Children's Book Awards.

She was a superb arbiter of taste and elegance, who recently stated that nothing about her life had ever been beige. The ban on smoking on airplanes meant Carol curtailed first her international flights, and then almost all travel.

After retirement, she was a devoted caregiver to her aunt Sylvia Schwartz, and loved sharing the world of information on the internet with her inner circle.

A private funeral has been held at Carol's request. Donations in her honour, if desired, may be made to the Ontario Arts Foundation, 416-961-1660, directed to the Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Children's Book Awards.

THE HONOURABLE MR. JUSTICE WILLIAM PARKER SOMERS

On January 5, 2018 at Sunnybrook Hospital, the Honourable William P. Somers passed away peacefully from heart failure. Dad endured numerous physical challenges over the past few months, all of which he bore with characteristic determination and grace. He was particularly happy to have hosted his family on Christmas Day and was in fine form, enjoying an old fashioned or two, good food and the comfort and company of those he loved.

William was born February 26, 1933 in Toronto, Ontario to parents, Geoffrey and Maggie Somers. Boyhood was spent crisscrossing the country with his mother and his lifelong best friend, his older brother, Geoffrey. His days as a boarder at St. Andrew's College left an indelible mark and he remained heavily involved with the school as a loyal old boy and Board Director. After graduating high school, he attended McMaster University and The University of Toronto where he received his BA in English. William then attended Osgoode Hall Law School and was called to the Bar in 1957, thereafter pursuing a successful litigation career with Osler Hoskin, followed by Montgomery Cassels, and then as a founding Partner with Dutton, Brock, Somers. From 1991 until his retirement in 2008, he served honourably in the Ontario Court of Justice.

While at U of T, Dad met the love of his life, Sally Wigle. They married in 1957 and remained together until Mum's untimely passing in 2013.

Together they forged a strong and loving bond, and provided a caring and welcoming home for their three sons. The Somers home on Lytton Blvd.

became the centrepiece of the North Toronto driveway hockey universe, with Dad playing goal in his unique style, and Mum overseeing food and beverage service from her well stocked commissary. Summers were spent on the warm shores of Georgian Bay and Muskoka, and we have many fond memories of endless nights on the screened-in porch at Beaumaris being regaled by Dad's mirthful story telling. He was also an active member of The Toronto Golf Club, The Badminton and Racquet Club and the Delray Beach Club in Florida, where he spent many winters in retirement with Sally enjoying the warmer lifestyle.

William leaves behind his son, Sandy (Gillian) and their daughters, Andrea and Kate; and his son, Tony (Julie) and their children, Ellen, Heather and William. He was predeceased by his son, Peter whose widow, Jennifer Loft Somers (Crisp) now lives in Calgary, along with their daughters, Maggie Somers and Rosie Somers (Crisp). He provided his family with wonderful memories of their father, father-in-law and adored "Didi", and touched so many friends and acquaintances with his unique combination of wit and charm, and his sincere interest in their lives.

Cremation has taken place. Friends are invited to a visitation at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West, on Sunday, January 21st from 4-7 p.m. A Memorial service will be held at St.

Clement's Anglican Church, 59 Briar Hill Avenue, on Monday, January 22nd at 2 p.m., with reception to follow at the church. In accordance with William's wishes, donations in lieu of flowers may be made to either the Canadian Cancer Society (http://www.cancer.ca/en/donate) in memory of his son, Peter, or to the St. Clements Church Foundation (http://www.canadahelps.org/en/charities/the-church-of-st-clement-eglinton).

VERNON TURLEY 1923-2017

Vernon Turley passed away peacefully at home in Westmount, QC, in accordance with his wishes, surrounded by family, on December 14, 2017 at the age of 94, after being treated in the hospital for complications from pneumonia.

Beloved husband of 72 years to Gavine; dearest father to Penny (Ivan Velan), Ron (Madeleine Paton), Neil and Cynthia (Peter Selnar); devoted grandfather to Rob Velan (Claire), Shane Velan (Jill), Corey Velan (Kristine), Kristina Velan, Andrew Velan (Erin), Ryan and Heather Turley and Tara Sellers (Landon); step-grandfather to Karena Selnar and Monika Bennett (Darren); great-grandfather to 11 Velan great-grandchildren, Grayson, Emma, Ryan, Blair, Charlie, Oliver, Cole, Will, Elliot, James, and Matthew; and step-greatgrandfather to Sullivan Bennett.

Born and raised in Montreal, he joined the RCAF to serve as a pilot during WWII. At the end of the war he re-joined McDonald Currie (now PwC) becoming a partner in 1955. His career as a CA included being one of the first in his profession to apply flow charting and computer programming to the audit process. Other career highlights: he was invited by the U.K. government in 1967 to participate in a Royal Commission investigating gambling and corruption in the Bahamas. Post retirement highlights: due to his extensive experience as a bank auditor he was invited to serve on the Estey Commission Inquiry in 1981 into bank failures in Alberta; and he took a more active part in steering a family company - 100 year old Laurentian Spring Water - modernizing it into an efficient and profitable bottling plant.

Adventurous, creative, athletic (runner, skier, scuba diver) and modest: he had many passions and interests which included sailing - at the cottage on Lake Champlain, the Atlantic seaboard, and the Caribbean; dance lessons with his wife, Gavine, and travelling the world together. With his affinity and skill for building he remodelled the family homes and built a summer cottage, saving lots of money, another passion. In retirement he took up wood carving, creating an assortment of enchanting characters.

Perhaps his greatest satisfaction came later in life as a volunteer at the BC Aviation Museum where, for 17 years, he restored vintage aircraft, culminating in his single handed rebuilding of a Lincoln Sport, a home built bi-plane popular in the 1920's. He 'retired' from the museum at age 90.

The family would like to express special thanks to Dr. Ivan Rohan and Dee Davidson together with all the Complete Care caregivers who provided devoted care during his last days.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Operation Smile, Toronto or the BC Aviation Museum, Sidney, BC. A funeral will be held at St. Matthias Anglican Church in Westmount on Tuesday, January 23, 2018 at 11:00 a.m.

YOSHIKO TERADO (nee Oga)

Aged 81. Mom passed away peacefully at St. Vincent's, Langara Care Home, surrounded by her family, on January 3, 2018.

Yoshiko was born in Yamaguchi prefecture, Japan on September 29, 1936 which is where she met her future husband, Sunao. Together with their two eldest children, they immigrated to Canada in 1966 where they lived, added to (William) and raised their family and built a successful business in Mississauga, Ontario. Yoshiko will be remembered as a gracious, dignified and loving mother to William, Risa and Jun and his wife, Karin; and grandmother to Alexander.

Mom was predeceased by her husband, Sunao, her parents and youngest brother.

The family has held a private service at Vancouver Memorial Services and Crematorium on January 5, 2018 and has requested that, in lieu of flowers, please make a donation to a charity of your choice. The family would like to especially thank the staff at St. Vincent's, Langara, Dr. Caron and the staff at St. Joseph's Hospital who gave mom such excellent care over these past years and who showed such kindness and respect towards her - we are grateful.

CYRIL GRANT WILCOX WWII Veteran

Passed away on Monday, January 8, 2018 at the age of 94 years.

Beloved husband of the late Elizabeth (Bess). Loving father of Larry and his wife, Delphine; Barbara and her husband, Glenn Crawford. Proud grandfather of Kelly Wilcox and her husband, Alex Lara; Heather Belajac and her husband, Mark; James and Jennifer Crawford. Much loved great-grandfather of Eva Sofia, Daniel, Aubrey and Laylah.

Predeceased by his brothers, Rae, William and Loyal.

Cyril was the co-founder of Electrostatic Coating Equipment (Canada) Limited and a WWII Veteran with the Canadian Forces, Perth Regiment, serving four years overseas. Friends may call at the Turner & Porter Peel Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy 10 N. of Qew) on Monday, January 15, 2018 from 2 p.m. until the time of the Memorial Service in the Chapel at 3 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, if you would like to make a donation in Cyril's memory, please do so to SickKids Foundation or United Way of Peel Region. Online condolences and donations may be made through http://www.turnerporter.ca

ALLAN HARVIE WAISMAN January 24, 1928- December 20, 2017

Allan Harvie Waisman was born in Winnipeg, the only child of immigrants Rubin and Bessie Waisman. He went to school in the city's North End and took his turn behind the counter of his parents' corner store, mostly, he later reported, to eat candy bars and read comics. He graduated from the University of Manitoba with a Bachelor of Architecture in 1950, and soon after married Joyce Faigie Sedletsky, after a romance that began when they noticed each other on a bus on their way to work. In 1953, he founded an architectural practice with Jack Ross and they started by designing several small rural hospitals. Waisman Ross also designed Winnipeg's New York Life building, a landmark modernist two-storey glass and steel office structure, which is currently being restored. The firm won two silver Massey medals, one for Allan's family cottage in Husavik, an open glass and wood structure built entirely around a large fireplace. Allan applied his original sense of design to his family homes, all of which were unusual.

In the 1960s the firm designed a unique office at 10 Donald St., and merged with another firm to become Waisman, Ross, Blankstein, Coop, Gillmore, Hanna, later changing their name to Number TEN Architects. They designed the Manitoba Theatre Centre (now a National Historic Site), and Allan was active on its board. As well, he was on the board of the Winnipeg Art Gallery and the Royal Winnipeg Ballet. The Winnipeg community's embrace of the arts, culture and design, was a wonderful environment for Allan's formative years as a young architect. As the sixties drew to a close, he was ready to spread his wings and move west.

Allan moved to Vancouver in 1971. He had already formed a business relationship with R.C. Baxter, a prominent developer. Allan designed one of their projects, a group of three office towers on Hastings. The new Waisman Architectural Group re-purposed an old barge (known as the WAG barge) for an office and moored it in Coal Harbour. The firm became Waisman Dewar Grout Carter Architects and later Architectura. Al was known as somewhat of a maverick employer. He was extremely generous to his employees and enthusiastically shared his many new-age ideas. His firm had many noteworthy projects including the Vancouver International Airport Expansion, six pavilions for Expo 86 including the permanent BC pavilion and Whistler Town Centre. Over the years, he received many architectural awards including an Urban Development Institute Award, Governor General Award, Canadian Architect Award and the Royal Architectural Institute Award.

After retirement, Al focused on his entrepreneurial skills, becoming involved in several start-ups. He loved his morning walk through Vancouver's downtown to his office, greeting many acquaintances and planning his day.

Spending most summers exploring the coast on his boat, the Flying Jenny, he also enjoyed international travel with the family, and, never a stickler for rules, would lead them on many harrowing adventures.

In his later years, as a respected community figure, Al still radiated vitality and leadership, mentoring many young people in his profession. He was an astute collector of contemporary Canadian Art and generous patron to many organizations, including the Vancouver Playhouse, Vancouver Art Gallery, Simon Fraser University, and Britannia Mine Museum. In 2009, he endowed a fund at the University of Manitoba to support a graduate scholarship for Aboriginal students in the Faculty of Architecture.

Devoted to his family, Allan was always available for advice and support, providing educational opportunities to all. He lived a very full life, always looking for new experiences and fun. Loved and remembered by his wife, Faigie (Joyce); children, Sheera, Yail, Tully, Dean, (daughter-in-law TC); and grandchildren, Aidan, Adlai, Kelsey, Oren, Dylan, Cameron and Brynn.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the University of Manitoba, Allan Waisman Aboriginal Architecture Scholarship, 200 - 137 Innovation Drive, Winnipeg, MB R3T 6B6.

Condolences can be sent to the Waisman Family at waisman2018@gmail.com.

"So come, my friends, be not afraid We are so lightly here It is in love that we are made In love we disappear" (Leonard Cohen)

WILLIAM J. WITHROW C.M.,O.Ont.,C.D.,M.A.,M.Ed.,F.M.C.A.,F.O.C.A. Director of the Art Gallery of Ontario,1961-1991

Bill Withrow died peacefully, with family at his side, on Sunday, January 7, 2018 at Sunnybrook Veterans Centre.

Bill was born in Toronto on September 30, 1926 to Wilfred and Evelyn Withrow. Showing early artistic promise, he was selected to attend Saturday classes at the Art Gallery of Toronto, where Arthur Lismer was among his teachers. At 18, following the example of his father and grandfather, who had both served in France during WWI, Bill enlisted in the army. Upon his discharge, Bill's parents encouraged him to use his veterans' allowance to attend university. He agreed on one condition - that he could first marry his high school sweetheart, the beautiful and vivacious June Van Ostrom. After graduation from the University of Toronto, Bill became an art teacher and then department head at Earl Haig Collegiate. He also taught evening art classes, served in the intelligence unit of the army reserves, and obtained two Master's Degrees, one in Fine Art and another in Education.

In 1960, Bill joined the Art Gallery of Toronto as Associate Director and was appointed Director in 1961. Under his leadership, the AGT flourished. In 1966, he convinced the province that the institution should become the Art Gallery of Ontario, providing it with more prominence and funding. With the significant donation of European and Canadian modern art by Sam and Ayala Zacks, and the promise by Henry Moore of a major donation of his own works (the foundation of what is now the largest collection of Moore works in the world), Bill was able to obtain public and private funding to undertake an ambitious three-stage, twenty-year expansion of the AGO's building and its collection.

Bill introduced the blockbuster exhibition to Toronto by bringing the international touring exhibition, Treasures of Tutankhamun, to the AGO in 1979. Outstanding touring shows organized by the AGO followed, such as Vincent Van Gogh and the Birth of Cloisonnism and The Mystic North.

He was also active in the wider arts community, co-chairing an influential federal task force on policy-making for Canada's museums, serving on the committee to choose a Canadian war memorial for Green Park in London and as a founding board member of the Varley Art Gallery of Markham.

Bill leaves behind his wife, June, to whom he would have been married 70 years on January 24. June was his great love, nurturing presence and charming companion at AGO events, and their home was the gathering place for family birthdays, holiday celebrations and countless backyard barbecues. Bill will be lovingly remembered by his children, John (Laurel Murdoch), Stephen (Christine), Anne (John Trimble) and David (Chloe McIntosh); by grandchildren, Jennifer (Craig Whiteside) and Diana Withrow; Stephanie Eadie (Wayne) and Ryan Trimble; Jacqueline Cavalier-Withrow; and by great-grandson, James Whiteside. Fondly remembered by stepgrandson, Patrick Walsh. Predeceased by his youngest grandchild, Laura Withrow, on November 29, 2017.

The family wishes to acknowledge with deepest thanks his personal support workers, led over the past 5 years by the incomparable Mercy Flores. We are also most grateful to Dr. David Shergold and Dr. Maria Chang and the staff of the Sunnybrook Veterans Centre, who showed Bill and the family much kindness.

A celebration of life will be held in Walker Court at the Art Gallery of Ontario (317 Dundas Street West, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1G4) on Sunday, April 8, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, making a donation or taking out a membership to the AGO would be most fitting. Donations in Bill's name may be made at http://www.ago.ca or by calling 416-979-6660, ext. 816.

Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through http://www.humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

DR E.JOHN WYLIE "Jack" OD, FAAO

On Tuesday, December 12, 2017 Jack passed away peacefully at the age of 86. Jack was born June 27, 1931 in Toronto to Ernest William and Margaret Kathleen (Sweeney). He will be forever remembered by his wife, Lynn of 64 years; daughters, Karen, Jill and Ann; grandchildren, Rebecca (Nick), Kim (Hector), Diana, Jasper (Kenny) and Dustin (Laura); greatgrandchildren, Maia and Maeve; brother, Bill (Jane); brother-in-law to Wendy and Don; and uncle to many nieces and nephews, as well as lots of friends and colleagues.

Jack was predeceased by brother Don and sister Margaret.

Jack graduated from the College of Optometry in 1953 and continued with a long and successful career.

He volunteered with numerous organizations including Outreach Programs with the University of Waterloo through CIDA, Ministry of Transportation, as well as serving on many boards including Kennedy House Youth Services and Scarborough Philharmonic Orchestra. Jack was the president of the North Scarborough Rotary Club and a Paul Harris Fellow, as well as being an honourary member. Besides being hard working, Jack also loved to travel both with the family and with Lynn within Canada and many places around the world. He especially enjoyed trips in the "old car", his vintage MG with Lynn and the car club members.

Jack had a competitive side with his hobbies of sailboat racing in his younger days, before moving on to sports cars and pit crews.

He built furniture for their home and was involved with many renovations as well. Jack also showed quite the artistic side in his painting, woodcarving and pottery creations. He also shared in Lynn's love of the Toronto Zoo and spent many an hour there with her.

A very special thank you from the family to the staff at the Scarborough Retirement Residence and Scarborough Centenary Hospital for your kindness and compassion.

Jack, as well, appreciated your thoughtful care.

A funeral will be held Saturday, January 20, 2018 at McDougall & Brown, Scarborough Chapel at 2900 Kingston Road. There will be a family receiving line and gathering at 11:00 a.m., service at 12:00 p.m., followed by a reception. Inurnment will take place at Resthaven Memorial Gardens at 2:30 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, memorials can be made to the University of Waterloo School of Optometry, Kennedy House Youth Services, The Toronto Zoo, Scarborough Philharmonic Orchestra or the organization of your choosing.

JUNE ROWLANDS

Celebration of life for June Rowlands, 2 p.m., Tuesday, January 16, 2018 at Rosedale United Church, 159 Roxborough Drive, Toronto. TTC: Rosedale Bus 82 from Rosedale Subway Station.

Parking on nearby streets, wheelchair access.

JUSTICE JOHN C. BOUCK May 9, 1931 January18, 2010

Lovingly remembered by Shirley and families

DAVID CROMBIE

The family remembers David with much love and admiration for being a most wonderful husband, father, son, uncle, brother, brother-in-law, friend and neighbour. Unfortunately none of his 10 grandchildren ever got the chance to meet him or share in his fun, but their parents are doing a great job of talking about "Grandpa David" and telling stories about their adventures in life with him. That helps so much to keep his memory alive.

It is hard to believe that 30 years have already passed by but we want to take this opportunity to celebrate David's life and thank him for so many of the good things that we continue to enjoy in this world: "The County" (his favourite place to be), the farm in Milford, his passion for hobbies and DIY projects, his love for summer boat trips and winter ski breaks, and so much more. And we are especially grateful for his gift of humour which brought us so many laughs over the years.

We miss you terribly David, and we will love you forever.

Libby, Robyn, Brad, Martha and Tighe.

MRS. MAY JONES

Who passed away, one year ago.

Deeply missed by her Loving husband and children. May you Rest In Peace Mom.

We all love and miss you and you are in our thoughts.

Your Loving Family

BIRTH AND DEATH NOTICES
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Saturday, January 20, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B18


DAVID MARTIN AIRTH

Died on January 16, 2018 at The Grace Hospice in Toronto. David ran David's Framing for 48 years where he was known to be welcoming or curmudgeonly. David framed people's lives in art and photographs. He loved to engage in discussions, often spirited and full of humour.

David loved New York and his life-long home, Toronto. He often said that cities can make the world a more peaceful place by bringing people together. David himself brought people together. He leaves a large and varied group of friends and family with rich memories.

Elizabeth will have a celebration of David's life in the spring. Donations in David's memory can be made to either The Grace Hospice or to an animal charity of the donor's choosing.

WILLIAM WADDELL ALLAN

"BILL" January 11, 2018

William (Bill) Waddell Allan died January 11, 2018 at North York General Hospital in his 91st year. Bill was predeceased by his wife, Gavina Allan, nee Brown. Thanks to the staff at North York General and the Teddington. Survived by nephews, Ian Brown, Randy Cousins; niece, Anne Goodchild; their families and by the late Kevin Brown's family.

A private celebration of Bill's life is planned for the spring. Condolences may be left at http://www.aftercare.org

CHARLES ROBERT ERNEST ALLEN

"Bob"

Born June 20, 1926 and died January 10, 2018 in Toronto. Raised in the small town of Hartland, New Brunswick; directly after graduation from high school joined the Canadian Army July 23, 1943 serving in Canada until discharge December 17, 1945. Enrolled in the University of New Brunswick, graduating in 1949 with a degree in Electrical Engineering. Followed a working career of some 35 years as a Professional Engineer and then general insurance broker, 25 years with Marsh & McLennan Limited.

Predeceased by his wife, Adele Vaisey Allen; he is survived by a brother, Reade Allen of Topsham, ME; a stepson, Douglas Vaisey of Toronto; predeceased by his stepdaughter, Robin Vaisey; and survived by many grandchildren and greatgrandchildren.

Cremation has taken place followed by a private family ceremony near Bancroft. Memorial donations to the Parkinson Foundation or your local Food Bank. Arrangements entrusted to the Graham A. Giddy Funeral Homes, Fergus 519.843.3100. http://www.grahamgiddyfh.com.

HONOURABLE ALLAN MCNIECE AUSTIN

March 7, 1928 -January 12, 2018

His family is saddened to announce that Mac died peacefully at Belmont House, Friday, January 12th.

Beloved husband of Margaret Kyle for 66 years. Adored father of Allan (Lyn), Jim (Sue) and Tom (Rosaria). Devoted and loving grandfather of Maggie (Jeremy Packard), Gren, Graham (Mallory Lazarus) and Michael.

He was the third son of Allan McNiece Austin and Alice Dickinson. He was predeceased by his brother, James McNiece; and is survived by his brothers, John Beresford and Richard Jackson; and many cousins, nieces and nephews.

Mac was born and received his early education in Chapleau, in Northern Ontario, before following his older brothers south to attend Trinity College School in Port Hope. He went on to Victoria College at the University of Toronto and was a member of the first class to graduate from the University of Toronto Law School.

He was a student, associate, partnerand managing partnerwith the firm now called WeirFoulds, LLP. From 1987 to 2003 he served as a judge in the High Court of Justice and the Court of Appeal for Ontario. After retiring from the bench he returned to WeirFoulds and participated in arbitration and mediation work.

He was a natural athlete and an accomplished cross-country runner, and he loved sailing and skiing well into his later years. He was a dedicated and long-time member of Eglinton St. George's United Church.

He loved God, his family and his work. He loved life.

We are profoundly thankful for the care he received from the whole team at Belmont House.

The family will receive friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home A.W. Miles - Newbigging Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue) from 4:00 - 6:00 p.m. on Saturday, January 20th.

A Service of Thanksgiving will be held on Monday, January 22nd at 2:00 p.m.in Eglinton St. George's United Church, 35 Lytton Boulevard, Toronto M4R 1L2.

In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation in Mac's memory to the Alzheimer Society of Canada, 20 Eglinton Avenue West, 16th Floor, Toronto M4R 1K8, http://www.alzheimer.ca. Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through www. humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

LAWRENCE BALLON M.D.

On Thursday, January 18, 2018 at St. Michael's Hospital. Dr. Lawrence Ballon, beloved husband of the late Jeraldene Ballon. Loving father and father-in-law of Amy Ballon and Ian Schnoor, and Luke Ballon and Dalia Cohen. Brother and brother-in-law of Henry and Frances, Fred and Esther, and Marvin and the late Sheila Blackstien. Devoted saba of Jessie, Kyra, Lily, and Jack. Also sadly missed by Madelaine Roig.

At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Sunday, January 21, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. Interment at the Holy Blossom section of Pardes Shalom. Shiva will be held at 109 Walmer Road, Toronto. Memorial donations may be made to http://www.tafelmusik.org.

LOIS ANNE BELL

January 17, 2018

Lois Anne Cossar "Loey" Bell, 86, beloved wife of Dr. Edward Graham "Ted" Bell died Wednesday at home. Loey was born in Toronto, Canada, the daughter of the late George and Dorothy Green Cossar. She was a graduate of St. Clements School and the University Of Toronto Department Of Physiotherapy. She was a marathon runner, decathloner, world class swimmer and a proud member of Syracuse Chargers. Loey lived in Pompey and cherished her farm where she had horses and raised cattle and turkeys.

Loey is survived by her husband of 63 years, Dr. Edward Graham "Ted" Bell; was the mother of Andrea Kathleen Bell and Todd Kennedy Bell (Alisha) and sister of Noreen Beasley of Schomberg, Ontario, Canada. She was predeceased by her sister, Jeanne Pettitte.

A memorial service will be held Saturday, January 27, 2018, 3:00 p.m. at Ballweg & Lunsford Funeral Home, at Route 20 and Field Lane, LaFayette, NY 13084.

Please visit the online memorial at http://www.ballweg-lunsford.com

KATHLEEN ISABEL BOX

Passed away at Roseglen Village for Seniors, Port Hope on Thursday January 18, 2018. Kathleen Hamilton beloved wife of the late George Box. Dear mother of Peter (Heather) and Tom Box. Also remembered by grandchildren, Charlie and Grace. Sister of the late Charles Hamilton and Ruth Gooderham. Survived by her niece, Jean Eiranova.

Private interment of cremated remains in Port Hope Union Cemetery.

http://www.allisonfuneralhome.com

TOM BROWN

Retired Architect, Thomas Brown Architects; Landscape Designer and Artist.

Passed away at Lennox and Addington County Hospital in Napanee on Thursday, January 18, 2018, after bravely battling a long illness, Thomas Edward Brown of Tamworth, Ontario (SpindleTree Gardens) in his 80th year. Beloved husband of Susie Meisner. Dear brother of Paul Brown (Yvonne) of Kitchener and Judy LeFeuvre (late Richard) of Mississauga. Proud uncle of Noelle (Randy); Johnathan (Karla) and Joshua (Brittany). Predeceased by his parents, Tom and Reta Brown.

Special thanks to his doctors Laing McFadzean and John Matthews for their dedicated and compassionate care over the years.

The family will receive friends at the Hannah Funeral Home in Tamworth (613-379-2997) on Saturday afternoon, January 27 from 2-4 p.m. Memorial service will be held in the chapel on Sunday, January 28 at 2:00 p.m. Memorial donations made to the Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplasia Association of Canada would be appreciated by the family.

JEOFFREY STEVEN BULL

April 7, 1965 -January 2, 2018

Died in Toronto after a short struggle with an aggressive cancer. Left behind to mourn are his beloved wife and very best friend, Julia Rhodes; and his cherished daughter, Charlotte; his dear parents, John and Fruji Bull of Ottawa; his brother, Stephen Bull; his wife, Louisa and family; and his in-laws, Ned and Liz Rhodes and family.

Jeoff was born in Ottawa where he earned a reputation as a learned fellow at an early age. He completed an Honours BA in English Literature from McGill University followed by an MA and PhD in English Literature from the University of Toronto. He found his calling as a Professor of English and History at Humber College. He was a born teacher.

We all will miss our "village explainer." He made a point of learning as much as he could about literature, history, politics, sports, music, film and any other topic that was of current interest in the world - even social history, children's literature and crafting, much to the delight and love of his wife. He happily shared this knowledge with everyone.

Jeoff was a warm, kind, honourable man who was unaware of his huge impact on those around him. He loved a day on the ski slopes, a three-hour sail or an afternoon on his front porch with a book or his guitar.

A Celebration of his Life will be held on Sunday, February 11, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. in the G Commons at the Lakeshore Campus of Humber College, 17 Colonel Samuel Smith Park Drive. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the Jeoffrey Bull Memorial Scholarship at Humber College: 416-6730152, online http://www.humber. ca/tribute/jeoffbull, or send a cheque, payable to "Humber College", to Humber College, Advancement and Alumni, LRC 5th Floor, 205 Humber College Boulevard. Toronto, ON M9W 5L7. Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

COLONEL JOHN H.C. CLARRY

MBE, ED, CD, QC

Lawyer, soldier, woodlot proprietor, beer lover, generous provider. John Hamilton Cameron Clarry passed away peacefully at home on Friday, January 12, 2018. Born September 20, 1919 in Calgary to parents Ernest and Jean Clarry. Survived by his three children and five grandchildren: Susan (Sara and James), David (Andrew and Cameron), and Michael (wife, Michelle, and son, Max). Predeceased by the love of his life, Elizabeth Joy Denton Clarry; and his sister, Norah.

Displaced to Toronto by the Great Depression, where he attended and graduated from UTS, University College at U of T, and Osgoode Hall (Silver Medal recipient).

John's lifelong connection with the Canadian military began as a cadet at UTS, and progressed through overseas duty during the Second World War, and continued with militia duty, culminating as Honorary Colonel of the 25 (Toronto) Service Battalion. His connections also included 35 years of volunteer service with the Army Cadet League, and enjoyment and leadership with the Royal Canadian Legion and the Royal Canadian Military Institute. Recognition included the Order of Orange-Nassau for his contribution to Canadian military operations in Holland at the end of the war, Past Honorary Counsel of the Conference of Defence Associations, Honorary President of the Royal Canadian Military Institute, and the Colonel John H.C. Clarry Award recognizing Ontario's top large cadet corps.

His legal career with McCarthy Tetrault spanned over 40 years, including a period as Managing Partner. During that time he was valued by clients and colleagues as someone adept at translating complex legal issues into business terms and translating business agreements into clear and useful legal documents. He was a quiet, progressive person who provided thoughtful insights to clients and numerous Boards on which he served, as well as being a mentor to younger lawyers.

John's personal life was centred on family and on Grasshopper Park, the family weekend retreat and reforestation project. He understood that time and a few thousand seedlings could turn an abandoned farm into a thriving forest, and watching that come to fruition over the decades gave him much pleasure.

The family wishes to thank John's amazing caregivers from Premier Home Care Services for their dedication and kind and gentle support over the past few years.

The family will receive friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home A.W. Miles - Newbigging Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue) from 2:00 -4:00 and 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. Friday, January 19th. Funeral service to be held in Calvin Presbyterian Church, 26 Delisle Avenue on Saturday, January 20th at 1:00 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, donations are encouraged to the Army Cadet League of Canada (Ontario), 1200 Markham Road, Suite 527, Toronto M1H 3C3 (http://www.canadahelps. org), or Haven Toronto (formerly the Good Neighbours' Club), 170 Jarvis Street, Toronto M5B 2B7(http://www.haventoronto.ca), or another charity of your choice. Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

RAYMOND COURTEAU

1922 - 2018

Raymond Joseph Roger Courteau, Ray, passed away peacefully on January 12, 2018, he was 95. He was predeceased by his loving wife of 64 years, Frances (Fitzpatrick), who left us May 27, 2017. Since her passing, all he wished for was to be by her side. He was a loving husband and father and was proud of his children, Peter (Diana), Bob (Flora), Michael, Tom (Jennifer) and Margaret-Anne (Danny). He loved and was loved by his grandchildren, Chris, Jade, Caitlin, Campbell, Alex, Jennifer, Jillian, Nicole; and great-grandchildren, Mason and Dylan Rose. Dad had a wonderful life, born in Quebec City, to an amazing family of 13 siblings and was the last surviving member. He had a 13- year professional hockey career, awarded the Golden Gloves in boxing, and he was a natural at every sport that he played. He saw the world while working for Canadair (Bombardier) for over 30 years, finishing his career as a pre-flight engineer in California. He will be sadly missed by all. Visitation will be held on Saturday, January 27 at 1:00 p.m. at Rideau Funeral Home, 4275 Sources Blvd., Dollard-Des- Ormeaux, QC H9B 2A6 514- 685-3344, with a celebration of life at 2:00 p.m. Reception to follow the service at Bellissimo Italian Restaurant - 484 Chemin Bord Du Lac, Dorval H9S 2A8. Details available on the funeral home website: www. r i d eaumemorial.com. In lieu of flowers, donations in his memory may be made to the Canadian Heart & Stroke Foundation

MARION ISABEL COWAN

Passed away January 7, 2018. Born in Galt, (Cambridge), Ontario. Daughter of Thomas D. Cowan and Ethel M. Turnbull. Stepdaughter of Jennie F. Turnbull. Sister of the late James E. Cowan, Cambridge, Ontario and Helen Cowan Virgo, Montreal. Longtime social worker in Vancouver, BC and Toronto, Ontario. Member of St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, King Street West, Toronto. At the request of Marion there will be no funeral.

ISABEL KATHLEEN EDDY

(née Race) 1922 - 2018

At her home in Bathurst, NB, January 14, 2018, aged 95. She leaves her children, Catherine, Bruce (Shelagh), Mary Jane Somers (Dan), and Richard (Sue Taylor); her grandchildren, Sarah, Andrew (Marie Cheong), Katherine, David, Grace, Ian Lenihan (his mother, Lynne), Patrick Rémillard, Caroline Rémillard, Michael Somers (Susana), Robert Somers (Erin), James Somers, Maggie (Kyle Murphy), Katie (Alexander Ednie), and Marian; her greatgrandchildren, Thomas and Angus McCallum, Finnegan Eddy, and Christian Somers; her nieces, Judy Elliott (Gary) and Jane LeVan; and a host of other relatives and friends. Her husband, Robert Cheyne Eddy, died in 1986. She was also predeceased by her infant daughter, Caroline, in 1963; and her son, John (Susan), in 2008. Born in Brantford, ON, she was the daughter of Wilfrid Ballantyne Race, the principal of the Ontario School for the Blind, and his wife, Mary Dell Harkness. Isabel was much the youngest of the family, which included four half-siblings, Morley, Gena, Watson, and Dorothy (Ryerson); and her sister, Virginia. She outlived all of them by many years. After school in Brantford, she went to Queen's in Kingston where she met Robert Eddy from Bathurst. They got engaged before Robert was posted overseas in 1942, sustaining the relationship by many letters. Isabel kept Robert's letters and years later edited them, "Letters of a Subaltern," an interesting record of the war years from the perspective of two young people. Immediately after Robert returned, they married in July of 1945. After a year at Queen's, they moved to Bathurst in 1946. The move was a surprise to Isabel, but she came to love Bathurst, where they raised their family and where she lived the rest of her long life. Isabel loved her family and kept in touch with friends from every stage of her life. She always had her nose in a book-preferably British letters and memoirs, but she liked biographies of all kinds, provided they were well written. She was one of the founders of the Bathurst Centennial Library and a member of St. George's Anglican Church, the Bathurst Heritage Trust Commission, the Bathurst Public Trust, and the Gloucester Chapter of the IODE. She loved her cottage at Youghall Beach in Bathurst, and for many years she had a winter home in Longboat Key, Florida. She greatly appreciated the kind and skillful people who enabled her to live at home during these last few years, notably Jane, Sharon, and Connie, as well as the nurses and therapists of the Extramural program and her physicians. Friends may call at Elhatton's Funeral Home, Bathurst (www. elhatton.com) on Tuesday, January 23, 2018 from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. or 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. The funeral service will be at St. George's Anglican Church, Bathurst at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, January 24, 2018. Donations in her memory to St. George's Anglican Church or the Bathurst Heritage Museum would be appreciated by the family.

JEAN GRIFFIN ELLIOTT

Born in Hartford, Connecticut on September 17, 1929, died peacefully at home in Toronto on December 19, 2017 at the age of 88. The daughter of the late Samuel and Florence (née Smith) Griffin, she is survived by her loving daughter, Jean Smith Elliott (Robert Williams); her brother, William Griffin (Shirley); her sister, Bette Forbes (Bruce); and predeceased by her brother, Samuel Griffin, and his wife, Mary. She also leaves nieces and nephews, Sam Griffin (Marcia), Martin Griffin (Alyson), Martha Hennig, Victoria Ford, Bruce Forbes, and their respective families. Jean received her A.A. from Hartford College for Women, where she served as President of the Student Council. She earned her B.A. with First Class Honours in Modern History at Trinity College at the University of Toronto, and her A.M. from Harvard University. She enjoyed pursuing her interest in history with the Friends of Franklin and the group's numerous trips to Europe and the United States. Her career was a rewarding creative and social outlet. Early on, she enjoyed her work as a telephone company business office supervisor, a department store service manager, and an academic dean. Years later she applied herself at the Royal Canadian Institute (1982-84) and at the University of Toronto (1984- 95). She loved finding answers to the most unusual questions, meeting and connecting interesting people, and developing extremely popular courses for Later Life Learning. Jean pursued volunteer opportunities at the U of T with vigor, particularly as Founding President of the Friends of the Library, Trinity College in 1975. She was a longstanding member of the Corporation of Trinity College and the Soldiers' Tower Committee. She also served as President of the University Arts Women's Club and the University College Faculty Wives. In 1997, Jean was a proud recipient of the Arbor Award. The family is deeply grateful to Veronica Silva for providing many years of devoted care with support from Jocelyn Ocio, Cristy Flores, Joan De Los Santos, and Ria Ruiz. A service will be held in Trinity College Chapel, 6 Hoskin Ave., Toronto on Monday, January 22, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. followed by a reception. As she wished, Jean will be buried next to her parents in St. James' Cemetery in Glastonbury, Connecticut. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in her memory to The Friends of the Library, Trinity College, 6 Hoskin Avenue, Toronto, M5S 1H8

EDWARD CARL FREELAND

After a brief illness, Carl passed away on Saturday, January 13, at the Kingston General Hospital. Predeceased by Audrey, his beloved wife of 67 years; and his son, Timothy, then 5. Raised on a small family farm in Winchester, ON, Carl delivered milk by horse and carriage or sleigh in winter, and was recently amazed by the internet, Twitter, Instagram and the future of the world. Carl excelled after conscripting into the Canadian Armed Forces. His proficiency in typing resulted in his assignment to what would become the Canadian Security Establishment. He would serve over 65 years in CSE, enjoying his posting in Cheltenam, UK and travels around the world. He raised his family in Manotick, ON, enjoying extensive time outdoors together. He and Audrey retired at the Mill near Sharbot Lake and later in Bath. Proud father of his surviving sons, Michael (Tessa) Yellowknife, NT, Steven, Ladysmith, BC, and Andrew (Jeannie) Vernon, BC; grandfather of Erin (Robin) Yellowknife/Ottawa and Aven- Lee (Joe) Whitehorse, Yukon; and great-grandfather of Uma, Kai and Hunt-Fraser. Carl was also predeceased by brothers, Ron, Harry, Earl, Reg and Doug. A memorial service in honour of Carl will be held in the "Chapel on the Corner", Robert J. Reid and Sons Funeral Home, 309 Johnson St., Kingston on Wednesday, January 31 at 11 a.m., reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to The Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated. He lived fully, remaining in his house with the care of his sons until his passing. Our thanks goes out the frequent paramedics from Napanee, the emergency staff at the Napanee and KGH hospitals and close friends and neighbours in Bath and especially our dear Linda. As Carl recently said, "At my age, I no longer buy green bananas!" Online Condolences http://www.ReidFuneralHome.com

ROBERT DOUGLAS GILLESPIE

"SID" Born in Colborne, Ontario: November 10, 1931 Passed away: January 16, 2018

Sid is survived by Marion, his devoted wife and partner of 62 years; his daughters, Susan (Alec Zimmerman) and Cynthia (Stephen Shea); grandchildren, Jason Prendergast (Amanda Griffis), Blake Prendergast, Lily MacLeod and Calder MacLeod; step-grandchildren, Megan Shea and Caragh Shea; and sister-inlaw, Dr. Margaret MacMurdo McMillan (widow of Alan); and was predeceased by his brothers, Bill and Don. Born to William S. Gillespie and Ruby (née Grant), Sid was raised on the family farm on Shelter Valley Road near Grafton, Ontario, which he continued to maintain and enjoy with Marion and the family until his death. A student of the local one-room schoolhouse, Sid's character was shaped early on: hard-working, self-reliant, humbly self-confident, patient, generous, principled, a man of faith oriented toward his community and his family. Sid was understanding of others, but demanding of himself. A gentleman through and through. Naturally adept at maths and sciences, Sid attended the Royal Military College, earning his wings as a navigator and graduating with a B.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering. It was while spending his summers posted to Navigation School in Summerside, PEI that he met Marion MacMurdo at a golf course. They were married on the first weekend following Sid's graduation from RMC in 1955. Thus began their lifetime together, often spent on the golf courses of PEI and with their friends at Thornhill Golf and Country Club, where he served as President in 1976. Sid obtained his engineering degree, and later his MBA, from the University of Toronto, and while there was recommended by a professor to Jim MacLaren of James F. MacLaren Ltd., then one of Canada's largest environmental consulting companies. Sid remained at MacLaren for 27 years, becoming President in 1978. He founded MacViro Consultants Inc. in 1989, serving as its President until he retired in 2006. Owing to Sid's unquestioned integrity, he was retained by Cole Engineering in 2009 to provide advice and guidance to its senior management team, serving for 7 years until finally retiring at age 85. Sid was recognized by the Association of Consulting Engineers of Canada with the Beaubien Award for his outstanding contributions to that Association and the advancement of consulting engineering in Canada. He also served on several committees established by the Association of Professional Engineers of Ontario. Sid was ahead of his time in his focus on environmental concerns and many of the modern comforts of city life, including sanitary water supply, sewage treatment plants and municipal heating systems, were built under his supervision at home and abroad. Sid will be remembered by the staff and community of Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, the home to his faith, to which he offered decades of service as Clerk of Session, Deputy Chair of the Board of Trustees and a member of the Council. The family would like to thank Dr. Ken Gamble and Dr. Srikala Sridhar for the care and comfort that they offered Sid. A visitation will be held at the Humphrey Funeral Home A.W. Miles - Newbigging Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue) from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. on Tuesday, January 23rd. Please join us for a funeral service in Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair Avenue West, Toronto at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, January 24th, with reception to follow in the Flora McCrea Eaton Auditorium. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to Timothy Eaton Memorial Church or to Prostate Cancer Canada. Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

PETER ROBERT GLOVER

August 16, 1956 January 18, 2018

Gone too soon, at 61, from ALS. Loved and remembered by a large network of family and friends as a fun-loving, smart, adventurous individual - one of the good guys. If a man is measured by the love of his friends and the devotion of his family, Peter was a giant. An avid outdoorsman and all-round athlete. A tough competitor at cards. A wannabe great curler. An involved and wonderful dad. His wife, Pat Underwood; and his two grown children, Jack and Hanna Glover, are left with cherished memories of many many good times and travels. Family stories are being fondly shared by Peter's mother, Anne Loughlin; siblings, Kerri (Haig), Patti (Ross), John (Libby), Scott (Sarah); and the gaggle of nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his father, Gary (Maureen). Much loved by his mother-in-law, Barbara Underwood; and sister-inlaw, Mary Jo Underwood (Peter). Best friends forever with Rob McAdam and Elspeth Gaukrodger. We were so well supported, cared for and loved during Peter's illness. Thank you for all the visits, the special events, the quality time and the financial support provided by so many to ensure Peter received the best. Special thanks to Sue McNeeley at the Ottawa Hospital Rehab Clinic, Lianne Johnston of the ALS Society, Dalal and the OCC, and Andrew Coyne for his caring ways. Please consider a donation to the ALS Society of Canada to tackle this most cruel disease. To honour Peter, details of two parties, in Ottawa and Toronto, will be shared in the coming weeks.

RENIE GROSSER

1931 - 2018

Renie Grosser passed away peacefully in Ottawa on January 18, 2018. Survived by a sister, Shirley; thousands of former students; and friends around the world. A funeral service will be held in the Cwinn Chapel on Sunday, January 21 at 3:30 p.m. at the Jewish Memorial Gardens Osgoode Cemetery, 6549 Herberts Corners Road, Greely, Ontario. Interment to follow in the Temple Israel section. A Shiva Reception will follow around 4:45 p.m. at Temple Israel Ottawa, 1301 Prince of Wales Drive. In memoriam, donations may be made to Hospice Care Ottawa, 114 Cameron Avenue, Ottawa, ON K1S 0X1 or Temple Israel, 1301 Prince of Wales Drive, Ottawa, K2C 1N2. Condolences, donations or tributes may be made at http://www.tubmanfuneralhomes.com

JUDITH INCE

Our beloved Judith died of a stroke on January 16, 2018. Judith grew up in Burnaby, BC. She studied art history at UBC and subsequently taught the subject at SFU and Emily Carr. After taking time away from her career to parent her three children, she returned to work as a journalist with The Tyee before retiring permanently. Throughout her life, Judith was dedicated to helping those in need and advancing positive social and political change, goals she pursued through her work as a volunteer with numerous and diverse nonprofit organizations. Judith was a woman of exceptional intelligence whose life was marked by a profound curiosity about the world. These qualities expressed themselves through her academic accolades - of which there were many - but even more so through her lifelong love of the written word. In our hearts, Judith is best remembered curled up with a book or magazine. The cornerstone of Judith's life was Richard McMahon, her husband of 35 years; and their children, Paul, Laura and Allison. The dinner table was the centre of family life, where Judith's exquisite cooking provided the backdrop for much debate and laughter. In recent years, Richard and Judith cultivated many shared passions, including Galiano Island, wine, film, and travel. We have lost a remarkable and unforgettable spouse, mother, and friend. In our mourning, we strive to follow Judith's example of kindness, compassion, and generosity. A celebration of life will be held in Vancouver on Sunday, February 11, 2018. For details, please contact judithincememories@ gmail.com. Remembrances of Judith are welcome at the same address. Donations in Judith's memory may be made to Doctors Without Borders.

RUTH JACOBI

Peacefully in her 92nd year with family by her side on Monday, January 15, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Hans Jacobi (2004); predeceased by her sisters, Irmi and Edith; and parents, Auguste and Karl; devoted mother of John (Tracey); she will be sadly missed by her grandchildren, Heiden and Beck; and niece, Daisy (Claude-André). Ruth lived a life full of love and adventure. Born in Davos, Ruth struck out on her own in 1955 arriving in Canada by ship to work in Toronto, where she would eventually meet Hans, the love of her life. A classical music, ballet, art and museum enthusiast, downhill skier, potter, avid flower gardener, wonderful cook and baker, chocolate lover, Swiss Women's Club member, yoga and Thai chi student. Summers were spent at the hobby farm with its lovely restored log house and valley views. Trips to Switzerland were always a joyous event. The annual flower competition and ribbon awards a source of personal pride. Always friendly to everyone, Ruth had a manner that endeared her to others. Never one to shy away from a challenge or learn something new, she always completed whatever she set out to do. I could not have asked for a more wonderful mother and I am eternally grateful for her love, wisdom, selfless devotion, strength and courage. She loved her small family deeply and was extremely proud of her grandsons who brought her much joy and love. Ruth was a strong woman with an infectious laugh who will be greatly missed by family and friends. The family thanks Kensington Gardens and all staff for their support and care over 14 years; doctors and staff at Toronto Western Hospital, physiotherapist Sian and assistant Alicia and to her many friends including Helmut and Zaneida Kellen, Helen McNeil, Ruth Zürcher and Francoise Sutton. Cremation has taken place. Visitation on April 26th from 1-2 p.m. followed by a celebration of life at 2 p.m. at Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Toronto (416-485-5572). Donations may be made to Kensington Gardens or a charity of your choice. Condolences may be sent to the family at contact.jacobi.family@gmail.com. Liebe Mutter. Ich bin klein, mein Wunsch ist klein. Liebe Mutti du sollst glücklich sein.

CONSTANCE MARY JEFFERESS

1929 - 2018

Peacefully on Friday, January 12, 2018 at Parkwood Hospital in her 89th year. Predeceased by her parents, Frank and Mary Jefferess; and sister, Diane (Jefferess) Robinson; and her brother-in-law, Terry Robinson. Will be missed by her nephew, Jeffrey Robinson (Catherine); nieces, Janet Robinson (Sam Crozier) and Barbara Robinson; and her grandnieces and nephew, Alexandra Robinson, Joshua Robinson (Emma) and Alison and Gillian Crozier. She will also be missed by her close friends and the people of St. James Westminster Anglican Church. Connie spent many years working as a commercial artist, after which she taught in the Art Department at H. B. Beal Secondary School for 24 years. She was active on many committees at St. James Westminster Anglican Church including 25+ years with the Altar Guild and the Property Committee. After retirement, years were spent working with the Canadian Embroiderers' Guild as well as producing liturgical embroideries for churches throughout Southwestern Ontario. Connie was also an active member of the Canadian Bookbinders and Book Artists Guild. The family wishes to extend a thank you to Dr. Catherine Faulds and staff at Grandwood Park for their care and compassion. A memorial service will be held at a later date. Donations if wished, may be made to St. James Westminster Foundation, 115 Askin Street, London, ON N6C 1E7. Arrangements entrusted to A. Millard George Funeral Home, 519-433-5184. Online condolences, memories and photographs shared at http://www.amgfh.com

FATHER ALEXIS FREDERICK KIRSTEN S.J. June 5, 1947 January 17, 2018

Father Alex Kirsten, Jesuit priest, died on January 17, 2018 at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Ontario. He was 70 years old and had been in the Society of Jesus, the Jesuits for 47 years. Alex was born on June 5, 1947 in Woodstock, Cape Town, South Africa, son of Alexander Edward Kirsten and Lilian Kathleen Veret. He studied Zoology at the University of Guelph and later Theology at Regis College in Toronto. He was ordained a priest on June 2, 1979 by Cardinal Carter. Among the different positions Alex held was: President of St. Paul's High School in Winnipeg; Director of Martyrs' Shrine in Midland, Ontario; Jesuit Treasurer and Director of the Rene Goupil Centre in Pickering, Ontario. He will be missed by his family, friends and his Jesuit companions. Friends may visit on Sunday, January 21, 2018 from 7-9 p.m. at St. Ignatius Chapel, Manresa- Jesuit Spiritual Renewal Centre, Liverpool Road North, Pickering, ON. A wake service will be held at 8 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Monday, January 22, 2018 at 10:30 a.m. at St. Ignatius Chapel Manresa- Jesuit Spiritual Renewal Centre. Interment to be held at the Jesuit Cemetery, Guelph, Ontario at 2:30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Jesuit Development Office would be appreciated as your expression of sympathy.

ANDREW DUNCAN LAURIN

Born May 1, 1957, Andy passed away peacefully on August 24, 2017 with his son, Bryce at his side and his childhood best friend Chris Payne in palliative care at Surrey Memorial. Andy is survived by his son, Bryce (Cayer); grandson, Sidney (Cayer); wife, Nazy; brother, Darryl (Laurin); sister, Suzanne (Gavin); nephews, Duncan and Robert (Gavin). Predeceased by his father, Duncan (Laurin); and Mother, Ina (Boo) (Laurin). Brother-in-law, Ray (Gavin); and sister-in- law, Marjukka (Laurin). Andy was born in Montreal, moving to Vancouver in January 1972. Andy attended West Vancouver Secondary. Upon graduating he moved to Northern BC, to work and explore. He returned to Vancouver, where he attended Technical programs at BCIT to complete all his tickets for welding and pipe fitting. His career took him to Libya, Northern BC, Alberta, returning to Vancouver for the last 25 plus years. Andy was a passionate motor bike rider, loving the freedom of the wind in his face. He took several trips to Mexico on his bike, as well as numerous trips throughout BC and a trip with his brother, Darryl to Panama. At Andy's request, cremation has taken place and a private celebration of life is planned for close friends and family. A special thank you to the staff in Palliative Care at Surrey Memorial, who did amazing work keeping Andy comfy during his final days. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Canadian Cancer Society or a charity of your choice.

SYLVIA LEVITT

Peacefully on Thursday, January 11, 2018 at home. Sylvia Levitt, beloved wife of the late Alexander Leo Levitt. Loving mother and mother-inlaw of Richard and Hsaio - Mi Levitt, Terry W. Levitt of Vancouver, Judi Ferguson and Stuart Thorne of Edmonton, and Robert Levitt. Cherished sister of Sheldon Kates, and the late Zelda Urmin, and William Kates. Devoted grandmother of Samuel, Avigayil, Kaitlyn, and V i . Treasured g r e a t - grandmother of Jaimee May, and Julian Alexander. The family would like to express their gratitude to Sandra Fellus and Sheldon Kates for watching over Sylvia for the past several years. She will also be sadly missed by her many relatives in Vancouver, B.C., and her friends at both the Joseph E. and Minnie Wagman Centre and the Bernard Betel Centre. A funeral service will take place at Steeles Memorial Chapel, 350 Steeles Avenue West, on Sunday, January 21, 2018. Interment will follow in the Community Section at Pardes Chaim Cemetery, 11818 Bathurst Street. The family will be sitting shiva privately. Memorial donations may be made to the SickKids Foundation (416) 813-6116, the Bernard Betel Centre (416) 225-2112, and the Joseph E. and Minnie Wagman Centre (416) 785-2500 ext. 2267.

Raymond Joseph MacDonald "Ray"

At the age of 93 passed away on December 11, 2017 surrounded by family at l'Hôpital Cité de la Santé in Laval, Quebec. Son of the late Angus and Susan (Morin) MacDonald. Predeceased by brother, Kenneth and sisters, Beatrice and Eleonor. Friends and family are invited to visit at Les Salons Funéraires Guay, 418 Boul Labelle, Rosemère, Quebec on Friday, January 26 from 3-5 p.m. and 7-9 p.m., and Saturday, January 27 from 9-10:30 a.m. Funeral Mass to be celebrated at l'église Ste-Rose-de-Lima in Laval, Quebec on Saturday at 11 a.m. Reception to follow. Interment at Ste-Rose Cemetery.

MOYA MANDEL

A beautiful spirit peacefully on Friday, January 19, 2018 at Forest Hill Place. Beloved wife of the late Maxwell. Loving mother and mother- in-law of Mark, and Drew Mandel and Denise Cooper. Dear sister-in-law of the late Pearl and Archie Sherman, Sam and Anne Mandel, Louis and Helen Mandel, Moe and Rose Mandel, and Min and the late Joey Mandel. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Janette and the late Alan James, and Sheila and the late Tony Palin. Devoted grandmother of Max, and Marlowe. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Sunday, January 21, 2018 at 12:00 noon. Interment Ozrower Society Section of Mt. Sinai Memorial Park. For shiva details see http://www.benjamins.ca. Memorial donations may be made to the Moya Mandel Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 416-780-0324, http://www.benjamins.ca

AINA MARTENS 1939 - 2018

It is with deep sorrow that Aina's sister Ille-Mai and brother-in-law Janis announce her passing, from cancer, on Sunday, January 14, 2018, at the Palliative Care Unit, Scarborough General Hospital. We can truly be thankful that at the end she was spared the suffering and agony we had all feared. Aina's life was eventful. As a child she survived WWII in occupied Estonia, the loss of her home, her country, her father and many other members of her family. This was followed by post-war refugee experience in Sweden. In Canada Aina enjoyed a brilliant academic career and an extensive successful working life with the Federal Government as a Member of the Immigration and Refugee Board. Work was her hobby and her refuge, and to relinquish it at the age of 67 was a sacrifice. Those who knew Aina will always remember her for her sense of humour, her razor-sharp wit, her enjoyment of irony, her love of fun and laughter, and her relentless determination to live life in her own way. She leaves behind numerous relatives and some very dear and true friends who were there for her, not just in the good years, but also in the last five or six highly challenging ones. Thank you Isabel, Tuula, Rita, Vivian, Julie and Joan. Thank you Mai, Reet, Jaan and Toivo. Thank you for laughing with her to the end, for keeping her company and for stimulating her wonderful mind that never gave way, either to cancer or to Parkinson's. A sincere thank-you also to the fifth-floor care-giving staff at Midland Gardens Care Centre for all their efforts on Aina's behalf, and to the Scarborough General Hospital for easing her final passing. Cremation has taken place. At a future date, a private memorial service and final farewell to Aina will be held at the Humphrey Funeral Home A.W. Miles - Newbigging Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue). If desired, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Parkinson Society would be appreciated. Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

EVELYN ISABEL MCKEE (née McIntosh)

June 25, 1928, to January 17, 2018

Evelyn McKee (Ev to everyone who knew her) passed away in Toronto in her 90th year. Ev was predeceased by her husband, David C. McKee; survived by her four children, David (Elaine McKee), Matthew (Heidi McKee), Mary McKee-McElwain (Alex McElwain), and Ramsay (Peggy McKee); proud grandmother of Yosef Rouch (David and Elaine), Ramsay, Jackson and Connor (Matthew and Heidi), and Hilary and Allan (Ramsay and Peggy); and great-grandmother of Liza McKee (Jackson and Aleksandra). Ev was survived by her sister, Mary Campbell; and predeceased by her brother, Ramsay McIntosh. Ev's twin passions in life were her family and the child-care movement in Ontario. Everyone familiar with the McKees knows she was the anchor that held the family together through all the good times and some challenging ones as well. Many more will know her through her tireless work and advocacy on behalf of children, child care, early childhood workers (ECWs) and child-care policy in Ontario. She was honoured for her dedication as the co-recipient of the Constance E. Hamilton Award in 1990 in recognition of her actions that had a "significant impact on securing equitable treatment for women in Toronto, either socially, economically or culturally." We want to extend our many thanks to the wonderful staff at The O'Neill Centre in Toronto who made our mother's last years so warm and comfortable. A service will be held in memory of Ev on Monday, January 22, 2018, at 2:00 p.m. at the Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Square, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1B1. In lieu of flowers, we ask you to make a donation in her memory to the Ontario Coalition for Better Child Care, at 489 College Street, Suite 206, Toronto, Ontario M6G 1A5, or to the Church of the Holy Trinity.

MILES ROY MERWIN LL.B November 14, 1933 - January 18, 2018

Passed away peacefully, at Wyndham Manor in Oakville, Ontario at 8:45, January 18, 2018 after many years of coping with Alzheimers. Much loved son of the late Benjamin Foote Merwin and Dorothy (Cowcill) Merwin. Cherished husband of Jane Taylor (Robertson) Merwin; and beloved father of Robertson Benjamin Taylor Merwin (Vikki). Grandad Miles to Christopher, Alexander and Daniel. Predeceased by sisters, Peg Hewson (Geale) and Mary Jane Christakos (Harry); and brother, Benjamin (Bud) Foote Merwin (Diane). Miles grew up in Sudbury, Ontario enjoying hockey and spending summers at his family's timber camps. Miles graduated from the University of Western Ontario with a BA and then went on to Osgoode Hall Law School. He was called to the bar in 1960. Miles spent 27 years at Ford of Canada in the legal department. He enjoyed Broadway plays, music and sports. Miles believed strongly in family and was active in the Miles Merwin (1623-1697) Association throughout his life. Miles would always greet you with a smile and made sure you felt welcome. He will be greatly missed by many. Visitation will be on Monday, January 22, 2018 from 6-8 p.m. at Ward Funeral Home, 109 Reynolds St. Oakville. A celebration of life will be held at St. Jude's Anglican Church, 160 William Street Oakville, on Tuesday, January 23, 2018 at 4:00 p.m. followed by a reception at the Oakville Club, 56 Water St. In lieu of flowers, the family would be grateful for donations to a charity of your choice. The family would like to thank the staff at the Villages of Erin Meadows and Wyndham Manor for their loving care. Please visit the book of memories at http://www.wardfuneralhome.com

YOLANDE RUTH MOSES "Lani" 1947-2018

Of Toronto, passed away after a brief illness on Tuesday, January 16th at Toronto General Hospital with her family at her side. She is survived by her husband of 48 years, Charles; daughter, Alexandra (Kevin McKeag); sons, Michael (Esther Jun) and Jonathan; grandchildren, Ailis and Seamus McKeag and Lola Moses; sisters, Diane Cathro and Cynthia Ferris; and brother, Doug Nugent; and she was predeceased by her brother, John Eastwood. Lani will be remembered for her love for life and her joyful creativity, which she celebrated with her many cherished friends, especially Julie Macdonald, Lynn Morgan and Susie Gunn. The family will be holding a private service and a memorial will be held at a later date. Condolences through Humphrey Funeral Home. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Garden Club of Toronto or the Toronto Botanical Garden.

ROBERT NEVINS "Bob" 1927-2018

Robert Nevins of Pointe-Claire passed away peacefully on January 12, 2018. Bob is survived by his wife, Diana (Arrell); children, Jim (Jan Nevins), Margot and Cindy; and his grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He is predeceased by his brother, William Nevins. Bob graduated from McMaster University with a BSc in Chemistry and Physics. While at McMaster and after graduating, he served in the Royal Canadian Navy Reserves. Bob met his future wife, Diana, a Hamilton resident, at McMaster. The couple subsequently moved to Québec, finally settling in Pointe-Claire where he lived for fifty-eight years. Working in the medical/pharmaceutical industry, Bob's final position until retirement was Director, Sales and Marketing Planning and Development at Johnson and Johnson Inc. His community involvement included volunteering with NOVA West Island, the West Island Volunteer Bureau and the Chemical Institute. Bob acted as Chair of the Pointe- Claire Association of Pools in the early sixties. The Association proudly achieved its key goal of establishing a first-class swimming facility in Pointe- Claire, which fostered national and international champions. Bob enjoyed membership along with Diana in the Pointe-Claire Bowling Club and the Pointe-Claire Curling Club. The family wishes to thank the staff of Maison Herron for their years of care, and to the staff of the Gerontology Unit at the Lakeshore General Hospital. A private service will be held on January 21, 2018 with interment at a later date. In remembrance of Bob, donations in his name can be made to NOVA West Island or to The Alzheimer Society of Canada.

IRENE RADCLIFFE (née Mary Irene Martin)

Irene died peacefully in Toronto on January 15, 2018, aged 99. Born in Coventry, England, to Mary and John, she was the eldest of three daughters. Irene remained close to her sisters, Ena and Connie, throughout their lives. During World War II, Irene experienced the Blitz and met her future husband, Gordon, a Canadian soldier w i t h t h e C a m e r o n Highlanders. As a war bride, she crossed the Atlantic and made the "never-ending" train journey from Halifax to Winnipeg to join Gordon. Irene lived most of her adult life in Winnipeg, raising her son, John, working at Great- West Life and baking her famous apple pies. Irene was devastated when Gordon died in 1980. Late in life, she left her treasured home of 50 years to join John, her daughteri n - l a w , A y a l a , a n d granddaughters, Liat and Talia, in Toronto. Visits with her great-granddaughters, Ariella and Orly, were the highlights of her last decade. A private memorial will be held Sunday.

MURIEL JUNE ROSS "June" (nee Gremell) June 19,1928 - January 17, 2018

June died suddenly but peacefully in her 90th year. She will be greatly missed by her daughter, Kathy; son, David; grandchildren, Gordon, Nathan and Emma; Gordon's Mother, Joy; "Cousin", Rob and his son, Jamie; nephews, Paul and Neil; former husband, Alan; and her sister-in-law, Audrey. She was predeceased by her niece, Yvonne; brother, Ernie; and sister-in-law, Barbara. Education was the passion of June's life. She graduated from University of British Columbia with a degree in Honours Mathematics. She also had a MBA from University of Toronto, taken as a part time student later in life. She trained in Montessori method at the Whitby School in Greenwich, Connecticut in the early 1960's, under the guidance of Dr. Nancy Rambush, the first president of the American Montessori Society. She established the first Montessori School in Oakville, educating preschoolers in the method that emphasized self-motivation and self-education. A highlight from that time was when Mario Montessori, Maria Montessori's son came to Oakville to visit her school. She was instrumental in development of the Early Childhood Education Program at Sheridan College. During her time at Sheridan College she became the Dean of Applied Arts and was later involved in International Studies with many trips to Japan. She travelled the world and assisted educators in Africa and India through the Aga Khan Foundation. She was proud to be a mentor and friend to her wonderful colleagues at Sheridan College. In her retirement, her travels continued, often with her brother, Ernie and sister-in-law, Barbara. Genealogy was a great interest and a focus of her later travels. She could be happily found in the archives doing her research. She was proud to be a descendant of William McDougall, one of Canada's Fathers of Confederation. In order to assist her research she became very computer savvy. She was also an avid bridge player, she enjoyed many a game with her friends at SAS, the weekly games at the Madison Pub were also a highlight. The last two years of her life were spent at the Annex Retirement Home. Many thanks to their caring staff and to Dr. Maryniarczyk. Also thanks to the staff from Mosaic Home Care. A private family service will be held at a later date to celebrate June's remarkable life.

MICHAEL A. SPOONER

Associate Dean, Chief Medical Director, Professor of Family Medicine, and loving father, died, in the company of his family, on January 15, 2018. He was born in Regina, Saskatchewan in 1937 and spent his formative years in that city. In 1958, he married Donna (nee Rice) Kernaghan and they remained committed and inseparable for the next 60 years. Graduating in Medicine from the University of Toronto in 1963, he worked continuously until he was 75 years old. Following internship, Mike returned to Regina and started his career as a family physician at the Medical Arts Clinic, joining his father, Harold, an orthopedic surgeon in the Clinic. It was during this time that he became involved with a new organization dedicated to medical education and improved practice, the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC), and in so doing set out his vocational path for the years to come. In 1972, he and Donna packed up their young family and ventured to Michigan State University where, as a McLaughlin Fellow, he obtained his Master's degree in Medical Education. This led to a return to Saskatchewan to the College of Medicine in Saskatoon where he oversaw a myriad of changes to the College's educational processes. In 1975, it was back to Regina, now as the Chairman of the Department of Family Medicine and subsequently as the Associate Dean of Medicine with a mandate to extend the undergraduate and postgraduate reach of the College of Medicine not only to the southern half of the province but to its citizens in the north as well. In recognition of his seminal role in forming Saskatchewan's Northern Medical Service he was awarded the Queen's Jubilee Medal. As a medical educator, Mike remained close to his family medicine roots and in 1978 served as President of the CFPC. As a practitioner who was aging along with his patients, Mike saw the need for a different aspect of family practice, that being the new discipline of geriatrics. Once again, he left his established position to repurpose himself. He and Donna spent a year at UCLA and the University of Edinburgh as he honed new skills. Upon returning to Regina he found geriatrics practice opportunities limited so he looked to the United States. Here he found work with his favourite group of patients - veterans. He joined the Veterans Administration (VA) and worked first as a geriatrician and subsequently (as the VA recognized his administrative skill) as the Medical Director at a variety of VA hospitals. Following retirement from the VA, Mike joined the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. This work took him all over the USA and, later, all over the world. Beyond his accomplishments, it was Mike's essence as a magnificent human being, husband, and father that will truly be missed. He loved his family with all his heart and he preserved his sense of humour and his sense of caring for others to the day he died, all the while approaching his death with an unparalleled dignity and grace. He is survived by his wife, Donna; children, Peter (Claudia), Jane (Chris Arrasmith), Melinda (David Diviney), Thomas; and grandchildren, Ellen, Michael (Samantha), Bridget, Maggie, Anthony, Gabriella, Nicholas, Patrick, Charles, Rose Marie, Jack, Thomas; and great-grandchild, Isabella.

MARJORIE ANNE JUNE SKENE

Marjorie Ann (June) Skene of Ottawa died peacefully Saturday, January 13, 2018 in her 96th year. She was born June 13, 1922 in Ottawa to Francis Logie and Marjorie Wilkes Armstrong. June lived a long and active life. She was an avid downhill and cross-country skier well into her 70s, enjoyed golfing at the Royal Ottawa Golf Club, and could be seen for many years on her daily walks with her dog around McKay Lake. Her witty limericks were frequently published in the Ottawa Citizen and The Globe and Mail. She was an active participant in the Ottawa Garden Club and book clubs and was a supporter of many charities and the arts. June was predeceased by her brother, Logie; and her husband, Donald. She will be sadly missed and lovingly remembered by her dear sister, Joy Saunders; her sons, Chris, Tim, Jerry (Sally), and Paul (Christine); grandchildren, Jennifer (Tony), Andrew (Smitha), Elizabeth, and Thomas; and great-grandchild, Sameer. Even as she passed away, her family grows: a new great-grandchild is expected any day. She will be greatly missed also by her close cousin, Liz Rhodes; many nieces and nephews including her namesake, June Saunders; and by a close circle of neighbours and friends. The family wishes to thank the exceptional staff of the Rockcliffe Retirement Residence for their kindness and care, and the dedicated staff of the Montfort Hospital. Thanks to Dr. Andre Gauthier for his many years of attentive service. Donations to the Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind are welcomed. Celebration of Life will be held Monday January 22nd, at 2:30 p.m. at the Rockcliffe Retirement Residence, 100 Island Lodge Road, Ottawa.

MARY STITT June 15, 1952 January 16, 2018

After a long, courageous battle with cancer, Mary passed away peacefully. Daughter of the late Jack and Phyllis Stitt of Scarborough; and sister of Kathy Sakamoto (Norm) of Thunder Bay, and John Stitt (Marilyn) of Pickering. Aunt to Valerie Hanson (Brian), Danny Taisey, Gregory and David Stitt. Sadly missed by many friends and fellow teachers. A Celebration of Life will be held at Jerrett Funeral Home (660 Kennedy Rd.), on Saturday, January 27, 2018 from 3 p.m. - 5 p.m. Special thanks to the doctors, nurses, and staff at Toronto East General for their care and compassion. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Michael Garron Hospital Foundation (TEGH). Online condolences may be left at http://www.jerrettfuneralhome.com

CHRISTOPHER CHARLES STUART TIDY

Loving father of Alexandra Rawling (Peter), and Jennifer Tidy. Dear GrandPops to Georgina and Billie. Son of the late Charles and Diana Tidy. Brother to Elizabeth Evelyn (David) and the late Pamela Corsen. Passed suddenly on January 17, 2018 at Northumberland Hills Hospital after a brief illness. A celebration of his life will be held at The Mill, 990 Ontario St., Cobourg from 1-4 p.m., Saturday, January 20, 2018. In lieu of flowers, a donation may be made to a charity of your choice. Condolences received at http://www.MacCoubrey.com.

JOHN ALBERT WILCOX

It is with great sorrow that we announce the passing of John Albert Wilcox on January 13, 2018. After a short but courageous battle with cancer, John's passing was peaceful. Beloved husband of Pamela Wilcox (LeBoldus nee Holden) and the late Patricia Wilcox. He was a caring and dedicated father to Kathleen (Ken), Tim (Suzy), and Elizabeth (Ryan); and the most amazing Pop to his six grandchildren, Maggie, Claire, Andrew, Brian, Riley and Eli. He will also be missed by his stepchildren, Geoffrey (Vicki), Tom (Laurina), Lauren (Sean); and their children, Gillian, Kellett and William. John was born in Winnipeg on June 17, 1940 to Marv and Ruth Wilcox and grew up in Winnipeg. John received a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the University of Manitoba and was proud to be their Senior Stick in his final year. In addition, he graduated from Harvard University with a Masters of Business Administration. John began his career as an investment banker at Richardson Securities in Winnipeg and over thirty-five years managed corporate financial operations for Richardson and First Boston (Credit Suisse) in Toronto, Montreal and New York. Throughout his life, whether at university, in business or within his community, he believed deeply in helping others and was a respected leader. John loved so many things, especially the outdoors, sports and the arts. He was an avid golfer, skier, gardener, Minnesota Vikings and Toronto Maple Leafs fan. But most of all, John enjoyed spending time at the family cottage in Minaki, Ontario where he could often be found standing on the high rock with a morning cup of coffee or reading on the screen porch. John's passion for his family and friends filled his life with joy. In recent years, he attended many of his grandchildren's sporting and artistic events enthusiastically offeringwords of encouragement. He always looked forward to connecting with old friends near and far. The family wishes to thank John's many great friends for their love and support and the wonderful caregivers from ParaMed Home Health Care Services. Our family looks forward to seeing those of you who will be able to join us for a service on Tuesday, January 23rd at 11 a.m. at St. Paul's United Church (123 Main Street East, Milton, ON L9T 1N4) followed by a light lunch in the Church Annex. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that you consider a donation to St. Paul's United Church, or to the Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation in support of ParaMed Home Health Care Services, or the charity of your choice. http://www.smithsfh.com

DR. GERALD IAN BAKER June 15, 1941 January 21, 2013

Beloved Husband, Father, Grandfather, Son, Brother, Colleague and Friend. Loved with a love beyond all telling. Missed with a grief beyond all tears. To the world he was just one. To us he was all the world.

HOW BEVERLEY MCLACHLIN FOUND HER BLISS
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From a hardscrabble Alberta childhood, Beverley McLachlin went on to become a powerful force in shaping the rights of Canadians and defending the role of the judiciary in the age of the Charter. Sean Fine talks to the recently retired Supreme Court chief justice about the lessons her mother taught her - and weighs the impact of the legal architecture she helped set in place
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By SEAN FINE
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Saturday, January 13, 2018 – Print Edition, Page A12


She grew up in a log house without electricity or running water, at the end of a long, twisting road in the backcountry of southwestern Alberta.

In the mid-1950s, Beverley Gietz was 12, and living much as children did 50 years earlier.

An outhouse stood deep in the back of the yard. For light, her family had kerosene lamps. For baths, the youngest of her four siblings went first. A little hot water was added for the next, and the next, all the way up to the oldest, Beverley, and then her mother and father.

She knew how to ride a horse. Her home was where the foothills met the Rockies; for fun, she played in the mountains and read books. Grizzly bears, cougar, elk and deer roamed nearby. Her father, Ernest, was a rancher, a hunter, an owner of a small sawmill. Her mother, Eleanora, did the bookkeeping. Her parents were evangelical Lutherans. No drinking or dancing, no playing cards, no smoking.

These were the years in pioneer country that helped form the country's longest-serving Supreme Court chief justice - the judge who put her stamp on some of the most pressing legal and social questions of 21st-century Canada. Those early years bred in her that quality that defined her as a judge: a "fierce independence," in the words of Warren Winkler, who grew up in the area at the same time, and went on to become chief justice of Ontario.

She showed that independence early.

The log house was so remote and the unpaved road so treacherous, that she took Grade 7 at home, by correspondence - and finished an entire academic year before December.

When rural electricity arrived soon after that, 13-year-old Beverley designed a big new wooden house, which her father then built from the timber he milled on his property. "Beverley's room seemed like a scene from the movie Heidi," her childhood friend Diana Reed, who still lives on a ranch in the area, recalled several years ago. "I remember being with her and looking out the window at the mountains and the stars."

Even so, Beverley Gietz was impatient to leave. She could have waited until Grade 9, when she would stay at a dormitory near the school in Pincher Creek, with others from the countryside.

Instead, she chose to leave home for Grade 8, boarding with a family in town.

She had a sense that she had a dream to follow.

Ultimately, her achievements were remarkable. She would go on to help shape Canadians' fundamental rights as much as any judge in the country's history, from the legalization of assisted dying, to a huge expansion of Indigenous rights, to a rebalancing of how police and the legal system treat people accused of crimes.

Along the way, her independence and that of the institution she led, and shaped, would put her on an unprecedented collision course with a sitting prime minister from the Conservative Party, whose strongest supporters were to be found in rural, religious areas like the one in which Ms. McLachlin had grown up.

The legal architecture she helped put in place, built in increments over decades, will not easily be torn down by future jurists.

And yet, Beverley McLachlin remains unknown, in human terms, to most Canadians. And an enigma, in legal terms, even to many in the legal community.

"SHE HAD A PRESENCE"

Her drive was unstoppable - a reaction, in no small part, to her mother's lost dreams.

Eleanora Gietz had wanted a university education and to write children's books, but then her own mother took sick and she had to nurse her rather than go to school. And then, she had a family of her own.

"Life overtook her," Chief Justice McLachlin said during a 50-minute interview in her Supreme Court office last month.

It is four days before her retirement.

She is relaxed and open. At times she laughs loudly.

"I identified very early with her aspirations, and her disappointment. I think at some subconscious level, it made me very determined that that would not happen to me.

"And I had a very strong sense that it was important to, as Joseph Campbell would put it, follow your bliss. Not in any trivial sense, but in a sense of where life seemed to be leading you, what you felt you might have a vocation to do. I didn't know what it was, but I knew, as a teenager, I would try to find it."

She knew she would go to university - but didn't know how she would pay for it. Then she won "three or four" scholarships to the University of Alberta; she left home and obtained an undergraduate degree in philosophy. As if in a hurry to find where life was leading her, she studied law at the same time as she did her master's in philosophy. Her peers were in awe of her intellect and the way she carried herself.

"She had a presence," recalls Ellen Picard, one of a handful of women studying law at the University of Alberta at the same time as Ms. McLachlin. (Ms. Picard became a judge on the province's Court of Appeal, from which she has now retired.)

Those were pioneering times for women in law. "Some people viewed women as an oddity," Ms. McLachlin told the Allard School of Law History Project at the University of British Columbia last year. "There were a lot of sexist comments. I just learned to ignore them.

That was the other person's problem. I refused to make myself a victim."

When she graduated in 1968, Ms. McLachlin won the law school's gold medal. For the next half-dozen years, she practised law, mainly civil litigation - first in Edmonton, then in the northeastern B.C. town of Fort St. John and, finally, in Vancouver.

Leaving her practice behind in 1974, she became a tenured professor at UBC, teaching the law of evidence, and cowriting several legal textbooks. In April, 1981, she left the academy to become a judge on the B.C. County Court, a provincially appointed body.

Neither of her parents witnessed the moment she joined the bench. Both died relatively young. Her mother, born in 1920, passed away in 1972; her father died in 1977, at 62.

She stayed at the County Court only through the summer. In September, the Liberal government of Pierre Trudeau appointed her to the B.C. Supreme Court, six months before the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms took effect.

Over the next four years, the Progressive Conservative government of Brian Mulroney would appoint her to three different jobs. First was the B.C. Court of Appeal, the province's highest court, in 1985. Then, in 1988, back down she returned to the B.C. Supreme Court - now, as chief justice.

A few days later, her husband of 20 years, Roderick McLachlin, a logger and environmental consultant with a PhD in biology, died after a 10-month struggle with cancer of the mouth. Shortly afterward, Chief Justice McLachlin was scheduled to give a speech; she went ahead with it. Life was not going to overtake her.

And tragedy would not hold her back.

Six months after Roderick's death, Mr. Mulroney called to offer her a spot on the Supreme Court of Canada.

"She was very strongly recommended to me by John Fraser," Mr. Mulroney told The Globe and Mail for this story. Mr. Fraser was the minister of fisheries. More importantly, he was the political minister from B.C. in the federal cabinet, influential in the appointment of judges.

"John," Mr. Mulroney says, "was a guy whose opinions I respected a great deal."

Chief Justice McLachlin was in Australia with her son, Angus, when she got the call. He was just 12 years old - and told her to take the job. She left him in the care of her sister, Judy, in Vancouver for the remainder of the school year while she moved to Ottawa for her April start.

She was 45, and had found her bliss.

One summer soon after joining the Supreme Court, Beverley McLachlin travelled to England for a legal conference for Canadians at Cambridge University.

Frank McArdle, the conference founder, was a masculine, brainy type. He had once played hockey in his youth with the legendary Maurice (Rocket) Richard. (Mr. McArdle was on the junior Verdun Maple Leafs, and the Montreal Canadiens, the Rocket's team, called him up for an exhibition game of past, present and possible future players.) And like Chief Justice McLachlin, Mr. McArdle, a father of two boys, had an adventurous spirit, having reinvented himself at the age of 47 by heading to law school, after years working in public relations and advertising. They married in 1992.

"There's always another page to turn, and you turn it," she said once, quoting her friend and colleague Claire L'Heureux-Dubé.

Justice L'Heureux-Dubé's own husband of two decades, Arthur, had died by suicide while she was still a young judge in Quebec.

In the face of loss, life demands resilience.

A PIVOTAL MOMENT

Justice McLachlin's early performance on the Supreme Court, beginning in 1989, was an astonishing tour de force.

The court was brimming with the titans who had taken on the earliest challenges of interpreting the Charter of Rights and Freedoms: Chief Justice Brian Dickson, a liberal lion. Bertha Wilson, the first woman on the Supreme Court, and a feminist icon. (In the 17 rulings in which both took part, the two agreed just once.) John Sopinka, a renowned authority on criminal law.

In this group, Beverley McLachlin was not shy to express herself.

Prominent among her powerful, controversial early written judgments was R. v. Keegstra. The 1990 case involved a rural Alberta teacher, James Keegstra, who was charged with promoting hatred, after teaching that all Jews are evil, that anyone evil must be Jewish, and that the Jews had "created the Holocaust to gain sympathy."

The case presented a pivotal moment for the young Charter. Did the Charter prevent government from limiting basic rights, including that of free expression, in the interest of protecting vulnerable minorities?

Justice McLachlin, writing in dissent, said it that did, at least in this case. "If the guarantee of free expression is to be meaningful," she wrote, "it must protect expression which challenges even the very basic conceptions about our society."

But Chief Justice Dickson's vision of the Charter, which carved out room for government to protect minorities, triumphed over hers, by a count of 4 to 3.

Next, she brought down the wrath of feminist critics. In R. v. Seaboyer, in 1991, the court struck down a federal rapeshield law that had protected victims from questions from defence lawyers about past sexual conduct.

Justice McLachlin wrote that the shield law was too sweeping because it did not allow for the possibility that previous sexual conduct would be relevant in some cases - though not for sexist purposes, such as establishing the complainant's credibility or likelihood of consenting. "It exacts as a price the real risk that an innocent person may be convicted," she wrote.

But just a year later, feminists applauded her. When Laura Norberg of B.C. sued her doctor, Morris Wynrib, for giving her narcotic painkillers in return for sexual favours, it was Justice McLachlin's written reasons, joined by Justice L'Heureux-Dube, that a quarter-century later seem to have stood the test of time.

She stressed that the doctor had violated his fiduciary duty - a special responsibility that people in positions of authority or trust have toward the vulnerable. (The men on the court also sided with Ms. Norberg, but largely for other reasons.)

"It's the humanity in every case that is so important to me, and it always has been," she told The Globe last month.

By 1993, just four years into her tenure on the court, Justice McLachlin was its most prolific author of judgments, with 36 - fully 10 more than the court's second-most prolific author, Justice Sopinka.

She was also its second-most frequent dissenter (after Justice L'Heureux-Dubé).

One dissent stood out, in a case that riveted the country. Sue Rodriguez, 42, of B.C., had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and she wanted the right to seek assistance to die. Under federal law at the time, anyone who helped her to end her life could be punished with up to 14 years in jail. The court narrowly rejected Ms. Rodriguez's claim, by a count of 5 to 4.

"I thought it would be a simple matter for the Parliament of Canada to delete assisting a suicide as a crime," retired Supreme Court justice John Major, who was in the majority in that case, said in an interview for this story. "But they didn't have the courage."

Justice McLachlin, however, did not think Ms. Rodriguez should have to wait: Neither Parliament's failure to take up the issue, nor the lack of widespread acceptance of assisted suicide elsewhere in the world, mattered. "What value is there in life without the choice to do what one wants with one's life?" she asked in that ruling, perhaps channelling writer-philosopher Joseph Campbell again. "One's life includes one's death."

After a few short years on the court, she had made it clear where she was headed: She was a classical liberal - embracing an essentially conservative view that protected individual freedoms, whether of speech or of control over one's death, against encroachments from the state. And conversely, on the small-l liberal side, she displayed a willingness to view legal claims from the vantage point of the vulnerable.

Above all, she had planted her flag in the Charter's Section 7: the right to life, liberty and security of the person. The state could limit those rights, the Charter says, but only in accordance with "the principles of fundamental justice."

Beverley McLachlin's written judgments on this section presaged enormous social change. Even seemingly timeless laws such as those criminalizing prostitution or living off its avails - pimping - or injecting illegal drugs, in some circumstances, would soon feel the force of the legal arguments she had put in motion.

"SOCIAL COHESION"

Beverley McLachlin came from recent immigrants who had left behind a world of upheaval and injustice. Her paternal grandparents were ethnic Germans, farmers, living in the Pomeranian region of Central Europe (which had at times been part of Germany, at other times of Poland). During the First World War, the German army took over the family home to house troops. After the war, she says of her grandparents, "At one point they had a Jewish family living in their basement to be protected against some sort of pogrom that was going on."

So they left in 1927, bringing their offspring, of whom they had 13, and money to invest in land and education. "The whole atmosphere was such that, although they were prosperous, they did not see much future for their children."

The future chief justice came to law through religion. "There was a strong tradition of debate and study," she recalls. "You were always reading the Scriptures and talking about them. My father was kind of a scholar of this. And so, I grew up with lots of philosophizing and debate. I think that had an impact on my mind as I grew up."

Fittingly, her hometown was founded to protect the rule of law. The NorthWest Mounted Police, forerunner of the RCMP, set up in Pincher Creek in 1878 to breed the horses they needed to patrol the West. The town was incorporated in 1906. There were no cities nearby: The closest town was Lethbridge, 100 kilometres to the east. Calgary, where Mr. Harper would one day serve as MP, was 220 km to the north.

Not every isolated community engenders positive values. But Pincher Creek is not just any community. It has produced at least four chief justices of Canadian courts. William Ives, a cowhand as a child - who did not attend elementary school till he was 21 - was chief justice of the Alberta Supreme Court from 1942-44.

Val Milvain was chief justice of the Alberta Supreme Court Trial Division from 1971-79. Warren Winkler served as chief justice of the Ontario Court of Appeal from 2007-13.

Pincher Creek and the surrounding area seem to have had what today is called "social cohesion" - that intangible quality of healthy communities that helps children grow into happy, productive adults. "There was no demarcation between young people and old people," Mr. Winkler said in an interview. "I grew up with grownups. I was included in everything. You got used to talking to people who were your elders but they treated you as an equal."

Privation and uncertainty bred resiliency. "Everybody went to jobs that were risky," he says. "There were miners, lumber people, cattle ranchers, oil workers.

You went to work and it was dangerous and you might not come home."

A half-century after their Alberta childhoods, he and Chief Justice McLachlin would see each other at meetings of the Canadian Judicial Council, a disciplinary body of judges. She was the chair, he the vice-chair. Within seconds, they would be sharing stories of Pincher Creek, Mr. Winkler recalls, while the other judges groaned and said, "Here they go again."

SHATTERING THE STATUS QUO

As a new Supreme Court judge, Beverley McLachlin visited the office of her colleague Antonio Lamer. On the wall was a large painting of rolling farmland, by Robert McInnis.

"I think that's where I grew up," she said.

Mr. Lamer said he didn't know where it was set.

"I'd like to buy it," she said.

But she couldn't: It was leased from a gallery, and in any event, he wouldn't part with it. Soon after, Mr. Lamer became chief justice and moved the painting into his new office.

More than a decade after that, on Jan. 7, 2000, Liberal prime minister Jean Chrétien named Justice McLachlin to the top job on the bench; she was the first woman to hold the position. The McInnis painting of Pincher Creek was now in her office.

Her hometown invited her back early in her tenure as chief justice. It was naming a street after her, Bev McLachlin Drive. At the celebrations, a tall, handsome Indigenous man approached her with a gift: pearl earrings he had crafted himself. "Your parents were the most wonderful people, and I will never forget them," he told her.

He described coming to the Gietz sawmill as a boy, with his parents and several siblings. It was Ernest Gietz's birthday, and Eleanora Gietz invited the large family in for cake. His piece had the dime she'd baked into it for luck. Ms. McLachlin remembered the visit, and asked why he found it so meaningful.

"It was the first time I ever went into a white person's home," he replied.

Decades later, on Beverley McLachlin's watch, Indigenous peoples would be guaranteed a place at the table when government or corporations sought to develop lands that had been set aside under treaties. And even if those peoples had not signed a treaty, the court ruled in 2014, their ancestral lands belonged to them. "The doctrine of terra nullius [that no one owned the land prior to European assertion of sovereignty] never applied in Canada," the chief justice herself wrote, in Tsilhqot'in Nation v. British Columbia, in which a unanimous court granted title to an Indigenous group over a large swath of the B.C. Interior.

In the eyes of many Indigenous people, it was the biggest of all victories, because it gave First Nations enormous leverage in negotiations over proposed development of Indigenous lands.

"What they're doing is they're strengthening the negotiation hand of aboriginal people, who didn't really have a hand at all," Jean Teillet, a Vancouver lawyer who is the great-grandniece of Louis Riel, said in an interview for this story. "It's a little bit of a revolution going on in this country, I think."

OPPOSITION INTENSIFIES

The Charter of Rights represented a potentially massive change to Canada's political system. And led by Chief Justice Dickson, judges seized the moment: If the Constitution was supreme, he said, judges were its guardians.

Collisions between the Supreme Court and politicians began to build in intensity.

Early on, those on the left of the political spectrum were concerned that socially progressive legislation would come crashing down. But before long, it was conservatives who were worried. The federal criminal law on abortion fell. The Supreme Court forbade Canada from extraditing suspects abroad to face the death penalty. Gay marriage became a reality.

As elected legislators began taking a back seat to unelected justices, attacks on "activist judges" - from the Reform Party and its successors on the right - became commonplace. McGill University political scientist Christopher Manfredi shares the concern about the role of judges in the Charter era. "There are reasons," he told The Globe, "to ask whether courts have the capacity to make the kinds of policy decisions they're being asked to make."

Even within the court, Chief Justice McLachlin was at times seen as pushing the court's scrutiny of laws too far. In a 5-4 ruling in Sauve v. Canada, in 2002, she wrote the majority decision declaring it unconstitutional for the federal government - the Liberal government of Jean Chrétien, in that case - to have taken away the right to vote from federal prisoners. The dissenters, in a decision from Justice Charles Gonthier, all but accused her of plucking such a constitutional right from thin air.

To this day, Justice McLachlin sees it differently. "I don't think you necessarily lose your humanity or your rights just because you're in prison or committed a very serious offence," she told The Globe.

"I understand for many people this is counterintuitive."

She was now the face of a court that would be increasingly called on to justify its role in defending the rights of marginalized groups. In the House of Commons in 2003, Opposition leader Stephen Harper accused the Supreme Court of having illegally rewritten the Charter eight years earlier - in the case of Egan v. Canada - to include sexual orientation as a prohibited ground of discrimination in the equality clause, Section 15. (The framers deliberately left it off the list of protected groups; but the court had long since decided that the list was open-ended.) "I would point out," Mr. Harper said, "that an amendment to the Constitution by the courts is not a power of the courts under our Constitution." He had brought the emotional U.S. debate on "originalism" to Canada.

Still, sometimes Mr. Harper and Chief Justice McLachlin agreed on constitutional issues. Before he was elected prime minister, Mr. Harper was instrumental in bringing a case all the way to the Supreme Court on the right of citizens to advertise before elections. A Liberal government had passed a law strictly limiting such third-party advertising. Representing a conservative group, the National Citizens Coalition, Mr. Harper argued that this was an unjustifiable limit on freedom of speech.

He lost, 6 to 3 - but Chief Justice McLachlin was on his side. "This denial of effective communication to citizens violates free expression where it warrants the greatest protection - the sphere of political discourse," she co-wrote in dissent, with Justice Major, in Harper v. Canada in 2004.

But the gulf between them remained.

Under her predecessor, Antonio Lamer, the court had sometimes broken into multiple factions, obscuring the meaning of decisions. But as Chief Justice McLachlin tangled with the fledgling Conservative government, she became a unifying force on the court.

"If you couldn't get five judges on the same decision, you then had a lack of clarity as to what the court was deciding," Ian Binnie, a judge on the court from 1998 to 2011, said in an interview for this story.

"So, without pushing people to a particular outcome, she would urge all of us to rethink our positions to at least have five of the nine judges saying the same thing."

Off the bench, too, she tried to hold the court together. During one fractious period within the court, she invited her colleagues to prepare a meal at her home, under the direction of the Supreme Court chef, Mr. Binnie recalled: "So we were all instructed to clean fish and peel vegetables, which brought people together on a personal level at a time when there were some professional differences that needed to be healed."

Mr. Winkler said he gained an insight into her subtle leadership style by observing her at Canadian Judicial Council meetings. "You get to the end of a meeting and you say, 'How did we get to this position?' And then you look back: She got you there. But she didn't come in and say, 'Here's what we're going to do.' You never thought she dictated or compelled the conclusion. It's like magic to see."

Thus, when three major cases arrived at the court on the right to life, liberty and security of the person - Chief Justice McLachlin's sweet spot - the court was ready to speak clearly and with one voice.

The first of those cases, in 2011, involved the Harper government's stated "war on drugs."

Since 2003, cocaine and heroin addicts had been injecting drugs under nursing supervision at Vancouver's Insite clinic.

Now, however, the federal government wanted to close the clinic, arguing that it promoted drug use and addiction.

The judges balked. Chief Justice McLachlin, writing for a unanimous court, said that the federal approach was not in accordance with "the principles of fundamental justice," because it would increase the risk of death or disease to the vulnerable, an effect grossly disproportionate to any benefits such an approach might have. The clinic stayed open.

The second case, in 2013, involved prostitution laws (street soliciting, running a bawdy house, living off the avails) predating the Conservative government. Again, all nine judges stood together. Again, Chief Justice McLachlin penned the ruling. As in the Insite case, she wrote that the prostitution laws put the lives of vulnerable Canadians, in this case sex-trade workers, at risk. The court struck down the prostitution laws, thus allowing sextrade workers to ply their trade legally, in dwellings or on the street. (A subsequent Conservative law criminalized those who purchase sex.)

The ruling had an added consequence, far beyond the case: It gave lower-court judges the right to overturn precedents in certain circumstances, even those set by the Supreme Court. Until then, only the Supreme Court could topple its previous rulings. But now, if a trial judge found new "social facts" - such as a new understanding of how certain laws add to the dangers of the sex trade - that judge could revisit what seemed to have been a settled constitutional matter. And higher courts would have to show deference to the trial judge's findings on how times had changed. Precedent is "not a straitjacket that condemns the law to stasis," Chief Justice McLachlin wrote.

This was the "living tree" on steroids, exactly what Mr. Harper opposed. But he had not been able to find the Canadian equivalent of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, a believer in a "frozen Constitution."

The third case, Carter v. Canada, in 2015, was a reprise of the 1993 assisteddying case. And the prostitution ruling sealed it. A lower-court judge in Carter v.

Canada had found as a fact that, in countries that allowed assisted dying, the vulnerable were protected. Under Chief Justice McLachlin's judgment in the prostitution case, the Supreme Court judges had little choice but to defer to this critical finding.

The government's central rationale for criminalizing assisted dying (protecting those vulnerable to being pressured to die) was thus shattered. The 9-to-0 Supreme Court ruling lifting the ban on assisted dying was authored not by the Chief Justice but by "the Court," giving it extra oomph.

Chief Justice McLachlin's vision was triumphant: Section 7 (the right to life, liberty and security of the person) now placed strict limits on what might be described as legislating morality. Individual rights would prevail over community standards. Bradley Miller, a conservative law professor later appointed to the Ontario Court of Appeal by the Harper government, said that governments had been deprived of the right to make their arguments on behalf of larger societal interests. "Justice and justification are to be considered from one side only," he wrote on a British constitutional blog before becoming a judge.

Even if only one person was wronged, a law could fall.

"I JUST FELT THIS WAS WRONG"

Federal Court of Appeal Justice Marc Nadon was an outspoken small-c conservative (though not a Scalia-like originalist).

He was also semi-retired.

When Mr. Harper appointed him to the Supreme Court in 2013 - to replace Morris Fish of Quebec - a legal challenge began over whether he had the legal qualifications. In 2014, the court ruled that he did not. It was the court's first rejection of an appointee in its history.

That was just one case in a losing streak for the Harper government. In five major cases, the government found just a single vote - once - on the Supreme Court. Three involved tough-on-crime laws central to the government's political agenda. In the last of the five, the court turned thumbs down on the government's wish to make the Senate an elected body.

That Senate ruling seemed to be the last straw for Mr. Harper. Soon after, the Prime Minister's Office put out a news release saying that Chief Justice McLachlin had sought to interfere in a case before the court - the Nadon case. It said she had inappropriately called Justice Minister Peter MacKay, and had tried to call Mr. Harper, who would not take the call. "Neither the Prime Minister nor the Minister of Justice would ever call a sitting judge on a matter that is or may be before their court," the news release stated.

That same day, the Chief Justice had been giving a speech at the University of Moncton on women and the law. She did not learn of the PMO's statement till four the next morning, as she hurried to catch a plane to return to Ottawa. "I obviously was shocked and dismayed," she recalled in the interview in her office. "I thought, 'This is not right. This is not true.' " Back in Ottawa, she met with her executive legal officer, Owen Rees, and decided to speak out.

"I never felt fear. I didn't even feel anxiety, as I recall. I just felt this was wrong. I did not want it to tarnish the office of chief justice or the court. I had devoted my whole life, or a good part of it, to doing whatever I could to make the court a wonderful and hopefully respected institution. My concern was that somehow this might tarnish the image of the court."

She says she told Mr. Rees, "'We're going to put out a statement and deny any wrongdoing' - which there was none - 'and just set out the facts.' That's what we did. We set out the dateline of when that call was - which, by the way, was several months, I believe, before the candidate in question's name ever came up.

The call was a purely administrative one of the nature that chief justices make to the justice minister from time to time."

(As The Globe later reported, the PMO had created a list of six candidates for the Supreme Court, of which four, including Justice Nadon, were from the Federal Court's trial and appeal divisions. No Federal Court judge had ever filled one of the three places reserved for Quebec on the Supreme Court, because the law did not explicitly allow it. When Chief Justice McLachlin was shown the list, she contacted Minister MacKay to warn him of the legal roadblock. But the confidentiality of the process prevented her from publicly revealing these details.)

In his recent interview with The Globe, Mr. Mulroney said there was nothing unusual in a chief justice contacting the justice minister over an administrative issue.

"Look, when I was prime minister, I would frequently sit down with the chief justice and hear his views on the operation of the federal courts generally in Canada. I would ask, for example, in respect of appointments, what he might think of A, B or C. This was Tony Lamer and Brian Dickson. I would have the chief justice for dinner at 24 Sussex when there were special dinners going on."

He added that Mr. Harper, in his view, had been deeply in the wrong. "The Supreme Court is the backbone of Canadian democracy," he said. "That is diminished when a person in authority like the prime minister attacks, publicly, the chief justice of the Supreme Court."

Mr. Harper did not respond to The Globe's attempt to contact him for this story.

In the backcountry near Pincher Creek, Dick Hardy, a modern-day cowboy who bought the planks for his first corral from the Gietz sawmill, was not impressed by the prime minister's actions.

"I was a Harper fan," the 75-year-old, who went to high school with the chief justice, said in an interview. "I had a great respect for his management, fiscally, of this country. But he was out of school on that one.

"But how gracefully did she handle that."

THE ROAD AHEAD

In her years on the court, Beverley McLachlin did not wear her heart on her sleeve.

Cool, methodical logic was her domain.

"There's a certain effacement of who she is, even in her judicial writing," says David Sandomierski, one of her former law clerks. "She really inhabits the cloak of her office, which entails a concealing of her own person. I view her as an avatar for the court."

The closest she came to a passionate display, perhaps, was in a speech in 2015, in which she said that Canada - led by its first prime minister, John A. Macdonald - had committed cultural genocide against Indigenous peoples in its use of residential schools for assimilation. She called this the "most glaring blemish on the Canadian historic record." But even that, according to her, was a simple statement of fact that she did not think was controversial.

Wrote Joseph Campbell, explaining what it meant to follow one's bliss: "The heroic life is living the individual adventure."

Beverley McLachlin's personal adventure has been unstoppable. She emerged from her pre-electricity, horse-riding childhood to become a modernizing force in Canada, spending 17 years as chief justice - and 28 years in total on the Supreme Court - in the 35 years since the Charter of Rights took effect. And she more than pulled her weight: She wrote or co-wrote 172 of the court's roughly 1,000 reserved decisions while chief justice, about one in six - including many of the most important decisions, according to political science professor Peter McCormick of the University of Lethbridge.

Her legacy, covering virtually every area of the law - from strong protections of due process for suspected terrorists and criminals, to a new legal footing for Indigenous peoples, to the resounding independence of Canada's highest court, to the vibrant growth of the "living tree" of constitutional rights - is now part of the country's foundations.

As for what comes next, more adventure seems likely. She has written a mystery novel, Full Disclosure, to be published this spring. And she'll have a little more time to follow other pursuits as well.

"We both agree there's more to life than just sitting around," says Mr. McArdle, who is now 89. "I'm sure we'll find something interesting to us."

Sean Fine is The Globe and Mail's justice writer. In 2014, he won a National Newspaper Award for politics, for his story on Stephen Harper's secret shortlist and the case of Justice Marc Nadon.

Associated Graphic

Right: Beverley McLachlin gives an interview with The Globe and Mail in her office at the Supreme Court of Canada last month, days before her retirement. She joined the country's top court in 1989 and became its chief justice in 2000.

FRED LUM/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Ms. McLachlin, seen in this high-school photo, grew up in an Alberta community that has produced at least four chief justices of Canadian courts.

Pincher Creek, painted by Robert McInnis, hangs in the office of the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada.

FRED LUM/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

FRED LUM/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Left: Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin sits with the Supreme Court of Canada in Ottawa in February, 2015. Right: New Justice McLachlin signs the oath book after her swearing-in ceremony in Ottawa in 2000.

LEFT: BLAIR GABLE/REUTERS; RIGHT: TOM HANSON/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Friday, January 19, 2018

Correction

A Saturday feature on Beverley McLachlin incorrectly said her husband, Frank McArdle, was the founder of a legal conference for Canadians at Cambridge University. In fact, it was Paul Martin Sr.

Island of boom
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Canada's smallest province has a big economic problem: not enough workers. PEI's answer is to import them by opening the gates wide to immigration. So far, it's working. Is there a lesson for the rest of the country?
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By DAVID PARKINSON
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Saturday, January 20, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B1


On a crisp, late-autumn morning, locals shuffle through the Charlottetown Farmers' Market, scooping up farm produce from the fertile countryside just a few minutes up the road, cuts of meat from local ranchers, fresh Prince Edward Island oysters (shucked while you wait) and an array of handmade crafts and preserves. The scene is familiar to anyone who's visited the market during its 34-year history.

But as you head deeper in, the lilt of rural PEI accents is interspersed with less familiar sounds: Mandarin, Hindi, Arabic. A long line of market-goers waits at a stall serving foods from Africa. Young students carry on an animated conversation in Spanish in front of a Mexican food vendor. Other stalls serve Chinese, Indian and Middle Eastern fare.

"It's a different atmosphere altogether from what it was back 20 years ago," said Ralph Younker of Younker's Farm Fresh Produce. Mr. Younker has had a fruitand-vegetable stall at the market for the past 28 years, and he has watched as a new wave of immigrants has transformed the popular Charlottetown attraction. "In the last two or three years, we've really noticed the influx."

About 2,500 new immigrants landed in PEI in 2017; roughly 90 per cent of which have settled, for now, in Charlottetown. About the same number arrived in 2016.

The province has also taken in about 800 non-permanent foreign residents in the past year.

While those numbers might not sound like a lot to people living in Canada's big, immigrant-intensive hubs, such as Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal, they're a very big deal in a place the size of Charlottetown (population 36,000). The annual immigrant influx is equivalent to roughly 6 per cent of the city's population - which, on a per capita basis, dwarfs the intake of municipalities elsewhere in the country.

This is all very new for a part of Canada that, historically, has been among the least ethnically diverse regions in the country. It reflects a major push by PEI's provincial government to make its slow-growth, aging population both larger and younger - and in doing so, hopefully reverse the demographic collision course on which the province's economy is otherwise headed.

As of the 2016 national census, nearly 20 per cent of PEI's population was 65 and over, up from 15 per cent in the 2006 census. Its average age, 43, had increased by three years in the span of a decade. Crucially for the economy, its labour force (people who are either employed or seeking work) had actually begun shrinking. The prime-age labour force - those between the ages of 25 and 54, considered the most productive segment of the population - declined by 5.8 per cent between 2012 and 2016.

An aging population and slow-growth work force is hardly unique to PEI; Canada's overall population, and those of most of the world's advanced economies, are trending in the same direction - a symptom of the inevitable aging of the huge baby-boomer population.

Statistics Canada has projected that, over the next 20 years, the number of working-age Canadians (15 to 64) will grow just 7 per cent, or only about one-third of the pace seen over the past 20 years; the country's 65-plus population is expected to balloon by 64 per cent in the next two decades. Slow labour growth threatens to stifle the economy's capacity to expand. It's the key reason Ottawa has substantially increased the country's annual immigration targets to import more skilled labour in the coming years - and has changed its rules to help steer more immigrants to regions with the most pressing need.

PEI, along with the rest of Atlantic Canada, is at the top of the list; the demographic crunch has arrived earlier here than in the rest of the country. Slowing natural population growth, a steady exodus of the region's youth and historically low immigration rates have all taken their toll. With another 15 per cent of PEI's population within 10 years of the traditional age of retirement, 65, the prospect of a deepening economic malaise looms on the horizon.

Facing this reality, the government of PEI Premier Wade MacLauchlan has embraced immigration as the cornerstone of its economic revitalization strategy. Taking advantage of the evolution in Ottawa's immigration rules giving the provinces more power to recruit their own immigrants, PEI has roughly doubled its annual immigration intake - heavily weighted toward skilled workers and entrepreneurs and their families who, if all goes as planned, will form a big part of a new generation of PEI prosperity.

The early economic returns have been encouraging. But it's too soon to tell whether PEI can keep enough newcomers here to turn the current immigration boom into the sustainable longer-term prosperity the province seeks.

"My family loves this beautiful island, especially the summer. But it's a small city," said 38-year-old Henry Yin, who arrived in Charlottetown from Beijing in 2014 with his wife and two young sons.

"There's not a lot of business in PEI." He has already abandoned the software and internet business he originally came here to set up, and now works as a real estate agent. "Maybe we'll move to a bigger city in five or six years. Maybe Halifax or Moncton." PEI will serve as an immigration laboratory for the rest of the country, as many regional economies look to address their own looming demographic crunch.

Because of the province's small economy and population, even steering what amounts to only a few more of Canada's immigrants to the province (it still takes in less than 1 per cent of Canada's annual total) is having a rapid and observable impact, both economically and socially. As Charlottetown's and PEI's highspeed immigration makeover progresses, policy makers in many other small cities and rural regions will want to take notes.

"DEAD IN THE WATER"

If you want to understand how an aging population and shrinking work force have the capacity to choke off an otherwise healthy economy, just ask Francis Morrissey.

Mr. Morrissey is the manager of Royal Star Foods Ltd., a lobster processing cooperative in the village of Tignish on the northwestern tip of Prince Edward Island.

The business is thriving; it can barely keep up with growing demand from export markets.

What he lacks, increasingly, is a work force to staff his high-tech plant. The population in the community shrank nearly 8 per cent in the past five years; its workingage population declined more than 16 per cent. The median age in Tignish is 53.2 years, up from 48.6 just five years ago.

"Fifteen years ago, it wasn't a problem, we had more workers than we needed.

Today, we're short, all the time," the big, rugged fisherman said. "The older ones are retired, and the younger ones aren't coming into the industry."

The solution, increasingly, has been to bring in workers from other countries.

Royal Star employs about 70 foreign workers, mostly from the Philippines, out of a total staff of about 400 at the peak of the lobster season. Without workers from overseas, Mr. Morrissey said, he wouldn't have the staff necessary to keep the plant running - and to keep all those people employed.

"Without a work force, we're dead in the water."

Royal Star's dilemma is symptomatic of the demographic crunch the entire PEI economy has been facing. Until recently, the province's population growth had stalled; its working-age population was actually shrinking. Shortages of skilled labour stifled businesses' ability to expand, and thus the economy's capacity to grow. Little business growth translated into little hiring, and little opportunity for the province's youth - who have routinely moved to greener employment pastures. In agriculture, the fishery, tourism - the traditional backbone of the province's economy - workers and business owners have retired in increasing numbers, with no one to take their place.

While temporary foreign workers have plugged some holes in the province's threadbare labour fabric, a longer-term solution was needed. If left unchecked, the province faced a future in which its key industries looked destined to decline, along with its tax base and, by extension, its government's capacity to provide services.

"This is staring all of us in the face," Mr. MacLauchlan said as we chat in his spacious but understated office - a room that feels more like a professor's study than the seat of provincial power - fitting for a former law professor who spent more than a decade as president of the University of Prince Edward Island. It was in his time at UPEI, seeing the fading schoolenrolment rates in the province, that he developed an interest in the province's demographic fate that has become a defining crusade of his political career.

"It was quite obvious, nearly two decades ago, that we were already in the process of a demographic trend that wouldn't turn out very well."

Mr. MacLauchlan made population growth the core of the province's economic strategy after becoming Premier in 2015. He set a population target of 150,000 for the province by the end of 2017 (which it surpassed) and 160,000 by 2022. The government's economic plan, branded "The Mighty Island," focuses on recruiting newcomers to the province, particularly skilled workers and entrepreneurs; getting more of those newcomers to stay in the province long term (what people in the immigration biz call "retention"); and convincing former Islanders to come home. The plan also includes encouraging more newcomers to move beyond Charlottetown and settle in rural communities, such as Tignish, where a new generation of skilled workers and business owners is acutely needed.

The first step has been an increase in immigration numbers - getting more people into PEI in the first place.

15% Portion of PEI's population currently within ten years of the traditional age of retirement, 65. 53.2 Median age in Tignish, PEI.

"What we need to do is open the doors," the Premier said.

Mr. MacLauchlan's ambitions have been aided by shifts in federal immigration policy in recent years which give individual provinces, particularly in the Atlantic region, increased capacity to recruit their own skilled workers and entrepreneurs. Between Ottawa's recent increases of provincial allotments under the nearly two-decade-old Provincial Nominee Program (PNP), and a new program launched this year called the Atlantic Immigration Pilot Program, PEI was afforded nearly 1,000 annual slots for skilled immigrants, plus their immediate families, in 2017 - compared with just 400 three years ago.

(Each of those slots for a so-called "principal" immigrant translates to, on average, about 2.4 immigrants, once family members are included.)

It also helps that the bar that PEI has set for PNP entrepreneurs - the portion of the program that brings in immigrants who pledge to start a business - is among the lowest in the country. Those approved receive immediate permanent-resident status; in exchange, they are required to put $200,000 in escrow, which they get back if they live in PEI and operate a business there with at least $75,000 of operating expenses for one year. Most other provinces either have larger financial requirements, or only grant temporary work permits until the minimum-residency and business-operation period is completed. The relatively easy standards have drawn immigrant entrepreneurs to PEI's door.

The Premier's efforts have turned his province into an instant immigration hotbed. Charlottetown, the epicentre of this boom, has seen its immigrant population double in just five years; new Canadians made up 12.4 per cent of the city's population as of the 2016 census, nearly triple the share of a decade ago.

By many key measures, the strategy has so far been a success. Over the past year, Prince Edward Island had the fastestgrowing population among Canadian provinces - growth driven almost entirely by immigration. More importantly, the median age in PEI declined slightly in the past year - the first time that has happened in 50 years.

That growth is fuelling a hot economy.

PEI's real gross domestic product expanded by 2.3 per cent in 2016 - its fastest growth in a decade, and a full percentagepoint higher than Canada's national growth pace. The economy is believed to have grown at about the same pace again last year. In the past year, PEI led all provinces in employment and wage growth, on a percentage basis.

The quick success has won over most Islanders. Mr. MacLauchlan points to a recent survey from Corporate Research Associates, an Atlantic Canada-based independent research firm, showing that two-thirds of Islanders believe the province "is headed in the right strategic direction."

"I think it's a good sign that people see the growth," he said. "If we're going to catch up, we have to do better than the average." Yet, Charlottetown is feeling the strain of so much growth, so fast. Housing is scarce and prices have soared. Immigrant-settlement services are overworked.

The schools are grappling with an influx of immigrant children who are struggling with a new language and culture. Health care and transit are scrambling to keep up with demand that is rising almost by the day.

"Immigration has arrived faster than people were prepared for," said Craig Mackie, executive director of the PEI Association for Newcomers to Canada, the non-profit agency that provides a wide range of settlement services for new arrivals. "It's not just the government, it's not just the private sector and it's not just the non-profit sector - we're all struggling to deal with this."

A NEW WAVE OF ENTREPRENEURS

Walking up from the waterfront along historic Queen Street in the heart of old Charlottetown, the first thing that strikes you is the old-world flatness of the skyline. There are only a handful of buildings that stretch above the traditional threeand four-storey structures that have defined the city's architecture for generations. (There isn't a building in town taller than 10 storeys.)

As the "Birthplace of Confederation" - the city where, more than 150 years ago, the leaders of the British colonies in what is now Canada first formally discussed banding together to form a new country - Charlottetown's streetscapes have long been protected as a physical, visual testament to its unique place in Canadian history.

There are about 300 officially designated historical buildings in downtown Charlottetown alone, saved in perpetuity from the wrecking ball and from modern urban development. Strict building codes have otherwise kept development close to the ground. To hear Mayor Clifford Lee talk about it, his job is part administrator of a small but growing city, part curator of a living national historical monument.

"I think Charlottetown will always be a heritage city," Mr. Lee said in his corner office in the 19th-century City Hall, overlooking Queen Street. "I think the city of Charlottetown has an obligation to Canadians to preserve the city that portrays the Birthplace of Confederation."

Yet, even amid a downtown very deliberately lost in time, a new face of Charlottetown is emerging from its storefronts.

Whereas a decade or so ago this popular tourist area would have been dominated by seafood restaurants and pubs, there is now a world of choices: Chinese, Japanese, Indian, Korean, Vietnamese, Afghani. And it's not just eateries dotting the downtown streets; newcomers are making a go of bookstores and boutiques, grocery stores and gift shops.

The entrepreneurial portion of the PNP remains the most controversial part of the province's immigration push. Memories of past scandals have left a lingering suspicion that wealthy immigrants are simply using PEI's entrepreneur scheme to buy their way into Canada. But there's little question it is breathing fresh life into Charlottetown's retail community.

Just around the corner from City Hall is a little jewellery shop owned by Pam and Joe Arora. The PNP brought the couple, in their early 50s, to Charlottetown from New Delhi in mid-2015. After more than a decade of experience owning a handcrafted jewellery store in India, they opened their business, Pam & Joe Handcrafted, about a year later.

"We've been doing well," Pam said.

"We've been getting quite a lot of help from the government; we took advantage of it."

The Aroras are among the new wave of immigrant entrepreneurs who have been nurtured by PEI Connectors, a government-funded program run through the Greater Charlottetown Area Chamber of Commerce. The program connects new immigrants looking to own a business with Islanders seeking buyers for existing businesses, as well as providing a link for newcomers with members of the business community who can provide advice, mentorship and education on the ins and outs of starting a business in PEI. The idea is to smooth the way for newcomers to succeed and thrive in their new business environment - with the end goal to improve the chances of retaining new immigrants in the province. It's the kind of support that was sorely lacking in the failed immigrant-investor program of a decade ago.

"It takes a while to build relationships, to build the trust and understanding," said Penny Walsh McGuire, executive director of the Chamber of Commerce.

"Our ability to facilitate those connections is very important. ... Providing the support that we do is important to help increase the chances of success."

The Aroras are one of PEI Connectors' success stories. While their business isn't yet profitable, they sound committed to staying and making it work - encouraged by the close connections they have been able to quickly make in the close-knit Charlottetown business community.

"The acceptance is amazing," Pam said.

"It's a small place, everyone knows everyone. There's no mad rush. The crime is very low here. People are more connected, they have time for each other, they have patience.

"All that is helping us fall in love with this place more and more."

NAGGING WORRIES

Nevertheless, the Aroras are in the minority among PNP entrepreneurs. Recent statistics from the government show nearly two-thirds of PNP entrepreneurs have either failed within their first year or never got off the ground to begin with.

That means the province has pocketed $18-million from escrow defaults - money PNP entrepreneurs forfeited because they didn't fulfill their promise to own and run a business on the Island for the required one year.

Critics also worry that the entrepreneur program isn't focused enough on recruiting businesses to the province in emerging high-skill sectors that will help launch the province into new growth industries.

Nearly 30 per cent of the approved startups have been in small retail.

The nagging worries reflect back on the embarrassing failure of the provincial strategies of a decade ago aimed at bringing in wealthy foreigners to inject investment in local business - a wound still fresh for many Islanders.

The previous program, under which immigrants invested $200,000 a piece in PEI businesses in exchange for permanent-resident status in Canada, brought more than $400-million into the province, but much of the money never made it past middlemen who worked with both prospective immigrants and companies looking to capitalize on the program.

Businesses that should have never qualified for the program received immigrant funds, in some cases using the "investments" to pay off creditors and back taxes. Many immigrant investors never even saw the companies that took their money, let alone actively participated in the business - a requirement of the federally sanctioned program. There were allegations provincial officials doled out funds to businesses of friends and family, and even that some accepted bribes. Ottawa shut down the program in 2008, citing rules breaches. Federal authorities, including the RCMP, launched formal investigations, though no charges were ever laid.

Perhaps worst of all, most of those immigrants merely used PEI as a stepping stone, moving on to other provinces. Tax-filing statistics suggest that just one-third of the immigrants who landed in PEI in 2007 were still living there three years later.

That policy calamity has left some Islanders skeptical about the current immigrant push - and suspicious of whom in the province is really benefiting.

Among the most vocal of skeptics is Vision PEI, a grassroots political group concerned with safeguarding "the future well-being of the province," as it states on its Facebook page. The group's leader is David Weale, a local author and former UPEI professor - who frequently takes to social media to, among other things, rail against the threats to the province's rich farmlands from large-scale industrial farming and express suspicions about a Buddhist monastery and school that is expanding its footprint in rural PEI.

I had a coffee with Mr. Weale and a couple of his Vision PEI colleagues - Kevin Arsenault and Dale Small - in the elegant dining room of the Rodd Charlottetown, the city's grande dame of hotels (the Queen has slept here). The old-Charlottetown atmosphere seems apt for a discussion about safeguarding Prince Edward Island's past in the face of a government rushing headlong into its future.

"The immigration policy at the present time has nothing to do with the long-term benefits to the Island, or the kind of society we want to build. It just has to do with opportunism," Mr. Weale argued. "There are all kinds of sectors of the population that are temporarily happy - because they're selling properties, they're selling cars, they're lawyers and accountants. But if you ask the question, 'Where's all this heading?' Nobody's even talking about that."

"The strategy is the government needs revenue to help manage their fiscal deficit. They know the people they are bringing in only really want permanent-resident status, and they're going to go to Toronto or Vancouver, the vast majority of them - which they've been doing for nearly two decades," said Mr. Arsenault, who is all too familiar with PEI's spotty immigration past - he ran the PEI Association for Newcomers to Canada from 1999 to 2009.

"The people coming here, the majority of them, aren't even starting businesses."

There are plenty of new shops throughout the city that suggest otherwise; the rules under the current plan require newcomers to be personally involved in running an active business. Nevertheless, given the failure rate, it's unclear how many of the PNP businesses ever had a realistic chance of succeeding. PEI's system of granting permanent residency immediately means that anyone who is accepted as a PNP entrepreneur has no real obligation to actually make a serious go of their business - so long as they're willing to forgo their escrow funds, or swallow the costs of running the business for a year.

For some wealthy immigrants, that may be a reasonable price to pay to gain permanent entry into Canada.

On a rainy afternoon, I met 39-year-old Jessica Wang at her new business, Family & Bookland, which she started a few months ago. Officially, it's a Chinese bookstore - but one with remarkably few books for sale. She calls it a "learning centre," where she hosts seminars for Chinese newcomers to learn about the local community and culture. Sometimes she charges money for these seminars, either to the attendees or the presenters; sometimes they are free.

Ms. Wang is quite candid: She doesn't plan to stay - in the business, or in Charlottetown. Once she fulfills her obligations to get her escrow money back, she and her 8-year-old son intend to look elsewhere.

"I think, eventually, I will move out of PEI. The job opportunities here are not that good. When I finish this business ... I think, probably, I will move out," she said.

"It's a turnstile. That's what PEI is, it's just a turnstile," Mr. Weale said.

Back in the Premier's office, Mr. MacLauchlan shakes his head at the notion that immigration to PEI must be meted out with great care, to protect the Island against immigrants who may be using the province as a convenient way to get into Canada, without being fully committed to the economic best interests of the Islanders who were here before them.

"Our [past] approach to immigration is like librarians who don't want to let the books out. I think we have to recognize that immigration is a good thing, and when people come, they will find what's best for them."

And, anyway, recent government data suggest that many PNP immigrants are finding PEI to their liking. The figures show that even though more PNP businesses appear to be failing than succeeding, very few newcomers are defaulting on the portion of their escrow deposits covering their commitment to live in the province for at least 12 months. And PEI's outward migration has slowed even as its immigrant intake has swelled. Though it's not definitive evidence, both of those figures suggest that more immigrants are staying put.

"BEIJING STREET"

Perhaps the biggest draw to keeping immigrants in any community is the presence of more immigrants - building a "critical mass," as people involved in the immigration industry here call it. As the province's immigration numbers rise, and at least some percentage of them stay, the expectation is their numbers will grow sufficiently that various ethnic communities will become self-sustaining - substantial enough to provide a built-in community that nurtures newcomers as they integrate into a new country and culture.

"It becomes self-reinforcing," Premier MacLauchlan said. "Communities get to the point where others will want to come and join them."

Elements of such ethnic communities have started to emerge in Charlottetown and its suburbs - for example, among the growing Indian and Arab populations. A modest Syrian community has arisen, as the area has taken in more than 300 refugees from the war-torn country over the past two years. The city's Filipino population has grown substantially in recent years.

But the big ethnic group taking hold in Charlottetown is the Chinese community.

More than one-quarter of all immigrants in the city, and nearly half of the immigrants who settled here from 2011-16, came from China, according to last year's census. The city is gaining a reputation among immigration hopefuls in Beijing, where people fed up with the Chinese capital's unwieldy size, crowded streets and air pollution are drawn to the promise of a quieter, healthier environment.

Mr. Yin, the real estate agent, takes me on a tour of Stratford, a suburb across a short bridge from downtown Charlottetown. He turns his SUV up Stonington Boulevard, known to locals and real estate professionals as "Beijing Street."

As we wind past the sprawling two-level and ranch-style homes, with their double garages and seemingly endless lawns, Mr. Yin points to house after house: "Chinese. Chinese. Chinese." He estimates about 70 per cent of the homes on this street have been bought by Chinese immigrants.

In newer subdivisions, such as the waterfront communities in Stratford and West Royalty and Bell Heights in Charlottetown's north end, the city is seeing the beginnings of what demographers call "ethnic enclaves" - pockets where immigrant families have clustered, in some cases even forming the majority of the population, if only for a few blocks.

Researchers say the emergence of enclaves - common in the country's big, urban immigrant hubs, but less so outside of them - bode well for a city's ability to attract and retain newcomers, wrapping them in a built-in support network.

As new arrivals from China are drawn to these neighbourhoods, they are fuelling pockets of acute price surges. Mr. Yin said homes around here that sold for about $350,000 two years ago are going for more than $500,000 today. It's not only because of the jump in demand, but also because many newcomers are more than willing to bid up prices in order to get the exact house they want on the exact street where they might have friends and family.

As Mr. Yin notes, an average twobedroom apartment in Beijing sells for about $2-million; newcomers don't bat an eye at the asking prices for the kind of spacious homes and rambling lots you find on Beijing Street.

This phenomenon is part of a broader housing boom gripping Charlottetown, fuelled by the immigration wave. Average prices have jumped 22 per cent since 2015, while sales are up nearly 30 per cent.

Housing starts this year are running at nearly twice the pace of previous years, but are still having trouble keeping up with rising demand.

"The market is very hot," Mr. Yin said.

"I'm very busy, every day."

And good luck trying to find an apartment. Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. reported last month that Charlottetown's rental-vacancy rate is a thin 0.9 per cent, half of what it was a year ago.

This is one of the tightest rental markets in the country - tighter than Toronto and matching Vancouver.

With immigration straining the city at its seams, Charlottetown is fast discovering that its low-to-the-ground architectural tradition and its large swaths of historically untouchable land in the city core are at odds with its increasingly pressing housing needs. Mayor Lee believes the city has little choice but to loosen its zoning bylaws to allow for high-rise development.

"The reality is there's not a whole lot of vacant land available for new development. When you can't go out any more, you have to go up," he said.

"A LEARNING CURVE" Around the corner from Pam & Joe's stands the headquarters of the growing business empire of Xuan Zhou, or Frank Zhou as he's known locally. In the nearly 18 years since he and his wife arrived here from Beijing, he has built his company, Sunrise Group, from a modest language school into a miniconglomerate, rooted in Charlottetown's immigration industry.

In addition to the language school, the company is one of seven provincially authorized immigration agents - fee-based consulting firms that skilled-worker and entrepreneur applicants can hire to assist them in navigating the PNP process. It is also involved in Chinese-Canadian business and investment consulting, shipping logistics to and from Asia and early-childhood education. And Mr. Zhou is responsible for exporting two of Prince Edward Island's most famous brands - Anne of Green Gables and COWS ice cream - to China.

He's a one-man bridge between Prince Edward Island's business establishment, its new immigrant face and the economic opportunities they have opened for each other.

"We're ambassadors. We're branding this beautiful province," Mr. Zhou said in his Queen Street office.

Mr. Zhou has had a unique view of PEI's sometimes treacherous immigration journey of the past two decades. He said he is convinced the province is on the right track.

"It's been a learning curve, for everybody - for government, for intermediaries, for us as immigrants, for the business community," he said. "But from the trend, you can see, it's getting better."

"PEI's economy has benefited from this heavily. Different sectors have benefited heavily. Of course, there are some minor strings that need to be fixed. But biggerpicture-wise, it's looking good."

Still, he said, there's plenty of work to be done - to give newcomers the tools and access to information they need to integrate more quickly into the business and social cultures and give them an even better chance to succeed - and stay.

"I'm optimistic. But it's such a long journey. It's not happening in a day. It's years," he said. "People need to work together to sustain this."

Associated Graphic

Ralph Younker weighs out bags of cranberries at his stand at the Charlottetown Farmers Market in December.

PHOTOS BY DARREN CALABRESE/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Housing in Charlottetown, along avenues such as Great George Street, is scarce and prices have soared, conditions exacerbated by the city's historical character and building restrictions.

The Charlottetown Farmers Market is 'a different atmosphere altogether from what it was back 20 years ago,' Mr. Younker, right, said. As the ethnic diversity of the city has expanded, so has that of the market.

Workers at Royal Star Foods, a lobster processing co-operative in the village of Tignish on the northwestern tip of the island, lift a case of lobster in December. The business is thriving with increasing demand, but the drop in the local comunity's prime-working age population has made staffing the high-tech plant difficult for owner Francis Morrissey.

PHOTOS BY DARREN CALABRESE/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

In light of the local-labour shortage, Royal Star Foods has increasingly been forced to rely on temporary foreign workers, such as Exequiel Ligan.

Pedestrians cross Queen Street, one of downtown Charlottetown's major arteries, in December.

BIRTH AND DEATH NOTICES
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Friday, January 12, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B15


DAVID J. BEESLEY

October 2, 1948 January 6, 2018

It is with great sadness that David's family announces his passing after a courageous battle with lung cancer. He will be deeply missed by his loving wife and partner of 35 years, Mary Opper; his three children and their spouses, Simon (Monica), Matthew (Lesia) and Dan (Lynda); his three grandchildren, Emily, Madeline and Isabella; his two brothers and their spouses, Michael (Margaret) and Mark (Margaret); his brother-in-law and sisters-in-law, Tom (Jennifer), Carol and Jane; as well as his many nieces and nephews.

David was born in London, England and immigrated to Canada 41 years ago to build a better life for his family.

After working many years in advertising, sales and marketing he hit his stride at The St. Clair Group where he embraced the sport of curling, eventually taking over the sponsorship sales and marketing. In 1996, David and his partner, John Dunlop formed the Canadian Sponsorship Group, fulfilling a 25 year association with Curling Canada and the World Curling Federation. David was widely respected and loved by the many colleagues and friends he made along the way.

David remained remarkably optimistic throughout his illness, maintaining his usual positive attitude, good humor and generous spirit. He had great enthusiasm for life, including his cars, fine wines and leisurely meals, his time at the family cottage on Lake Muskoka, playing golf with his friends and years as a member of the Metro Toronto Dart League. David loved his life and spending time with family and his many friends. Those who know him well will raise a glass of Macallan in his honour.

There will be a private family service: a celebration of life for friends and colleagues will be announced later in the spring. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation where David was very grateful to the nurses, doctors and staff that took care of him as well as UHN.

JUNE BENNETT BRAMALL (nee Smith)

Born Toronto, August 29 1922, died January 7, 2018.

Predeceased by husband, David Gurth Bramall. Loving mother of Richard (Nola), Christopher (Thy) and Amanda. Grandmother to Matthew, Katherine, Michael (Avery), Andrea (Joe) and Thomas. Great-grandmother to Payton, Holden, Klea, Marissa and Burkley. A talented lady, blessed with many friends, missed by all.

Private family service to be held.

Celebration of life, in her garden, come the spring.

In lieu of flowers, donations to Wellspring Birmingham/Gilgan House in Oakville would be appreciated.

Please visit the Book of Memories at http://www.wardfuneralhome.com

NATHALIE HELOISE DOIRON

Passed away at the West Island Palliative Care Residence in Kirkland (Montreal) on December 31, 2017 at only 53.

She will be sorely missed by her loving husband, Don Stroub; her parents, (Henri and Joan Doiron); aunt, Leona Graham-Elen; uncles, Robert and Ralph Graham; cousins, Laura, John, Bruce, Lila, Alex, Lara, Daniel and Kim-Ellen Hurst; as well as Doiron relatives. Her many friends from across North America and the world will miss her regular phone calls, emails and Christmas cards.

She was born in Ottawa, raised in Toronto, and spent many years in and around Montreal. She studied history and social work at McGill University, law at the Université du Québec à Montréal, and received her Masters and PhD in social work from the University of Toronto. She loved her work and her colleagues at the Centre francophone de Toronto, and later was an instructor for Dalhousie University.

She had struggled with multiple chemical sensitivities for years before her cancer diagnosis in 2014. On June 27, 2015, she married the love of her life, Don Stroub. He was her best friend, her confident, her staunch supporter and her unfailing caregiver. She could not have lived so long and so well without Don and he was with her until the end.

If desired, donations in memory of Nathalie can be made to the West Island Palliative Care Residence.

RUTH ISOBEL EMERY

Artist. Athlete.

Volunteer. Traveller.

Ruth Isobel Emery, 103 years.

January 1, 2018. North York, Ontario. Born July 22, 1914, Toronto, Ontario; daughter of William Mark and Isobel Ettie Jackson. She was the beloved wife of the late Roy W. Emery; predeceased also by their beloved son, John R. Emery.

She will be greatly missed by her many friends and large family; son, Alan Emery and his wife, Frances; daughter, Nancy Geisler and her husband, Hans; daughter-in-law, Nina Emery; six grandchildren, Kitty Emery-Keller (Kyle Keller), Timothy Emery (Dian Emery), Matthew Geisler (Jane Geisler-Lee), James Emery (Julie Han-Emery), Robert Emery, and Gwen Geisler (Alex); and by her four great-grandchildren, Sarah Emery, Alec Emery, Alana Keller, and Jayden Han Emery.

Interment will be held privately.

In lieu of flowers, donations to the Parkinson's Society of Canada may be made. The family extends our grateful thanks to the management and staff of the Gibson Nursing Home, who cared so kindly for Ruth during the many happy years when she called it home.

Ruth was first a loving wife and mother, but also a talented artisan, recognized especially for her beautiful pottery, as well as for her prodigious output of knitted items, with new sweaters for every family member for birthdays and Christmas. She was athletic when she was younger, but loved swimming most of all, and swam every day well into her 80s and even her 90s. She and Roy travelled the world together on business. She was a busy volunteer, chairing the board of the local branch of the Victorian Order of Nurses for several years.

PROF. DONALD DWIGHT EVANS

September 21, 1927 January 5, 2018

Prof. Donald Dwight Evans was a gifted philosopher, educator, mystic humanist, social activist, spiritual counsellor and mentor.

Born, September 21, 1927 to Ira Dwight Evans and Jesse Milliken Evans in Fort William (now Thunder Bay), Ontario. He lived a rich life, full of diverse intellectual pursuits. Married to Ruth Blenkinsop (1952-1976) and Frances Smith (1983-1997) and predeceased by brother, John; he was the father of Steve (Joan), Greg (Ronda), Luke (Guylaine), Nick (Sue) and Gareth (Susannah); beloved grandfather of Drew (Andrea), Cass (Juliana), Tom, Ryan, Philippe, Luke, Ben and Isobel; and great-grandfather to Aidan and Felix.

Prof. Evans received his B.A. in Philosophy and English (University of Toronto, 1950) followed by a Bachelor of Philosophy (Oxford University, 1953), Bachelor of Divinity in theological studies (McGill University, 1955) and his PhD in Philosophy (Oxford University, 1960). He was ordained as a minister in the United Church of Canada in 1955 and served as Pastor in Grand Forks, British Columbia from 1955 to 1958. He went on to serve as an Assistant Professor of Philosophy of Religion at McGill University (196064), before joining Victoria College at the University of Toronto as a Professor of Philosophy in 1964, where he taught for 44 years until 2008 with much appreciation from his students.

In his early scholarly works such as The Logic of Self-Involvement (1969), Prof. Evans explored the meaning of religion through language. In the same period, he advocated for more independent Canadian foreign policy in Peace, Power and Protest (1967).

In his middle-career works such as Faith, Authenticity and Morality (1980) and Struggle and Fulfillment (1981), he explored attitude-virtues, constituents of religion and morality that unify our being, experiences and environments. His Spirituality and Human Nature (1993) brought together religion, psychology, spiritualism and mysticism to explore our nature and experiences. Finally, his online book Grateful Reflection (2013) provided an intimate exploration of his life's spirituality, sexuality, healing and search for community (see http://donevans.ca).

During the late 1960s he was a leader in the protest movement against Canadian involvement in the Vietnam war, serving as a spokesperson at the first demonstration on Parliament Hill in 1965 and co-organizing of the first International TeachIn at Varsity Arena, Toronto. He later initiated and organized a protest march of 400 University of Toronto professors. In 1985 he initiated an observance of the United Nations International Day of Peace in Metro Toronto: a minute of silence and a moment of sound for peace. Over the next three years this observance spread across Canada, growing to an estimated one million Canadians taking part with broadcasts over 60 radio stations.

Prof. Evans' exceptional contributions were recognised when he was elected President, Canadian Theological Society and received an honorary Doctor of Divinity from Huntington University in 1982. He was also awarded a Commemorative Medal by the United Nations for his work during the International Year of Peace. Prof. Evans passed away peacefully in his sleep and he will be dearly missed by family, friends, and colleagues. His family have said farewell in a private gathering but will welcome memories or condolences via condolences @ donevans. ca .

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to organisations promoting world peace.

MAUREEN KATHERINE GIBBS (nee Connolly)

It is with deep sadness that we announce the very sudden passing of our cherished mother, grandmother, and greatgrandmother on Wednesday, January 10, 2018 at the St.

Joseph's Health Centre in her 88th year. Predeceased by her beloved husband of 63 years, Edward Sr. Wonderful; mother to Gerry (Flo), Cathy (Dale), Dan (Lancy), Chris (Nancy), Patricia (Albert), Joe (Katherine) and Edward (Colleen); loving grandmother to 16 grandchildren; and 17 greatgrandchildren. Dear sister of Lally (Michael) Foxwell.

Maureen will be fondly remembered by her many friends at Weston Golf and Country Club, Victoria Harbour and Florida.

Mom was very passionate about her family times spent at Georgian Bay and Florida and her vast world travels.

Friends will be received at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Road (North of Lawrence Ave. W.) Weston, on Monday, January 15, 2018 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at All Saints Catholic Church, 1415 Royal York Road on Tuesday, January 16 at 10 a.m. Interment will take place in the spring at St. Michael's Cemetery in Orillia.

Please visit our Book of Memories at http://www.wardfuneralhome.com

WHARTON FREDERICK RIDOUT HOOD 1920 - 2018

Wharton (Tony) passed away peacefully at the Toronto General Hospital on Thursday, January 4, 2018 with his family in attendance, shortly after an enjoyable lunch and bridge game. Loving father of Ginny, Adrienne (Edward Cole) and the late Douglas. Husband of the late Mary (nee Emmett).

Stationed in England during World War II, he returned to Canada and joined the Independent Order of Foresters, ultimately assuming the role of Vice President and Executive Secretary. Retirement brought the joys of country living and travels around the world on a variety of extended voyages as a passenger on cargo ships.

Most recently, Wharton lived at retirement home, Bradgate Arms, where he developed many new friends; the family would like to thank all the Bradgate staff for their compassionate care over the years. We owe particular gratitude to our friend, Mary Musgrave, for her warm and kind assistance in ensuring that he got out to his various appointments and sharing a laugh or two with him over many coffees. Also, special thanks to Veterans Affairs for their support over the years and to the wonderful staff at Toronto General Hospital during his last hours.

Cremation has taken place and we will hold a small gathering for family and friends later in the summer to celebrate what would have been his 98th birthday. If so desired, a memorial donation can be made to the Canadian Hearing Society (271 Spadina Road, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2V3) https://chssco4294. thankyou4caring.org/donationform-in-memory, or to a charity of your choice. Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

NANCY MCCABE (nee O'Reilly)

Suddenly, yet peacefully, with her family by her side on Wednesday, January 10, 2018 in Toronto at the age of 87. Predeceased by her loving husband, Frank. Devoted mother of Anne (Stephen) Carey, Theresa (Gordon) Mein, and John (Angela). Cherished grandmother of Eamon (Nicole), Samantha (Joseph), Stuart, Myles; and Molly and great-grandmother of Patrick.

Dear sister of Seamus, Maureen, Edward, Tony, Myles, Roisin, Phyllis, Kathleen, Stella, Carmel, and Stephanie. Nancy will be fondly remembered by her many nieces and nephews.

Nancy came to Canada from Belfast, Ireland with her sister, Maureen in 1954. She was a kind, caring, and generous lady who devoted her life to her children and helping others.

Visitation will be held on Friday, January 12, 2018 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge St., at Goulding, south of Steeles).

A Funeral Mass will be held on Saturday, January 13, 2018 at 1 p.m. at Blessed Sacrament Roman Catholic Church (24 Cheritan Ave.). Interment to follow at Mount Hope Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Heart & Stroke Foundation or the Good Shepherd Centre.

Condolences http://www.rskane.ca.

"We will miss your cups of tea, but know you are enjoying many with Daddy."

R.S. Kane 416-221-1159

RONALD WILLIAM PARK "Ron " FCPA , FCA, CPA (Hon)

Ron passed away on January 1, 2018 at the age of 87. Loving husband of Marjean for 62 years; wonderful father to Randy (Nora Cullen) and Eileen MacDonald (George); proud grandfather to Peter and Cameron MacDonald; special friend to John and Sharan Clark and their children, Ashley and Harrison. Predeceased by brother, Alan.

Ron began his distinguished accounting career as a Chartered Accountant at public accounting firm McIntosh, McVicar and Dinsley in 1949. Next he joined Finning Tractor, quickly rising to the rank of corporate secretary, and forming an integral part of the leadership team as Finning grew from a regional, family owned business to a publicly traded international success. After years involved as a volunteer on the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants research committees, and as President of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of British Columbia (often as the first or only industry representative), he culminated his career as Executive Vice-President of the ICABC (now CPABC) where he remained until his retirement in 1990. Ron was also a longtime, active member of the Financial Executives Institute in Vancouver.

Ron lived most of his life in his beloved West Vancouver. He will be remembered as a genuinely devoted husband, father, grandfather, dog lover, co-worker, neighbour and friend. Ron was an accomplished baritone, and his hobbies included sailing at Hollyburn Sailing Club, gardening, and woodworking. His motto was "there are no problems, only projects".

Thank you to the staff at Evergreen House for making his last few months as comfortable as possible.

In lieu of flowers, donations in Ron's name to the BC SPCA or a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

A celebration of life will be held on February 3, 2018 2:00 p.m. at West Vancouver United Church. Details will be posted at http://www.hollyburnfunerals.com.

GOLDIE PLENER

Passed away peacefully at Baycrest on Wednesday, January 10, 2018, in her 92nd year.

Devoted wife of the late Leo Plener. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Jeff Plener and Sharon Baker, Steve and Catherine Plener, and Maydie Plener. Proud bubbie to Rebecca, and Sam. Dear sister and sister-inlaw of George and Frances Dankevy, Ruthie and the late Marty Berman, and the late Moishe and Faye Dankevy, Itch Dankevy, Lil and Marty Winter, and Sofie and Lenny Klein. Dear sister-in-law of Frances and the late Carl Goodman, Ellen and the late Gerry Plener, Marg and the late David Plener, and the late Babe Plener, Adel and Art Brown, Herbie and Sarah Plener, and Morton and Sheila Plener. Dear daughter-in-law of the late Bubbie Belle. Cherished aunt to many nieces and nephews, especially Judy.

At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Friday, January 12, 2018 at 11:30 a.m. Interment Shedlover Young Mens Section of Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park.

Shiva 3600 Yonge Street with visits Sunday and Monday from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Special thanks to the staff at Baycrest and Humber River Hospital who cared for Goldie. Donations may be made to Participation House, Markham 905-513-2756 or a charity of your choice.

MARY AGATHA ANNE O'GRADY SAVAGE

June 20, 1934 January 8, 2018

Mary Agatha Anne O'Grady Savage, aged 83, passed away peacefully January 8, 2018 at the O'Neill Centre in Toronto. She was born in Kinvara, Ireland on June 20, 1934 and was predeceased by her parents, John Peter and Anne Bridget O'Grady; and her brother, Martin; as well as her loving husband of 43 years, Patrick John Savage.

Remembered for her feistiness and devotion to her students and family, Mary Agatha will be fondly missed by her sons, Grady (Julia) and Francis (Cagla former spouse); grandsons, Declan, Ronan, Efe and Spencer; as well as many dear friends and relatives.

Special thanks to all the staff at the O'Neill Centre, particularly the 5th Floor, for their wonderful care and kindness over the years.

Friends may call at the Turner & Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W. (east of the Jane subway) on Friday from 6-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Our Lady of Sorrows Roman Catholic Church the following day, Saturday, January 13, 2018 at 1 p.m. For those who wish, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be greatly appreciated.

Online condolences available at http://www.turnerporter.ca

ALLAN HARVIE WAISMAN

January 24, 1928 - December 20, 2017

Allan Harvie Waisman was born in Winnipeg, the only child of immigrants Rubin and Bessie Waisman. He went to school in the city's North End and took his turn behind the counter of his parents' corner store, mostly, he later reported, to eat candy bars and read comics. He graduated from the University of Manitoba with a Bachelor of Architecture in 1950, and soon after married Joyce Faigie Sedletsky, after a romance that began when they noticed each other on a bus on their way to work. In 1953, he founded an architectural practice with Jack Ross and they started by designing several small rural hospitals. Waisman Ross also designed Winnipeg's New York Life building, a landmark modernist two-storey glass and steel office structure, which is currently being restored. The firm won two silver Massey medals, one for Allan's family cottage in Husavik, an open glass and wood structure built entirely around a large fireplace. Allan applied his original sense of design to his family homes, all of which were unusual.

In the 1960s the firm designed a unique office at 10 Donald St., and merged with another firm to become Waisman, Ross, Blankstein, Coop, Gillmore, Hanna, later changing their name to Number TEN Architects. They designed the Manitoba Theatre Centre (now a National Historic Site), and Allan was active on its board. As well, he was on the board of the Winnipeg Art Gallery and the Royal Winnipeg Ballet. The Winnipeg community's embrace of the arts, culture and design, was a wonderful environment for Allan's formative years as a young architect. As the sixties drew to a close, he was ready to spread his wings and move west.

Allan moved to Vancouver in 1971. He had already formed a business relationship with R.C. Baxter, a prominent developer. Allan designed one of their projects, a group of three office towers on Hastings. The new Waisman Architectural Group re-purposed an old barge (known as the WAG barge) for an office and moored it in Coal Harbour. The firm became Waisman Dewar Grout Carter Architects and later Architectura. Al was known as somewhat of a maverick employer. He was extremely generous to his employees and enthusiastically shared his many new-age ideas. His firm had many noteworthy projects including the Vancouver International Airport Expansion, six pavilions for Expo 86 including the permanent BC pavilion and Whistler Town Centre. Over the years, he received many architectural awards including an Urban Development Institute Award, Governor General Award, Canadian Architect Award and the Royal Architectural Institute Award.

After retirement, Al focused on his entrepreneurial skills, becoming involved in several start-ups. He loved his morning walk through Vancouver's downtown to his office, greeting many acquaintances and planning his day.

Spending most summers exploring the coast on his boat, the Flying Jenny, he also enjoyed international travel with the family, and, never a stickler for rules, would lead them on many harrowing adventures.

In his later years, as a respected community figure, Al still radiated vitality and leadership, mentoring many young people in his profession. He was an astute collector of contemporary Canadian Art and generous patron to many organizations, including the Vancouver Playhouse, Vancouver Art Gallery, Simon Fraser University, and Britannia Mine Museum. In 2009, he endowed a fund at the University of Manitoba to support a graduate scholarship for Aboriginal students in the Faculty of Architecture.

Devoted to his family, Allan was always available for advice and support, providing educational opportunities to all. He lived a very full life, always looking for new experiences and fun. Loved and remembered by his wife, Faigie (Joyce); children, Sheera, Yail, Tully, Dean, (daughter-in-law TC); and grandchildren, Aidan, Adlai, Kelsey, Oren, Dylan, Cameron and Brynn.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the University of Manitoba, Allan Waisman Aboriginal Architecture Scholarship, 200 - 137 Innovation Drive, Winnipeg, MB R3T 6B6.

Condolences can be sent to the Waisman Family at waisman2018@gmail.com.

"So come, my friends, be not afraid We are so lightly here It is in love that we are made In love we disappear" (Leonard Cohen)

CYRIL GRANT WILCOX WWII Veteran

Passed away on Monday, January 8, 2018 at the age of 94 years.

Beloved husband of the late Elizabeth (Bess). Loving father of Larry and his wife, Delphine; Barbara and her husband, Glenn Crawford. Proud grandfather of Kelly Wilcox and her husband, Alex Lara; Heather Belajac and her husband, Mark; James and Jennifer Crawford. Much loved great-grandfather of Eva Sofia, Daniel, Aubrey and Laylah.

Predeceased by his brothers, Rae, William and Loyal.

Cyril was the co-founder of Electrostatic Coating Equipment (Canada) Limited and a WWII Veteran with the Canadian Forces, Perth Regiment, serving four years overseas. Friends may call at the Turner & Porter Peel Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy 10 N. of Qew) on Monday, January 15, 2018 from 2 p.m. until the time of the Memorial Service in the Chapel at 3 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, if you would like to make a donation in Cyril's memory, please do so to SickKids Foundation or United Way of Peel Region. Online condolences and donations may be made through http://www.turnerporter.ca

DR E. JOHN WYLIE "Jack " OD, FAAO

On Tuesday, December 12, 2017 Jack passed away peacefully at the age of 86. Jack was born June 27, 1931 in Toronto to Ernest William and Margaret Kathleen (Sweeney). He will be forever remembered by his wife, Lynn of 64 years; daughters, Karen, Jill and Ann; grandchildren, Rebecca (Nick), Kim (Hector), Diana, Jasper (Kenny) and Dustin (Laura); greatgrandchildren, Maia and Maeve; brother, Bill (Jane); brother-in-law to Wendy and Don; and uncle to many nieces and nephews, as well as lots of friends and colleagues.

Jack was predeceased by brother Don and sister Margaret.

Jack graduated from the College of Optometry in 1953 and continued with a long and successful career.

He volunteered with numerous organizations including Outreach Programs with the University of Waterloo through CIDA, Ministry of Transportation, as well as serving on many boards including Kennedy House Youth Services and Scarborough Philharmonic Orchestra. Jack was the president of the North Scarborough Rotary Club and a Paul Harris Fellow, as well as being an honourary member. Besides being hard working, Jack also loved to travel both with the family and with Lynn within Canada and many places around the world. He especially enjoyed trips in the "old car", his vintage MG with Lynn and the car club members.

Jack had a competitive side with his hobbies of sailboat racing in his younger days, before moving on to sports cars and pit crews.

He built furniture for their home and was involved with many renovations as well. Jack also showed quite the artistic side in his painting, woodcarving and pottery creations. He also shared in Lynn's love of the Toronto Zoo and spent many an hour there with her.

A very special thank you from the family to the staff at the Scarborough Retirement Residence and Scarborough Centenary Hospital for your kindness and compassion.

Jack, as well, appreciated your thoughtful care.

A funeral will be held Saturday, January 20, 2018 at McDougall & Brown, Scarborough Chapel at 2900 Kingston Road. There will be a family receiving line and gathering at 11:00 a.m., service at 12:00 p.m., followed by a reception. Inurnment will take place at Resthaven Memorial Gardens at 2:30 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, memorials can be made to the University of Waterloo School of Optometry, Kennedy House Youth Services, The Toronto Zoo, Scarborough Philharmonic Orchestra or the organization of your choosing.

What have we done?
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Silicon Valley once promised its digital revolution would topple dictators - but now it's disrupting the free world instead, argues Niall Ferguson. Why social networks are resulting in a global crisis of democracy
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By NIALL FERGUSON
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Saturday, January 20, 2018 – Print Edition, Page O1


Niall Ferguson's new book, The Square and the Tower: Networks and Power from the Freemasons to Facebook, is published this month by Penguin Press.

'Esc!" It's the key on the top left of the keyboard that you hit frantically when your laptop crashes. Confronted by the ghastly reality that some of their proudest creations - Google, Facebook and Twitter - helped propel Donald Trump into the White House, the tech titans of Silicon Valley are hitting esc like panic-stricken sophomores whose term papers have frozen before they clicked on the "save" icon.

"Content moderators" are being hired by the thousand. Fake accounts are being closed. The News Feed is being "fixed." Esc, esc, esc. But that page is still frozen.

And it will take more than esc to fix this. More like ctrl+alt+del.

It wasn't supposed to be this way. For a time, it seemed as if the internet was on democracy's side, helping the crowds in Cairo's Tahrir Square or Kiev's Maidan topple terrible tyrants.

"Current network technology ... truly favours the citizens," wrote Google's Jared Cohen and Eric Schmidt in their 2013 book The New Digital Age. "Never before have so many people been connected through an instantly responsive network," with truly "game-changing" implications for politics everywhere.

Mr. Cohen and Mr. Schmidt's 2010 article "The Digital Disruption" presciently argued that authoritarian governments would "be caught off-guard when large numbers of their citizens, armed with virtually nothing but cellphones, take part in mini-rebellions that challenge their authority."

The "real action" in what they called "the interconnected estate" could be found in "cramped offices in Cairo" as well as "on the streets of Tehran. From these locations and others, activists and technology geeks are rallying political 'flash mobs' that shake repressive governments, building new tools to skirt firewalls and censors, reporting and tweeting the new online journalism, and writing a bill of human rights for the internet age."

Even more euphoric was Mark Zuckerberg, the cofounder and chief executive of Facebook. In 2015, he called the internet "a force for peace in the world." Connecting people on Facebook was building a "common global community" with a "shared understanding" of the problems confronting humanity.

Oh, happy days. Oh, glad, confident morning. Sadly, over the past two years, it has gradually become apparent that internet may pose a bigger threat to democracies than to dictators.

For one thing, the growth of network platforms with unprecedented data-gathering capabilities has created new opportunities for authoritarian regimes, not least in China and Russia, to control their own populations more effectively.

For another, the networks themselves offer ways in which bad actors - and not only the Russian government - can undermine democracy by disseminating fake news and extreme views. "These social platforms are all invented by very liberal people on the west and east coasts," said Brad Parscale, Mr. Trump's digital-media director, in an interview last year. "And we figure out how to use it to push conservative values. I don't think they thought that would ever happen."

Too right.

Having initially dismissed as "a pretty crazy idea" the notion that fake news on Facebook had helped Mr. Trump to victory, Mr. Zuckerberg last year came clean: Russians using false identities had paid for 3,000 Facebook advertisements that sent implicitly pro-Trump messages to Americans before and after the election.

By some estimates, between 146 and 150 million users - more people than voted - had seen posts from accounts linked to the Internet Research Agency, a proKremlin organization, including around 16 million users of Instagram, which Facebook owns.

One analysis of six Russia-linked Facebook pages found their posts had been shared 340 million times. And those were just six of 470 pages that Facebook had identified as Russian. Trolls with false identities had also used Facebook Events (the company's event-management tool) to promote political protests in the United States, including an Aug. 27, 2016, antiimmigrant, anti-Muslim rally in a rural Idaho town known to welcome refugees.

In May, 2016, two Russian-linked Facebook groups had organized simultaneous opposing protests in front of the Islamic Da'wah Center of Houston. "Heart of Texas," a bogus group claiming to favour Texas secession, had announced a noon rally on May 21 to "Stop Islamification of Texas." Meanwhile, a separate Russiansponsored group, "United Muslims of America," had advertised a "Save Islamic Knowledge" rally for exactly the same place and time. This wasn't the kind of global community Mr. Zuckerberg had envisaged.

This is not just an American story. To an extent that is not well enough appreciated, it is a global crisis of democracy.

Similar efforts were made, albeit on a smaller scale, to influence the outcome of the British referendum on European Union membership - mainly via fake Twitter accounts - as well as last year's elections in the Netherlands, France and Germany. And the fact that the Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. election has since become the focal point of multiple inquiries in Washington - which may even pose a threat to the legitimacy and longevity of Mr. Trump's presidency - does not mean that similar things are not going on in other countries even as you read this article. Canadians have good reason to worry about how social media could impact the 2019 federal election.

When Facebook and Twitter told MPs last year that they could increase public engagement in the debates between party leaders, some people wondered how much of this would be provided by Russian bots.

Yet the most alarming revelation of the past year is not the importance of Russian fake news, but its unimportance. Former president Barack Obama implicitly acknowledged that in his recent Netflix interview with David Letterman. Having swept into the White House in 2008 as the first candidate of the social media age, Obama acknowledged that he had "missed ... the degree to which people who are in power, special interests, foreign governments, et cetera, can in fact manipulate [social media] and propagandize."

However, the former law professor made no attempt to lay all the blame on outside forces. "What the Russians exploited," he said, "was already here ... [The fact that] we are operating in completely different information universes. If you watch Fox News, you are living on a different planet than you are if you listen to NPR. That's what's happening with these Facebook pages, where more and more people are getting their news from.

At a certain point, you just live in a bubble. And that's part of why our politics is so polarized right now."

What happened in 2016 was much more than just a Kremlin "black op" that exceeded expectations. It was a direct result of the profound change in the public sphere brought about by the advent and spectacular growth of the online network platforms. In many ways, the obsessive focus of the American political class on the Russian sub-plot is a distraction from the alarming reality that - as the European competition commissioner Margrethe Vestager argued earlier this month - the big tech companies, and the way their services are used by ordinary people, pose a much bigger threat to democracy. It is the threat from within we really need to worry about - not the threat from Putin.

A POLARIZATION PROBLEM

We are nearly all addicts. The website eMarketer estimates that adult Facebook users in the United States spent roughly 41 minutes a day on the platform in 2017.

And that's just our favourite app. The average smartphone user clicks, taps and swipes that insidious little device an amazing 2,617 times a day.

And we don't just passively read. We engage. We like. We retweet. We reply. We comment. Now, it must be admitted that most of what we write is inane. In Canada, the five most-commonly used words in Facebook status updates are: "day," "hangover," "loud," "ticket" and "word."

("Hangover" is ranked 7th in Britain and 8th in the United States - make of that what you will.)

But a fair amount of what we engage with online is news. Two-thirds of U.S.

adults are on Facebook. Nearly half - 45 per cent - get news from Mr. Zuckerberg's platform. More than one in 10 Americans get news from YouTube, while roughly the same proportion (11 per cent) get news from Twitter. In Canada, 51 per cent of people get their news from digital sources first. As a recent Harvard paper co-authored by Gary King demonstrates, the network platforms essentially amplify news from established news outlets. As they do so, however, a strange thing happens. Whether one looks at blogs or at Twitter, social media tend to promote polarization. Liberal bloggers link to liberal bloggers, rarely to conservative ones. Liberal Twitter users re-tweet one another, seldom their conservative counterparts. And tweets on political topics - gun control, same-sex marriage, climate change - are 20 per cent more likely to be retweeted for every moral or emotional word they employ.

Note also that political Twitter is not for everyone. As Daniel Hopkins, Ye Liu, Daniel Preotiuc-Pietro and Lyle Ungar have shown, by analyzing nearly five million tweets generated by four thousand Twitter accounts in August, 2016, it is "very conservative" and "very liberal" users who are most likely to tweet political words.

We see a similar phenomenon when we analyze the Facebook followers of U.S.

legislators. In both the House of Representatives and the Senate, the pattern is clear: The more ideologically out there you are - whether to the left or the right - the more followers you are likely to have.

In this context, it becomes apparent that Russian fake news represented a drop in an ocean of inflammatory political commentary that was overwhelmingly indigenous. Between March, 2015, and November, 2016, 128 million Americans created nearly 10 billion Facebook posts, shares, likes and comments about the election. Remember how many Russian ads there were? That's right: a paltry 3,000.

According to new research by Brendan Nyhan of Dartmouth College, Andrew Guess of Princeton University and Jason Reifler of the University of Exeter, roughly one in four Americans saw at least one false story in the run-up to the presidential election. But fake stories were just 1 per cent of the news Hillary Clinton supporters read, and 6 per cent of the news Trump supporters read.

Remember, too, that not all the Russian-sourced news was fake. The tens of thousands of e-mails hacked from the accounts of John Podesta and other Democrats were as real as they were confidential. But it wasn't the Russians who were driving the traffic on the Breitbart website to record highs. It wasn't the Russians who explained to the Trump campaign how they could use targeted Facebook advertising to compensate - with precision - for what they lacked in dollars. It was Silicon Valley: its big data, its algorithms, its employees.

A MATTER OF PRIORITIES

Don't take it from me. Take it from former Facebook staff who have spoken out in the past year. Antonio Garcia Martinez, the former Facebook engineer and author of the book Chaos Monkeys, put it starkly: "I think there's a real question if democracy can survive Facebook and all the other Facebook-like platforms," he said in an interview. "Before platforms like Facebook, the argument used to be that you had a right to your own opinion. Now, it's more like the right to your own reality."

Facebook's propaganda was all about building a global community. But in practice, the company was laser-focused on the bottom line - and highly resistant to outside criticism. Sandy Parakilas, who worked as an operations manager to fix privacy problems on Facebook's developer platform in advance of its 2012 initial public offering, has said that the company "prioritized data collection from its users over protecting them from abuse."

"When I was at Facebook," he said last year, "the typical reaction I recall looked like this: Try to put any negative press coverage to bed as quickly as possible, with no sincere efforts to put safeguards in place or to identify and stop abusive developers." The policy was to "react only when the press or regulators make something an issue, and avoid any changes that would hurt the business of collecting and selling data."

Perhaps the most scathing assessment came from former vice-president for user growth, Chamath Palihapitiya. "I think," he told an audience of students at Stanford's Graduate School of Business in December, "we have created tools that are ripping apart the social fabric of how society works. ... The short-term, dopamine-driven feedback loops that we have created are destroying how society works.

No civil discourse, no co-operation: misinformation, mistrust. And it's not an American problem - this is not about Russians ads. This is a global problem."

Mr. Palihapitiya said he felt "tremendous guilt" about his own part in this because he believed he and his former colleagues "kind of knew something bad would happen." He is not alone in feeling guilty. Facebook's first president, Sean Parker, has talked in similar terms. Another early employee told Vanity Fair, "Most of the early employees I know are totally overwhelmed by what this thing has become. They look at the role Facebook now plays in society ... and they have this sort of 'Oh my God, what have I done' moment."

True, in recent months Facebook has scrambled to respond to all this recrimination. On Sept. 21, for example, Mr. Zuckerberg pledged to work "pro-actively to strengthen the democratic process."

Facebook would require that all political ads disclose which page paid for them and ensure that each ad is accessible to everyone. Later last year, he announced plans to clamp down on "bad content and bad actors" by doubling the number of employees and contractors who handle safety and security issues to 20,000 by the end of 2018. And just last week, he announced an overhaul of the News Feed to prioritize "meaningful interaction" between users over the kind of mediagenerated content that advertisers like.

But if you think this kind of self-regulation is going to fix democracy's socialmedia problem, then I have a bridge to sell you. For one thing, it would take at least an order of magnitude more people to achieve meaningful monitoring of the vast amount of content that Facebook's two billion-plus users produce and share every day. For another, none of this alters the company's fundamental business model, which is to sell advertisers the precision targeting that Facebook's user data allows. Political advertising may henceforth be identified as such, in the way that it is on television. But just how much less effective will that make it?

Google says it will curate its "News" search results more carefully, to rank established newspaper sites above bulletin boards such as 4chan or Reddit, which are favourite channels for alt-right content. Anyone who thinks that will stop people reading fake news hasn't found the "scroll down" button on their keyboard.

A NEW KIND OF POLITICS

The reality is, no matter how Facebook, Google and Twitter tweak their algorithms, a new kind of politics has been born. It can no more be unborn than the new kind of politics born when television revealed how much better-looking John F. Kennedy was than sweaty Richard Nixon, with his five o'clock shadow. Or how easily Lyndon Johnson could make Barry Goldwater seem like a man who wanted to drop atomic bombs on little children.

There are now two kinds of politicians in this world: the kind that know how to use social media as a campaign tool and the ones who lose elections. All over the world, the distinction is clear. The populists of the right and of the left understand the power of social media. The moderates who occupy the centre ground, with few exceptions - Justin "Selfie" Trudeau is one of them - are still playing by 1990s rules.

Among the few indicators that Mr. Trump had a good chance of beating Ms. Clinton were his enormous leads on Facebook and Twitter throughout the 2016 campaign. Applying similar metrics around the world yields startling results.

Take Britain, for example. The Leave campaign's victory in the 2016 referendum on Britain's membership in the European Union owed a great deal to its pioneering use of Facebook advertising.

Yet the principal political beneficiary of Brexit - the woman who became prime minister shortly after the referendum, Theresa May - is a social-media loser, with little more than half a million Facebook followers and even less on Twitter.

By comparison, the Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn - a grizzled populist of the left in the style of Bernie Sanders - has 1.3 million followers on Facebook followers and 1.7 million on Twitter (numbers as of Jan. 18). No other British politician comes close. Boris Johnson is often mentioned in the same breath as Mr. Trump, but all the two men really have in common is big hair. Mr. Corbyn has four times more Twitter followers than "BoJo."

Britain has no election scheduled for 2018 - although it is possible Ms. May's woefully weak government could fall as the economic costs of Brexit make themselves felt and the harsh realities of the EU's divorce terms become apparent.

Elsewhere, however, electorates are preparing to vote in general elections, notably in Brazil, Colombia, Italy and Mexico.

These contests will give us a chance to see how far the new politics has spread.

Start with Brazil, a country whose political elite has been battered by corruption scandals that led to the impeachment of the Workers' Party President Dilma Rouseff and probably disqualify her predecessor, Luiz Lula da Silva, from running this year. But who cares?

Lula has three million Facebook followers and just 189,000 Twitter followers. Far ahead of him on social media is Luciano Huck, the entrepreneur and television star, host of the hugely popular Saturday night TV show Caldeirao do Huck. With 17 million Facebook followers and nearly 13 million on Twitter, Mr. Huck is in a league of his own in Brazilian politics.

A Huck candidacy would be the Brazilian equivalent of Oprah Winfrey (FB 11.6m, TW 41.4m) running for president in 2020. He is not a populist; he's just popular. In second place, however, comes Jair Bolsonaro (FB 5m, TW 0.8m), the former army parachutist whose political positions make Mr. Trump seem like a lilylivered liberal. Mr. Bolsonaro is an unabashed defender of the military dictatorship that ruled Brazil between 1964 and 1985. Name any politically incorrect position; Mr. Bolsonaro has taken it.

"I would never rape you," he once told a female politician, "because you do not deserve it."

Italian politics was in many ways the experimental laboratory for the kind of candidate who combines wealth and celebrity with political incorrectness. Silvio Berlusconi has claimed, not without justification, to have been the prototype Trump. Despite a criminal conviction, Mr. Berlusconi is still a political player, though more of a kingmaker than a candidate these days. Yet he is behind the times (FB 1m, TW 19,300). The King of Twitter in Italy is former prime minister Matteo Renzi (FB 1.1m, TW 3.34m), although on Facebook he trails the populists: the two Five Star Movement leaders, Beppe Grillo (FB 1.9m, TW 2.5m) and Luigi di Maio (FB 1.1m, TW 0.3m), as well as the Northern League leader Matteo Salvini (FB 1.9m, TW 0.6m).

In Mexico, the best-known populist - Andrés Manuel López Obrador, universally known by his initials as "AMLO" - is a man of the left. On social media (FB 2.3m, TW 3.5m), AMLO is far ahead of the likely PRI nominee José Antonio Meade (FB 0.3m, TW 1m) and his PAN (National Action Party) counterpart Ricardo Anaya Cortes (FB 0.9m, TW 0.4m). True, AMLO is not the most followed Mexican politician: Rafael Moreno Valle, the former governor of Puebla, is now neck-andneck with him on Facebook. Only just behind AMLO on Twitter is the mayor of Mexico City, Miguel Angel Mancera. But neither Moreno Valle nor Mancera is going to be a presidential candidate.

Politics on Colombian social media also leans left. There, the leading figure is Gustavo Petro (FB 0.9m, TW 2.8m), the former mayor of Bogotá, who as a young man belonged to the guerrilla group the 19th of April Movement and who made his political reputation as an opponent of the conservative presidency of Álvaro Uribe.

THE INESCAPABLE THREAT

It used to be that all politics was local.

Today, perhaps, all politics is becoming social, in that social media have emerged as the crucial battleground of modern elections. Just a few years ago, that would have seemed like a good idea. What could be more democratic, after all, than enabling politicians to communicate their messages directly to individual voters, and to hear back from them in real time? The only thing to worry about was whether or not online speech was truly free - the core preoccupation of Freedom House's annual "Freedom on the Net" survey.

But what if the biggest threat to democracy is not online censorship or surveillance, but the near-total absence of regulation of politics on social media?

The public is beginning to sense this. A new Gallup-Knight survey, published last week, revealed that 57 per cent of Americans think that the way sites choose which stories to show to users presents "a major problem" for democracy. Just less than half of those interviewed favoured regulation of how the network platforms provide news.

The difficulty is knowing what form regulation should take. As Sam Lessin - another former Facebooker - has argued, the real transformation of the public sphere is that a candidate "can for the first time effectively talk to each individual voter privately in their own home and tell them exactly what they want to hear ... in a way that can't be tracked or audited."

Forget fake news, Mr. Lessin argues.

Forget the "feed bubbles" and "echo chambers" that have dominated the discussion in the United States. The real challenge is not that the public sphere has grown polarized. The challenge is that it has been so fragmented by misnamed social media that it is no longer a single public sphere.

"It has been a foregone conclusion for a long time," Mr. Lessin concludes, doubtless remembering the inspirational Zuckerberg speeches of the pre-2016 era, "that the internet has been a vehicle for moving us toward speaking one common language and being able to work together to solve the great problems of our era. ... The sad reality is that the most exciting attempt to bring our world together is putting us at risk of not being able to trust what we see or hear" - but (and this is the point he missed) voting for the most engaging candidate anyway.

Hit "esc" all you like. This is the real - and inescapable - threat facing every democracy today.

Associated Graphic

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: THE GLOBE AND MAIL. SOURCE PHOTO: AP/GETTY

PHOTO ILLUSTRATIONS: THE GLOBE AND MAIL. SOURCE PHOTOS: AP/GETTY

Questions still hang over Soulpepper
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Globe hears of more complaints about the company's workplace culture in wake of Schultz allegations
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By J. KELLY NESTRUCK
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Saturday, January 13, 2018 – Print Edition, Page A4


Back in April of 2016, Albert Schultz, the founding artistic director of the Soulpepper Theatre, was giving one of his periodic interviews about his ambitious plans for the theatre company he had already built into Toronto's biggest not-forprofit in less than two decades.

At the time, Mr. Schultz was at the height of his powers and influence - and his company was reaching for the stars, announcing a trip to New York , an anchor contribution of $1-million for a new theatre building and $1.25million in commissions, while its first foray into television, Kim's Convenience, was readying for a premiere on CBC-TV.

But Mr. Schultz's conversation with The Globe and Mail that day also touched on what would happen if he were to suddenly no longer be in a position to run the expanding company. "The bus scenario," he said, with a sigh. "I hear about this all the time and it's depressing: What if Albert gets hit by a bus?" Mr. Schultz's board of directors had been pressing him on succession planning - and so, for the first time, the theatre company was hiring two full-time associate artistic directors, Alan Dilworth and Ravi Jain.

Last week, that planning proved crucial as Mr. Dilworth stepped into the role of acting artistic director after a different crisis forced the company to make do without Mr. Schultz - four civil lawsuits filed on Jan. 3 against him and his theatre company by former Soulpepper performers who allege that he is a "serial sexual predator." He resigned at the board's request within 36 hours.

Soulpepper "severed" its relationship with executive director Leslie Lester, who had been in a long-term relationship with Mr. Schultz and married him last summer, shortly thereafter.

There have been calls for the resignation of the board of directors from the editorial board of the Toronto Star.

Mr. Schultz has vowed to "vigorously defend" himself against the allegations that have been levelled against him in the lawsuits. Ms. Lester says that no allegations "of any nature whatsoever" against Mr. Schultz were ever brought to her attention at any point during her employment with Soulpepper.

Now, the Soulpepper show will go on Saturday night with the first preview performance of Edward Albee's A Delicate Balance.

However, serious questions still hang over Soulpepper in terms of how they handed sexual harassment in the past and present - and whether everyone has signed on with the board's desire to move on to a process of "reflection, renewal and change" that they committed to in a statement last week.

The Globe and Mail since has heard more complaints about Mr. Schultz's behaviours from young women who worked at the company, as well as a new allegation from a founding member that the board had previously been informed about an incident in which Mr. Schultz hid in the female dressing room.

THE LEGACY OF LASZLO MARTON

To understand why Soulpepper's board and administration might still be viewed with suspicion even after Mr. Schultz and Ms.

Lester have left the building, we have to revisit how an earlier sexual-harassment scandal to hit the theatre company was handled in the fall.

Ten weeks ago, on Oct. 30, Mr. Schultz, Ms. Lester, board chair Shawn Cooper and the head of human resources and general counsel Sarah Farrell (who has now assumed many of Ms. Lester's duties at the company) stood on stage at a meeting with staff and artists to publicly reveal for the first time that the theatre had received two complaints of sexual harassment, a year and a half earlier, against Laszlo Marton - a Hungarian director who was a regular guest artist at the company and had taught in its Soulpepper Academy.

After the meeting, Soulpepper issued a statement to The Globe saying it had launched a formal investigation after the first complaint was received in late 2015, had determined that Mr. Marton had engaged in sexual harassment by early 2016 and that his "relationship with the Company had to be immediately and permanently terminated."

The statement described Mr. Marton's behaviour as "both unacceptable in human terms and in violation of Soulpepper's past and present policies and codes of conduct," but that the company was nevertheless engaging a third-party expert to conduct a review of its policies and that it wanted "to reaffirm that Soulpepper is dedicated to creating a safe place of belonging for artists, audiences and aspirants."

To many, it looked as if Soulpepper had acted swiftly and decisively on sexual harassment well before #MeToo became a hashtag - but, in fact, the meeting and statement about Mr. Marton was a turning point that set in motion the lawsuits that Patricia Fagan, Kristen Booth, Diana Bentley and Hannah Miller would file against the theatre company and Mr. Schultz in early 2018.

At the time of the Marton meeting, Ms. Fagan had already started to connect with other women to talk about their experiences at Soulpepper and with its then artistic director as the #MeToo movement opened up a space for those conversations.

Ms. Fagan, who worked at Soulpepper for 13 seasons and has pages of allegations against Mr. Schultz, told The Globe that she had spoken to a lawyer at that point but was considering a number of options - and top of her list was sending a letter to the theatre company's board of directors with other women listing their allegations against Mr. Schultz; she didn't want to "upend her life" by going to the media or pursuing a lawsuit.

The unsigned statement issued by the company on Oct. 30 was part of what "changed our direction," Ms. Fagan told me.

The actress knew that the artistic head of Soulpepper had not, in fact, cut ties with Mr. Marton in 2016, as she had received a group e-mail from him in April of 2017 inviting her and a group of other Soulpepper artists to "a very fatty dinner to celebrate an extraordinary man" - that was, Mr. Marton. (The Globe has seen a copy of the e-mail - and also recently learned that it was, in fact, cc'd to one of the women who had complained to HR about Mr. Marton, unbeknownst to Mr. Schultz.)

Ms. Fagan wondered why the company had waited for media reports to emerge of 10 women accusing Mr. Marton of sexual harassment in Hungary to hold a meeting about him. She also heard through the whisper network - and The Globe has since confirmed - that one of the complainants against Mr. Marton at Soulpepper had been asked to sign a non-disclosure agreement.

(That complainant was not offered any financial compensation.) "I wondered how systemic the problem [was] within Soulpepper," Ms. Fagan recalled. "I thought the dialogue should happen in the public and not behind closed doors."

Soulpepper's statement about Mr. Marton in October also led The Globe to begin to look into the possibility of other harassment at Soulpepper. How Soulpepper handled the Marton allegations stood out in contrast to the way other theatre companies dealt with similar sexualharassment allegations.

For instance, two days after actor Anthony Rapp told the world his story about Kevin Spacey in October, the Old Vic - the venerable London theatre that Mr. Spacey ran until 2015 - sent out a statement with a confidential email address for anyone to contact who had "been connected with the Old Vic or in our employment and feel you have a complaint you were unable to raise."

Similarly, in early November, after seven women alleged abuse and harassment against Irish director Michael Colgan, the Gate theatre in Dublin also set up an e-mail address for former employees to disclose complaints.

In Soulpepper's case, however, the company released no statement about how former employees could get in touch with further complaints.

Mr. Schultz and Ms. Lester did not accede to requests for followup interviews about sexual harassment until Nov. 24 - and, at that point, The Globe had already been speaking with women who had allegations about Mr. Schultz rather than Mr. Marton.

Indeed, earlier that month, The Globe had received an anonymous letter written in big letters on loose-leaf paper in what looked like a purposefully disguised hand:

"SOULPEPPER LASZLO MARTON ALBERT SCHULTZ FIND OUT NOW! END IT." (The sender remains a mystery.) In the wake of the allegations in the lawsuits against Mr. Schultz, Soulpepper's board is no longer saying that the policies against harassment it had on paper were enough. Last weekend, the executive committee of the board issued an incredible statement for a company that is being sued: "We understand why many artists felt that raising concerns about the safety of the Soulpepper workplace was very difficult."

On Friday morning, board chair Shawn Cooper e-mailed The Globe to say: "We have engaged and are in the process of rolling out, a confidential, independently-managed hot-line reporting service for any person who would like to raise a concern (1-855 484 2273)."

Mr. Cooper did not answer other questions sent to him since Jan. 3. "As you know, Soulpepper is currently engaged in litigation, which limits our ability to discuss some of the issues about which you have asked questions," he wrote in an email cc'd to the company's legal counsel, Linda Rothstein, of Paliare Roland Rosenberg Rothstein LLP.

DESCENT INTO DISARRAY

When it comes to the future of Soulpepper without Mr. Schultz, it is important to note that this was being considered well before 2016 - and that, indeed, very quickly after the company was founded in 1998 its members began to plan for its life beyond all 12 of its founding members.

In 2000, the theatre company started a "Young Company" for emerging actors, similar to one that existed at the Stratford Festival where many of its members had originally met. In 2006, a new arm of Soulpepper was created called the Soulpepper Academy as the company moved into its own permanent home, the Young Centre for the Performing Arts.

The Academy is billed as "Canada's only multi-year paid professional training program for the country's brightest talent."

Because of that and Soulpepper's reputation, it is extremely hard to get into - for its 2016-2018 class, there were 1,148 applications for its 17 positions.

The Academy is also one of the mechanisms that is supposed to diversify a company that was originally founded by 12 white artists and now is the largest in multicultural Toronto and bills itself as a "national civic theatre."

Back in 2016, Mr. Schultz boasted that the newest cohort of the Academy was the "most diverse" in its history - and that this was a step toward fulfilling a commitment to gender and cultural diversity that the company had articulated a year earlier.

"We want to look at gender equity and diversity in several ways, not simply in who do we see on stage," the artistic director said.

The reality, however, was that the Academy shortly thereafter began to fall into serious disarray - with four of the nine actors in it parting ways with Soulpepper by the end of 2017.

Last week, a fifth Academy member - who had been brought only last summer to replace a depleting stock of young female actors - left as well.

She told me she had talked to her agent about leaving the day before the lawsuits were filed.

All five Academy member who left the current cohort were either women or actors of colour (or both).

Another quiet departure early in 2017 further indicated behindthe-scenes problems with Mr. Schultz's plan for the company's future. Officially, Ravi Jain - the other associate artistic director who was to step up if Mr. Schultz was hit by a bus - left less than a year into his term because he became too involved in his own company, Why Not, to continue on - but he told The Globe that he couldn't find a place for himself at Soulpepper and became frustrated by his attempts to internally challenge Mr. Schultz and the company to fully follow through on their public claims about inclusion.

"They're not ready for the change that they're talking about," Mr. Jain told me before the lawsuits came out. On the subject of the Soulpepper Academy members who had left by that point, he said: "Those artists didn't get the support that they needed and that real investment."

Over the fall, The Globe spoke - mostly off the record - to more than a dozen past and present artists who had passed through the Academy since 2011 about what they considered a toxic environment.

And, of course, since last Saturday, sixty-four Soulpepper artists have signed a statement that acknowledges "there has been an unhealthy workplace culture for a long time" at the theatre company in general, not just the Academy.

A couple of past Academy members did agree to speak on the record about what how Mr. Schultz contributed to that "unhealthy workplace culture."

For instance, Sarah Koehn - an actor who was 25 years old when she entered the Academy in the same cohort as plaintiff Hannah Miller in 2011 - e-mailed me that, while she had many great experiences at the Academy, "when Albert was in the room, things changed."

Ms. Koehn told me it was common for Mr. Schultz's to comment on people's sexuality, clothing and bodies at work. At a celebratory gathering in the green room at Soulpepper, she said she heard him say, while she had her back to him: "Those pants ought to go to jail they make her ass look so good."

"I was stunned and embarrassed, I quickly calculated the appropriate response, the path of least consequence for my career, which was to lightly and casually laugh it off so as not to draw more attention to myself," she wrote me.

Ms. Koehn also said that a few months into her time at the Soulpepper Academy, there was a celebration at a house that involved drinking - and at the end of it, Mr. Schultz offered to walk her home.

"I had my bike and didn't really need a chaperone, but I said yes to be polite," she recalled.

"When we got to my back gate and I was surely home safe, he said to me, 'Aren't you going to invite me in?' " According to Ms. Koehn, she was taken aback because it was after midnight and she lived alone. "[T]his didn't feel safe or appropriate, but wanting to stay in his good graces (as my boss and someone who could potentially make my career) I casually said that I'd give him a tour of my one bedroom apartment," she recalled. "I felt I had no choice because of who he was, but this still feels like a violation and humiliating to me when I think about it."

In a statement from his lawyer, Mr. Schultz said there was "no merit" to Ms. Koehn's allegations.

Ellie Moon, a former Academy member from 2016 to 2017 who parted ways with the company early, said that in Academy classes she both experienced and witnessed Mr. Schultz subbing in for male actors playing Romeo in scene studies with female actors playing Juliet that involved touching. (Three of the plaintiffs currently suing Mr. Schultz and Soulpepper allege that, as a director, he inserted himself into scenes to grope or kiss actresses during rehearsal.)

Ms. Moon also recalls Mr. Schultz telling graphic sexual stories to the students he was teaching. She says: "I wanted to speak out because I feel like I'm able to corroborate an on-going pattern."

Via his lawyer, Mr. Schultz denied Ms. Moon's allegations: "[Mr. Schultz] did not step in for male actors. Neither did he use language inappropriate to the subject at hand."

The actor and playwright said she did try to raise concerns about the way Mr. Schultz behaved within Soulpepper but that Soulpepper staff (who she does not want to name) she approached discouraged her from doing so.

Ms. Koehn, meanwhile, said she never reported Mr. Schultz's behaviour to anyone internally "because at the time I was ashamed that it even happened in the first place. I had heard stories of similar behaviour and understood that this was to be expected."

The biggest question that continues to hang over Soulpepper is whether, as per the statements of claim of the four plaintiffs, Mr. Schultz's alleged "harassment and assault [of women] ... was Soulpepper's best known secret."

In particular, the board has not yet responded to the allegation made by plaintiff Hannah Miller, who was in the Soulpepper Academy in 2011, in her statement of claim that Mr. Schultz told a "cautionary tale" to her cohort about how he had "hid in a female dressing room as a 'joke' while an actress was changing, which was reported to Soulpepper's board of directors by another Soulpepper employee who found this to be inappropriate." According to Ms. Miller's statement of claim, "Albert explained that the Board of Directors 'had to' call a hearing and review the incident. Albert explained that he simply told the Board that his behaviour had been a joke and was all in good fun. In the end, there were no repercussions for Albert's behaviour." Ms. Koehn remembers Mr. Schultz telling the same story - and agrees with Ms. Miller's interpretation of it. "I felt that he was basically asking us all to have a laugh ridiculing the fact that this employee would complain to the board for something like that," she wrote.

Ms. Miller's tale also sounds familiar to Soulpepper founding member Joseph Ziegler. "I knew that [Mr. Schultz] spied on some actress changing her clothes at one point," he told the The Globe this week. "I know that the board was informed about it."

In an e-mail, Peter Wardle, Mr. Schultz's lawyer, acknowledged that there was a "dressing room incident," but continued: "Mr. Ziegler was not a witness to this event. No one who was involved in this harmless incident complained about it. Soulpepper did conduct an internal investigation which found no basis for taking action against anyone involved.

At no point did Mr. Schultz attempt to see any actress undress."

The Globe forwarded Mr. Schultz's claim about an "internal investigation" to Soulpepper's board for comment. "As we have said in our previous statements, we did not know that Albert Schultz was alleged to have engaged in any harassment," the board replied. "No such complaints ever made their way to the Board. That includes the [dressing room] incident you describe below."

On the day the company was served with the lawsuits, the board of directors sent out a statement saying it had commenced an "immediate investigation" - but the chair has not answered any questions from The Globe about the scope of this investigation, who is conducting it, when it is expected to complete and whether it will look into the allegations about the board as well - or, for that matter, how the allegations against Mr. Marton were handled.

The Globe has learned, however, the theatre company is working with Navigator, a company that does crisis management. The board and Navigator did not respond to questions about what its role was.

THE FINANCIAL AND ARTISTIC FUTURE OF SOULPEPPER

The immediate impact of the allegations contained in the lawsuits against Soulpepper and Mr. Schultz is difficult to overestimate.

The company has already had to cancel its season-opening production of Amadeus (which was to be directed by Mr. Schultz), while a proposal it was secretly advancing to start producing at the city-owned St Lawrence Centre for the Arts will be scuttled. Two major productions that Mr. Schultz directed that went to New York as part of a $2.5-million residency off-Broadway last summer, Of Human Bondage and Spoon River, are now tainted goods that will likely never be staged again - whereas, two weeks ago, they were still freshly minted New York Times Critics' picks with commercial potential.

Then there's the fact that, according to its last filing with the Canadian Revenue Agency at the end of 2016, Soulpepper received just 15 per cent of its $11.5-million annual revenue from government funding; 44 per cent came from donations and gifts - and so keeping donors on board is crucial to being able to continue to operate at its current size. More lawsuits or a drip of revelations in the press will not help persuade the company's supporters to open their wallets.

Mr. Schultz, for a long time, was the face and most prominent voice of a company that involves hundreds - but his departure has led to a cacophony of voices, well beyond the original twelve, a measure of how the company's influence has grown.

This week saw hundreds of Toronto artists sign an open letter supporting the plaintiffs and looking forward to the board announcing "concrete steps" to ensure a safe environment, another 50 holding a silent protest outside the theatre and hundreds more artists and supporters signing a statement released by the company itself about its determination "to emerge a stronger organization that serves as a home for art and artists in Toronto."

Martha Burns, one of the company's founding members who has not been involved with it for a decade, sent The Globe her own individual statement saying that she supported the "voices" of Patricia Fagan, Kristen Booth, Diana Bentley and Hannah Miller, the women who are suing the company she helped found.

"I worked with Trish Fagan at Soulpepper," she wrote. "It pains me that I, as an older actor in the company, was not aware of how she was being treated and that I was not available to listen. I wonder if I would have had the courage to speak up."

Ms. Burns said in her e-mail that she had much to add to the discussion and was doing so through a group of women artists from every generation called Got Your Back.

"We must be forever vigilant about preventing power imbalances by making sure listening and speaking up are everyone's responsibility," she said. "Soulpepper Theatre began with a group of artists listening to each other."

Follow me on Twitter @nestruck

Associated Graphic

Soulpepper actors Diana Bentley, Kristin Booth (front), Hannah Miller and Patricia Fagan attend a news conference on Jan. 4, in which they spoke of their claims against Albert Schultz.

FRED LUM/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Then-artistic director of Soulpepper Albert Schultz, far left in blue jacket, poses with the imagiNation project donors, Kevin and Roger Garland, front left, and several artists.

GLENN LOWSON/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Clarification

A Saturday story on Soulpepper Theatre quoted Soulpepper founding member Joseph Ziegler saying he knew the board was informed about an allegation that Albert Schultz, the company's founding artistic director, spied on an actress changing her clothes. Mr. Ziegler said on Tuesday he could not confirm that the allegations regarding the dressing room incident were ever brought to the board's attention and that he did not have any first-hand knowledge of this occurring.

BIRTH AND DEATH NOTICES
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Wednesday, January 17, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B20


FOOTE Baby!

The Foote and Roberts clans are pleased to announce their newest addition: William Grahame Alan Foote was born very early on January 14th at Mt. Sinai. Will and mom, Sally, are doing well.

He is welcomed by Sally; dad, Andrew; brother, Jeremy; sister, Natalie; grandparents, Sue and Paul Roberts and Sue Magor; and very very many cousins (and our dog, Zoe).

First tracks and Georgian Bay are on the horizon!

HONOURABLE ALLAN MCNIECE AUSTIN

March 7, 1928 January 12, 2018

His family is saddened to announce that Mac died peacefully at Belmont House, Friday, January 12th.

Beloved husband of Margaret Kyle for 66 years. Adored father of Allan (Lyn), Jim (Sue) and Tom (Rosaria).

Devoted and loving grandfather of Maggie (Jeremy Packard), Gren, Graham (Mallory Lazarus) and Michael.

He was the third son of Allan McNiece Austin and Alice Dickinson. He was predeceased by his brother, James McNiece; and is survived by his brothers, John Beresford and Richard Jackson; and many cousins, nieces and nephews.

Mac was born and received his early education in Chapleau, in Northern Ontario, before following his older brothers south to attend Trinity College School in Port Hope. He went on to Victoria College at the University of Toronto and was a member of the first class to graduate from the University of Toronto Law School.

He was a student, associate, partner and managing partner with the firm now called WeirFoulds, LLP. From 1987 to 2003 he served as a judge in the High Court of Justice and the Court of Appeal for Ontario. After retiring from the bench he returned to WeirFoulds and participated in arbitration and mediation work.

He was a natural athlete and an accomplished cross-country runner, and he loved sailing and skiing well into his later years. He was a dedicated and long-time member of Eglinton St. George's United Church.

He loved God, his family and his work. He loved life.

We are profoundly thankful for the care he received from the whole team at Belmont House.

The family will receive friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home A.W. Miles - Newbigging Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue) from 4:00 - 6:00 p.m. on Saturday, January 20th.

A Service of Thanksgiving will be held on Monday, January 22nd at 2:00 p.m.in Eglinton St. George's United Church, 35 Lytton Boulevard, Toronto M4R 1L2.

In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation in Mac's memory to the Alzheimer Society of Canada, 20 Eglinton Avenue West, 16th Floor, Toronto M4R 1K8, http://www.alzheimer.ca. Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through www.

humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

DR. BUXTON GEORGE LEOPOLD BLAKE

Born December 6, 1922 in Green Island, Jamaica, passed away on Wednesday, January 10, 2018. He is the father of Arun and Yashin (Gretchen); the grandfather of Hannah and Dexter.

He served in the Royal Air Force during World War II, was ordained as a Theravadan Buddhist Monk in Thailand and acquired his PhD in clinical psychology from Edinburgh University. He founded Pinewood Centre in Oshawa.

As well, he was a raconteur, photographer and musician of note. He was 95 years old.

The family would like to thank the caring staff of Oshawa General Hospital.

A Memorial Service will be held at a later date at Armstrong Funeral Home, 124 King Street East, Oshawa. Memorial donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated. For online condolences, please visit http://www.armstrongfuneralhome.net.

SHIRLEY LOUISE EDITH BROWN

Went peacefully to be with the Lord on Friday, January 12, 2018 at the age of 90. Shirley was the daughter of Joseph George Lionel Edwards and Ida May "Babe" (nee Britton). Predeceased by her dear brother, John "Jack" Herbert Edwards; and her treasured Aunt Muriel Louise Ockley (nee Britton).

Beloved wife of the late Kenneth Allen James Brown; and cherished mother of daughter, Wendy Elizabeth Brown of Oakville; and sons, Wayne Kenneth Brown, and his wife, Helena "Lainy" Vanderwey of Belleair Beach, Florida, Wallace Jamie Edwards Brown and his wife, Diane (nee Stirling) of Oakville; and dearly loved granddaughters Holly and Heather.

Family and friends will be received at Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West, Toronto, on Thursday, January, 18th at 10 a.m. with the funeral service to follow in the chapel at 11 a.m. Private family interment in Mount Pleasant Cemetery.

"Only one life 'twill soon be passed, Only what's done for Christ will last"

EDITH MARY DAVIS "Nim" (nee Manchester) 1916 - 2018

In her 102nd year on January 11, 2018 at St. Joseph's Health Centre.

Beloved wife of the late F. Allan Davis (2009); and much loved mother of Peter and Wendy. Born in New York City, daughter of the late Albert Augustus and Helen Louise (Tipping) Manchester; and sister of the late Norman A. Manchester.

The Manchester family in the early 1930's returned to Nim's maternal grandparents' town, Coldwater, Ontario where Nim grew up.

She attended Normal School in Toronto to become a kindergarten teacher, teaching for 10 years until her marriage to Allan. While bringing up her children, Nim was an active member of various organizations including and most particularly The American Women's Club of Toronto (life member), the Kingsway Women's Club, Engineering Wives Group (Engineering Institute of Canada) and a member of All Saints Kingsway.

She was able to remain in her home, with the capable and loving assistance of her primary caregiver Mary Gyarchie, until shortly before her death. A heartfelt thanks goes to Mary from her family for almost 7 years of dedicated and loyal caring. Special thanks go to her neighbours Rob and Heather Timberg, Ethel Tomlinson, Bev Dodds and the Dryzmalas for their assistance and friendship.

Additional thanks to Thornbrook Home Care Inc.'s Ruth Bear who matched Mary with Nim and the team at Thornbrook who assisted during crises to make this work! Thanks also to the CCAC's Palliative team who assisted the family in keeping Nim in her home until her final illness. In addition, her medical specialists over the past few years - Dr. Anselm, Dr. Stein, Dr. Gill, Dr. Yan and Dr. Armogan - who improved her quality of life. For this last hospital stay, the family would like to thank the doctors and staff of 3M and 6M at St. Joseph's Health Centre. Most particularly Dr. Arnold I. Smith is thanked for his perceptive and wise diagnoses and informed care over the past 40 years.

Friends will be received at the Ridley Funeral Home, 3080 Lake Shore Blvd. W. (at 14th St., between Islington and Kipling Aves., 416-259-3705) on Friday, January 19, 2018 from 2pm to 4pm. At her wish, a private service was held followed by cremation.

Donations to St. Joseph's Health Centre or a charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family. Messages of condolence may be placed at RidleyFuneralHome.com.

DR. JOHN NOEL DOIG

December 6, 1927 - January 12, 2018

His family regrets to announce the passing of Noel Doig, peacefully at home after a brief terminal illness.

Survived by: his beloved wife, Joan (née Dickinson); daughter, Anne (Bob Cowan), sons, Mark (Kim Hargreaves), Peter (Terrie Robbins), Robert (Andrea Klassen), and Christopher "Chip" (Suzanne Joanis) Doig; grandchildren, Rob (Sarah Nordick), Alison, John (Berkeley Donkervoort), Peter (Leo Perlinger), Patrick and Alexander "Sandy" Cowan; Jenna (Brian Meli), Tim (Holly Hooper), Angela (Fadi Shlah), and Carly (Brett Baron) Doig; Jennifer (Mark Young), Andrew (Miranda Robb) and Lindsay Doig; Kathleen, Michael, and Meghan Doig; Lauren, Benjamin, Stuart and Stephen Doig; and by great-grandchildren, Natasha and Luke Cowan and Scarlett Meli.

He is also survived by his much-loved brother, Clive Doig (Julia); his brother-in-law, Harry Dickinson (Julie); and extended family in England, Australia and the USA.

Predeceased by: his parents, Allan John Doig and Jessie (Ericson) Doig; his stepmother Janet (Ogle) Doig; his sister, Jennifer (Doig) Williams; and brother-in-law, Tony Williams; infant grandson, Cameron Doig and infant granddaughter, Shannon Doig; and parents-in-law, Mabel (Pockley) and Frank Dickinson.

Noel was a well known and dedicated Family Physician. Having moved to Saskatchewan from England in 1958, he established a rural practice in the village of Hawarden where he practised for three years. Noel and Joan moved to Saskatoon in 1961, where Noel practised first with Dr. Sam Landa.

He was later joined by Dr. Joe Golumbia and others including his daughter, Anne. Many of Noel's original patients from Hawarden and their extended families still attend the practice, now known as City Centre Family Physicians.

The loyalty of those patients is a testament to the care and compassion shown to them by Dr. Doig throughout his 40 years in practice.

Noel was a respected contributor to his profession. He served on innumerable committees and boards at the local, provincial and national levels. He was Chief of Staff of Saskatoon City Hospital, chaired the Discipline Committee of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan for many years, and was the Chair of the Ethics Committee of the Canadian Medical Association. Noel most valued his long service to the Saskatchewan Medical Association, and particularly after his retirement in 1998, his ongoing work with its Member Advisory Committee through which he was able to provide support and advice to colleagues. As part of his legacy to the profession in Saskatchewan, Noel wrote a history of the 1962 Medicare crisis. Setting the Record Straight, published in 2012, is his uncompromising account of the principles behind the profession's resistance to the Medical Care Insurance Act. In that, as in his clinical practice, it was all about the patients. Noel received honorary Life Memberships in the CMA, the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan, and the Canadian Medical Protective Association.

Together with Sam Landa, Noel was one of Saskatoon's first "sports medicine" physicians. Sam and Noel served for many years as the team physicians for the Saskatoon Hilltops, as track physicians for the Knights of Columbus Indoor Games, and as physicians for the 1971 Canada Winter Games. Their sons' participation in competitive swimming introduced Noel and Joan to parental involvement in the Saskatoon Goldfins Swim Club as swim officials and as directors of the club. Noel was a Divisional Surgeon with St. John's Ambulance, and in 1977 was granted the Dignity of a Serving Brother of the Most Venerable Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem, by its Prior, Richard, Duke of Gloucester.

All those who knew Noel knew him as a highly principled and deeply moral person. He was devoted to his beloved Joan, his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Noel was a practising Anglican and long-term member of the parish of All Saints, who lived the tenets of his faith.

He will be deeply missed.

His family would like to thank the staff of Stonebridge Crossing Retirement Community, Palliative Home Care, Dr. B. Brunet and nurse Elaine at the Saskatoon Cancer Clinic, and Drs. S. Goluboff and F. Wardell for their devoted care of Noel and their support of Joan and the family.

The family gratefully declines the gift of flowers. Memorial donations may be made to STARS (Shock Trauma Air Rescue Society), the Medical Benevolent Fund of the Saskatchewan Medical Association, the St. Cecilia Fund at All Saints Church, or a charity of the donor's choice.

A Requiem Mass will be celebrated at St. John's Anglican Cathedral, 816 Spadina Crescent East on Saturday, January 20, 2018 at 2:00 p.m., with refreshments to follow in the Cathedral church hall. Private interment of cremated remains in the Columbarium at St. John's. Condolences may be left for the family at http://www.saskatoonfuneralhome.com. Funeral arrangements in care of Saskatoon Funeral Home.

VASILIS FOTOPOULOS

April 23, 1925 January 14, 2018

It is with great sadness that Vasilis' family announces his passing. He will be deeply missed by his two children and their spouses, Ted (Jo), Bess (Jakob); and his three grandchildren, Alexa, Matthew and Hannah.

Vasilis was born in Monastiraki, Greece. He was preceded by his beloved wife Eleni. A funeral will take place at 10:00 a.m. on Friday, January 19, 2018 at All Saints Greek Orthodox Church, 222 Burbank Dr., North York. A reception will follow immediately.

ROBERT NEVINS "Bob"

1927-2018

Robert Nevins of Pointe-Claire passed away peacefully on January 12, 2018. Bob is survived by his wife, Diana (Arrell); children, Jim (Jan Nevins), Margot and Cindy; and his grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He is predeceased by his brother, William Nevins.

Bob graduated from McMaster University with a BSc in Chemistry and Physics.

While at McMaster and after graduating, he served in the Royal Canadian Navy Reserves. Bob met his future wife, Diana, a Hamilton resident, at McMaster. The couple subsequently moved to Québec, finally settling in Pointe-Claire where he lived for fifty-eight years. Working in the medical/pharmaceutical industry, Bob's final position until retirement was Director, Sales and Marketing Planning and Development at Johnson and Johnson Inc.

His community involvement included volunteering with NOVA West Island, the West Island Volunteer Bureau and the Chemical Institute. Bob acted as Chair of the PointeClaire Association of Pools in the early sixties. The Association proudly achieved its key goal of establishing a first-class swimming facility in Pointe- Claire, which fostered national and international champions. Bob enjoyed membership along with Diana in the Pointe-Claire Bowling Club and the Pointe-Claire Curling Club.

The family wishes to thank the staff of Maison Herron for their years of care, and to the staff of the Gerontology Unit at the Lakeshore General Hospital.

A private service will be held on January 21, 2018 with interment at a later date.

In remembrance of Bob, donations in his name can be made to NOVA West Island or to The Alzheimer Society of Canada.

MORRISON RAMSEY WALKER (nee Kyle)

October 1, 1919 January 15, 2018

Morrison died peacefully at Trenton Memorial Hospital on January 15, 2018 in her 99th year.

Born in Skelmorlie, Scotland, she often recalled happy memories of her early life. The River Clyde was a major base for Allied naval ships in World War II and one day she agreed to guide a Canadian sailor, a family acquaintance who was stationed there, through Glasgow to meet his aunt. Not much impressed at their first meeting, on further acquaintance she fell in love with his laughing eyes and in November 1946 sailed on the RMS Queen Elizabeth to marry Alexander Walker in Canada. They shared a happy but too brief life together in Hamilton and at their beloved cottage in Bala until his death in 1984. Not long thereafter, she moved to Belleville where she bravely built a new life for herself and made many dear friends.

She will be lovingly remembered and sadly missed by her children Christine of Belleville and her husband Richard Bird, Alan of Wellandport and his wife Kim and Diane of Toronto and her partner Rob Bell. She loved and was dearly loved by her grandchildren and their partners Colin Bird and Prudence Bouchard-Boivin, Owen Bird and Carissa, Tony Walker and Kathryn McCulloch and Alison Walker and Ryan Keller. She was delighted by visits from her greatgrandchildren Louis and Oscar Bird, Lucille-Morrison Bird and Fiona Ramsey Keller. She also leaves her sister Violet Ferguson of Paisley, Scotland and Alex's brother Donald Walker and his wife Gina of Ancaster as well as many loving nieces, nephews and their growing families on both sides of the Atlantic.

The family would like to thank the staff at Bridge Street Residence in Belleville where Morrison spent eight happy years. They would also like to thank the staff at Trenton Memorial Hospital for the sensitive care they gave Morrison in her final days.

A private family celebration of Morrison's long life will be held at a later date. If desired donations may be made to the Belleville Memorial Hospital Foundation, the Trenton Memorial Foundation or charity of your choice. Arrangements entrusted to Bay of Quinte Cremation Service, 150 Church St.

Belleville. Online condolences at http://www.burkefuneral.ca

JOHN ALBERT WILCOX

It is with great sorrow that we announce the passing of John Albert Wilcox on January 13, 2018.

After a short but courageous battle with cancer, John's passing was peaceful. Beloved husband of Pamela Wilcox (LeBoldus nee Holden) and the late Patricia Wilcox. He was a caring and dedicated father to Kathleen (Ken), Tim (Suzy), and Elizabeth (Ryan); and the most amazing Pop to his six grandchildren, Maggie, Claire, Andrew, Brian, Riley and Eli. He will also be missed by his stepchildren, Geoffrey (Vicki), Tom (Laurina), Lauren (Sean); and their children, Gillian, Kellett and William.

John was born in Winnipeg on June 17, 1940 to Marv and Ruth Wilcox and grew up in Winnipeg.

John received a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the University of Manitoba and was proud to be their Senior Stick in his final year. In addition, he graduated from Harvard University with a Masters of Business Administration. John began his career as an investment banker at Richardson Securities in Winnipeg and over thirty-five years managed corporate financial operations for Richardson and First Boston (Credit Suisse) in Toronto, Montreal and New York.

Throughout his life, whether at university, in business or within his community, he believed deeply in helping others and was a respected leader.

John loved so many things, especially the outdoors, sports and the arts. He was an avid golfer, skier, gardener, Minnesota Vikings and Toronto Maple Leafs fan. But most of all, John enjoyed spending time at the family cottage in Minaki, Ontario where he could often be found standing on the high rock with a morning cup of coffee or reading on the screen porch. John's passion for his family and friends filled his life with joy. In recent years, he attended many of his grandchildren's sporting and artistic events enthusiastically offering words of encouragement.

He always looked forward to connecting with old friends near and far.

The family wishes to thank John's many great friends for their love and support and the wonderful caregivers from ParaMed Home Health Care Services. Our family looks forward to seeing those of you who will be able to join us for a service on Tuesday, January 23rd at 11 a.m. at St. Paul's United Church (123 Main Street East, Milton, ON L9T 1N4) followed by a light lunch in the Church Annex.

In lieu of flowers, the family asks that you consider a donation to St. Paul's United Church, or to the Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation in support of ParaMed Home Health Care Services, or the charity of your choice.

http://www.smithsfh.com

BIRTH AND DEATH NOTICES
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Tuesday, January 23, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B15


MARTIN BARKIN

On Sunday, January 21, 2018 at Toronto General Hospital.

Beloved husband of Carol. Loving father and father-in-law of Tim and Nancy Barkin, Jeffrey and Karen Barkin, Risa Barkin Worth, and Robert and Lisa Barkin. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Miriam Marks, and Sharon and Mel Shiffman. Dear brother-in-law of Joel and Catherine Kohm.

Devoted grandfather of Jack, Ethan, Daniel, Slater, Jake, Halle, and the late Eden Worth.

At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Tuesday, January 23, 2018 at 1:00 p.m. Interment in the Temple Sinai section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva 54 Old Forest Hill Road, Toronto.

Memorial donations may be made to the Martin Barkin Chair in Urological Research at U of T 416-978-4296, Sunnybrook Hospital Fundation 416-480-4483, or to a charity of your choice.

MARY WINNIFRED CRAWFORD 1931 -2018

Mary Crawford (née Lang) died peacefully on January 20, 2018 following a brave and challenging journey in recent years through Alzheimer's disease and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

She leaves her beloved and loving family: daughters, Jane Crawford (Brian Hayes), Ann Crawford (Dan Blais) and Sarah Crawford (David Kirkwood); grandchildren, David Benson, Joseph Benson, Noah Benson, Robin Hayes, Ellen Hayes and Neil Hayes. She was predeceased by her beloved husband of almost 60 years, Wilmer Crawford. She was also predeceased by her dear sister, Margaret Bethune; and brother, Don Lang. Mary also leaves cherished nieces, nephews, in-laws and many loyal and loving friends.

Mary lived a long and happy life filled with love and engagement.

She graduated from McMaster University where she met Wilmer, and thus began a lifelong partnership and love. Their marriage was and will always be an inspiration to their children.

Mary embraced and excelled in her jobs of wife, mother and active community volunteer in Winnipeg, Hamilton, Montreal and Toronto. She and Wilmer created warm, beautiful and inviting homes where family and friends were always welcomed.

"Grammy and Grandad" spent many special years in retirement at their Staney Brae cottage, where grandchildren, family and friends gathered together under the same roof. Mary was an avid second-generation gardener, creating and tending gorgeous home gardens. She was an avid reader and passed on her book-loving ways to her kids.

A wonderful cook, family dinners were important to Mary and she always created wonderful meals.

Mary's laughter and love of life were gifts to family, friends and all who shared her path.

We are especially grateful to our mother's team of caregivers who provided loving care and companionship in her last years; thank-you Jeremay, Tessa, Marisa, Gemma, Nemia and Mary.

We are also thankful to Betty Daignault and the entire staff at The Teddington who provided a warm and supportive home to her in the past year. Deep thanks and appreciation to Dr. Russell Goldman and the entire team of nurses and doctors who provided excellent palliative care for Mary in her final days.

A memorial service will take place at Mt. Pleasant Funeral Centre, 375 Mount Pleasant Road (east gate entrance), on Friday, January 26 at noon. Reception to follow.

Donations may be made to: The Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care at Mt. Sinai Hospital (416-586-8203) (tlcpc.org).

ROBERT DOUGLAS GILLESPIE "SID"

Born in Colborne, Ontario : November 10, 1931 Passed away: January 16, 2018

Sid is survived by Marion, his devoted wife and partner of 62 years; his daughters, Susan (Alec Zimmerman) and Cynthia (Stephen Shea); grandchildren, Jason Prendergast (Amanda Griffis), Blake Prendergast, Lily MacLeod and Calder MacLeod; step-grandchildren, Megan Shea and Caragh Shea; and sister-inlaw, Dr. Margaret MacMurdo McMillan (widow of Alan); and was predeceased by his brothers, Bill and Don.

Born to William S. Gillespie and Ruby (née Grant), Sid was raised on the family farm on Shelter Valley Road near Grafton, Ontario, which he continued to maintain and enjoy with Marion and the family until his death. A student of the local one-room schoolhouse, Sid's character was shaped early on: hard-working, self-reliant, humbly self-confident, patient, generous, principled, a man of faith oriented toward his community and his family. Sid was understanding of others, but demanding of himself. A gentleman through and through.

Naturally adept at maths and sciences, Sid attended the Royal Military College, earning his wings as a navigator and graduating with a B.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering.

It was while spending his summers posted to Navigation School in Summerside, PEI that he met Marion MacMurdo at a golf course. They were married on the first weekend following Sid's graduation from RMC in 1955. Thus began their lifetime together, often spent on the golf courses of PEI and with their friends at Thornhill Golf and Country Club, where he served as President in 1976.

Sid obtained his engineering degree, and later his MBA, from the University of Toronto, and while there was recommended by a professor to Jim MacLaren of James F. MacLaren Ltd., then one of Canada's largest environmental consulting companies. Sid remained at MacLaren for 27 years, becoming President in 1978.

He founded MacViro Consultants Inc. in 1989, serving as its President until he retired in 2006.

Owing to Sid's unquestioned integrity, he was retained by Cole Engineering in 2009 to provide advice and guidance to its senior management team, serving for 7 years until finally retiring at age 85.

Sid was recognized by the Association of Consulting Engineers of Canada with the Beaubien Award for his outstanding contributions to that Association and the advancement of consulting engineering in Canada. He also served on several committees established by the Association of Professional Engineers of Ontario. Sid was ahead of his time in his focus on environmental concerns and many of the modern comforts of city life, including sanitary water supply, sewage treatment plants and municipal heating systems, were built under his supervision at home and abroad.

Sid will be remembered by the staff and community of Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, the home to his faith, to which he offered decades of service as Clerk of Session, Deputy Chair of the Board of Trustees and a member of the Council.

The family would like to thank Dr. Ken Gamble and Dr. Srikala Sridhar for the care and comfort that they offered Sid.

A visitation will be held at the Humphrey Funeral Home A.W.

Miles - Newbigging Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue) from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. on Tuesday, January 23rd. Please join us for a funeral service in Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair Avenue West, Toronto at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, January 24th, with reception to follow in the Flora McCrea Eaton Auditorium. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to Timothy Eaton Memorial Church or to Prostate Cancer Canada. Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

RUSSELL ALBERT NEALE "Rus"

Passed away on Friday, January 19, 2018 in Toronto, in his 90th year.

Rus was predeceased by his beloved wife of 49 years, Patricia (2001); and his parents, Albert and Gladys Neale. Devoted father to Pamela (John), David (Kelly), and Jeffrey (Seow). Loving grandfather to Baba's "first draft" Blue Jays: Erin (Ryan), Gregory (Nicole), Heather, Katelyn, and Patrick. Loving great-grandfather to Big Baba's "second draft" Blue Jays: Avery, Callum, Reagan, Sophie, and Neil.

Rus loved family first, followed by reading, history, playing hockey and baseball, and the Toronto Blue Jays. When his grandchildren were young, he attended all their games and recitals, enthusiastically participating in the bleachers, soon becoming known to all by his chants! As a young man, Rus worked with his father Albert in his Long Branch butcher shop, Park Meat Market. His successful life insurance sales career with Confederation Life began in the 1950s, followed by a financial services practice with his son, David, well into his 80s.

The family wishes to thank loving caregivers Anabelle and Gleanard for their devoted care, and staff from Walden Circle Retirement Community in Mississauga, and Baycrest Health Sciences in Toronto.

Friends may call at the Turner & Porter Peel Chapel, 2180 Hurontario St., Mississauga (Hwy 10 N of QEW), on Tuesday, January 23, 2018 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held in the Chapel on Wednesday, January 24, 2018 at 11 a.m. If desired, please consider a donation in Rus' memory to Baycrest Health Sciences: http:// http://www.baycrest.org/give/ Online condolences may be made through http://www.turnerporter.ca

JOHN HESLOP RUTHERFORD

B.Comm, CA September 28, 1930 January 17, 2018 (Aged 87) Passed away suddenly at his home in St. John's, Newfoundland on January 17, 2018. Predeceased by his beloved wife, Anne (Hethrington).

Survived by his daughters, Margaret (Dean Van Hooydonk), Patricia (Tom Beshoff); his grandson, Graham Mercier; and sister, Margaret Hill, and her daughters in the UK.

John will be greatly missed by all who knew him for his brilliant mind, wit, generosity and kind heart. He always had a story to tell, complete with relevant literary and historic references.

John was originally from Northern England and made Canada his home in the late 1950s, after detours through Finland and France. He settled in Montreal where he met his wife, Anne.

They raised their daughters in Toronto and in the late 1980s embarked on their next adventure - a move to St John's, NF, where John was the Vice President/CFO of Fortis (Newfoundland Light and Power) until his retirement. The family would like to send heartfelt thanks to all the kind and helpful neighbours and friends who helped make St. John's home for him over the past 30 years. John always made the world a more interesting place and he will surely be missed by all.

The family will receive friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home A.W. Miles - Newbigging Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue) from 2 - 3 p.m. on Saturday, January 27, 2018. A service will follow in the chapel. If desired, in lieu of flowers, donations in his memory can be made to the Parkinson Society of Newfoundland & Labrador, 136 Crosbie Road, Suite 305, St.

John's Newfoundland, A1K 1J8, or the Canadian Red Cross, P.O. Box 39, Saint John, NB, E2L 3X3.

Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through http://www.humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

WILLIAME WART STAVERT

December 15, 1934 December 18, 2017 Suddenly at age 83 while visiting family in England. Beloved husband of Margaret (née Racey); son of the late Kathleen Rosamond and the late Ewart Stavert; and brother of the late Mary Huguessen. He will be missed by his dear brother, the Most. Rev. A. Bruce Stavert; and his loved stepchildren, Robert Legge (Dr. Jane Prichard); Wendy Legge (John Fursey), Suzanne Legge (Jeffrey Orr), Martha Legge (Timothy Fitzpatrick); his 12 grandchildren, Elizabeth and Jamie Legge, Elle Prichard, Alexandra, Deborah, Robert and Caroline Fursey, John, Will and Jackie Orr, and Colin and Jeffrey Fitzpatrick who knew him as their beloved 'Gramps'; as well as many nieces and nephews.

Oak Tree Farm in the Eastern Townships was especially dear to Bill as he spent hours walking and cultivating paths in the forest and tending to his vegetable garden with immense pleasure. He rode horses, a love he shared with his wife (of 32 years), Margaret.

His grandchildren remember fondly the many walks taken with him through the forest, his commentaries on birds, his explanations of table manners (bulldozer analogies included) and his encouragement to them to read as much as they could.

Bill attended Lower Canada College, Bishop's University (BA '56), and on graduation from McGill University in Law (BCL '59) and admission to the Bar 1960, he joined the firm of McMaster, Meighen (later Borden Ladner Gervais) and became a partner in 1972. He was seconded to Price Waterhouse and to the Federal Department of Finance in Ottawa for short terms to study new tax reforms being introduced in Canada at that time.

From there with his interest in the Wills and Estates group in the firm, he built one of Montreal's foremost Wills and Estates practices. His successful pleading at the Supreme Court of Canada transformed the law of Trusts in Quebec.

Bill was a devoted member of The Black Watch Royal Highland Regiment which he joined as a Junior Officer in the mid 1950's. He founded The Black Watch Canada Foundation and ultimately served on the Board and Executive Committee of the Regiment providing professional guidance and leadership until his retirement a few years ago.

Bill served as President of The Douglas Hospital Corporation for a number of years in the 1970's and 1980's. He also served on Boards or Committees of The Canadian Heritage of Quebec, The Vimy Foundation, the Chawkers Foundation, Tyndale-St. George's Foundation, The Old Brewery Mission, The Hay Foundation and Bishop's College School Foundation. Bill was instrumental in supporting the War Flowers Exhibition currently travelling in Canada and on to Vimy, France.

His interest in history prompted him to write a book on the stained-glass windows of his church, The Church of St. Andrew and St. Paul, entitled 'Windows of History, Service and Sacrifice.' A service of celebration of his life will be held on Friday, January 26th at 11:00 a.m. at The Church of St. Andrew and St. Paul, 3415 Redpath Street, Montreal.

Any memorial donations in his memory may be made to a charity of choice and will be gratefully acknowledged.

PHILIP MICHAEL TAYLOR

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Philip M. Taylor on January 19, 2018 peacefully, with his family by his side.

Beloved and loving husband of Anna. Loving father of Richard (Florence), Andrew (Hélène), Susan (Peter), Helen (Steve).

Proud and indulgent grandfather of Mathilde, Thomas, Théo, Claire, Sophie, Alexander, Louise, Leonard, Victor, Edouard, William.

Philip was born in Nablus, Palestine on October 11, 1932. He obtained his BA Hons French from London University. He married Anna on February 4, 1961.

Trained as a Chartered Accountant, he worked with Deloitte & Co from 1961 to 1964. He joined Texaco UK in London and then Texaco Europe in Brussels as Tax Coordinator. The family moved to Canada in 1980 when he transferred to Texaco Canada, which in 1985 was sold to Imperial Oil where he served as Corporate Tax Officer until his retirement in 1997. He was a long standing member of the Tax Executives Institute.

After his retirement, he embarked on his second career as a full-time volunteer with the St Vincent de Paul Society tirelessly visiting the elderly, sick and isolated. He readily accepted responsibilities: past member of the board of directors of Toronto Central Council, past president of Toronto North Particular Council and active member and past president of St Gabriel's Parish Chapter.

Also assisting St John's XXIII Parish Chapter, he was active on various governance and finance committees. He was treasurer and board executive member of VincentPaul Family Homes Corp - Gower Place which provides affordable housing.

He was an avid tennis player and enjoyed great success in his retirement years. In 2004, he achieved a top 10 ranking in singles in the over 70 category. He became Tennis Canada national doubles champion in 2008 in the over 75, a feat he repeated in 2014 in the over 80.

Philip loved music. He played the piano and the flute and was still singing in the choir of St Gabriel's Church this past Christmas. He enjoyed hosting his family over the Christmas season organizing the traditional cards, darts and table tennis tournaments.

A funeral Mass will be held at St. Gabriel's Church (670 Sheppard Avenue E) at 11 am on 27 January with reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to St. Vincent de Paul society or a children's charity. Condolences http://www.rskane.ca

MARK ALEXANDER SILVER

February 13, 1970 January 23 , 2017

Mark Alexander Silver - son, grandson, father, nephew, cousin, friend and fiancé.

Our lives go on without you But nothing is the same We have to hide our heartache When someone speaks your name Sad are the hearts that love you Silent are the tears that fall Living without you is the hardest part of all You did so many things for us Your heart was so kind and true And when we needed someone We can always count on you The special years will not return When we are all together But with the love in our hearts You will walk with us forever Love, Mom, Dad, Sylvia and Walter (Butch); Daughters, Alexis, Robyn; Fiancé, Corinne; Jennifer, Jonathan, Alicia; Big Sid, Bru SARAH MICHELLE COTÉ SUTHERLAND September 9, 1964 January 23, 2001 In memory of my darling daughter, you were goodness and beauty Sarah and brought so much happiness. I love you and miss you with all my heart and soul. Mom

The other Stockholm syndrome
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Sweden's capital has infiltrated global pop music for decades, and is now responsible for the shape of the genre. But what's behind the small Scandinavian country's dominance?
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By JOSH O'KANE
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Saturday, January 13, 2018 – Print Edition, Page R1


STOCKHOLM -- Sara Hjellstrom had just had a tonS sil operation when a friend, DJproducer Mike Perry, handed her the roots of a song he hoped she could turn into a hit. Sitting on the couch in her Stockholm apartment, Hjellstrom built Perry's four chords into a tropical house track, with help from her songwriting partner Nirob Islam.

The beat, top-line melody and the words came near-instantly.

Hjellstrom wanted her own voice on the track, but had been told by her doctors not to sing. Being from Sweden, though, where music is treated like a job - a profession, really, such as an engineer or electrician - she wanted to get that job done. So, a half an hour after she began writing, she stepped into her walk-in closet and recorded the vocals - in a single take.

In June, 2016, that song, The Ocean, began a six-week summer run atop Sweden's charts, reaching No. 11 on Billboard's American dance chart, too.

Hjellstrom, who's taken on the alias SHY Martin, instantly went from musicschool student to coveted co-writer and guest performer, jumping on tracks by the Chainsmokers, Kygo and Bebe Rexha.

The 24-year-old wants to become a household name, and she's in the right place to make it happen. Sweden is the low-key Nashville of the Nordics, a hitmaking heavyweight that's one of the world's biggest exporters of music relative to the size of its economy. (The only country that has crept ahead of it is Canada - another country with a small population, a tendency toward hockey fanaticism and long, dark winters.)

Sweden has infiltrated global pop for decades. ABBA ruled the seventies; Robyn and the Cardigans tore a strip off the nineties; Tove Lo and Zara Larsson carry the country on charts today.

Countless North American hits, too, are written by Swedes you've never heard of. The root causes of the disproportionate dominance of this country of 10 million, however, are less evident. One clue can be found in a single, vastly influential studio that began ushering in a new school of songwriting in the 1990s, sending teen-pop artists including the Backstreet Boys, NSYNC and Britney Spears flocking to Stockholm. Further clues can be found in Swedish culture itself, and the deep appreciation of music that's instilled in Swedes from an early age. "They're gods of pop music," says Carly Rae Jepsen, who regularly travels to Swedish studios, most recently for her forthcoming record.

Today, Sweden is responsible for much of the shape of popular music: how songs are written, how they're recorded and, now thanks to Spotify, how they explode into the world. "Just because you're a Swede," Hjellstrom says over coffee in downtown Stockholm, "people respect you right away."

At the centre of Kungsholmen, the island just west of Stockholm's core, there's a little twostorey storefront that changed pop history. Wedged between a highway tunnel, a playground and two impossibly drab midrise apartment blocks is the original Cheiron Studios.

The tan-brick bunker was, for nearly a decade, the finest hit factory in the world. It was founded in the early nineties by Denniz PoP, a remix pioneer with a gift for melody who propelled Swedish pop band Ace of Base to global fame, co-producing All That She Wants and The Sign. He cared little for the divide between the club and the radio, making music that bridged both worlds: beats you can't sit still for and melodies you can't forget. To road-test his prototypes, he'd blast them in empty discotheques in the dead of morning to assess their dance-floor effectiveness. The approach gave radio pop, long a critical castaway, an unforgettable immediacy.

Over time, Denniz PoP recruited a team of producers and songwriters including Jacob Schulze, Kristian Lundin and a metalhead who went by the name Max Martin. By the mid-nineties, freshfaced teen-pop musicians started showing up in Stockholm to record with them, walking away with such classics as Quit Playing Games (with My Heart), Tearin' Up My Heart and ... Baby One More Time.

When Schulze talks about Denniz PoP now, he almost always refers to his mentor as "he." His tone has the warmth of familiarity, but it's buffered by a deliberate, steely reverence. "He wanted to make songs for his cool friends, he wanted people in the countryside, everybody, to dance to these songs," Schulze tells me in late September in the lobby of his new studio. ABBA might be shorthand for Sweden, but with its new approach, the Cheiron collective became the architects of the late nineties teen-pop explosion, and in turn, much of pop ever since.

At Cheiron, Denniz PoP, and later Martin, sought the same thing from songwriting that today's tech execs do: simplicity and scale. A pop banger doesn't need to sound genius to be ingeniously constructed, but it's most effective, and financially lucrative, when it combines the elements that make it enjoyable across all demographics - the beat, the melody, the chorus almost scientifically calibrated to be unforgettable. Schulze, whose work with the studio included NSYNC's Bye Bye Bye, refers to Cheiron's guiding principles with a Roxette reference: "The really cliché concept of 'Don't bore us, get to the chorus.' " Pop music was his kingdom, his magistrates eternally faithful.

When he died in 1998 at the age of 35, after an unexpected stomach-cancer diagnosis, it shook the whole country. Days later, DJs all across Sweden held a moment of silence in his honour. His death rattled Cheiron even more - in mourning, Martin, Schulze and the gang took months to get back to work. When they did, they found they found the pop world had begun modelling itself in Denniz PoP's image.

The studio shut down a few years later, but the Cheiron diaspora are still making music today, and Martin, especially, commands immense control over pop. Much of Taylor Swift's new album Reputation is his production handiwork, and he has written or co-written more than 20 Billboard No.1-hits, including Swift's Shake it Off, Katy Perry's I Kissed A Girl and the Weeknd's Can't Feel My Face.

There have been whole academic papers dedicated to figuring out why Swedes so disproportionately rule popular music. There are less-than-scientific theories - it's dark so much of the year, so let's go inside and be creative! - and many more reasonable ones.

Those include a national tendency to be earlier adopters; role models such as Martin and ABBA, and the globalized audiences they captivated; and a profound national proficiency in English, the unofficial language of pop.

Patrik Berger, a 38-year-old who has spent his entire life messing around with sound, has other ideas. His studio is in a little house, not much bigger than a shack, in a hidden courtyard off a main drag on the Stockholm island of Sodermalm. There, he brings me over to a Korg Mono/ Poly synthesizer along the redvelvet wall of the back room, and starts fiddling with a knob: It was this synth, in this room, that helped him shape the iconic, throbbing bass backbone to Robyn's Grammy-nominated 2010 single Dancing On My Own.

The song put him in the spotlight as an in-demand songwriter and producer. "It was one of those songs where people came up to me, talking about how much it mattered," he says.

Berger, whose catalogue includes Icona Pop and Charli XCX's I Love It and numerous other Charli songs including Boom Clap, believes Sweden dominates pop in large part because music is woven into life at an early age, and at minimal cost, through education. It's why artists such as him and Hjellstrom take it as seriously as any other job. Younger students are entitled to at least 230 hours of music education and can steer hundreds more into electives such as lessons, music-theory study and ensemble playing.

In high school, students can choose music as their primary stream and have many different classes to choose from. Nearly a third of Swedish children, meanwhile, get publicly subsidized music education after school hours, and adult education associations offer space, equipment and workshops, one study says, while grants are available for bands to cover rehearsal costs.

"It was just part of life: Kids should learn how to swim, kids should learn how to play an instrument," Berger says. "If you can't afford a saxophone, you just rent it - for basically nothing. What can be more encouraging than that?" Hjellstrom began playing guitar before she was 10, started taking after-school music classes and was in a band at the age of 12. In gymnasium - Swedish high school - half her class time was spent studying and practising music. By 17, she says, she was signed to the label EMI on the strength of a YouTube video. Later, at a songwriting academy in Northern Sweden, Hjellstrom spent a year writing at a private studio, taking notes from publishers and labels, honing her craft, before moving to Stockholm for a year of internships.

She hadn't even graduated when she finished The Ocean.

"We can afford to make mistakes and experiment," she tells me. "You can afford to find yourself, and your own expression, without having any pressure, money-wise."

Max Martin has said he feels the same way. "I have public music education to thank for everything," he told an interviewer in 2001.

By the time Hjellstrom first picked up the guitar, the boyband wave had already crested, but Martin and his colleagues, taking Denniz PoP's mantle, had infiltrated all of pop music with their methodical approach to songwriting and production.

When journalist John Seabrook wrote a book about this movement, he called it The Song Machine: within a few years of Cheiron's demise, music, the industry, had become industrialized. Martin's once-proprietary pop process is now global gospel: Producers take beats and chord progressions, offer them up to a series of "top-line" songwriters such as Hjellstrom to gift it with melody and hits are made.

This system has helped Hjellstrom get into songwriting sessions she couldn't have dreamed of. Berger, too, says this has been undeniably helpful: "When all this success with Max Martin happened - you see him going and getting milk at the store - everybody felt, 'If he can do it, then I can do it as well.' " Today, the songwriting and production community there has grown well beyond the Cheiron disapora. Carly Rae Jepsen, for example, has worked not just with Martin associates such as Shellback and Rami Yacoub, but others such as Berger, too. "They just get really good at their craft," she told me earlier this year.

But some sonic scholars, Berger included, have come to believe that Martin's school of pop is getting old: It makes songs that sound wonderful, but feel inherently repetitive.

Sweden's future will be brightest, Berger says, if the kids aren't afraid of getting a little weird.

When he writes, he says, he's aiming for a "window" of song that captures commercial appeal without destroying music's mysteries. "That little window is so tiny, you have to throw a lot of balls to see one thing cut through that little crack - to actually change something."

He talks about the pressure he faced working on Dancing On My Own. "When I did that song, so many people were telling me what I should do with it," he says.

Rather than follow the pack, he wrote it how he wanted to, inadvertently establishing his voice as a producer and songwriter.

"They were so angry that I produced it in the way that I did.

Why? No, it should be like this - it should be raw and gritty."

Hjellstrom's looking to try new things, too - starting with a debut solo single. As much as she looks up to Martin, she's also smitten by Tove Lo, a younger pop star held in equally high regard for her songwriting and her solo work - two worlds Hjellstrom is also hoping to occupy.

"As a songwriter, you can hide behind the artist," she says. "You don't have to be in the spotlight if you don't want to. And I love that. But it will be really exciting to release my own stuff as well."

Sweden has never had a perfect scene. Last month, more than 2,000 women in its music community signed a letter accusing the industry of enabling sexual assault and harassment, sexism and a culture of silence around it all. Hjellstrom signed the letter.

"I didn't hesitate for one second before signing," she says.

"This affects all of us regardless of sex. Reading the stories from these women, not only do I recognize myself in them but I'm also angered by the fact that I meet these perpetrators on an almost daily basis."

The foundations of Swedish music are shifting in many ways.

Artists and genres have diversified, and a significant DJ culture has emerged, with Avicii, Axwell & Ingrosso and many others carrying on the work that encouraged Denniz PoP to get into music. The country might now be better known among casual music fans as the home of Spotify, the world's most popular subscription streaming service.

And despite all the milk he purportedly buys from Stockholm convenience stores, the press-shy Martin, and some of his former colleagues, spend much of their time in the United States.

When Martin and Spotify chief executive Daniel Ek launched the Equalizer project this year to promote women's work in the music industry, Hjellstrom was one of the first songwriters on board.

She's quickly finding her way to the forefront of Sweden's changing musical identity. Earlier this year, too, she and her writing partner won the grand prize at the Denniz PoP Awards - a series of music prizes founded in 2013 by Jacob Schulze.

"We felt that he shouldn't be forgotten," Schulze says. He and his old Cheiron colleagues agreed the finest tribute to Denniz PoP would be to champion newcomers; the awards' tag line is "The Legacy Continues."

"That's much more important work, and much more important to me, than giving away prizes to established artists," he says. In championing new, homegrown talent, the awards are a distinctly forward-looking celebration of Swedish history.

"I didn't even think I would end up here," says Hjellstrom, who grew up in a tiny village a few hours from Stockholm. "I'm really enjoying doing what I love, and doing it with friends." But she's travelled the world for work - for music - more this past year than the rest of her life before it, often to even bigger music hubs.

Sometimes, she says, she feels pressured to move.

That's another thing Sweden has in common with Canada.

The Weeknd, Drake, Justin Bieber, Carly Rae Jepsen, Joni Mitchell, Neil Young: Each of these music juggernauts spends some or all of their time in the United States. SOCAN, Canada's performing-rights society for songwriters, has nearly 900 members in California alone. Music's globalization has given artists from small-market countries such as Canada and Sweden disproportionate, although welcome, influence in pop music. It can also pull talent away from home.

"It's kind of a natural step," says Berger, who spends some winter months in California himself. "I mean, what are we gonna do here? It's 10 million people; there's only so much you can do." But maybe this isn't a bad thing. Swede-made music can now reach more ears than ever.

So, too, can music made by Canadians. And there's a pipeline of inspiration and encouragement, too, coming back to both countries. "They bring back new ideas, and it just becomes this big loop," Berger says.

It's the kind of thing that helps new artists such as Hjellstrom get their start. "As soon as you get role models like Drake and Justin Bieber," she says, "the younger generation will start doing music."

In November, a few weeks after we spoke, Hjellstrom released Good Together, her debut solo single as SHY Martin. In less than a week, it was streamed more than a million times.

Associated Graphic

Sara Hjellstrom, known by the stage name SHY Martin, released Good Together, her debut solo single, in November. In less than a week, it was streamed more than a million times.

Above: Producer Max Martin speaks at the Grammy Awards in 2015. Right: By the mid-nineties, Stockholm had become the place to be for teen-pop musicians such as Britney Spears, who would show up to record with Denniz PoP and his team of producers - including Martin.

ABOVE: KEVORK DJANSEZIAN/GETTY IMAGES; RIGHT: INTS KALNINS/REUTERS

BIRTH AND DEATH NOTICES
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Thursday, January 18, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B16


HONOURABLE ALLAN MCNIECE AUSTIN

March 7, 1928 January 12, 2018

His family is saddened to announce that Mac died peacefully at Belmont House, Friday, January 12th.

Beloved husband of Margaret Kyle for 66 years. Adored father of Allan (Lyn), Jim (Sue) and Tom (Rosaria).

Devoted and loving grandfather of Maggie (Jeremy Packard), Gren, Graham (Mallory Lazarus) and Michael.

He was the third son of Allan McNiece Austin and Alice Dickinson. He was predeceased by his brother, James McNiece; and is survived by his brothers, John Beresford and Richard Jackson; and many cousins, nieces and nephews.

Mac was born and received his early education in Chapleau, in Northern Ontario, before following his older brothers south to attend Trinity College School in Port Hope. He went on to Victoria College at the University of Toronto and was a member of the first class to graduate from the University of Toronto Law School.

He was a student, associate, partner and managing partner with the firm now called WeirFoulds, LLP. From 1987 to 2003 he served as a judge in the High Court of Justice and the Court of Appeal for Ontario. After retiring from the bench he returned to WeirFoulds and participated in arbitration and mediation work.

He was a natural athlete and an accomplished cross-country runner, and he loved sailing and skiing well into his later years. He was a dedicated and long-time member of Eglinton St. George's United Church.

He loved God, his family and his work. He loved life.

We are profoundly thankful for the care he received from the whole team at Belmont House.

The family will receive friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home A.W. Miles - Newbigging Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue) from 4:00 - 6:00 p.m. on Saturday, January 20th.

A Service of Thanksgiving will be held on Monday, January 22nd at 2:00 p.m.in Eglinton St. George's United Church, 35 Lytton Boulevard, Toronto M4R 1L2.

In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation in Mac's memory to the Alzheimer Society of Canada, 20 Eglinton Avenue West, 16th Floor, Toronto M4R 1K8, http://www.alzheimer.ca. Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through http://www.humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

MORTIMER BROWN P. Eng "Monty"

June 16, 1921 January 13, 2018

Predeceased by his wife, Frances; and brothers, Jeff and Bert.

The eldest of four boys, he is survived by his brother, Leslie of London, England. Loving father to Carol Brady (Mike) of Caledonia, Jacqueline Sargent (Bob) of Georgetown and Robin (Susan) of Whistler, B.C. Grandfather to Meghan, Courtney, Jared (Meredith) and Sean; and Greatgrandfather to Sydney.

Born in Bromley, Yorkshire, and a graduate of the Leeds College of Technology in Mechanical Engineering.

Commissioned to the British Army, Monty served in the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers. He was transferred to the Indian Army where he commanded workshop companies serving in Southeast Asia, specifically India, Burma, French Indo-China and the Dutch East Indies. He was discharged in 1947 with the Rank of Major, and returned to England where he married and began a career in manufacturing research.

In 1952, he immigrated to Canada with his family, initially working at Westinghouse in Hamilton, Ontario, as a member of the team that produced the first Canadian Homing Torpedoes. He later returned to the aluminum industry.

In 1969, Monty co-founded RAM Partitions, which manufactured moveable walls and later office partitions. He then joined Nightingale Industries, one of Canada's leading office furniture manufacturers. He was responsible for the product INTERLOC for which he held the patents.

In 1983 he accepted a new challenge: the development of Teknion Furniture Systems as President, supported by Global Upholstery. Since its inception Teknion has grown to become of one the world's premier companies in the international office furniture systems market. Monty retired from Teknion as Chairman.

Monty Brown served as an elected Trustee on the Oshawa Board of Education, and a Director on the Board of the Danny Grossman Dance Company, The Design Exchange and the Business and Institutional Manufacturers Association of Canada.

Monty lived by the rule "form follows function." His excitement and passion came from leading new products in the design phase thru manufacturing to the end product - finessed and driven by function, predicated on rationale and logical thought. From his time in the army until his retirement, his curiosity in the composition of systems and structures drove him to enhance and create unique applications and solutions. This curiosity extended to the world around him, which he travelled extensively. From a young age he was actively engaged in fitness, he was an avid sailor, racing keelboats and became a lifelong patron of the arts. Devotion to family was evidenced in the loving care he sought for his wife Frances in her battle with Alzheimer's, and the worldly experience he provided each of his grandchildren to attend Neuchatel Junior College in Switzerland and travel throughout Europe for their final year of secondary school, finally joining each of them for graduation and one last sojourn.

Special thanks to Comfort Keepers of Oakville, Monty's team - Gina, Joan, Nanette, Cristher and Dr. Corrine Breen for their compassionate care and commitment to Monty and family over the past 5+ years. Also to the staff at Churchill Place for recognizing and engaging "Major Monty" every day.

Family and friends are invited to join us at the J.S. Jones and Son Funeral Home, 11582 Trafalgar Road, Georgetown, 905 877-3631 on Thursday January 25th from 7-9 p.m. A memorial service will be held in the chapel on Friday, January 26, 2018 at 11:00 a.m.

(with visitation from 10:00-11:00 a.m.) Reception to follow at North Halton Golf and Country Club.

In lieu of flowers, at Monty's request, memorial contributions to The United Jewish Appeal, Salvation Army, Alzheimer's Society or Oakville Hospital would be appreciated. To send expressions of sympathy visit http://www.jsjonesandsonfuneralhome.com

SHIRLEY CARLSON

November 27, 1924 January 12, 2018

Age 93. Physiotherapist, church organist, gracious hostess, friend, wife, mother, grandmother, greatgrandmother. Shirley died in Rideaucrest Home, Kingston after several months of gentle decline.

Born in Mankato, Minnesota, she was the daughter of a papermaker, Parker Faler, and his wife, Hilda (Knoff) Faler. She was raised in Iroquois Falls, Ontario before graduating from U of T as a physiotherapist in 1945. Shirley was predeceased by her husband, Colonel C.V. (Chuck) Carlson. She is survived by son, John, and his wife, Alice (Daverne); and son, David, and his wife, Sarah James; grandchildren and their families include Dan and wife, Katie (Bellefontaine), with children, Brenna and Ronan; Andrew and wife, Alex (Belton Brown), with children, Wesley and Cedric; Mark and partner, Kirsten Newman; Heather and Chloe.

Shirley began playing the organ at the Iroquois Falls United Church at age 12 and shared her gift of music for the next 80 years, singing, directing choirs and playing the organ. Wherever "The Army" posted her and Chuck, she became the church organist.

Even in retirement, she served as organist for many years at Elgin United Church, and most recently at the Royale Place in Kingston. Both Chuck and Shirley were young officers when they married in 1947-she outranked him at the time, and Chuck for the next 63 years delighted in observing that the ranking had never changed. Together they served Canada in 4 countries and travelled to 45 others, with Shirley working as a physio, or mother, or Senior Officer's Wife.

And always there was the music.

"Music was the soundtrack of her life" (paraphrasing Dick Clark).

A Memorial Reception will be held at The Royale Place, 2485 Princess Street, Kingston on Sunday January 21, 2018 from 2:30 until 4:00 p.m. An Interment Service will be held at St. Alban's Cemetery, Adolphustown at a later date. Thanks to the professional and caring Rideaucrest staff for making her last few months more comfortable; and thanks to her friends and staff at the Royale for their friendship, particularly in the years since Dad died.

In lieu of flowers, memorial tributes may be made to the University Hospitals Kingston Foundation or a charity of your choice. (Funeral arrangements entrusted to the Scotland Funeral Home, Elgin, 27 Main Street, Elgin; 613-359-5555 or at http://www.scotlandfuneralhome.com)

COLONEL JOHN H.C. CLARRY MBE, ED, CD, QC

Lawyer, soldier, woodlot proprietor, beer lover, generous provider. John Hamilton Cameron Clarry passed away peacefully at home on Friday, January 12, 2018. Born September 20, 1919 in Calgary to parents Ernest and Jean Clarry. Survived by his three children and five grandchildren: Susan (Sara and James), David (Andrew and Cameron), and Michael (wife, Michelle, and son, Max).

Predeceased by the love of his life, Elizabeth Joy Denton Clarry; and his sister, Norah.

Displaced to Toronto by the Great Depression, where he attended and graduated from UTS, University College at U of T, and Osgoode Hall (Silver Medal recipient).

John's lifelong connection with the Canadian military began as a cadet at UTS, and progressed through overseas duty during the Second World War, and continued with militia duty, culminating as Honorary Colonel of the 25 (Toronto) Service Battalion. His connections also included 35 years of volunteer service with the Army Cadet League, and enjoyment and leadership with the Royal Canadian Legion and the Royal Canadian Military Institute. Recognition included the Order of Orange-Nassau for his contribution to Canadian military operations in Holland at the end of the war, Past Honorary Counsel of the Conference of Defence Associations, Honorary President of the Royal Canadian Military Institute, and the Colonel John H.C. Clarry Award recognizing Ontario's top large cadet corps.

His legal career with McCarthy Tetrault spanned over 40 years, including a period as Managing Partner. During that time he was valued by clients and colleagues as someone adept at translating complex legal issues into business terms and translating business agreements into clear and useful legal documents. He was a quiet, progressive person who provided thoughtful insights to clients and numerous Boards on which he served, as well as being a mentor to younger lawyers.

John's personal life was centred on family and on Grasshopper Park, the family weekend retreat and reforestation project. He understood that time and a few thousand seedlings could turn an abandoned farm into a thriving forest, and watching that come to fruition over the decades gave him much pleasure.

The family wishes to thank John's amazing caregivers from Premier Home Health for their dedication and kind and gentle support over the past few years.

The family will receive friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home A.W. Miles - Newbigging Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue) from 2:00 4:00 and 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. Friday, January 19th. Funeral service to be held in Calvin Presbyterian Church, 26 Delisle Avenue on Saturday, January 20th at 1:00 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, donations are encouraged to the Army Cadet League of Canada (Ontario), 1200 Markham Road, Suite 527, Toronto M1H 3C3 (http://www.canadahelps.org), or Haven Toronto (formerly the Good Neighbours' Club), 170 Jarvis Street, Toronto M5B 2B7 (http://www.haventoronto.ca), or another charity of your choice. Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

YOLANDE RUTH MOSES "Lani"

1947-2018

Of Toronto, passed away after a brief illness on Tuesday, January 16th at Toronto General Hospital with her family at her side.

She survived by her husband of 48 years, Charles; daughter, Alexandra (Kevin McKeag); sons, Michael (Esther Jun) and Jonathan; grandchildren, Ailis and Seamus McKeag and Lola Moses; sisters, Diane Cathro and Cynthia Ferris; and brother, Doug Nugent; and she was predeceased by her brother, John Eastwood.

Lani will be remembered for her love for life and her joyful creativity, which she celebrated with her many cherished friends, especially Julie Macdonald, Lynn Morgan and Susie Gunn.

The family will be holding a private service and a memorial will be held at a later date.

Condolences through Humphrey Funeral Home. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Garden Club of Toronto or the Toronto Botanical Garden.

CAROLYN NADLER

On Wednesday January 17, 2018 at Sunnybrook Hospital. Carolyn Nadler, beloved wife of Peter.

Loving mother and mother-in-law of Debbie Stern and Alan Lipman, Lara and Peter Kaufman, and Jennifer and Shane Citron. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Stephen and Vivian Ruby, Eleanor Nadler, Audrey Kumer, Caren Ruby and the late Gerry Ruby. Dear grandmother of Matthew, Ryan, Nicole, Kailee, Russell, Rachel, Carley, and Joshua.

At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Thursday January 18, 2018 at 3:00 p.m. Interment at Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. Shiva will be held 577 Old Orchard Grove, Toronto. Memorial donations may be made to The Canadian Hadassah-WIZO 416-630-8373.

DIANE MARIE POMROY

It is with great sadness we announce the death of Diane Marie Pomroy (nee Chapman). Di passed away in the evening of Saturday, January 13, 2018 at Ian Anderson House at the age of 70.

Beloved wife of Ray Pomroy for 43 years. She was a devoted mother to Victoria and her husband Todd, Georgina and Mark. A loving Granny to Alexandra and Samuel whilst also being an aunt, a greataunt, and a sister-in-law. She leaves behind her sister, Shirley; but was predeceased by her twin brother, Ian. Di's love, friendship and "Joie de Vivre" will be sorely missed by those who knew and loved her.

There will be a private family funeral followed by a celebration of life. The dates will be announced later.

In lieu of flowers, please donate in Di's name to Ian Anderson House, 430 Winston Churchill Blvd, Oakville, ON L6J 7X2.

Please visit our Book of Memories and extended obituary at http://www.wardfuneralhome.com

PANCRAZIO SICILIANO "Tello"

With profound sadness we announce the passing of Tello Siciliano at St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto on Friday, January 12, 2018 at the age of 85.

Devoted and much loved husband of Fiorella for 51 years. Cherished Dad Giacomo (Jack) Siciliano and his wife Rita of Ashburn and Barbara Gualtieri of Font Hill. Nonno of his grandchildren Freddie, Cate, Matteo and Dante.

Fondly remembered by Anna Maria Bacci. Predeceased by his sisters, Felicia and Venera; and brother-in-law, Oscar.

Visitation at Barnes Memorial Funeral Home, 5295 Thickson Rd. N., Whitby on Friday, January 19th, from 2:00 - 4:00 and 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. Then to St. John The Evangelist Catholic Church, 903 Gifford Street, Whitby on Saturday, January 20th for Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m.

Entombment will follow at Resurrection Catholic Cemetery, Whitby. In memory of Tello, memorial donations to World Vision or St. Michael's Hospital Foundation (Trauma).

Messages of condolence and shared memories can be left for the family by visiting barnesmemorialfuneralhome.com

MORRIS WILSON

On Friday, January 12, 2018 in Jupiter, Florida. Beloved husband of Audrey. Loving father and father-in-law of Judy Wilson and Albert Wong, Alan Wilson and Fran Alexander, and Simone Wilson and Jeff Norden. Dear brother of the late Harry Wilson, Esther Middlestadt, Izzy Wilson, Lou Wilson, Frank Wilson, Lil Donnenfield, Sidney Wilson, Bertha Savlov. Devoted grandpa of Kailey and Garrett, Julie, Zoe, Eva, and Hannah. Devoted greatgrandfather of Avery.

At Benjamin's Park Memorial, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Thursday, January 18, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. Interment at Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. Memorial donations may be made to The Morris Wilson Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 416-780-0324.

RICHARD BENNETT BOARA

In loving memory of Richard Bennett Boara November 16, 1956January 18, 2008. Very sadly missed, loved always by his wife Anne, daughters Caeleigh, Shaughna and Kim, family and friends.

BIRTH AND DEATH NOTICES
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Monday, January 15, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B16


DAVID GEORGE CONWAY

Unexpectedly passed away from cardiac arrest at his home in Collingwood on Tuesday, January 9, 2018 in his 76th year. Dave, as he was known by most, grew up in Toronto and Winnipeg, attended the University of Manitoba, and enjoyed a career as an entrepreneur and real estate developer. Collingwood, while a weekend retreat for many years, became Dave and his family's permanent residence in the mid-90s. Whether skiing the slopes, golfing the greens, or enjoying dinners with friends immersed in Sinatra and great conversation, Dave always enjoyed the moment.

As a loving father and husband, he will be forever loved and deeply missed by his wife, Judy; son, Damon (Jenna) Conway; daughter, Chelsea Conway (Hugh O'Connell); and grandson, Hudson. Born to parents the late George and Myrtle Conway, David is survived by his brother, Paul (Christine). His genuine nature and love of life will be fondly remembered by his cousins, nieces, nephews, family and friends.

Visitation will be held at Fawcett Funeral Home, 82 Pine St., Collingwood on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. A Celebration of Life will be held at Blue Mountain Golf & Country Club, 706 Tenth Line, Collingwood on Thursday, January 18, 2018 from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. with remembrances at 3:00 p.m.

For those who wish to make a donation in memory of David, please consider the Georgian Triangle Humane Society or the Collingwood General & Marine Hospital. Friends may visit Dave's online Book of Memories at http://www.fawcettfuneralhomes.com

JOHN MICHAEL GULKA

August 9, 1958 January 12, 2018

Best friend and husband of Anne O'Regan. Adored, adoring and oh so very proud father of Rebecca Gulka and Kam, and Alana Shepherd and Lyle. Missed by his parents, Janice and Guido Filice; his sisters, Deanna (and Don) Lecuyer, and Tanya Filice Bento; his brothers, Joey Gulka, Gino Filice, and Jerry Gulka (Debbie). Also missed by his nephews, nieces and grandnephews, as well as his extended family: the O'Regans, Medlars, and O'Donnells in Ireland; and the O'Regan-McGradys in England.

Proprietor and sole employee of John Gulka Custom Furniture. John touched the lives of so many people many of whom will have some of the wonderful furniture he built over the last 25 years.

John always lived every moment to the fullest, and treated every day since his diagnosis with Hodgkin's Lymphoma in 2005 as a special gift. For the last three years, he and Anne embarked on a great adventure, working in Korea and then in China where many friends will be sad to hear of his death. He took great delight in truly living (rather than just visiting) in different countries, learning new languages, meeting new people, learning something of the culture, the cuisine and how to shop in local markets.

But his prime focus and joy was his family, and he was heartbroken that he had to leave his daughters, Rebecca and Alana, and his wife, Anne.

He tried so hard to stay. He will be with them forever.

As John wanted, there will be no funeral service or visitation. A celebration of his life will take place at a later date, to be arranged, at his childhood home in Waterford, Ontario. Arrangements are entrusted with ThompsonMott Funeral Home, Waterford, 519-443-5332. http://www.thompsonmott funeralhome.com

JOHN KASS

Died on Friday, January 12, 2018, at Toronto General Hospital. He was 66. Throughout his life, he suffered from Alport's syndrome and its consequences including kidney failure and transplant, hearing and vision loss, openheart surgery as well as the amputation of both legs.

John was born in Sydney, Nova Scotia. His deceased parents, Peter and Veronica Kass, were born in Latvia and immigrated to Sydney in 1950 before the family later settled in the greater Toronto area where they resided in Whitby.

John was employed as a news producer and writer for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for years before being disabled. His news broadcasts frequently focused on disability and human rights subjects. John took pride in not being limited by his physical disabilities and fought hard to live a full and complete life.

Visitation will take place at the Rosar-Morrison Funeral Home and Chapel, 467 Sherbourne Street, in Toronto at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, January 17, 2018, followed by interment at 1 p.m. at St. John the Evangelist Cemetery in Whitby.

DR. DONALD ROBERT KRAMER

B.Sc., D. D. S., M. S. D.

Don passed away on Friday, January 12, 2018 at Sunnybrook Hospital due to a lengthy illness.

He was the beloved husband of Breda; father of Bryce, Heather and Andrew; and will be missed by his sisters, brother, extended family and friends in Canada, Ireland, Bermuda, Bahamas and Australia.

He will be fondly remembered by his "McGill Dental Classmates" for their kindness and support.

Don was born in Langenburg, Saskatchewan. He graduated from McGill University School of Dentistry, followed by completion of a Graduate Programme in Prosthodontics at Indiana University, School of Dentistry in Indianapolis.

Returning to Toronto he practiced on Bay Street until his retirement.

Don was active in choral music; Life Board Member of the Iseler Singers and sang in many choirs in Toronto. Don would simply be described as a "gentleman", a chivalrous, courteous and honorable man.

Breda wishes to thank Dr. Matthew Cheung, Dr. Mark Peteska, and Dr. Shannon Goddard at Sunnybrook Hospital, and especially Dr. Alison Moskowitz and colleagues at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre in New York for all their support and kindness to Don.

Visitation at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. W., Toronto (2 stoplights west of Yonge St.) on Wednesday, January 17th from 7-9 p.m.

A Funeral Mass will be held at Blessed Sacrament Church, 24 Cheritan Ave. on Thursday, January 18th at 11:00 a.m.

In lieu of flowers, a donation to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

ELIZABETH MEREDITH

"Buffy" Passed away on November 18, 2017.

A Celebration of Life will be held at Trinity College Chapel, 6 Hoskin Avenue on Saturday, January 20th at 1:30 p.m.

ALAN MIRABELLI 1 9 48 - 2 01 7 O t ta w a , O n ta r i o Alan Mirabelli left the dance floor and exited the ballroom with gentle grace, smiling goodbye to all who accompanied him on the dance of life on December 20, 2017.

Alan danced with cancer for the past 18 months. Predeceased by his parents, Robert and Lisette; survived by his sister, Marilyn; son, Michel (Alison); grandchildren, Ava, Ben, Tommy, Lucas, and Leah; and so many friendships that he considered family.

For him, life was not about accomplishments (although there were many) his life was about celebrating cherished moments with the ones who chose to accompany him on his journey, for "at the core there is love".

Alan arrived in Canada, the country he loved, as a young child with his parents, Robert and Lisette and his sister, Marilyn (Toronto), following a short time in the U.K. where he lived with his family after fleeing Egypt as refugees.

As a Communications and student at Loyola College in Montreal he worked at America Express including at the corporate pavilion at Expo 67 in Montreal. After graduating with a Master's Degree in Communication from Fairfield University in Connecticut. Alan becomes a professor at Loyola University in Montreal.

Relocating to Ottawa in the midseventies, Alan made a difference for families in Canada as coExecutive Director with Dr. Robert Glossop at the Vanier Institute of the Family more than 30 years.

Following his 1998 sabbatical, spent in BC, Alan discovered this county's beauty through new eyes and captured the nature of relationship in his powerful and evocative images. Alan's photographs can be found in homes and offices across Canada and at the Ottawa Art Gallery.

While his accomplishments were many, the one he was most proud of was his son, Michel, who with his wife, Alison, are raising his five amazing grandchildren, Ava, Ben, Tommy, Lucas and Leah.

Alan spent the past 40 years in the community of Almonte and village of Appleton where he found joy in his many friendships with neighbours and colleagues in the artist community. He was a mentor to many and to the end of his last chapter he continued to meet with budding artists, young people and children guiding them to become the best of themselves in their creative pursuits.

A Celebration of Alan's life will be held on January 20, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. at the First Unitarian Church located at 30 Cleary Ave.

in Ottawa. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Alan Mirabelli Fund at the Vanier Institute, Almonte Hub Hospice or a charity of your choice that brings you joy and happiness.

JAMES REDMOND WHITTLE

"Jim" Of Chelsea, QC passed away as result of a cycling accident on tour in New Zealand on November 21, 2017. He was 63 years old. He will be fondly remembered by his three brothers and two sisters, Moira of Vancouver, BC, Michael (Beverley) of Calgary, AB, Dan (Jennifer) of Owen Sound, ON, Kathleen (Steve) of Ottawa, ON, and David (Cheryl) of Edmonton, AB. Jim will also be remembered by numerous nieces, nephews, aunts and cousins from across Canada and the USA. Jim joins his dearly departed father, Brian, and mother, Evelyn.

Jim recently retired as Program Coordinator of the esteemed Paramedic Program at Algonquin College in Ottawa where he taught for 34 years. He was an air ambulance attendant, a teacher, a traveller, a painter, an original chef, a hockey player and an outdoor enthusiast. He died doing what he loved, cycling the Haast Pass in the Southern Alps as part of an epic journey exploring the wilderness of New Zealand.

Jim was an avid adventurer, whether it was climbing the peaks of Nepal, Machu Picchu, Alps or Mount Rainier, hiking in the Gatineau and Laurentian Hills, scaling the glaciers of Alaska and Jasper, or kayaking on waterways as impressive as the Pacific Ocean and St. Lawrence Seaway or as simple as the Ottawa River in front of the cottage, he was always seeking out new horizons to discover.

He will be dearly missed by his family, friends, colleagues, and students. A memorial service for Jim will be held at Algonquin College in Ottawa on Friday, January 19, 2018 in Building D, Salon D. In memory of Jim, consider a donation to the Jim Whittle Award to support Paramedic students at Algonquin College. To donate online go to canadahelps.org (Algonquin College Foundation), mail cheque payable to the Algonquin College Foundation: Algonquin College Foundation, 1385 Woodroffe Ave., C211, Ottawa, ON K2G 1V8 or call 613-727-4723 ext. 7113.

Arrangements in care of the Murphy Funeral Home, Pembroke.

JOE MIOTTO

Always remembered and loved.

Your family and friends

SYLVIA SINGER-WEININGER

This past year without you has felt empty like the chair we still set for you at the table in our minds. We think of you every day and cherish our memories of your wit and your appetite for living; remembering your smile and your passion for lively conversation, good food and art.

We miss hearing your voice, your wisdom and your advice. You loved us so much and you are so loved and missed by your family and your many friends.

Loving you always and forever.

From our hearts, Lisa Erica Mckenzie Cody Cameron JD

WILLIAM J. WITHROW C .M ., O. Ont. , C. D., M. A., M . Ed., F.M. C.A ., F.O.C .A .

Director of the Art Gallery of Ontario, 1961 -1991

Bill Withrow died peacefully, with family at his side, on Sunday, January 7, 2018 at Sunnybrook Veterans Centre.

Bill was born in Toronto on September 30, 1926 to Wilfred and Evelyn Withrow. Showing early artistic promise, he was selected to attend Saturday classes at the Art Gallery of Toronto, where Arthur Lismer was among his teachers. At 18, following the example of his father and grandfather, who had both served in France during WWI, Bill enlisted in the army. Upon his discharge, Bill's parents encouraged him to use his veterans' allowance to attend university. He agreed on one condition - that he could first marry his high school sweetheart, the beautiful and vivacious June Van Ostrom. After graduation from the University of Toronto, Bill became an art teacher and then department head at Earl Haig Collegiate. He also taught evening art classes, served in the intelligence unit of the army reserves, and obtained two Master's Degrees, one in Fine Art and another in Education.

In 1960, Bill joined the Art Gallery of Toronto as Associate Director and was appointed Director in 1961. Under his leadership, the AGT flourished. In 1966, he convinced the province that the institution should become the Art Gallery of Ontario, providing it with more prominence and funding. With the significant donation of European and Canadian modern art by Sam and Ayala Zacks, and the promise by Henry Moore of a major donation of his own works (the foundation of what is now the largest collection of Moore works in the world), Bill was able to obtain public and private funding to undertake an ambitious three-stage, twenty-year expansion of the AGO's building and its collection.

Bill introduced the blockbuster exhibition to Toronto by bringing the international touring exhibition, Treasures of Tutankhamun, to the AGO in 1979. Outstanding touring shows organized by the AGO followed, such as Vincent Van Gogh and the Birth of Cloisonnism and The Mystic North.

He was also active in the wider arts community, co-chairing an influential federal task force on policy-making for Canada's museums, serving on the committee to choose a Canadian war memorial for Green Park in London and as a founding board member of the Varley Art Gallery of Markham.

Bill leaves behind his wife, June, to whom he would have been married 70 years on January 24. June was his great love, nurturing presence and charming companion at AGO events, and their home was the gathering place for family birthdays, holiday celebrations and countless backyard barbecues. Bill will be lovingly remembered by his children, John (Laurel Murdoch), Stephen (Christine), Anne (John Trimble) and David (Chloe McIntosh); by grandchildren, Jennifer (Craig Whiteside) and Diana Withrow; Stephanie Eadie (Wayne) and Ryan Trimble; Jacqueline Cavalier-Withrow; and by great-grandson, James Whiteside. Fondly remembered by stepgrandson, Patrick Walsh. Predeceased by his youngest grandchild, Laura Withrow, on November 29, 2017.

The family wishes to acknowledge with deepest thanks his personal support workers, led over the past 5 years by the incomparable Mercy Flores. We are also most grateful to Dr. David Shergold and Dr. Maria Chang and the staff of the Sunnybrook Veterans Centre, who showed Bill and the family much kindness.

A celebration of life will be held in Walker Court at the Art Gallery of Ontario (317 Dundas Street West, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1G4) on Sunday, April 8, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, making a donation or taking out a membership to the AGO would be most fitting. Donations in Bill's name may be made at http://www.ago.ca or by calling 416-979-6660, ext. 816.

Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through http://www.humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

Out of the trap
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Globalization's foundations are rotting away, spawning parochialism, nativism and xenophobia. If this stage of capitalism is not sustainable, what in the world comes next?
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By YANIS VAROUFAKIS
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Saturday, January 13, 2018 – Print Edition, Page O1


Professor of economics at the University of Athens, co-founder of DiEM25 and former finance minister of Greece. His most recent book is Adults in the Room: My Battle with the European and American Deep Establishment.

Back in 1991, a left-wing friend expressed his frustration that "really existing socialism" was crumbling, with exaltations of how it had propelled the Soviet Union from the plough to Sputnik in a decade.

I remember replying, under his pained and disapproving gaze: "So, what? No unsustainable system can be, ultimately, sustained." Now that globalization is also proving unsustainable, and is in retreat, its liberal cheerleaders resemble my friend when they proffer similarly correct, yet irrelevant, exaltations of how it lifted billions from poverty.

Progressives who had opposed globalization, like my leftwing friend in 1991, can take no solace from the manner in which globalization is retreating.

At the discursive level, neoparochialism is now trumping globalization's oeuvre in the United States, in Britain and elsewhere. Labour-saving technological change, meanwhile, underpins jobless deglobalization everywhere. None of these developments augur well for those who once believed in a borderless commonwealth of working people.

Humanity has been globalizing since our ancestors left Africa, the earliest economic migrants on record. Moreover, capitalism has been operating for two centuries like "heavy artillery," in Marx and Engels' words, using the "cheap prices of commodities" to batter "down all Chinese walls," "constantly expanding market for its products" and replacing "the old local and national seclusion and self-sufficiency" with "intercourse in every direction, universal interdependence of nations."

It wasn't until the 1990s, when we noticed the unleashing of momentous forces, that we required a new term to describe the emancipation of capital from all fetters, which led to a global economy whose growth and equilibrium relied on increasingly unbalanced trade and money movements. It is this relatively recent phenomenon - globalization, we called it - that is now in crisis and in retreat.

Only an ambitious new internationalism can help reinvigorate the spirit of humanism on a planetary scale. But before arguing in favour of that antidote, it is worthwhile recounting globalization's origins and internal contradictions.

In 1944, the New Deal administration in Washington understood that the only way to avoid the Great Depression's return at war's end was to transfer America's surpluses to Europe (the Marshall Plan was but one example of this) and Japan, effectively recycling them to generate foreign demand for all the gleaming new products - washing machines, cars, television sets, passenger jets - that American industry would switch to from military hardware.

Thus began the project of dollarizing Europe, founding the European Union as a cartel of heavy industry, and building up Japan within the context of a global currency union based on the U.S. dollar. This would equilibrate a global system featuring fixed exchange rates, almostconstant interest rates and boring banks (operating under severe capital controls).

This dazzling design, also known as the Bretton Woods system, brought us a golden age of low unemployment and inflation, high growth and impressively diminished inequality.

Alas, by the late 1960s, it was dead in the water. Why? Because the United States lost its surpluses and slipped into a burgeoning twin deficit (trade and federal budget), rendering it no longer able to stabilize the global system. Never too slow to confront reality, Washington killed off its finest creation: On Aug. 15, 1971, then-president Richard Nixon announced the ejection of Europe and Japan from the dollar zone. Unnoticed by almost everyone, globalization was born on that summer day.

Mr. Nixon's decision was founded on the refreshing lack of deficit phobia particular to American decision-makers.

Unwilling to rein in deficits by imposing austerity (that would have done more to shrink the country's capacity to project hegemonic power around the world than shrink its deficits), Washington stepped on the gas to boost them.

Consequently, the United States functioned like a giant vacuum cleaner, sucking in massive net exports from Germany, Japan and, later, China. However, what gave that era (19802008) its energy and character was the manner in which the United States paid for its expanding deficits: by means of a tsunami of other people's money (European, Japanese and Chinese net exporters' profits) rushing into Wall Street in search of higher returns.

But for Wall Street to act as this magnet of other people's capital, there were two prerequisites. One was Wall Street's unshackling from New Deal-era regulations. Bank deregulation was central in this audacious reversal: From recycling American surpluses, via transferring them to Europe and to Japan, the United States was now recycling the surpluses of the rest of the world rushing into Wall Street, completing the loop necessary to pay for America's deficits and keep globalization in rude health.

The second condition was the cheapening of American labour and the substitution of growing wages with escalating credit, provided via Wall Street.

This cheapening of American labour was essential to helping push Wall Street's capital returns above those of Frankfurt and Tokyo, where competitiveness was based instead on enhancements to productivity.

Through it all, neoliberalism emerged from the margins of political economics to dominate our discourse after the end of Bretton Woods.

But it was nothing more than the sermon that steadied the hand of politicians repealing New Deal-era protections for workers and society at large from the motivated abuses of Wall Street bankers and predators such as Wal-Mart.

In summary, what we now call globalization was the result of a brave new financialized global recycling mechanism of immense energy and ever-increasing imbalances - with the rise of neoliberalism, wholesale bank deregulation and Wall Street's "greed is good" culture as its mere symptoms.

Before long, the Soviet Union and its satellites collapsed, with the new rulers keen for a piece of the action and the Chinese Communist Party determined to survive by staging a managed insertion of China's workers into capitalism's proletariat.

Financial capital's inexorable march and two billion workers entering the global labour market ensured a stupendous redistribution of income and wealth.

While billions of people were lifted from abject poverty in Asia, large swaths of Western workers were discarded, their voices drowned out by the cacophony of money-making in financialization's epicentres.

GLOBALIZATION'S IMPASSE, PAROCHIALISM'S REVENGE "Speculators may do no harm," John Maynard Keynes once hypothesized, "as bubbles on a steady stream of enterprise.

But the position is serious when enterprise becomes the bubble on a whirlpool of speculation."

Which is precisely what had happened by 2007: Atop the tsunami of European and Asian profits rushing into Wall Street, bankers built oversized bubbles of exotic forms of private debt that, at some point, acquired the properties of private money.

When these bubbles burst in 2008, the recycling loop sustaining globalization was broken - despite energetic money printing by central banks and the Chinese government's breathtaking credit and investment spree.

U.S. deficits, even after returning to their pre-2007 levels, could no longer stabilize globalization.

The reason? Socialist largesse for the few - plus ruthless market forces for the many - damaged aggregate demand, repressed entrepreneurs' sales expectations, restricted investment in productive jobs, diminished earnings for the many and, presto, confirmed the entrepreneurs' pessimism.

Adding more liquidity to such a mix makes not an iota of difference, as the problem is not a dearth of liquidity but a dearth of demand.

Wall Street, Wal-Mart and walled citizens - those were globalization's symbolic foundations.

Today, all three have become a drag on it. Banks are failing to maintain the capital movements that globalization used to reply upon, as total financial movements across the globe are less than a fourth of what they were in early 2007. Wal-Mart, whose ideology of cheapness symbolized the devaluation of labour and the gutting of traditional local businesses, is itself being squeezed by the Amazon model, whose ultimate effect is a further shrinking of overall spending.

And the walls that were the nasty underbelly of the "global village" are now a source of political discontent, exposing the absurdity of a system that promotes the free movement of money and trucks while people remain fenced in.

Looking at the world from an Archimedean distance, globalization has been caught in a steel trap of its own making. Its crisis is due to too much money in the wrong hands. Humanity's accumulated savings per capita are at the highest level in history. However, our investment levels (especially in the things humanity needs, such as green energy) are particularly low. In the United States, massive sums are accumulating in the accounts of companies and people with no use for them, while those without prospects or good jobs are immersed in mountains of debt. In China, savings approaching half of all income sit side by side with the largest credit bubble imaginable.

Europe is even worse: There are countries with gigantic trade surpluses but nowhere to invest them domestically (Germany and the Netherlands), countries with deficits and no capacity to invest in badly needed labour and capital (Italy, Spain, Greece) and a euro zone unable to mediate between the two types of countries because it lacks the federal-like institutions that could do this.

And if these discontents were not enough, there is also the rise of the machines. By 2020, almost half the professions in Europe and North America will be susceptible to automation. Robots require a few highly paid designers and operators but may replace millions. This generates labour shortages and labour gluts in the same city at the same time. The middle class is in for another hollowing out, wage inequality is about to rise again in the richer countries, while developing countries will soon realize that having large young populations offers no respite from poverty: With robots getting smarter and cheaper, deglobalization takes over, and countries such as Nigeria, the Philippines and South Africa will bear the brunt of relocalization (especially with the evolution of 3-D printing).

Is it any wonder that parochialism, nativism and xenophobia are rearing their ugly heads everywhere? Rather than focusing on the role of Facebook, Russia or some unexplained, newfangled fear of the "foreigner," the so-called liberal establishment (which is neither liberal nor particularly well-established, judging by recent electoral results in Europe and the United States) should look instead at globalization's rotting foundations, which render it unsustainable.

But if globalization is no longer viable, what's next? The answer offered by the so-called alt-right, the xenophobes and those who invest in militant parochialism is clear: Return to the bosom of the nation state, surround yourselves with electrified fences and cut deals between the newly walled realms on the basis of national interest and relative brute strength.

The fact that this nightmare is presented as a dream is yet another failure of globalization: Mr. Trump is a symptom of Barack Obama's failure to live up to the expectations he had cultivated among the victims of globalization and its 2008 spasm.

Lest we forget, our problems are global. Like climate change, they demand local action but also a level of international cooperation not seen since Bretton Woods. Neither North America nor Europe nor China can solve them in isolation or even via trade deals. Nothing short of a new Bretton Woods system can deal with tax injustice, the dearth of good jobs, wage stagnation, public and personal debt, low investment in things we desperately need, too much spending on things that are bad for us, increasing depravity in a world awash with cash, robots that are marginalizing an increasing section of our work forces, prohibitively expensive education that the many need to compete with the robots, etc.

National solutions, to be implemented under the deception of "getting our country back" and behind strengthened border fences, are bound to yield further discontent, as they enable our oligarchs-without-borders to strike trade agreements that condemn the many to a race to the bottom while securing their loot in offshore havens.

Our solutions, therefore, must be global, too. But to be so, they must undermine at once globalization and parochialism - both the right of capital to move about unimpeded and the fences that stop people and commodities from moving about the planet. In short, our solutions must be internationalist. And the goals of an International New Deal are pressing.

First, we need higher wages everywhere, supported by trade agreements and conditions that prevent the Uberization of waged labour domestically.

Tax havens are crying out for international harmonization, including a simple commitment to deny companies registered in offshore tax havens legal protection of their property rights.

We desperately need a greenenergy union focusing on common environmental standards, with the active support of public investment and central banks.

We should create a New Bretton Woods system that recalibrates our financial infrastructure, with one umbrella digital currency in which all trade is denominated in a manner that curtails destabilizing trade surpluses and deficits.

And we need a universal basic dividend that would be administered by the New Bretton Woods institutions and funded by a percentage of big tech shares deposited in a world wealth fund.

The financial genie needs to be put back in its bottle, with capital controls domestically and globally to be imposed by co-ordinated action in the Americas, Europe and Asia.

Money must be democratized and internationally managed in a manner that shrinks both trade deficits and surpluses. The robots must become humanity's slaves, a feat that requires common ownership, at least partly.

All this sounds utopian. But no more so than the idea that the globalization of the 1990s can be maintained in the 21st century or replaced profitably for the majority by a revived nationalism.

Who should pursue this internationalist agenda? Progressives from Europe and North America have a duty to start the ball rolling, courtesy of our collective failure to civilize capitalism. I have no doubt that if we embark upon this path, others in Asia, Latin America, the Middle East and Africa will soon join us. At DiEM25, the Democracy in Europe Movement that I proudly co-founded, we take this duty seriously. We are determined to take this agenda, which we refer to as the European New Deal, to voters across the continent in the May, 2019, European Parliament elections. With globalization in retreat and militant parochialism on the rise, we have a moral and political duty to do so.

Associated Graphic

Top: Former European Central Bank president Jean-Claude Trichet takes questions from the media during an emergency financial summit at the Élysée Palace in Paris in October, 2008.

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY BRYAN GEE ORIGINAL PHOTO BY AP

UKIP Leader Nigel Farage holds a placard as he launches his party's EU referendum tour bus in London in May, 2016. The gradual decline of globalization has given rise to more parochial, protective movements such as Brexit.

NEIL HALL/REUTERS

Greek Australian economist Yanis Varoufakis speaks in Athens in January, 2015.

LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

BIRTH AND DEATH NOTICES
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Tuesday, January 16, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B16


SHIRLEY LOUISE EDITH BROWN

Went peacefully to be with the Lord on Friday, January 12, 2018 at the age of 90. Shirley was the daughter of Joseph George Lionel Edwards and Ida May "Babe" (nee Britton). Predeceased by her dear brother, John "Jack" Herbert Edwards; and her treasured Aunt Muriel Louise Ockley (nee Britton).

Beloved wife of the late Kenneth Allen James Brown; and cherished mother of daughter, Wendy Elizabeth Brown of Oakville; and sons, Wayne Kenneth Brown, and his wife, Helena "Lainy" Vanderwey of Belleair Beach, Florida, Wallace Jamie Edwards Brown and his wife, Diane (nee Stirling) of Oakville; and dearly loved granddaughters Holly and Heather.

Family and friends will be received at Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West, Toronto, on Thursday, January, 18th at 10 a.m. with the funeral service to follow in the chapel at 11 a.m. Private family interment in Mount Pleasant Cemetery.

"Only one life 'twill soon be passed, Only what's done for Christ will last"

COLONEL JOHN H.C. CLARRY MBE, ED, CD, QC

Lawyer, soldier, woodlot proprietor, beer lover, generous provider. John Hamilton Cameron Clarry passed away peacefully at home on Friday, January 12, 2017. Born September 20, 1919 in Calgary to parents Ernest and Jean Clarry. Survived by his three children and five grandchildren: Susan (Sara and James), David (Andrew and Cameron), and Michael (wife, Michelle, and son, Max).

Predeceased by the love of his life, Elizabeth Joy Denton Clarry; and his sister, Norah.

Displaced to Toronto by the Great Depression, where he attended and graduated from UTS, University College at U of T, and Osgoode Hall (Silver Medal recipient).

John's lifelong connection with the Canadian military began as a cadet at UTS, and progressed through overseas duty during the Second World War, and continued with militia duty, culminating as Honorary Colonel of the 25 (Toronto) Service Battalion. His connections also included 35 years of volunteer service with the Army Cadet League, and enjoyment and leadership with the Royal Canadian Legion and the Royal Canadian Military Institute. Recognition included the Order of Orange-Nassau for his contribution to Canadian military operations in Holland at the end of the war, Past Honorary Counsel of the Conference of Defence Associations, Honorary President of the Royal Canadian Military Institute, and the Colonel John H.C. Clarry Award recognizing Ontario's top large cadet corps.

His legal career with McCarthy Tetrault spanned over 40 years, including a period as Managing Partner. During that time he was valued by clients and colleagues as someone adept at translating complex legal issues into business terms and translating business agreements into clear and useful legal documents. He was a quiet, progressive person who provided thoughtful insights to clients and numerous Boards on which he served, as well as being a mentor to younger lawyers.

John's personal life was centred on family and on Grasshopper Park, the family weekend retreat and reforestation project. He understood that time and a few thousand seedlings could turn an abandoned farm into a thriving forest, and watching that come to fruition over the decades gave him much pleasure.

The family wishes to thank John's amazing caregivers from Premier Home Health for their dedication and kind and gentle support over the past few years.

The family will receive friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home A.W. Miles - Newbigging Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue) from 2:00 4:00 and 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. Friday, January 19th. Funeral service to be held in Calvin Presbyterian Church, 26 Delisle Avenue on Saturday, January 20th at 1:00 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, donations are encouraged to the Army Cadet League of Canada (Ontario), 1200 Markham Road, Suite 527, Toronto M1H 3C3 (http://www.canadahelps.

org), or Haven Toronto (formerly the Good Neighbours' Club), 170 Jarvis Street, Toronto M5B 2B7 (http://www.haventoronto.ca), or another charity of your choice. Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

VASILIS FOTOPOULOS

April 23, 1925 January 14, 2018 It is with great sadness that Vasilis' family announces his passing. He will be deeply missed by his two children and their spouses, Ted (Jo), Bess (Jakob); and his three grandchildren, Alexa, Matthew and Hannah.

Vasilis was born in Monastiraki, Greece. He was preceded by his beloved wife Eleni. A funeral will take place at 10:00 a.m. on Friday, January 19, 2018 at All Saints Greek Orthodox Church, 222 Burbank Dr., North York. A reception will follow immediately.

DOREEN MARIE HOWE (nee Hunt)

Of Trenton, Ontario passed away at Waterford Retirement Residence, Kingston on Thursday January 11, 2018 at the age of 78 years. Beloved wife of the late Peter Marvin Howe. Loving and proud mother of David Howe (Carla Silva), Stephen Howe (Erin Mitchell) and Jane Howe (Peter Ellis); and loving grandmother of Robin and Rachel. Doreen is survived by her sisters in law Mary Ellen McNaught (late David) and Susan Howe (Sandy) and was predeceased by her sister Donalda Eastwood (late Keith).

Fondly remembered by many nieces, nephews and friends.

Born and raised in Toronto, Ontario Doreen graduated from Queen's University (where she met Peter). Doreen was an excellent math teacher and guidance councillor for over two decades at Trenton High School, Belleville Collegiate Institute, and Quinte Secondary School.

Doreen was also treasurer of numerous local community associations. In retirement, Doreen and Peter traveled the world. Proud honourary member of the Rotary Club of Trenton and active member of the King Street United Church for over 50 years. Her commitment to her community will always be remembered. One of Doreen's passions was writing traditionally newsy letters and a vast array of festive cards to her international network of friends and family.

Cremation has taken place.

Memorial visitation will be held at Weaver - West, 170 Dundas Street West, Trenton, ON, Thursday, January 18th, 2018 from 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. and again on Friday, January 19, 2018 from 10:00 - 11:00 a.m. followed by a celebration of life at 11:00 a.m. in the West Chapel.

In lieu of flowers, donations to Ovarian Cancer Canada http://www.ovariancanada.org would be appreciated by the family. Online guest book and condolences at http://www.weaverfuneralhomes.com

DR. DONALD ROBERT KRAMER B.Sc.,D.D.S.,M.S.D.

Don passed away on Friday, January 12, 2018 at Sunnybrook Hospital due to a lengthy illness.

He was the beloved husband of Breda; father of Bryce, Heather and Andrew; and will be missed by his sisters, brother, extended family and friends in Canada, Ireland, Bermuda, Bahamas and Australia.

He will be fondly remembered by his "McGill Dental Classmates" for their kindness and support.

Don was born in Langenburg, Saskatchewan. He graduated from McGill University School of Dentistry, followed by completion of a Graduate Programme in Prosthodontics at Indiana University, School of Dentistry in Indianapolis.

Returning to Toronto he practiced on Bay Street until his retirement.

Don was active in choral music; Life Board Member of the Iseler Singers and sang in many choirs in Toronto. Don would simply be described as a "gentleman", a chivalrous, courteous and honorable man.

Breda wishes to thank Dr. Matthew Cheung, Dr. Mark Peteska, and Dr. Shannon Goddard at Sunnybrook Hospital, and especially Dr. Alison Moskowitz and colleagues at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre in New York for all their support and kindness to Don.

Visitation at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave.

W., Toronto (2 stoplights west of Yonge St.) on Wednesday, January 17th from 7-9 p.m.

A Funeral Mass will be held at Blessed Sacrament Church, 24 Cheritan Ave. on Thursday, January 18th at 11:00 a.m.

In lieu of flowers, a donation to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

ALLAN MILTON PAUL SMART

It is with extreme sadness that the family of Allan Milton Paul Smart, Lord of Edingale, announce his death Saturday afternoon, January 13, 2018 peacefully at Toronto General Hospital. He is survived by his wife, Ruth Mary Smart (nee Seubert); his daughter, Kellie Zupet; and husband, Tom; and daughters, Kirsten Zupet and Olivia Rowland; and husband, Andrew; daughter, Kara Alloway; and husband, Graham; and their sons, Baron, Hunter and Christian.

Born in Hamilton, Ontario, August 22, 1933 to Henry and Jean (nee Kohn) where he graduated from McMaster University with an Honours Degree in Economics. Recruited by William Mercer & Co. (pension consulting), Allan participated in establishing the pension plans for both the Municipal Employees and the Ontario Hospital Workers. It was during this assignment that Allan met his wife Ruth. Following years with William Mercer & Co., Allan worked with Alexander and Alexander before leaving to start his own company, Allan Smart Services Ltd. Allan established the Smart Group of Companies, headquartered in Toronto with offices in Ontario and Kentucky and provided employee benefits consulting and insurance brokerage services to over 200 corporate clients across Canada. His love of horses led him to establish one of the largest equine brokerage services in Canada.

Allan established the newly formed advisory services exclusively for Canadian underwriting members of Lloyds of London. An employment benefit specialist and strong advocate of equal opportunity employment, when interviewed on his hiring policies which was then considered breaking gender barriers, Allan's direct response was "hire brains not brawn". Allan's office was disproportionately staffed by women with all enjoying pay equity. Allan loved thoroughbred horse racing and owned and bred horses in Canada, the United States and Australia. Allan rarely, if ever, missed the Triple Crown races, the Ascot in England and his favorite race, the Prix de L'Arc de Triomphe held at Longchamp racetrack in Paris. Allan was a member of the Woodbine Turf Club in Toronto, the New York Turf & Field Club, Victoria Racing Club in Melbourne and Ascot in England. Allan's other club affiliations include the National Club of Toronto and the Metropolitan Club of New York.

Allan and Ruth enjoyed extensive world travel with their family and, for his 30th wedding anniversary, he surprised Ruth with an extended around the world adventure, spending time on every continent, visiting what was then considered the remotest regions known to the modern world.

Allan's philanthropic passions included the Canadian Cancer Society, Heart and Stroke Foundation, Sunnybrook Hospital, Princess Margaret Hospital, St. Michael's Hospital and several women's shelters in Toronto. His love of Shakespeare was evident to family and friends and was particularly installed in his grandsons.

Acute illness forced Allan to retire in 2005 and the family would like to give thanks to his many caregivers especially Rodlyn and Evelyn. Thank you as well to Dr. F. Brenneman, Dr. R. Wells, Dr. S. Alibhai, Dr. Ken Melvin, Dr. Zlotta and specially Dr. Krahn and his medical and nursing staff at Toronto General Hospital who gave compassionate and continued care.

The family will receive friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home A.W. Miles - Newbigging Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue) from 5:00 - 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 17th. A funeral service will be held in Blessed Sacrament Church on Thursday, January 18th at 1:30 p.m. followed by interment in Mount Pleasant Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in Allan's name to the Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Hospital Foundation, the Toronto General Hospital Foundation and/or the Princess Margaret Foundation.

Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through http://www.humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

EZRA A. SILVERSTEIN

With profound sadness, we announce the passing of Dr. Ezra Silverstein on January 15, 2018 at Bridgepoint Active Healthcare in Toronto.

Beloved husband of the late Mildred Silverstein. Cherished father of Russell, Mark, and Jeffrey. Devoted grandfather of Allison, Jamie, Margot, Max, Rachel, and Maya. Loving fatherin-law of Cynthia, Phyllis, and Ilona. Caring brother and brotherin- law of Isaac and Belle, and the late Eve Silver, Esther Greenberg, Harry and David Silverstein.

Fondly remembered by Maralyn Glick.

Born March 9, 1930, Ezra graduated from the University of Toronto and enjoyed a long, honourable career as an orthopedic surgeon at Mt. Sinai Hospital. A lover of classical music, antiques and sports, he was a kind, wise, sentimental and loving man whose memory will be forever cherished by his family and large circle of friends.

At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Thursday, January 18, 2018 at 11:30 a.m. Interment at the Pride of Israel section of Mount Sinai Memorial Park. Shiva will be held at 96 Hilton Avenue.

The family wishes to express our deepest gratitude to Maria Salvo, and the medical and palliative care staff of Sinai Health System.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Sinai Health Foundation 416-586-8203.

JOHN HAMILTON SPROATT

John was born in 1935 and died peacefully January 12 in Bowmanville. John was the loving and very much loved husband of Carolyn. He was the devoted father of Lynn (Augusto) and the late Andrew. John was predeceased by his brother Henry and sister Elisabeth.

Memorial Visitation will be held at Northcutt Elliott Funeral Home, 53 Division Street, Bowmanville, on Friday, January 19, 4:00 to 6:00 pm. As per John's request, there will be no funeral service.

In lieu of flowers, a memorial donation may be made to a charity of your choice or to the Royal Regiment of Canada (Education and Veterans fund), where John had served as an officer.

(Cheque to: R REGT C Association.

Address: R REGT C Association, c/o The Royal Regiment of Canada, Fort York Armoury, 660 Fleet St.

W. Toronto, ON M5V 1A9) Online condolences may be made at: http://www.northcuttelliott.com

ARTHUR WILLIAM WALKER F.C.A.

Peacefully passed away at Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket surrounded by his loving family on Friday, January 12, 2018. Arthur Walker of Bradford and formerly of Toronto and Brantford in his 88th year.

Beloved husband of Doris (nee Howell) for 65 years. Loving father Paul (Debra) Walker, Pam (David) Valentine, Susan (Gord) Wagner, Chris Walker and Carol Walker. Proud grandpa of Brandon (Stephanie), Amy (Gordon); Andrew (Laura), Meghan (James), Michael; David (Paula), Matthew, Erin; Andrea, Liam and Owen.

Cherished great-grandpa of Finlay, Thomas, William, Emersen and Lachlan. Dear brother of Doris (late Jim) McLeman and Margery (Malcolm) Seath. Arthur will also be fondly remembered by his nieces and nephews. Special thanks to nurses Patti, Teresa and Marg of the Stronach Regional Cancer Centre for their compassionate care of Arthur.

A celebration of Arthur's life will be held at the St. John's Presbyterian Church, 2940 10th Sideroad, Bradford on Friday, January 19, 2018 at 1 p.m.

Reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Stronach Regional Cancer Centre at Southlake Regional Health Centre Foundation or to the charity of your choice. Online condolences may be made at http://www.skwarchukfuneralhome.com

BIRTH AND DEATH NOTICES
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Monday, January 22, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B16


COLLEEN MARY BLAKE (nee Moore)

After a beautiful life Colleen Blake died peacefully at Parkwood Retirement Suites on Saturday, January 20, 2018, five days before her 94th birthday.

Predeceased by her beloved husband, George (1991).

Loving mother of Vicki of Toronto, Mary Lou (Allen) Colwell of Harriston, Mike (Janis) and Gerry (Donna) of Waterloo. Proud Nana to her nine grandchildren T.J. (Deb) and Rick (Anna) Schippling, Sarah and Michelle Sternberg, Nick, Jim, Meagan, Chris and Natalie Blake. Cherished great-grandmother to Lucia Schippling.

She was a 65 year proud member of the C.W.L. and a faithful member of St. Louis and St. Mary's Roman Catholic Churches. Mom's joy of life and care for others was a constant throughout her life. Her sense of humour and laughter was a gift to her family and friends to whom she will always be an inspiration. She loved watching sports, playing cards and her gin and wink.

Mom wanted to thank all her special friends especially Jacquie Papke. A special thanks to the staff at Parkwood Suites for their wonderful care and kindness.

A Memorial Mass will be held at St. Louis Roman Catholic Church, 53 Allen St. E., Waterloo on Wednesday, January 24, 2018 at 11 a.m., with Father Phil Reilly C.R. as Celebrant. Reception follow in the Church Hall. Cremation has already taken place.

Condolences for the family and donations in lieu of flowers to St. Louis R.C Church may be arranged through the funeral home at http://www.erbgood.com or 519-745-8445. There will be a celebration of life in Toronto at a later date.

EDGAR ALLAN EAGLE

It is with great sadness we announce the death of Edgar Allan Eagle, ON January 18, 2018, at the Hamilton General Hospital at the age of 87. Beloved partner of Donna Marie Sitter for the past 42 years. He was a devoted father to Marion Remen (Steve), John and Margaret "Susie" (John Kirkland). Grandfather to Andrew, Shannon, Shonn and Alana. He was predeceased by his brother, Jack; and sister, Jean Jull.

Allan will be remembered for his contributions to Ryerson Polytechnic University as Professor Emeritus, his memberships in his investment clubs, The Millionaires and Quotes 50 as well as The Arts and Letters Club and his support as a volunteer for many years with the Bruce Trail Conservancy.

Allan loved the outdoors and along with hiking and travelling, he was a woodsman who built his own homes and cottages. An avid downhill skier he especially enjoyed the slopes at Mansfield and Cedar Highlands. Many memories were made with his friends at Jumping Caribou Lake, Mulmur, Toronto and Hamilton.

Throughout his life he really enjoyed music and dancing and the occasional pint.

A celebration of Allan's life will be held at Church of the Ascension, 64 Forest Ave., Hamilton, on Friday, January 26, 2018 at 11 a.m. Burial will take place in Novar, ON at a later date. In Allan's memory, donations to the Bruce Trail Conservancy would be greatly appreciated. Online condolences may be made at http://www.marlattfhhamilton.com.

ROBERT DOUGLAS GILLESPIE "SID"

Born in Colborne, Ontario: November 10, 1931 Passed away: January 16, 2018

Sid is survived by Marion, his devoted wife and partner of 62 years; his daughters, Susan (Alec Zimmerman) and Cynthia (Stephen Shea); grandchildren, Jason Prendergast (Amanda Griffis), Blake Prendergast, Lily MacLeod and Calder MacLeod; step-grandchildren, Megan Shea and Caragh Shea; and sister-inlaw, Dr. Margaret MacMurdo McMillan (widow of Alan); and was predeceased by his brothers, Bill and Don.

Born to William S. Gillespie and Ruby (née Grant), Sid was raised on the family farm on Shelter Valley Road near Grafton, Ontario, which he continued to maintain and enjoy with Marion and the family until his death. A student of the local one-room schoolhouse, Sid's character was shaped early on: hard-working, self-reliant, humbly self-confident, patient, generous, principled, a man of faith oriented toward his community and his family. Sid was understanding of others, but demanding of himself. A gentleman through and through.

Naturally adept at maths and sciences, Sid attended the Royal Military College, earning his wings as a navigator and graduating with a B.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering.

It was while spending his summers posted to Navigation School in Summerside, PEI that he met Marion MacMurdo at a golf course. They were married on the first weekend following Sid's graduation from RMC in 1955. Thus began their lifetime together, often spent on the golf courses of PEI and with their friends at Thornhill Golf and Country Club, where he served as President in 1976.

Sid obtained his engineering degree, and later his MBA, from the University of Toronto, and while there was recommended by a professor to Jim MacLaren of James F. MacLaren Ltd., then one of Canada's largest environmental consulting companies. Sid remained at MacLaren for 27 years, becoming President in 1978.

He founded MacViro Consultants Inc. in 1989, serving as its President until he retired in 2006.

Owing to Sid's unquestioned integrity, he was retained by Cole Engineering in 2009 to provide advice and guidance to its senior management team, serving for 7 years until finally retiring at age 85.

Sid was recognized by the Association of Consulting Engineers of Canada with the Beaubien Award for his outstanding contributions to that Association and the advancement of consulting engineering in Canada. He also served on several committees established by the Association of Professional Engineers of Ontario. Sid was ahead of his time in his focus on environmental concerns and many of the modern comforts of city life, including sanitary water supply, sewage treatment plants and municipal heating systems, were built under his supervision at home and abroad.

Sid will be remembered by the staff and community of Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, the home to his faith, to which he offered decades of service as Clerk of Session, Deputy Chair of the Board of Trustees and a member of the Council.

The family would like to thank Dr. Ken Gamble and Dr. Srikala Sridhar for the care and comfort that they offered Sid.

A visitation will be held at the Humphrey Funeral Home A.W.

Miles - Newbigging Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue) from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. on Tuesday, January 23rd. Please join us for a funeral service in Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair Avenue West, Toronto at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, January 24th, with reception to follow in the Flora McCrea Eaton Auditorium. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to Timothy Eaton Memorial Church or to Prostate Cancer Canada. Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

EVELYN ISABEL MCKEE (née McIntosh)

June 25, 1928, to January 17, 2018

Evelyn McKee (Ev to everyone who knew her) passed away in Toronto in her 90th year. Ev was predeceased by her husband, David C. McKee; survived by her four children, David (Elaine McKee), Matthew (Heidi McKee), Mary McKee-McElwain (Alex McElwain), and Ramsay (Peggy McKee); proud grandmother of Yosef Rouch (David and Elaine), Ramsay, Jackson and Connor (Matthew and Heidi), and Hilary and Allan (Ramsay and Peggy); and great-grandmother of Liza McKee (Jackson and Aleksandra).

Ev was survived by her sister, Mary Campbell; and predeceased by her brother, Ramsay McIntosh.

Ev's twin passions in life were her family and the child-care movement in Ontario. Everyone familiar with the McKees knows she was the anchor that held the family together through all the good times and some challenging ones as well. Many more will know her through her tireless work and advocacy on behalf of children, child care, early childhood workers (ECWs) and child-care policy in Ontario. She was honoured for her dedication as the co-recipient of the Constance E. Hamilton Award in 1990 in recognition of her actions that had a "significant impact on securing equitable treatment for women in Toronto, either socially, economically or culturally."

We want to extend our many thanks to the wonderful staff at The O'Neill Centre in Toronto who made our mother's last years so warm and comfortable.

A service will be held in memory of Ev on Monday, January 22, 2018, at 2:00 p.m. at the Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Square, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1B1. In lieu of flowers, we ask you to make a donation in her memory to the Ontario Coalition for Better Child Care, at 489 College Street, Suite 206, Toronto, Ontario M6G 1A5, or to the Church of the Holy Trinity.

RUSSELL ALBERT NEALE "Rus"

Passed away on Friday, January 19, 2018 in Toronto, in his 90th year.

Rus was predeceased by his beloved wife of 49 years, Patricia (2001); and his parents, Albert and Gladys Neale. Devoted father to Pamela (John), David (Kelly), and Jeffrey (Seow). Loving grandfather to Baba's "first draft" Blue Jays: Erin (Ryan), Gregory (Nicole), Heather, Katelyn, and Patrick. Loving great-grandfather to Big Baba's "second draft" Blue Jays: Avery, Callum, Reagan, Sophie, and Neil.

Rus loved family first, followed by reading, history, playing hockey and baseball, and the Toronto Blue Jays. When his grandchildren were young, he attended all their games and recitals, enthusiastically participating in the bleachers, soon becoming known to all by his chants! As a young man, Rus worked with his father Albert in his Long Branch butcher shop, Park Meat Market. His successful life insurance sales career with Confederation Life began in the 1950s, followed by a financial services practice with his son, David, well into his 80s.

The family wishes to thank loving caregivers Anabelle and Gleanard for their devoted care, and staff from Walden Circle Retirement Community in Mississauga, and Baycrest Health Sciences in Toronto.

Friends may call at the Turner & Porter Peel Chapel, 2180 Hurontario St., Mississauga (Hwy 10 N of QEW), on Tuesday, January 23, 2018 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held in the Chapel on Wednesday, January 24, 2018 at 11 a.m. If desired, please consider a donation in Rus' memory to Baycrest Health Sciences: http:// http://www.baycrest.org/give/ Online condolences may be made through http://www.turnerporter.ca

JOHN HESLOP RUTHERFORD

B.Comm, CA September 28, 1930 January 17, 2018 (Aged 87) Passed away suddenly at his home in St. John's, Newfoundland on January 17, 2018. Predeceased by his beloved wife, Anne (Hethrington).

Survived by his daughters, Margaret (Dean Van Hooydonk), Patricia (Tom Beshoff); his grandson, Graham Mercier; and sister, Margaret Hill, and her daughters in the UK.

John will be greatly missed by all who knew him for his brilliant mind, wit, generosity and kind heart. He always had a story to tell, complete with relevant literary and historic references.

John was originally from Northern England and made Canada his home in the late 1950s, after detours through Finland and France. He settled in Montreal where he met his wife, Anne.

They raised their daughters in Toronto and in the late 1980s embarked on their next adventure - a move to St John's, NF, where John was the Vice President/CFO of Fortis (Newfoundland Light and Power) until his retirement. The family would like to send heartfelt thanks to all the kind and helpful neighbours and friends who helped make St. John's home for him over the past 30 years. John always made the world a more interesting place and he will surely be missed by all.

The family will receive friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home A.W. Miles - Newbigging Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue) from 2 - 3 p.m. on Saturday, January 27, 2018. A service will follow in the chapel. If desired, in lieu of flowers, donations in his memory can be made to the Parkinson Society of Newfoundland & Labrador, 136 Crosbie Road, Suite 305, St.

John's Newfoundland, A1K 1J8, or the Canadian Red Cross, P.O. Box 39, Saint John, NB, E2L 3X3.

Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through http://www.humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

MURRAY WASSERMAN

On Friday January 19, 2018.

Beloved husband of Rayla. Loving father and father-in-law of Janis and Kenny Finkelstein, Susen Wasserman, Bryna Wasserman, and Shelly and the late Kerry Wasserman. Dear brother and brother-in-law of the late Joe and Tillie Wasserman, Al and Shiffy Wasserman, Faye and Sam Singerman, and Harry and Jean Wasserman. Dear brother-in-law of Eitta and the late Gary Salter.

Devoted grandfather of Michael and Jamie, Joshua, Daniel, Rachel, Laura and Adam, and Lindsey. Devoted greatgrandfather of Noah, Abby, and Harrison.

Service was held at Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West on Sunday, January 21, 2018 at 10:00 a.m.

Interment Adath Israel Synagogue section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva at 25 Brandy Crt., Toronto. Memorial donations may be made to The Murray and Rayla Wasserman Endowment Fund c/o Baycrest Foundation 416-785-2875 http://www.baycrest.org/ donations.

JOHN ROY WILSON

Passed away peacefully, at home on Thursday, January 18, 2018 in his 86th year. Beloved husband for 57 years of Catherine Inez.

Predeceased by his parents, Dr. Cleveland Wilson and Maud Wilson. Born in 1932, John Roy Wilson attended Annette Street Public School, Humberside Collegiate, University of Toronto, and Victoria College. John was loved and will be missed by Valerie, Ryan and Arlo, Monica Dottor, Chinn, Du Vernet, Pell and Webb families. Also missed by John Thomas and many other friends.

Friends may call at the Turner & Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., at Windermere, east of the Jane Subway, on Tuesday from 2-4 and 6-8 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Wednesday, January 24, 2018 at 11 a.m. with reception to follow. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. For those who wish, donations may be made to a charity of your choice. Online condolences may be made through http://www.turnerporter.ca

MARGARET MAY TAIT

November 6, 1908 January 21, 2010 Forever in our thoughts.

Lovingly remembered by Sheila, Noel & Beverly, Julian, Donovan, Roya, her many nieces, nephews and family friends.

The Headless Giant
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bydesign and by mistake to cover for his wrong doing and because of his own vast carelessness and indifference Donald Trump is sabotaging the institutions and agencies that protect the United States and sustain the peace of the world.
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By DAVID FRUM
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Saturday, January 13, 2018 – Print Edition, Page O1


Senior editor at The Atlantic, former speechwriter for president George W. Bush, and author of Trumpocracy: The Corruption of the American Republic.

hen doing things he shouldn't, Donald W Trump is a hyperactive president. He blurts high secrets to Russian visitors. He fired the FBI director who investigated things Mr. Trump wished to hush up. Mr. Trump spreads disinformation, tweets abuse and hurls paper towels at Puerto Ricans like a dog owner dispensing treats. From the actual work of the American presidency, however, Mr. Trump's disengagement is extreme.

Mr. Trump is not merely shirking work, although he is. He is wrecking the systems that enable presidents to work effectively.

The United States government agglomerates giant bureaucracies, each with its distinct mission and culture, often riven by generations of mistrust. (Ancient joke: Briefing the Chief of Naval Operations, a junior officer refers to the Soviets as "the enemy." The CNO halts him. "The Soviets are our adversary. The Air Force is the enemy.") To yoke these agencies to a common purpose, a complex group of co-ordinating agencies has been stacked atop them inside the Executive Office of the President.

These agencies have been at best neglected - at worst sabotaged - by the Trump presidency.

Let's start with America's most lethal domestic challenge: the fight against drug addiction. A terrible epidemic of overdoses killed about 63,600 people in 2016, up from an already horrifying 52,000 in 2015. The casualties for 2017 will prove higher still, according to preliminary government reports.

A dozen federal agencies share the job of responding to this crisis, supporting the governments of 50 states plus the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Some agencies interdict drugs from abroad. Some regulate drugs manufactured at home. Some prosecute drug dealers. Some rehabilitate drug addicts. Some educate at-risk populations.

Bringing order to this vast undertaking is the mission of the Office of National Drug ControPolicy (ONDCP) within the White House.

Although Mr. Trump campaigned hard on the opioid crisis, he did not get around even to nominating a director of the ONDCP until September. He then picked about as bad a choice as could be imagined: Tom Marino, a member of Congress who had led the fight to make it harder to police imports of suspicious pharmaceuticals, receiving hundreds of thousands of dollars of campaign contributions and lobbying expenditures from the industry along the way.

What qualified Mr. Trump's choice for the job? He was the fifth member of Congress to endorse Mr. Trump during the 2016 campaign - and the first from the must-win state of Pennsylvania.

The nomination quickly unravelled under withering criticism. Today, nearly a year into the Trump administration, the director's job at ONDCP remains vacant.

Versions of that story can be told for almost every function of government in the Donald Trump years.

The most important domestic-side function in the White House is the Office of Management and Budget. Mr. Trump appointed a hyperideological director, Mick Mulvaney. As a leading figure in the House Republican "freedom caucus," back in 2011 Mr. Mulvaney declared his willingness to force a default on U.S. government obligations in order to win a budget battle.

That's already strange preparation for a budget chief.

But even stranger is that Mr.

Mulvaney has declined to regard his staggeringly demanding role as a full-time job. Alongside the OMB directorship, Mr. Mulvaney has also accepted an appointment as acting director of a powerful regulatory agency, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. (His task there is to roll back protections extended during the presidency of Barack Obama.)

Maybe because Mr. Mulvaney is so distracted, the budget process - always a mess - has degenerated into near chaos in the Trump years. His administration still has not passed a budget for the fiscal year that commenced three months ago.

Instead, the government has been funded by stopgap "continuing resolutions," premised on trillion-dollar deficits indefinitely - deficits, in times of comparative peace and prosperity, bigger than those the George W.

Bush administration ran during the Iraq war or that the Obama administration ran during the worst economic crisis since the 1930s.

Mr. Trump campaigned on "getting tough" on trade. He commenced his administration by withdrawing from negotiations for a new Trans-Pacific trade treaty. He has threatened to withdraw from the North American and U.S.-South Korean trade treaties, too, unless he gets better terms.

Trade is shared across almost as many agencies as the drugabuse portfolio. Treasury has a voice, for example, as does State.

The co-ordinating agency here is the U.S. Trade Representative.

This job Mr. Trump did fill (although there is still no head of either USTR's technology or agriculture office). Having named a reasonably plausible - although protectionist-inclined - trade lawyer as the trade representative, Mr. Trump then handicapped him by creating a second co-ordinating body, a "National Trade Council," and appointing as its head a protectionist polemicist with meagre professional qualifications: Peter Navarro.

Mr. Navarro so alarmed the U.S.

business community that in September, his office was joined to that of White House economic adviser Gary Cohn - effectively putting three people in charge of the trade portfolio, a practice even more destructive to policymaking than failing to name one.

The results have been deeply threatening to world prosperity.

Mr. Trump is hacking away at existing trade arrangements without even beginning to put anything in their place. Worse, the United States has been completely absent from the most important trade negotiation anywhere on Earth: the talks between Britain and the European Union on post-Brexit treaties.

The Trump administration is contemplating war in the Korean peninsula: a 30-per-cent likelihood, according to South Carolina senator and born-again Trump ally Lindsey Graham. At the same time, it has repeatedly threatened a trade war against South Korea, the most important military partner against North Korea.

The most globally consequential of the Trump wrecking projects has been his sabotage of the National Security Council.

The NSC has grown into a substantial bureaucracy in its own right. At its core is a "principals committee": a regular meeting of the most important people in the U.S. government. Amazingly, Mr. Trump's first appointments to the principals committee excluded the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Director of National Intelligence.

Mr. Trump instead included his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, and Steve Bannon, the white-nationalist blogger who had served as one of Mr. Trump's campaign chairmen. (Among the other chairs and managers were Paul Manafort, now in legal jeopardy for failing to disclose his work as a paid agent of the Russian government; and Corey Lewandowski, who lost his job after he was arrested for battery of a female reporter.)

Over the course of the year, Mr. Trump's NSC has become less bizarro. Mr. Bannon was removed from the principals committee, then from the White House - and has now spectacularly split with the President altogether. Trump's first national-security adviser, Michael Flynn, was forced to step down after 24 days, and has now pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI. Mr. Trump's first deputy national-security adviser - former Fox News talking head K.T.

McFarland - who had last worked in government as a speechwriter and communications aide back in the 1980s - was demoted. More appropriate people have replaced them. The intelligence and military chiefs were added back onto the principals committee. Many of the weirdos and security risks who previously prowled the NSC corridors were removed, or at least lost security clearances.

Yet even now, the system does not work. Every week, the United States' allies must make sense of some jarring new outburst. What security can South Korean and Japanese allies feel when Mr. Trump boasts of the size and strength of his "nuclear button" - indifferent to the fact that those two countries are already within range of a North Korean attack?

Is the Iran deal still in place or not? Will the United States negotiate with North Korea without preconditions? On even these basic questions, there is no clear Trump administration policy (although the President has now clarified - or at least claimed - that his "nuclear button" is larger and more powerful than that of Kim Jong-un). The National Security Strategy released in December described Russia as a revisionist competitor to the United States; Mr.

Trump, in his speech releasing the strategy, praised Russia as a partner.

Nobody is able to impose order. Crucial jobs remain empty even now. There is no ambassador to Germany: The President's nominee, Richard Grenell, a famously vituperative blogger and television personality, is stalled in the Senate, likely because the Germans have communicated that he would be unwelcome in Berlin. For nearly a year, there was no ambassador to Spain, a country that could have used the help of its friends to soothe the national-unity crisis in Catalonia. Past ambassadors to the European Union have included such luminaries as Stuart Eizenstat (formerly President Carter's top domesticpolicy adviser) and C. Boyden Gray (an eminent lawyer and close friend of George H.W.

Bush). The post is currently vacant, because Mr. Trump's first choice was exposed as a serial fraudster, and the President hasn't gotten around to selecting another.

Where the Trump presidency inherited a policy from its predecessors, it has sometimes been able to continue that policy to successful outcomes. Combat operations against Islamic Stateheld cities in Iraq started under Mr. Obama and have nearly reached their completion under Mr. Trump.

But when it comes time to do something new, the administration is baffled. The capture of Islamic State territory has not put an end to the IS threat. The Islamic State will dematerialize into a terrorist network, recruiting online and striking inside other countries - as an IS-inspired Bangladeshi immigrant struck Times Square in New York last month. What then?

Who's planning postconflict operations in Iraq and reconstruction in Syria? Who knows? If it cannot be done by the U.S. Department of Defence operating alone and unco-ordinated with other agencies or other countries, it probably will not be done at all.

Mr. Trump subverts executive-branch institutions in order to aggrandize his own power.

Maybe the most ominous of his attacks on these co-ordinating mechanisms is his drive to convert the Department of Justice and FBI into his own personal police force.

Historically, the president oversees law enforcement, but he does not control it. He sets priorities: more or less attention to this or that area of federal jurisdiction. He does not direct the FBI to target or exempt this or that individual. If the president thinks a person has been treated unfairly, he has the pardon power - but of course, a pardon is a public act. What the president is never supposed to do is whisper quietly to the FBI, "This person is a friend of mine, please go easy on him; this person is an enemy, please arrest him."

To protect the integrity of the law, the United States has evolved an elaborate system of rules and restrictions governing the relationship between the president, prosecutors and police. All communications between White House staff and the FBI are supposed to be routed through the White House counsel's office, and the White House counsel is usually a lawyer of high reputation.

Mr. Trump, by contrast, chose as his White House counsel a combative partisan - who happened to be the nephew of the top lawyer for Mr. Trump's Atlantic City casino operations back in the 1980s. Mr. Trump's short-tenure communication director Anthony Scaramucci actually tried to order FBI investigations on his own authority.

And Mr. Trump himself fired FBI director James Comey when Mr. Comey refused an order to shut down the investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 elections.

The last time a president fired an FBI director, back in 1993, it happened as a result of credible allegations of abuse of expense accounts - and after lengthy consultations with Congress.

The claim that a president can fire a director who refuses to obey an order to stop an investigation is a shocking departure from a century of federal practice. Yet, suddenly, that very claim is being asserted by this White House, by Trump allies in Congress, and by pro-Trump talkers on TV. The whole system of fencing law enforcement from politics is under attack, and not by Mr. Trump alone.

And as law enforcement has resisted Mr. Trump's politicization, the President has turned against the law enforcers. He has vilified the FBI in his speeches; his partisans have defamed special counsel Robert Mueller and his staff; and his own Department of Justice has leaked the personal communications of FBI agents who texted negative comments about Mr. Trump.

(One of those agents called Mr. Trump "a loathsome human being ... an idiot": a harsh opinion, but one apparently shared by the President's own Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, who reportedly called Mr. Trump a "moron" after a Pentagon meeting on July 20, and by Mr. Trump's national-security adviser, H.R. McMaster, who reportedly called him a "dope" and an "idiot" at a private dinner with Oracle senior executives two days earlier. A new book by Michael Wolff quotes other Trump aides - and Fox News owner Rupert Murdoch - all describing the President in similarly contemptuous language.)

Richard Nixon famously warned, half a century ago, that the United States might dwindle into a "pitiful, helpless giant."

Under Mr. Trump, the U.S. government has been decapitated into a staggering, headless giant. By design and by mistake - to cover for his wrongdoing and because of his own vast carelessness and indifference - Mr. Trump is sabotaging the institutions and agencies that protect the United States and sustain the peace of the world. The insider reports from Washington accurately portray a man unworthy of the presidency.

However petty the man, his legacy for bad is huge and growing - not only for Americans, but for America's friends and partners worldwide.

Associated Graphic

ILLUSTRATION BY R. SIKORYAK

ILLUSTRATION BY R. SIKORYAK

And the 2018 Oscar nominees should be ...
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By KATE TAYLOR, BARRY HERTZ
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Saturday, January 20, 2018 – Print Edition, Page R1


As long as the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences keeps its envelopes out of Warren Beatty's hands, this year's Oscars should go smoothly enough. Still, with no clear contender like last year's La La Land dominating the awards circuit, or an emerging favourite like Moonlight gaining traction as an underdog, this year's Academy Awards are anyone's game. Before the Academy reveals 2018's nominations on Tuesday morning, The Globe and Mail's chief film critic Kate Taylor and film editor Barry Hertz share their own ballots - contenders that, in a perfect world, would be heading toward the podium.

BEST PICTURE

Wonder Woman: Hollywood always loves the symbolic gesture and Oscar noms are determined as much by political sentiment as aesthetic merit, so is the Academy ready to recognize director Patty Jenkins's unique achievement? This is the first superhero movie ever to rejoice in a trifecta of narrative cohesion in what is normally a weirdly muddled genre, a forceful female protagonist and real fan support for the Amazon in question. If the Oscars are as much a cultural coronation as an artistic contest, Wonder Woman at least deserves a nomination in 2018.

The Breadwinner: And while we are breaking out of those hard categories that reserve best-picture Oscars for earnest adult dramas, how about a nod for this excellent animated film about a young girl forced to disguise herself as a boy in Talibancontrolled Afghanistan? Its exquisitely drawn mix of folk tales and harsh realities is inspiring.

Faces Places: So, in the real world, this title would be doubly discriminated against for any best-picture nomination - it's a foreign-language doc - but in the land of the rotisserie league, let's celebrate a real gem. Veteran filmmaker Agnès Varda and street artist JR travel through rural France photographing the locals and posting their giant images in town squares and on factory walls. Joyous serendipity and rich themes gently teased are the result.

Blade Runner 2049: Nostalgia will only take you so far and most sequels are dead on arrival, so to see a foundational classic so cleverly revived and prolonged does gladden a critic's heart. With one eye always trained on the box office, the Oscars may forget this film because of disappointing results with audiences. They shouldn't; there is much artistry to celebrate here.

Dunkirk: With only five spaces on this ballot, a voter is forced into difficult choices between grand achievements such as Dunkirk and indie breakouts such as The Florida Project. At the very least, director Christopher Nolan's intriguing use of three different chronologies in his script for this war epic should be recognized in the best original screenplay category. A week on land, a day at sea, an hour in the air; each one pulls an audience deeper into the fog of war.

BEST ACTRESS

Frances McDormand, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri: Behind anger, there is always grief. McDormand personified that truism in her tough and moving performance as a grieving mother who tackles small-town police incompetence and racism in this blackly comic drama.

Sally Hawkins, Maudie: Oscar rules say you can't have the same actor nominated twice in one category, so how to choose between Hawkins's performances in 2017? She began the year with her compelling work as the Nova Scotia folk artist Maud Lewis in Maudie and ended it with her standout performance as a mute woman in love with a sea monster in The Shape of Water. Maudie is the lesserknown film - and thus less likely to win her votes - but, actually, her work there is the tougher achievement. She movingly depicts a woman who is abused but not bowed, and manages to evoke both her increasingly disabled body and her ever joyful soul throughout decades of life.

Saoirse Ronan, Lady Bird: In this reinvigoration of the coming-of-age genre, Ronan sensitively relays the desires, the frustrations and the pretensions - as well as the fundamentally decent core - of a young woman in her final year of high school. It's a note-perfect performance.

Meryl Streep, The Post: Yes, she's back again. Her performance as Kay Graham, publisher of The Washington Post, neatly captures the odd combination of privilege and lack of confidence that marked a woman thrown into the top job by her husband's suicide. As director Steven Spielberg bangs the drum for the First Amendment in this Pentagon Papers drama, Streep more subtly indicates the emergence of Graham's power.

Brooklynn Prince, The Florida Project: At 7, she would be the youngest nominee ever, but let's recognize a God-given talent for hamming when we see it. The comedy in The Florida Project depends almost entirely on the unrepentant and irrepressible six-year-old Moonee, a figure animated by the energetic Prince and her unfailing instinct for scene stealing.

BEST ACTOR

Willem Dafoe, The Florida Project: The Academy does not define the difference between a leading role and a supporting one, leaving it to its members to decide as they vote, but producers always choose strategically in which category they are campaigning. Expect Dafoe's fine work as the caretaker in a welfare motel, which held this film's tragicomic action together, to get a nod in the best-supporting category, but admit that he deserves the bigger prize for the finest male performance of the year.

Daniel Day-Lewis, Phantom Thread: This is a tricky one, because this superb performance as an obsessive fashion designer surrounded by enabling women masterfully conjures the man's neuroses but also exposes the film's ill-conceived themes as his female costar (Vicky Krieps) drifts off into the realm of misogynist fairy tales. Still, Day-Lewis has said he's going to retire after this one, so lifetime achievement it is.

Jean-Louis Trintignant, Happy End: This famed French actor follows his heartbreaking work in Michael Haneke's Amour to finesse a bitter yet wise grandfather for the same director's ambitious satire, Happy End. The old man, who just wants to die, is snobby, grumpy and generally unpleasant, and yet Trintignant draws out of the character a moving meditation on end-oflife issues.

Daniel Kaluuya, Get Out: Kaluuya's deft work as a nice young African-American man meeting his white girlfriend's wealthy liberal parents is the solid core of this satirical horror movie. If director Jordan Peele manages so successfully to bridge genres and drive his hard points home, it is thanks in no small part to Kaluuya's light-fingered performance with its fine sensitivity for tone.

Timothée Chalamet, Call Me By Your Name: Many aspects of this indie same-sex love story are debatable, but if the film works at all, it's because of Chalamet's utterly convincing portrait of youthful infatuation and heartbreak.

BEST PICTURE

Lady Bird: Greta Gerwig's fourstar masterpiece is a small story told perfectly - which might oddly enough be a knock against it in the eyes of the Academy, which tends to go for tales with more epic designs (even last year's Moonlight sorta fits this bill, with its decadeslong narrative). Yet the work done here by the writer-director and her stellar cast deserves the largest, brightest spotlight possible.

Dunkirk: Speaking of epic, Christopher Nolan's Second World War thriller redefines the term. Doing away with much of the melodrama that comes with the war genre, Nolan presents a purely action-based exercise in high tension. It is a cinematic feat in large-scale spectacle that won't soon be repeated.

Get Out: It's a comedy! It's a horror! It's a documentary! Jordan Peele's genre-defying debut is all those things (well, maybe not a doc, as Peele jokingly tweeted), and much more. As the surreality of 2017 played out, Peele's work seemed only that much more of-the-moment, in its own terrifying way.

The Florida Project: The compassion that writer-director Sean Baker brings to his characters is immeasurable. From the lonely single moms living on the fringes, to the latchkey children they attempt to raise, to the weary working stiffs who keep them all out of even more trouble than they're already in, Baker crafts a drama both humane and profound.

Blade Runner 2049: It is a puzzle worthy of Eldon Tyrell as to why Denis Villeneuve's Blade Runner 2049 hasn't led, or even been part of, the Oscar conversation. Just because audiences rejected it - so much as anything with a worldwide gross of $258-million (U.S.) can be considered rejected - doesn't mean the critically acclaimed sequel should be out of the running.

Villenueve not only accomplishes the impossible here by making a follow-up just as good, if not better, than the original, he also crafts a uniquely compelling visual spectacle that's a direct rebuke to the sci-fi-bycommittee aesthetics of current megaproductions.

BEST ACTRESS

Saoirse Ronan, Lady Bird: Only 23 years old, Ronan has been ruling the screen for more than a decade, having made a huge first impression with 2007's Atonement. With Lady Bird, she offers a fully layered performance that some actors spend their entire careers trying, and failing, to deliver.

Frances McDormand, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri: The more audiences and critics discover Martin McDonagh's dark comedy, the less impressive it seems. But despite the script's convenient turns and queasy racial politics, there is little denying that McDormand rules the story, from beginning to end.

Vicky Krieps, Phantom Thread: Yeah, Daniel Day-Lewis is fine as Paul Thomas Anderson's latest misunderstood maverick, but Phantom Thread belongs to Krieps. Even though her character, Alma, the muse to DayLewis's dressmaker Reynolds Woodcock, is not given much back story or even a last name, Krieps lends a captivating, almost haunting presence that elevates the thin proceedings.

Emma Stone, Battle of the Sexes: Perhaps Battle of the Sexes was released too early in the fall, or maybe audiences went in expecting a sports biopic and were displeased to find a drama centring almost solely on Billie Jean King's inner life. Whatever the reason, Battle of the Sexes and Stone's starring performance have gotten lost in the Oscar chatter, and that's a shame - as the tennis phenomenon coming to terms with her sexuality, the actress is mesmerizing.

Jennifer Lawrence, Mother!: Darren Aronofsky's gonzo experiment in audience torture is not for everyone, and five months after first experiencing it, I'm still torn on whether or not it deserves to exist. But because Mother! is indeed a reality, Jennifer Lawrence - the one person on Earth who suffered the most for its artistic sins - should be rewarded for her sheer stamina, if nothing else.

BEST ACTOR

Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour: Sure, pounds of prosthetics helped the actor transform into Winston Churchill, but the emotional tenor and gentle touch was all Oldman. It is said that almost every actor is expected to play Churchill once they hit a certain age - with John Lithgow and Brian Cox doing so in the past year and a half - but no one has quite nailed the role, or brought something curiously new to it, like Oldman.

Daniel Kaluuya, Get Out: There has been much praise for Jordan Peele's screenplay for and direction of Get Out, and some deserved awards talk for costars Catherine Keener and Allison Williams. But why are we not collectively obsessing over Daniel Kaluuya's lead performance, a feat that ties the whole endeavour together?

Kumail Nanjiani, The Big Sick: Another casualty of awardsbodies indifference is The Big Sick. If the comedy must go ignored for its wry script, its sharp direction from Michael Showalter and its delightful performances from Holly Hunter, Zoe Kazan and Ray Romano (yes, really!), then a simple plea to the Academy: Don't forget about star Kumail Nanjiani, who does wonders when asked to do the most awkward act imaginable: re-enact his own relationship missteps for all the world to see and scrutinize.

Timothée Chalamet, Call Me By Your Name: It isn't until the end credits start rolling that you realize how committed Chalamet is to the spirit and beauty of Call Me By Your Name.

As a teenage musical prodigy who falls for a brash college student (Armie Hammer), Chalamet digs deep into the heartache that only young love knows.

Andy Serkis, War for the Planet of the Apes: As the rebooted franchise's main monkey, Serkis conjures an empathetic, deeply complex hero - a soul haunted by violence, but often forced to wallow in it for the sake of love, honour and family. To bring any such character to life without resorting to histrionics is a great endeavour. To do so via performance-capture technology, your facial expressions and body language hidden beneath vast reams of digital code, is quite another.

Nominations for the 90th Academy Awards will be announced Jan. 23.

Associated Graphic

Kate Taylor's best-picture picks, from top: Wonder Woman, The Breadwinner, Faces Places, Blade Runner 2049 and Dunkirk.

Barry Hertz's best-picture picks, from top: Lady Bird, Dunkirk, Get Out, The Florida Project and Blade Runner 2049.

ALBERT WATSON/COURTESY OF AMPA

Frances McDormand personifies the grief behind anger in the darkly funny Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.

Expect Willem Dafoe to earn a best-supporting actor nomination for The Florida Project, although deserves the bigger prize for his performance.

Saoirse Ronan sensitively relays the desires, frustrations and pretensions of a young woman in her final year of high school in Lady Bird.

Much has been made of Jordan Peele's Get Out screenplay, but Daniel Kaluuya's lead performance ties the whole endeavour together.

In Call Me by Your Name, Timothée Chalamet digs deep into the heartache that only young love knows.

On the heels of recent portrayals by John Lithgow and Brian Cox, Gary Oldman nails the role of Winston Churchill best of all in Darkest Hour.

Candidate for a gut reno, seller boosts price
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By SHANE DINGMAN, ADAM STANLEY
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Friday, January 19, 2018 – Print Edition, Page H5


A run-down rowhouse in Trinity Bellwoods has become a minor socialmedia sensation in Toronto, thanks to a list price of almost $750,000 that highlights the city's sky-high pricing for even the most distressed properties.

Originally priced at $679,000, the "builder's delight" at 15 Rebecca St. (first reported in The Globe and Mail last month) attracted four bids in its offering period, though none of the potential buyers came close to the seller's target of $900,000.

The house has now been relisted at $749,900, and while it has a few new bids, offers remain open in hopes of fetching a higher price.

Selling agent Al Sinclair of Re/ Max Hallmark Realty Ltd., has a message for bloggers and media looking to make a joke about this property's poor condition: Knock it off, this was a family's home.

"I've had people call me about wanting to do a movie there - a horror movie - it's just distasteful," said Mr. Sinclair, who explains that his client is the son and executor of the estate of the last owner, who had lived in the 120-plus-yearold house since the early 1960s before passing away in 2017. City records show Abraham Slomovitz had owned the property since 1961.

The last resident of the home died in the hospital, Mr. Sinclair says, not in the house - despite some of the ghoulish online speculation. "It's a very emotional situation for the family," he said.

Mr. Sinclair agrees the pictures for the listing show a house in need of "total renovation." While it has six rooms and nine-foot ceilings, it also has no basement, no parking and, while basically everything needs to be replaced, it can't be torn down because it's a rowhouse that shares walls on both sides. Sinclair estimates a builder buying the house would need to spend about $120,000 to $150,000 to make it ready for habitation - which is why no work was done to pretty it up for sale.

"It would be a complete waste of money to put anything into it because it's going to get torn apart. Who's gonna buy this house is a builder and they don't care about that.

"They don't wanna see a fresh coat of paint, because then it looks like you're hiding something," he says. "There's no comparables: this is the cheapest house out there, and there's not a better location in Trinity Bellwoods area."

VANCOUVER BUILDERS TEST 'LOCALS FIRST' POLICIES

The City of Vancouver is looking for ways to reset a housing market in which its residents are battered by both high prices and a low availability, and putting local buyers at the front of the line for any new presale real estate opportunities is one of the policies it is considering.

But as some recent voluntary efforts by developers to prioritize local buyers show, it's easier to declare a "locals-first policy" than it is to verify and enforce that locals end up living in a newly constructed condo or townhouse.

Similar to the province's 15-percent foreign-buyer real-estate tax, the city policy is aimed at non-resident investors who have been shown to buy a disproportionate share of the city's high-end condos.

Andy Yan, director of the City Program at Simon Fraser University, broke down the foreign ownership numbers from Statistics Canada and the CMHC and found that condominiums valued higher than $1.5-million had a remarkably high share of foreign ownership, as high as 19 per cent in Vancouver.

The city-wide percentage of foreign ownership of all home types was just 7.6 per cent and 4.8 per cent in Vancouver's metro area.

Before even having these numbers the city had already concluded that foreign buyers were distorting the market for new condos.

On Oct. 17, 2017, Vancouver's city council passed a motion to begin "a policy framework for new development applications that gives residents who live and work in Metro Vancouver the first opportunity to purchase new presale homes in Vancouver."

So far, such moves have been applied only to individual projects.

One of the first came in 2016 when the West Vancouver district attached a locals' first presale period to the its approval of the sixbuilding, 120-condo unit Sewell's Landing project.

Council's motion could eventually make locals-first the default in any new building application across the city.

That has prompted some developers to move now, and announce they are voluntarily adopting a locals-first policy.

Westbank Corp. opened up a locals-first buying period on Dec. 14 for its 57-floor, 331-unit, Butterfly building project for 969 Burrard St. in Vancouver, the company posted a long document explaining the policy on its website. The company also states it has done similar programs in the past, designed to give a 30-day exclusive buying period for literal locals (as in they lived in the neighbourhood of the development) and another 60 days for residents of Greater Vancouver.

"The sales team also verifies driver's licenses, utility bills and employment letters to insure the buyer included in the Local First program meets the criteria," the document says. "All buyers are asked to sign a declaration to confirm they meet the program's criteria."

The Butterfly document says that in addition to a 30-day window, at any time when presales are open if a foreign buyer and a local expressed interest in the same condo unit the tie would go to the local buyer.

"To be perfectly frank, it's a window-washing exercise," says Josh Gordon, assistant professor at the Simon Fraser University School of Public Policy. "This will have very little effect."

For example, what if a buyer was found to have falsified the declaration of "localness" they signed, would that cancel the sales contract? "We have never had to enforce a declaration before so we are unsure what legal consequences would be exactly if buyer does not live up to declaration," according to Michael Braun, director of sales and marketing for Westbank.

Even how the companies define and screen for locals is ripe for abuse, Mr. Gordon says. Locally registered shell corporations with foreign owners, for example, might slip by as "local." A recent civil case involving a $750,000 home purchase in Port Coquitlam, B.C., showed some Chinese overseas investors will go to extreme measures - such as having nine individuals each smuggle packets of $50,000 in cash across the border into Canada - in order to disguise the origin of real estate funds.

There's the more widely known practice of a foreign buyer transferring money to a relative or other agent in Canada to purchase the home on their behalf.

"We understand and acknowledge that a family member may be helping out another family member to purchase a home in Vancouver [a common reality in a high-priced housing market] and do not specially track that," Mr. Braun says.

Butterfly units start at $960,000.

Until policymakers are better able to establish residency of property owners - for example by tracking whether an owner declares income in the province - announcing a development will be locals' first "is more or less a meaningless pledge," Mr. Gordon says.

TORONTO CONDO RENTS UP 9.1 PER CENT

Rents for condominiums continue to rise rapidly in the Toronto area according to new data from Urbanation Inc., but there are signs of trouble ahead for landlords and investors as the combination of an affordability crisis and the province's new rent control regime are keeping tenants in their apartments longer.

The bad news for renters is that among the 5,094 condo units leased through the Multiple Listing Service in the fourth quarter of 2017 average monthly rents topped $2,166, that's 9.1 per cent higher than last year.

Rent growth happened most rapidly in the core of the city, where prices jumped more than 12 per cent, but renters seeking relief in the 905 suburbs also pushed rents up 8 per cent in those regions.

Rents rose fastest for studio apartments, up 11 per cent year-over-year to an average $1,665 a month.

Average rates for one-bedroom and two-bedroom units also rose, up 10 per cent and 8 per cent respectively.

"I still think rents have more upside," says Shaun Hillenbrand, senior vice-president for Urbanation, a real estate consulting firm that focuses on the condo market. Hillenbrand sees no immediate change in the market fundamentals (low inventory, high demand) in 2018. "I don't expect [rents] will continue to grow by 9 and 10 per cent, maybe 4 or 5 per cent," he says.

Even though developers have moved to cash in on the hot rental market - there are now more purpose-built rental units in planning than there have been in 25 years - of the 7,000 apartment units under construction now, only about 2,000 units will come to completion in 2018.

"That's nowhere near enough to satisfy the level of rental demand in the GTA right now, says Hillenbrand, who believes that 2018 will continue the trend in recent years of almost all new rental supply coming from the condo market. At the same time, Hillenbrand says even that supply has taken some hits as over the past three years a larger share of condo investors have sold their units once they are complete to cash in on the incredibly hot market; in 2017, 4 per cent of new owners flipped their units, up from 3 per cent in 2016 and 2 per cent in 2015.

"It's terrible that all of our rentals are coming from the condo market," says John Pasalis, president at Toronto's Realosophy Realty.

"That's non-permanent rental inventory. Those units can become owner-occupied, all this supply you're theoretically building can disappear five years down the road if people want to move into them."

Pasalis also spotted another clue in Urbanation's numbers that could put pressure on the condo rental supply in the future. The new provincial rent controls are already having an impact on factors that could make condo renting a less lucrative asset for the mom and pop investors who have no intention of living in those units.

Urbanation says the average length of time between "same-unit lease transactions" was 22.8 months in the fourth quarter, up dramatically from 2016 when it was 19.7 months and 2015 when it was just 16.4 months. Essentially, renters are staying in their condos longer: "It increased a lot in the last few months of the year, I don't think that's a coincidence that its happening after the rent controls have come in," Hillenbrand says.

"That's happening because landlords can't kick them out any more. Or they can't kick them out by jacking up rents the way they used to," Pasalis says.

In May, the province expanded rent controls that previously only applied to units built before 1991. Where once owners of newer units could raise rents or evict tenants almost at will, now rents can be raised according to a guideline, currently a maximum of 1.5 per cent a year.

Effectively, Pasalis says, tenants who have been living in a $2,000-a-month condo apartment for two years could expect to pay $400 more a month for the same unit if they moved. Naturally, fewer are moving.

"I have [purpose-built] rentals, our turnover is negligible, our average tenant has been there for seven to eight years. I don't think condo investors are ready for that," Pasalis says.

"Over time you're going to start seeing fewer condo investors buying them, because it's actually not a great investment any more."

MIZRAHI MAKES CONDO PLAY IN OTTAWA

Toronto developer Sam Mizrahi, who is currently building The One at Yonge and Bloor - at 85 storeys it is slated to become the tallest skyscraper in Canada when completed - has announced plans to build Ottawa's "most luxurious" condominium.

The 12-storey luxury condo at 1451 Wellington St. W., is in the capital's booming Westboro neighbourhood and sales are off to a "very strong start" since presales began in 2017, according to Mr. Mizrahi.

This kind of ultraluxury development is a first for Ottawa, but Mr. Mizrahi - whose wife was born and raised in the capital - felt the niche market wanted this kind of building but there just wasn't anything available.

"On a lot of the trips there I saw it and thought there was a good opportunity to do a high-end luxury building that would have significant landmark architectural status to it and would represent the capital of Canada similarly to the other significant buildings in Ottawa," he said.

The building is set for completion in 2023. Ottawa's city council shot down an earlier proposal for the site in 2014, but the Ontario Municipal Board eventually approved it after a debate about the building's height.

"The whole neighbourhood is transforming. The neighbourhood is absolutely right for this," Mr. Mizrahi said. "I'm hoping this will inspire more development of these kind of high-end buildings in Ottawa because there is definitely a market for them."

Associated Graphic

A run-down rowhouse at 15 Rebecca St. in Toronto's Trinity Bellwoods neighbourhood with a list price of $749,000 resulted in some internet fame, with people asking if they could use the site to shoot a horror film.

For its Vancouver building project The Butterfly, Westbank instituted a buying policy that gave a 30-day exclusive buying period for locals.

A scale model of developer Sam Mizrahi's latest project, a 12-storey luxury building at 1451 Wellington St. W. in Ottawa.

MIZRAHI DEVELOPMENTS

Friday, January 20, 2018

Unearthing a new approach to Indigenous history
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The campaign to preserve the remnants of one of the country's few intact residential schools is part of an attempt by archeologists to align their practices with the values of the people whose heritage they dig up
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By ERIC ANDREW-GEE
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Tuesday, January 23, 2018 – Print Edition, Page A1


BRANTFORD, ONT. -- He's a broad-shouldered 6 foot 2, but Paul Racher walks softly and with an almost apologetic stoop through the grounds of an old residential school.

It's the gait of someone visiting a cemetery or a famous battlefield.

The Mohawk Institute was a bit of both during the almost 150 years it operated here, until it finally closed in 1970. Now, like many battlefields and burial grounds, it has become an archeological site. Mr. Racher is part of a team excavating it pro bono for the Woodland Cultural Centre, the Indigenous-run organization that has preserved the school for educational purposes.

The dig is a "reconciliation project," Mr. Racher says, undertaken first by his own firm, Archaeological Research Associates, and then by the Ontario Archaeological Society (OAS) as part of the profession's attempt, during Canada's sesquicentennial, to bring its practices in line with the values and interests of the people whose heritage they dig up.

At the institute, Mr. Racher and his colleagues uncovered detritus from the residential school - old crockery, marbles, jacks - and then below that, evidence of habitation before contact with Europeans, including an arrowhead.

"So you had a happy Indigenous occupation, then a very sad one," Mr. Racher says.

Schools such as the Mush Hole - so nicknamed for the oatmeal it served students with deadening regularity - have become synonymous with the abuse of Indigenous Canadians through government policies. But studying the building itself, still grimly imposing after all these years, makes the misery of the place vivid.

Mr. Racher, 51, points out messages scratched into the red brick of the school's outbuildings: "FOWLER MINNIE + GAW GAW WAS HERE, MARCH 1952," "FRANK HILL SERVED TIME HERE," "HELP ME PLEASE."

He and Paula Whitlow, the executive director of the Woodland Cultural Centre, go through the hundreds of objects found in the walls of the third-floor dormitory during recent renovations: comic books, Valentine's Day cards, cigarettes, lots of food. Students at the institute "were always cold and always hungry," Ms. Whitlow says.

This excavation is part of the Save the Evidence campaign to preserve the remnants of one of the country's few intact residential school buildings. Mr. Racher and his colleagues are undertaking it in close collaboration with the cultural centre and on their behalf.

That simple goal is a departure for a profession that has long been dominated by disinterested academics or private contractors working for developers. But as reconciliation with Indigenous peoples grinds ahead, Canadian archeologists are motivated and well placed to show a way forward.

"We're trying to do things that will help the Indigenous communities," Mr. Racher says.

The profession has long been involved in saving the evidence of that inconvenient Canadian truth: that Indigenous people were here first. But it has often been done so clumsily and even brutally, mishandling and appropriating artifacts and disturbing ancestral remains. Now, many archeologists are determined to mend their ways.

"Anyone who doesn't think control of Indigenous heritage is going to pass to Indigenous peoples is smoking something," Mr. Racher says.

"The only weird thing to me is how long it took for us to figure that out." A NEW PROFESSION EMERGES In November, at a Best Western hotel 10 minutes from the Mohawk Institute site, the OAS held its annual symposium. The gathering had a daunting theme: "From Truth to Reconciliation: Redefining Archaeology in Ontario."

Most Canadians would struggle to define Canadian archeology, let alone redefine it. The field tends to be more closely associated in the public mind with the sites of classical antiquity such as Rome and Egypt. "When I first tell someone I'm an archeologist, they say, 'We have archeology here? No way!' " Mr. Racher says. "They're used to the Greeks, Italians, the U.K. It's rare you run into someone who thinks ... anything important could have happened here."

Of course, important things did happen in Canada before European colonists arrived. But the colonists were so successful in extinguishing the living cultures they encountered that by the late 19th century, archeology, as opposed to anthropology, had become a viable way to study the country's first peoples.

The first full-time professional Canadian archeologist was an enterprising blacksmith and bookseller named David Boyle, who in the 1880s began crudely excavating sites across Southern Ontario.

Some Indigenous peoples valued his work for preserving their material culture, according to the Dictionary of Canadian Biography. The Mohawk of Six Nations near Brantford, Ont., actually adopted Boyle and bestowed upon him the name "ambassador."

Still, the title of the paper he produced about his time among the Six Nations - "On the paganism of the civilized Iroquois of Ontario" - suggests how condescending and Victorian his sensibility remained. The tension Boyle embodied, between the respectful preservation and the arrogant misconstrual of Indigenous heritage, would define the next century of Canadian archeology.

For decades, the field remained the preserve of amateurs and scholars, "a small thing practised by a few people mostly out of university departments," Mr. Racher says. Only in the construction boom after the Second World War did that begin to change, as suburban tracts sprouted across North America and stories spread of Indigenous artifacts being "bulldozed away."

Anxiety about what was being lost helped spur stricter regulations around development and gave rise to what was virtually a new profession: the archeological consultant.

Even as the industry boomed, its attitude toward Indigenous cultures remained tainted by prejudice and indifference.

When Mr. Racher began practising archeology in the 1980s, the field was shot through with a rough-and-ready "pith helmet" approach that often led to the manhandling and effective confiscation of sacred artifacts.

"The theory used to be 'Just shut up and shovel,' " says Gord Peters, deputy grand chief of the Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians, which works to defend treaty rights.

It was an absurd but telling approach. In the eyes of many Indigenous groups, much of the land that now makes up Canada was never properly ceded. Settlers and their descendants, of course, largely take a different view.

"This is our land ... we have underlying title that was never extinguished," Mr. Peters says.

"[But] for some reason, it's easy to dig up our ancestors and put them in museums and things."

Mr. Racher's own upbringing provided plenty of evidence for the dispossession of Indigenous people that underlies so much of his profession. His grandparents' farm in Petrolia, Ont., bought on the cheap in the 1950s, was on a swath of 580,000 acres purchased by the Crown in 1822 from the Chippewa Nation as part of Treaty 25. In exchange, the Chippewas got a pittance. As Mr. Racher wrote in a presentation last year, "this is why, by 128 years later, that same land (cleared, 'improved' and with a house on it) was cheap enough that an uneducated farm labourer could afford to buy it and raise his six children there." It's what launched the Rachers into the middle class.

"FODDER FOR SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY"

Archeology was one way to fight back against this kind of dispossession. For all their blind spots, those who work in the field tend to have a keener appreciation of the richness of Indigenous heritage than most Canadians do.

Beginning in the early 2000s, meanwhile, a series of court decisions reaffirmed the Crown's duty to consult with and accommodate Indigenous peoples in the course of development, leading to a boom in archeological consulting, with professionals such as Mr. Racher increasingly called on to establish the heritage value of sites across the country.

That produced a bumper crop of contracts - Mr. Racher, who used to be a part-time Volkswagen mechanic and furnace installer, now has a staff of dozens - but it also created a sea change in the way archeologists thought about their relationship with Indigenous people.

Perhaps nowhere in Ontario was that change more evident than in the Thonnakona reburial. In the mid-2000s, negotiations began for the reinterment of the Kleinburg Ossuary, a traditional group burial ground containing HuronWendat remains excavated in 1970 and stored over the following decades in archives at the University of Toronto, where the bones were studied by anthropology students.

"It was not respectful to the descendant groups," says Dena Doroszenko, an archeologist with the Ontario Heritage Trust, which led the reburial process from the archeological side. "No one would want their ancestors to be excavated and used as fodder for scientific inquiry."

In 2013, after long negotiations, the remains from several similar ossuaries were reburied on a specially chosen site in the Toronto suburb of Vaughan. The Huron-Wendat Nation specified an elaborate ritual process for the reinterment, and it fell to Ms. Doroszenko to provide logistics.

In accordance with HuronWendat spiritual practice, the movers transporting the remains from U of T to the reburial site were not allowed to speak to each other. A First Nations representative was on hand to offer prayers throughout the move. The Ontario Heritage Trust provided a bushel of corn as a gift to the ancestors.

All non-Indigenous people were barred from the reburial ceremony, except for the backhoe operator filling in the burial trench, who underwent a purification process and had prayers said for his backhoe. It was all a long way from "shut up and shovel."

For all the progress made in the field, Mr. Racher says he feels there's still a long way to go. One of the most pernicious continuing problems in Canadian archeology is what happens to artifacts uncovered by private archeologists. Some museums have ceded to pressure and begun the long process of repatriating parts of their Indigenous collections, but small archeological consultants collectively hold troves of artifacts they have excavated, often haphazardly.

"As a condition of [our] licence we're required to curate them into perpetuity, but that could mean anything," Mr. Racher says. "Let's just say what happens to the artifacts in those collections is not well regulated."

"We hear stories of archeologists having boxes and boxes of artifacts in their basements," says Chief Stacey Laforme of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation. "Those things need to be gathered and stored somewhere."

Mr. Racher also believes provincial rules should be stricter when it comes to consulting local Indigenous groups. Currently, it's just three-quarters of the way through a site assessment.

What's more, even when archeologists are committed to consulting with First Nations, reserve governments often simply don't have the money to respond.

"What's engagement if on one side you have planners and developers and lawyers and on the other side there's nobody?" Mr. Racher says.

Many archeologists are acutely aware of the fraught nature of their work. Inspired by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Mr. Racher worked to reform the profession from within over the course of his two-year term as OAS president, which ends Jan.

20. In November, at the group's symposium, he succeeded in amending the OAS constitution and statement of ethical principles to acknowledge the "privilege" of working with the cultural property of Indigenous groups and to urge members to make "every reasonable effort" to consult with First Nations about the handling of Indigenous artifacts. The motions passed overwhelmingly.

"It isn't really obligating us to too much, but it is acknowledging a truth," Mr. Racher says.

While the profession is still overwhelmingly white, some Indigenous groups are starting to take the initiative in the field.

The OAS has been working with the Chippewas of the Thames to teach them how to do archeological monitoring of their lands and even designed a course on the subject for other nations to use. Chief Laforme, meanwhile, says his band government is developing its own archeological standards, which will have a lower-than-usual threshold for what counts as archeologically significant.

"In the future of archeology, our voices need to be heard - and frankly we need to lead these discussions," Mr. Laforme says. "How you come across and deal with our ancestors is a big part of reconciliation."

Mr. Racher agrees. But he doesn't stint in describing how big a task that will be.

"The profession is still colonial to its roots," he says. "You have a bunch of archeologists who are almost universally from the settler society, we get our licences from the Crown ... we dig this stuff up without their permission.

"Permission," he adds, "might come with strings."

As the country excavates its past with a newly critical eye, a century and a half after its founding, the profession that makes digging beneath the surface of Canada its business was always going to find itself encumbered by new strings. Mr. Racher welcomes the change.

"You like to feel that you'll be on the right side of history on this stuff," he says.

Associated Graphic

Archeologists have so far found 276 items hidden in the walls of the third floor of the Mohawk Institute in Brantford, Ont., including food, games and clothing.

MICHELLE SIU/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

JOHN SOPINSKI/THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: GOOGLE MAPS

Above: Archaeological Research Associates president Paul Racher points out messages carved by students into the red-brick walls of the Mohawk Institute in Brantford, Ont.

Left: A photo of Hilton Sherry is pinned on an office wall at the Woodland Cultural Centre. He had attended the Mohawk Institute in the early 1900s and went on to serve in the First World War.

The secret struggle of a Calgary business titan
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The family of AltaCorp founder George Gosbee, who died by suicide in November, reflects on his near-constant fight with mental illness and alcoholism
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By KELLY CRYDERMAN
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Saturday, January 13, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B6


CALGARY -- From the outside, George Gosbee appeared to have it all.

He was big player in the Calgary business establishment, a man who could get the ear of fund managers, chief executive officers and Finance ministers.

When Justin Trudeau was preparing for a run at the prime minister's job, he sought out the financier for advice on economic policy.

With business success came great wealth and status, including membership in the small, elite club of people who have owned a piece of a National Hockey League franchise. Meanwhile, he also tried to live a life with meaning - one that included mountain-climbing expeditions to Kilimanjaro and Antarctica.

But away from public view, the wunderkind investment banker was a man tormented by a near-constant struggle with alcoholism and mental illness, members of his family say.

"This was at the heels of him all the time," his widow, Karen Gosbee, said.

Mr. Gosbee's death by suicide on Nov. 12, at 48 years old, shocked Alberta's financial community, where he was known as a risk taker and consummate salesman, and had been an abiding presence for more than two decades.

Karen is speaking because she believes George's private pain is far from unique.

In a series of interviews with The Globe and Mail, she said her husband created a business legacy that won't be forgotten, but his family saw a much different version of the man.

He had long tried to manage his mental illness and his drinking, Karen said.

George had attempted suicide once before sending him to a Calgary hospital in late 2014, she revealed. He had been in addiction-treatment facilities twice, and joined a 12-step program. For more than a year, the founder of AltaCorp Capital Inc. had been living separately from his family to give him the space to recover, Karen said.

"A lot of people saw him as so accomplished and so externally validated," she said. But, she wants people to know that if this could happen to someone like him, it could happen to anyone.

"Maybe people will have more of an empathetic ear to other leaders out in the business community."

George's frenetic energy - along with good timing - helped make him the exemplar of a new generation of Alberta oil-and-gas entrepreneurs. At just 30 years old, he used what he said was "a couple hundred grand" to create his own investment firm, Tristone Capital Global Inc., just as Canada's energy sector was heading into a boom period. He went on to sell it nine years later, in 2009, for a staggering $130-million. But a year later, he was starting his next investment firm, AltaCorp, in partnership with the Alberta governmentowned ATB Financial. Meanwhile, his big picture economic patriotism - he spoke of growing underdeveloped Alberta sectors such as technology and agri-food - saw him selected for other plum roles, including a spot on the board of the province's $70-billion pension fund.

And after the federal government participated in the bailout of two U.S. auto makers in 2009, he was tapped by Ottawa to represent the government on the board of Chrysler Group LLC. Jim Flaherty, the finance minister at the time, looked to him for advice.

These tributes were laid out alongside his demons at his funeral. The Anglican priest officiating the celebration of life talked about George's "shadows," his selfmedication and substance abuse. Karen said she was approached by several people who told her about their own depression or suicidal thoughts.

"Lord knows there are so many people that came up to me," she said. "So why can't they tell their best friend?" While still grieving, Karen believes her husband's story can help others. In one way or another, she says, mental health is an issue for most families - right across the socio-economic spectrum. The Gosbees now believe that one of the first steps in dealing with mental illness is removing the shame, and "normalizing" discussions around it.

"A lot of people know him only as that public figure - the one that's always smiling," said John Gosbee, 23, their eldest son.

"They don't see really what's underneath the surface, or kind of what he was battling with the majority of his time," John said. "With the social stigma, he thought maybe he could beat it by himself."

When George and Karen met in their early 20s at the University of Calgary, they bonded over a similar sense of humour and George's medical history. Karen's father is a neurologist, and George had undergone surgery at 21 for a benign tumour.

Even before he was fully recovered from his surgery, and while he was still attending university, he went to work for the brokerage Peters & Co. Ltd. - a move that would start his swift rise in Calgary's investment-banking community. Following Peters & Co, he worked as managing director at Newcrest Capital Inc., another independent firm.

He and Karen married in 1994. He was diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, but Karen said he didn't take his prescription for a Ritalin-like medication because he was worried about it slowing him down as he conquered the business world. Later, he was diagnosed with depression, and explored treatments for other disorders including borderline personality and bipolar, she said.

At the same time, regular binge drinking was part of his life.

"All I know is that there was a mentalhealth component and there was substance abuse," she said. "I can't determine what came first."

In 2000, George founded Tristone, which quickly made a name for itself in financing and deal-making for junior oil companies and energy trusts, which were a hot sector at the time. Early in the firm's history, George brought in people with deep technical expertise, making Tristone a major force in the business of acquisitions and divestitures of oil and gas properties. The boutique dealer grew quickly - especially as oil prices ratcheted up beginning in 2004 - and opened offices in London, Houston, Denver and Buenos Aires.

The Gosbees' three children were young, and George worked long hours and travelled around the world for work. But John said when he was home in Calgary, he was present - attending hockey games and taking the children to indoor climbing gyms when the weather was too cold to go outside.

"He supported us. He was a really kind father - really, really kind," John said.

"He gave us everything. And later ... he kind of became a recluse."

Karen said that up until 2008, George was a heavy drinker. But that was the year it accelerated. Alcohol became an everyday thing, and binge drinking would happen three or four times a week. At times, he combined alcohol and sleeping pills, heightening his family's concern.

He would go a whole day without eating, or would pass out at the dinner table, Karen said. Someone in the family would talk to him by phone in the afternoon, and they could tell he was drinking - and a plan was hatched to get him home. The children didn't ask him to come to their school or sports events. They avoided talking about his work because it made him more stressed.

"The family was all working around it," Karen said. "It was one of those things where the family was trying to hide it ... you're on high alert."

The year 2008 was an intense time for George - indeed, for many people in the financial industry. Financial contagion had set off a sickening crash in markets and oil prices, and George, along with everyone else, was worried about losses.

But Karen said the heavy drinking didn't stop when markets recovered, and is loath to point to economic or business factors as the reason for his problems.

"It was a big thing for George, in that one, because a lot of people suffered," she said of the financial-crisis period. "But there will always be a reason to drink, or to use."

In 2007, he had began a seven-year stint as vice-chairman of Alberta Investment Management Corporation (AIMCo) - the province's newly created pension and endowment fund - which became one of his proudest business accomplishments, John said. In 2008, he was appointed to Mr. Flaherty's Economic Advisory Council. Next came the Chrysler board appointment, "to make sure the Canadian government's investment is well managed," George said. He regularly made lists of the most influential Canadian business people.

In the same period, George sold the company he had built from the ground up. In May, 2009, Australia's Macquarie Group paid $130million to acquire the 170-employee Tristone.

He later said he sold it reluctantly, at the urging of other shareholders.

In 2013, George headed a Canadian group that purchased the Arizona Coyotes, and he was credited with playing a major role in keeping the troubled franchise in Phoenix. But the group, which included Canadian oilmen looking for a business legacy beyond the energy sector, sold their controlling interest in the NHL team a year later.

Even while George struggled personally, Karen believes he still excelled in the business world.

She tried to look after him. There had been addiction in her own family when she was growing up, and she believes there was a strong element of co-dependency in their relationship. She wanted to "save him."

But eventually, Karen said she realized she needed to create a healthy example for their children. She started attending Alcoholics Anonymous meetings in 2013, and has since taken addiction-studies courses at Mount Royal University.

"I detached with love," she said. "I needed to do my own recovery if there was any chance that I was going to be able to mentor that for my kids, and for George to grow, too."

In December, 2014, Karen was in emergency at Calgary's Foothills hospital with George after his first suicide attempt. She was rapidly laying out plans to get him into the best addiction-treatment facility available when a blunt-speaking psychiatrist told her to stop - that George would only get help when he decided for himself he wanted to act.

"He leaned over and he's like, 'Hon, it doesn't matter what rehab place he goes to. He needs to decide to get better.' " George did make the decision to do something. He entered a substance abuse treatment centre on New Year's Day in 2015. Karen said George worried once he stopped drinking, it wouldn't be as easy for him to socialize for work - as so many business relationships were formed at a bar.

"That was a big fear ... when he had to quit and he wouldn't be able to do a lot of that stuff. How would he function in those circles?" Relapse is a part of recovery, and George was back to treatment in July, 2016. When he left, he began living separately from the family to work on himself, Karen said. He was attending Alcoholics Anonymous. She and John, and younger siblings Carter and Isla, still saw and spoke to him regularly. There was no legal separation, and the couple had recently started therapy sessions to determine where their relationship was going, Karen said.

There was also regular yoga for George, and mountain climbing - including 2017 expeditions to Mount Kilimanjaro, Antarctica's Vinson Massif and an attempt at Everest - that his son John said kept him "balanced."

"He tried, desperately," Karen said.

Someone like George, she said, was used to having solutions and results instantaneously. "But in recovery, it just doesn't happen that way."

John said his father at one time had a good connection with his Alcoholics Anonymous sponsor, but George had recently "seemed to kind of let go of the relationship."

"You would have maybe thought he would always battle with this, but ... it wouldn't come to this abrupt end," John said of his father's suicide.

"To be honest, it seemed like it came out of nowhere, because with his expeditions he seemed like he was the healthiest he had ever been before."

John, who is studying chemical engineering at Northeastern University in Boston, is plain-spoken about his father's strengths and his trials. In his eulogy at the funeral on Nov. 18, John spoke about George's talent and work ethic, his delighted grin expressing that "he got what wanted from you before you even had a chance" and his push to have his children attend university and see the world.

John also said his father did everything he could to try to defeat his illness.

"We can only imagine the weight burdened on him as he trudged through each day, each hour, each minute," he said in the eulogy.

"I know now that these ghosts no longer lurk behind him, and hold him down.

He is now light."

Associated Graphic

Top: Karen Gosbee and her son, John, walk their dog at a park near their Calgary home on Dec. 21. Above: George Gosbee's family, seen in 2014, saw a much different picture of the man seen by the business world. Left: George attends the annual Alberta Economic Summit at Mount Royal College in 2013 in Calgary.

TOP: TODD KOROL/THE GLOBE AND MAIL; ABOVE: COURTESY OF THE FAMILY; LEFT: CHRIS BOLIN/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

'One of the greatest situations in all of baseball'
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From the team's prospects this season to negotiating a long-term deal for star third-baseman Josh Donaldson, Toronto Blue Jays president Mark Shapiro sat down with The Globe and Mail's Robert MacLeod to offer his insights on the future
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By ROBERT MACLEOD
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Saturday, January 20, 2018 – Print Edition, Page S2


The best and brightest Toronto Blue Jays were put through the paces at the team's rookie-development program at Rogers Centre this week.

Close to 20 prospects were on hand, led by close-to-prime-time youngsters Vladimir Guerrero Jr. and Bo Bichette.

They are the future. The present remains entrusted to a familiar group, led by third-baseman Josh Donaldson, pitcher Marcus Stroman, catcher Russell Martin and shortstop Troy Tulowitski. Last season, during an injury-plagued campaign, the Blue Jays stumbled and missed the playoffs for the first time in three years.

On Thursday, Blue Jays president and chief executive Mark Shapiro sat down with The Globe and Mail to talk about the 2018 season. Spring training begins on Feb. 14.

You would be hard-pressed to find any baseball executive at this time of year who is not optimistic about his team's chances in the coming season. Why do you think the Blue Jays will bounce back in 2018?

Well, I would tell you that this year's Blue Jays team is not complete. I still feel like we've got resources left to spend and work left to do. It's been a slow off-season and I feel there's meaningful moves left to make.

But, regardless of those moves, I think our success largely hinges on the same thing it's hinged on since 2016, our pitching staff. So if [Aaron] Sanchez is healthy; if Stro [Marcus Stroman] can continue to pitch at the high level he's pitched at; if J.A. Happ can continue to be the rock-solid top half of the rotation he's been; and Marco [Estrada] can continue to compete and give us innings; and somebody else can join that mix, whether it's [Joe] Biagini or someone from the outside; if that happens, I think we're going to be in the mix because our pitching's going to give us a chance every day. And we've got a couple of guys, two or three guys, that have a chance to dominate some lineups.

So, if we are successful, it will largely be driven by our pitching.

And again, going back to even 2016, it wasn't our offence that drove us. It was largely our pitching.

The team's top prospects have been working out at Rogers Centre all week, led by the likes of Bo Bichette and Vladimir Guerrero Jr.

The club believes that their arrival is still a year or so away. What impact has this had in determining the direction of the team in the short term?

It hasn't, not at all. They are two different focuses and two different aspects of our job - both vitally important. One highly visible and the other not so visible.

One is essential for the sustainable long-term success, and that is the obsessive focus on the infusion of young talent and then the development of that talent and the articulation of what it means to be a Blue Jays player. So that's the piece that's being handled this week, not just with the 19 prospects that are here, but with the entire amateur-scouting staff that is here to meet to ramp up their scouting season over the next six months to another crucial draft in June.

And the other piece would be our major-league team, which is a relentless focus on trying to be as competitive as we can be. The fans in this city and this country are deserving of that based on the incredible passion and level of support that they offer.

So, the sustainable long-term model lies with those young players, but our obligation is to continue to try to play out the good core of major-league players that we've got and extend the competitive window we've got here as long as we can.

The core of the team returns pretty much intact from a year ago, an injury-ravaged season in which the Blue Jays mostly underperformed and finished next-to-last in the always-tough American League East. The Blue Jays have been relatively quiet during the off-season, with the free-agent acquisition of Curtis Granderson, a veteran support player at the tail end of his career, the biggest signing. What makes you think this year will be different?

I think we feel like the talent at the minor-league level has a better chance to reinforce us, but not drive our success. But we certainly feel like we've got a stronger cast of reinforcements that are closer to the major-league level. And we feel like if we're healthy, that we have a good enough group of guys to play at a championship level on our major-league team. I don't think Granderson is the only thing we've done. [Yangervis] Solarte was an important move for us. I would say you're right in characterizing that largely what we've done is add complementary players. Solarte, [Aledmys] Diaz, Granderson are all complementary players. But, when healthy, we've got a group of players that we're not going to do much better than in free agency.

Last season, was it just the multitude of injuries that eventually took its toll? I think if you look at our team and just say, 'Hey, maybe [if] just two of the 10 things don't go wrong, we might have been in the running.' The wild-card team won, what, 87 games? So we weren't far from that. We just had too many things go wrong and there were dips in performance.

No. 1, obviously, was Sanchez.

Between Sanchez and [Roberto] Osuna - even if those two guys alone [had healthy seasons], we're in pretty good shape for the wild card.

The elephant in the room - Josh Donaldson, who can become a free agent at year's end. By signing him to a record-setting, one-year, $23million deal for 2018, which avoided arbitration, does that give you a leg up on negotiating a long-term deal?

I don't know that. The long-term contracts are always about finding that sweet spot, the risk-sharing equation. And how do both sides feel about finding a level where they both compromise some, but both feel good about the length of the contract and the dollar amount on an annual basis?

I think our advantage lies in the fact that he's here, he's playing with this team, likes being here, he's appreciated here by both the organization and the fans.

But the rest of it, our best chance to sign him is to keep it [the negotiation process] as private as we possibly can. So that's how we're going to do it.

Have you entered into conversation yet with Donaldson on a long-term deal?

Any window where you negotiate you usually talk about a range of scenarios.

Is locking up Donaldson long term something that has to happen before the July 31 trade deadline?

I don't think in black-and-white terms. I don't live by deadlines.

There's no reason to close doors.

That's probably the best way to answer it.

What is your philosophy on longterm deals? I don't have a black-and-white philosophy on contract parameters for position players, pitchers, ages. I think every situation is unique and the set of variables that need to be examined to come up with the right value are dictated by a comprehensive analysis of that situation. Some of that also doesn't involve the actual player, but the team around that player.

The more information you have, the better chance you have of making good decisions.

How critical is it for Toronto's success that Troy Tulowitzki bounces back from that ugly season-ending ankle injury and returns to the form that made him a perennial all-star when he was playing in Colorado?

I think we've tried to offset the risk a little bit by bringing in a couple of infielders - and we still might bring in another one.

When Tulo is healthy and when he's performing at his peak level, he's one of the better players at his position in the game. It's hard to measure what that means. But the drop-off from him to anyone else is going to be pretty big.

I don't look at any one player being healthy as the key. Maybe Sanchez is the highest leverage, but Troy is certainly a guy who could impact our fortunes if he started playing well.

So you might have to control his playing time a bit more this season in order to ensure he maintains his health?

I think if you're trying to help players perform at optimal levels, you're looking at what the optimal amount of playing time is. It's unique and individual for every guy, based on age, body composition, the position being played, how his body recovers, size - all those things. It's going to be a unique answer for every guy.

But if we're going to be successful, we're going to manage everyone's playing time.

Business is booming at Rogers Centre with more than three million fans streaming through the gates last season. How does that rabid following come into play in trying to determine if a team needs to go through a rebuild?

We've got one of the greatest situations in all of baseball. I don't want to be redundant. I've been pretty consistent, open and honest, saying that if this were an intellectual exercise conducted in a vacuum, and there were no fans, we would have probably started trading players over a year ago.

What we're doing right now, we're doing for our fans.

We're doing it because we care about our fans because we put an enormous amount of weight on the level of passion and support that we enjoy and feel obligated to try and return that.

The rotation would appear to be the team's strength, led by Marcus Stroman, who is coming off two quality seasons. Do you see him moving into more of a leadership role? I think he's a leader already, but it's hard for a starting pitcher.

They can lead the starting-pitcher group, but it's hard for a starting pitcher to be a leader on a team. But he certainly sets a tone. He's got a swagger, he's got an elite work ethic, an elite level of athleticism. His competitiveness is second to none.

So if you look at his competitiveness, his athleticism, his work ethic, his drive - I think that sets a tone. That's a standard that other players feel that they want to rise up to.

What about Rogers Centre itself?

What plans are being considered for improvements there to improve the fan experience along with the longdiscussed new spring-training facility in Dunedin, Fla.?

The largest change to the organization this year, I feel like we're barrelling down on the final steps on Dunedin and finally hope to have shovels in the ground there this year. I'd be very surprised if we don't begin the construction of that project before the year's end.

As far as Rogers Centre goes, we've done an extensive amount of research, bench-marked it against all the best stadiums, ballparks, arenas in the world, reimagined what it should be and could be to provide us a competitive team in the current entertainment and sports landscape.

We presented all that to our ownership. Now it's in their hands to determine what the balance of capital needs and concerns they have, where this fits in their priorities.

Certainly, what we have received is they understand the need. And when it fits the broader corporate time frame it will be addressed.

Can we put to rest any notion that there will be a natural-grass playing field at Rogers Centre?

Grass is possible at Rogers Centre. The building wasn't designed with an irrigation system in place.

We're not talking about thousands of dollars and we're not even talking about millions of dollars. We're talking about tens of millions of dollars into maybe the hundreds of millions if you were to retrofit the stadium to accommodate grass. It would be an unbelievably huge undertaking that would consume a large portion of our budget.

So the question is not whether we can have grass, the question is are you willing to have grass over and above every other thing that you possibly want to do?

Whenever you're running a business, you're left to make choices as to what's most important. I think when it comes to the grass question, it's, 'Is it grass and nothing else?' Or, do we instead look at providing the best fan experience with a product of AstroTurf now that doesn't garner complaints anywhere except for historically?

This interview has been edited and condensed.

Associated Graphic

President and chief executive of the Toronto Blue Jays Mark Shapiro is seen at the team's clubhouse at Rogers Centre in Toronto last Sunday.

MARK BLINCH/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Canada can win at trade - even if NAFTA dies
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Here's how negotiators should approach next week's Montreal talks - and a Plan B if Trump decides to walk away
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By ERIC MILLER
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Saturday, January 20, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B4


President of Rideau Potomac Strategy Group and a Fellow with the Canadian Global Affairs Institute

Trade negotiators from Canada, the United States and Mexico will gather in Montreal next week for the sixth round of talks on the North American free-trade agreement (NAFTA). It's an important moment in the renegotiation.

When the process began in Washington in August, there was much chatter that it would all be over by Christmas. This was never the Canadian government's view, nor was it realistic.

One does not reopen the rules of the road for one of the world's largest trading blocs and expect the process to be swift or easy.

Going into the talks, the United States tabled more than 100 negotiating demands, making a balanced outcome - which is politically necessary for Canada and Mexico - hard to achieve.

Moreover, the United States has put forward controversial proposals on issues ranging from automotive rules of origin to dispute settlement to a fiveyear NAFTA "sunset clause."

These are antithetical to established trade practices and injurious to Canadian interests.

Even so, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer has grown increasingly frustrated about the slow speed and complexity of the renegotiation process.

Negotiators have made good progress on the less controversial NAFTA "modernization" agenda. These measures would do sensible things such as cover e-commerce and streamline border processes for trade. The bigger challenge comes from the more controversial U.S. proposals.

Being past his self-imposed deadline and facing the need this summer for U.S. President Donald Trump to secure renewal of his trade-negotiating authority, Mr. Lighthizer will make an assessment soon about the prospects for NAFTA deal.

Many in Canada and the United States are turning pessimistic and are beginning to prepare for a U.S. withdrawal.

One must ask: How did things devolve to the point of a possible U.S. NAFTA exit - and does it matter, anyway?

AMER-EXIT?

Canadians are well aware that recourse to protectionism is a recurring pattern in U.S. foreign economic policy.

Being in a continental-sized country with a large internal market, U.S. firms, unlike their Canadian counterparts, tend not to instinctively believe that they have to export in order to prosper. Even today, the United States has one of the lowest ratios of trade as a percentage of GDP among rich countries - 27 per cent as compared to 64 per cent for Canada. Foreign competition is often viewed as something to be fought not just in the marketplace, but also in the corridors of Washington.

During the 1980s, in the midst of growing competition from Japan and Europe, the United States showed signs of turning protectionist. A federal royal commission, the Macdonald Commission, argued that if the walls were going up around the U.S. market, Canada's interests were best served by being inside.

Brian Mulroney embraced the idea, concluded negotiations with the Americans in 1987, and won an epic election campaign on free trade in 1988.

Canada then joined the United States and Mexico in 1991 to negotiate NAFTA.

NAFTA was highly controversial in the United States. It took a well-organized effort by business groups, combined with the considerable political talents of then-president Bill Clinton, to get the agreed-upon deal approved by Congress. It entered into force on Jan. 1, 1994.

This coalition then moved on to other things.

Meanwhile, anger about the agreement persisted. As the first free-trade agreement with a developing country, NAFTA became synonymous in Middle America with the ravages of globalization, deindustrialization and income inequality.

When jobs were being outsourced to China in the 2000s, NAFTA was blamed.

When Mr. Trump became a presidential candidate, he barnstormed the country decrying NAFTA as a "disaster," and tapped into a deep vein of resentment about the agreement and its alleged effects. As President, he swiftly made good on his promise to renegotiate.

Canadians are basically supportive of free trade and never thought seriously about the prospect of the United States reconsidering its trade policy.

Rather, they got on with the business of making free trade a success.

Since 1989, Canada's merchandise trade with the United States has more than tripled, to $576-billion (U.S.) in 2015.

Among the three NAFTA countries, trade has more than tripled since 1993 to more than $1-trillion annually. There also has been a fivefold increase in the value of foreign investment between the United States and Canada since NAFTA.

Because of this, any attempt to disentangle the complex relationships and supply chains built across North America since NAFTA would be costly and destructive. And while some economists armed with "general equilibrium models" are playing down the importance of NAFTA to Canada's economy, they are missing an important part of the picture.

For Canada, a key benefit is the narrowing of what could be called the "investment premium." When firms consider investing in, say, Ontario versus Ohio, they note that the U.S. location enjoys natural advantages: a larger market, greater economies of scale and, typically, lower all-in costs. By integrating the two economies, NAFTA has significantly lowered the "premium" investors must pay for choosing Canada over the United States. This has come through certainty of market access, more efficient borders and streamlining of costs across the economy.

The end of NAFTA - or even a period of prolonged uncertainty - could swiftly erode these hard-won advantages.

SAFEGUARDING CANADA'S PREFERRED POSITION

From the beginning, Canada was alone in viewing a longer negotiation as something that would be in its interests. Its negotiating team has been rigorous in its preparations, cleareyed in its strategy and deft in its handling of both the United States and Mexico.

The early risk was that the United States and Mexico would coalesce around a deal that was bad for Canada. From the outset, the Mexican government has been motivated to quickly address America's NAFTA concerns. Prolonged uncertainty, it feared, would be a significant drag on Mexico's ability to attract investment, particularly the type of exportoriented manufacturing in which it has thrived in recent years.

Ultimately, the Americans' slowness in tabling proposals coupled with the sharpness of some of their positions meant that an early U.S.-Mexico tie-up was not possible. Regardless, Mexico's motivation to conclude the NAFTA renegotiation remains unchanged.

Montreal poses a new challenge. Canada needs to drive enough progress to constrain the Americans' ability to leave the table. If Canada is seen as pragmatic and solution-minded, Washington's ability to walk away and credibly blame Ottawa for NAFTA's failure diminishes.

This matters because if NAFTA collapses, Canada's perceived conduct in the present discussions will influence its ability to secure a U.S. commitment to negotiate a renewed bilateral deal.

Progress, of course, need not mean agreement. It does, however, mean some forward movement on the less controversial "modernization" issues and the identification of workable ways of getting traction on the more controversial ones.

The final formulations must both address U.S. concerns and leave Canada at least as well off as it is today.

The other core challenge is for Canada to begin making tangible progress on its offensive interests, such as expanded government procurement and temporary entry of business professionals.

To date, the Trump administration has been unwilling to deal seriously with these issues.

That may change as the talks move to a more advanced bargaining stage where big tradeoffs can happen.

In order to get there, Canadian negotiators will have to push hard in Montreal to reinforce the idea that trade-offs, not stark demands, are the only way to secure a NAFTA agreement.

Canada has reportedly made tangible progress on "trade facilitation" measures that will make the border work better, and on a number of other matters. Still, while the path ahead will not be easy, the right combination of tactics and strategy can secure a good NAFTA deal for Canada.

DIVERSIFICATION IMPERATIVE

Looking ahead, Canada must ask how it can reduce its vulnerability to the vagaries of American politics through trade diversification. Given that the United States takes 75 per cent of Canada's exports, there is no perfect answer.

Saving NAFTA is the preferred option, but if it falls apart, Canada should pursue a renewed bilateral deal with the United States. The U.S. would likely demand inclusion of key issues such as supply management and softwood lumber, so Canada should begin considering what it might be willing to do on these issues.

For its part, Canada should seek a comprehensive agreement. This would include full exemption from "Buy American" rules and a cross-border labour-mobility regime.

Some analysts suggest that Canada may not need a freetrade agreement at all and can simply rely on the World Trade Organization (WTO), but this is a risky bet. If the Trump administration is willing to withdraw from NAFTA, surely it is willing to erode the effectiveness of the WTO and skirt its rules. In what seems an ominous sign of things to come, the United States is presently blocking the appointment of new members to the WTO Appellate Body.

So diversification is a must.

In Asia, Canada must prioritize the swift completion of the new Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). It offers immense opportunities for Canadian exporters and can go a long way to fulfilling the goals of trade diversification. Once completed, Canada should champion the entry of a new group of TPP members, including Indonesia, Taiwan and Thailand.

Some have suggested that China can replace a protectionist United States in Canada's export mix. Geographic proximity alone suggests that this can never happen. But the two can still develop a mutually beneficial trade relationship.

In order to do so, the federal government should appoint a crack team of trade experts to map out China's economic interests, identify where Canadians have comparative advantages in the Chinese market, develop workable mechanisms for guaranteeing that Canadian firms get real access in that market, and design ways to administer the agreement - including settling disputes.

In September, 2017, the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) between Canada and the European Union entered into force. Canada also has an important trade agreement with South Korea.

On both fronts, the government needs a comprehensive strategy to turn the deal into business.

It is often said that free-trade agreements create opportunities, but do not guarantee results. With so much riding on the trade diversification agenda, it is time for Canada to up its game on trade promotion. This includes considering how to better utilize and resource the Trade Commissioner Service, Export Development Canada and the Business Development Bank.

Ottawa should also get more hands-on in developing export consortiums of Canadian companies that can provide integrated, coherent service offerings in target markets. Japan, for example, frequently offers partner countries infrastructure projects. A subway system, for instance, is built top-to-bottom with Japanese technology, materials and financing. Canada should do the same in areas where it has a critical mass of expertise.

Finally, Canada should fully align its domestic-policy regime, including at the provincial level, to reinforce the push to expand exports and build competitive companies. A variety of measures, from B.C. log export restrictions, which impede timber trade with Asia, to restrictions on the distribution of wines, which are under challenge by Australia and the United States at the WTO, ensure that Canada punches below its weight in sectors where it has comparative advantages.

OPPORTUNITY ABOUNDS

It is often said that out of crisis comes opportunity. With NAFTA at risk, farmers, business groups and ordinary citizens are publicly supporting the deal for the first time in years. A November Pew Research poll found that 56 per cent of Americans now think that NAFTA was "good for America," up five percentage points since May.

While this support has to be turned into leverage and then married with careful, creative negotiating techniques, it does raise the real possibility that the three countries could end up with a good agreement at the end.

If Canada comes out of Montreal having made meaningful progress on automotive rules of origin and can realistically foresee closing this issue within a couple of rounds, the sessions can be considered a success.

After all, if the three countries can crack one of the most highprofile controversial issues, the others may not look quite so impossible.

Nothing, of course, is guaranteed. If Canada ultimately does retain its preferential access in the U.S. market while pushing ahead in Asia and Latin America and better utilizing its Europe deal, it may enter the 2020s as one of the advanced economies best positioned for growth.

In an uncertain world, that would be a pretty good outcome indeed.

Associated Graphic

Softwood lumber is processed at a sawmill in Chertsey, Que., on Wednesday. Canada needs to consider what it might be willing to do on softwood should the NAFTA deal fall apart.

CHRISTINNE MUSCHI/REUTERS

How a lone-wolf operative is shaping political discourse
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One man's effort to disparage Ontario Liberals through Facebook feeds could augur the future of Canadian politics
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By ADAM RADWANSKI
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Saturday, January 13, 2018 – Print Edition, Page A16


A day after it was announced that many of Ontario's remaining community newspapers were being shut down, Jeff Ballingall was sitting in a downtown Toronto coffee joint explaining how he intended to step into the void.

This was preposterous, on its face. Mr. Ballingall has little experience in traditional media, nor interest in objective journalism. He's a 32-year-old former political staffer and employee of the shortlived Sun News Network who now produces Facebook-friendly videos and memes, under the moniker Ontario Proud, which mostly just attack or mock Premier Kathleen Wynne and sometimes Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Often that's through crude caricatures, sometimes scarcely pegged to the news: Recent examples include a cartoon of Ms. Wynne literally burning money, and a photo of her walking through the snow with the caption "It's so cold today, Wynne has her hands in her own pockets for once."

But when it comes to how we get information in the digital age - the tone and tribalism of political discourse, who influences it and how, what it is likely to look like in this year's Ontario election as well as campaigns nationwide - Mr. Ballingall's claims can't be dismissed out of hand. Working virtually alone, he is managing to simultaneously make a mockery of his province's new electoral finance laws, and to demonstrate that there is a huge market here for the sort of bias-reinforcing social media content that has polarized electorates around the Western world.

Those claims go well beyond finding an audience in abandoned readers of the 36 publications shuttered by Postmedia and Torstar. He also boasts his content "outperforms major media outlets" and attracts more eyeballs than what is put out by "all the [provincial] political parties combined," being seen by millions each week with minimal ad spending.

Mr. Ballingall's braggadocio requires a grain of salt; he is solely comparing social-media engagement, and political parties and media outlets reach Ontarians through plenty of other means.

But an ever-growing number of people have been getting information through Facebook. Last year, Abacus Data reported that, according to its opinion research, 61 per cent of Canadian adults log into the social network daily - more than who watch TV news, visit news websites or read printed newspapers each day. Nearly half of those under the age of 30 told the research company that Facebook is where they learn first of breaking news.

This week, Facebook signalled it wants to scale back that aspect of its service, announcing that it will aim to put less professionally made media content in feeds, and prioritize posts that users share with each other and comment upon. That could put a dent in Mr. Ballingall's ambitions. Or it could conceivably help him further realize them, as he continues to meet shareability demands better than traditional media are willing or able to do.

Mr. Ballingall has been recognized by other Canadian political operatives for mastering the algorithm that has been (and will remain, in some form) at the heart of Facebook's business model.

"We all know it's been designed to facilitate that you spend a lot of money on advertising," said Joseph Lavoie, who, as Stephen Harper's strategic communications director, oversaw digital communications in the Prime Minister's Office. But after some early spending on paid ads, Mr. Ballingall has been generating Facebook numbers that Mr. Lavoie (a partner at Navigator Ltd., where Mr. Ballingall previously worked) called "genuinely organic" and "very impressive."

Those numbers have played into the fears of some of Facebook's increasingly vocal critics - people including University of British Columbia professor Taylor Owen, who said Ontario Proud "exemplifies" his concerns about a "general debasing of the political discourse." The worry is not just about Mr. Ballingall's content. It's about how he has been leading the way in shaping where thirdparty involvement in this country's elections is going - and potentially making that involvement more impactful, despite recent attempts to curb it.

Last year, Ontario passed legislation dramatically restricting how much outside groups can spend to influence campaigns, limiting them to $600,000 in the six months before elections and $100,000 during them. It was largely a response to complaints that seven-figure ad campaigns by unions attacking the opposition Progressive Conservatives had repeatedly given the governing Liberals an unfair advantage. Thus far, as with similar rules in other provinces and nationally, it appears to be stymying that sort of traditional third-party effort, mostly reliant on television ads.

What the law's crafters didn't count on, or figured they couldn't do much about, was that TV has gone from the only game in town to probably not even the best one. Advertising on Facebook is more narrowly targetable and cheaper. That's assuming it's paid advertising at all: Get enough traction, as Ontario Proud did, through an outlay of about $100,000 by Mr. Ballingall's telling, and much of a third party's content will be shared among users for free. (He has not specified where his initial funding came from.)

Or, at least it will if that third party proves willing and able to produce a type of content that gets traction on Facebook.

Mr. Ballingall is pretty much the only person in Ontario who fits the bill. He is joined, in other provinces, by similarly named operations - Alberta Proud, B.C. Proud - targeting centre-left governments or parties. (He has described people running the other groups as friends but denied formal links.) But he is likely to inspire imitators who, as with him, want to help defeat politicians they dislike, and make a name and a salary (from solicited donations) in the process.

Unless Facebook is set on truly tearing down the model that has made it one of the most valuable companies in the world, Mr. Ballingall's formula - familiar to those who followed the 2016 U.S. election - will be replicable.

That formula relies upon giving Facebook's algorithm what it craves: strong reactions.

To this point, at least, those reactions need not be positive ones; what matters is that users signal that a post has captured their attention. The precise mechanics of the algorithm remain a company secret. So far as anyone can tell, every like, dislike, comment or share counts as "engagement," as does clicking on a post or watching a video for more than a few seconds, and each boosts the odds that the same or related content will turn up in other feeds.

So, to understand how Ontario Proud's content was seen by 6.3 million Facebook users in a single week last month - not necessarily clicked upon, but appearing in their field of vision - it helps to know that, in the same week, its 40 posts registered 1.4 million engagements. (How many were within Ontario is unclear.)

Each week, those numbers feed off each other: more views leading to more engagements, and vice versa.

Sometimes, Mr. Ballingall builds his numbers through shareable content that is apolitical - jokey memes about the recent spell of frigid weather, for instance.

That's to supplement the political attacks that are his bread and butter.

When Mr. Ballingall describes the key to his anti-Wynne or anti-Trudeau messaging as "going for things that are topical, that promote an emotive response, and that matter to people," it sounds like Political Messaging 101. But, as with any effective third party, he's doing something the folks seeking election avoid.

The way he explains it, parties are too riskaverse to produce stuff that will get people scrolling through their feeds to stop and pay attention. "On political campaigns I've worked on, everything has to go through a process, and any creative idea you have, by the time it's gone up the chain of command, it's either squashed or watered down to the point of obsolescence."

A more generous explanation is that parties try to present a modicum of respect for each other. Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown is not about to put his name behind a comedy troupe's rap video in which a Kathleen Wynne impersonator robs a "Joe Schmoe;" or a "Nightmare before Christmas" take in which Ontarians, sleepless because of their hydro bills, are alarmed to find Ms. Wynne on their lawn - both of which were pushed by Ontario Proud.

"If any one party gets caught making a mistake that's seen as childish or inappropriate, that could cost them the entire election," said Mr. Lavoie, the former Harper communications adviser. A third party has "much more flexibility to play with emotional levers."

Not that the provincial Tories are exactly disavowing Mr. Ballingall's content, with a spokesperson for Mr. Brown suggesting its traction is a manifestation of Ontarians' frustration with the Liberals.

As for how exactly all that traffic he's getting is supposed to contribute to the Liberals' defeat, part of it is mobilization.

Ontario Proud's Facebook page has more than 300,000 followers, with thousands more each week. Mr. Ballingall has already experimented with generating reallife protests around Ms. Wynne's events, and closer to the election will try to help with getting out the vote. Toward that end he is using the campaign software Nation Builder to amass a database loaded with his followers' contact details - information he could also leverage in future campaigns, such as leadership contests, to make himself more of a player.

But the bigger part, when it comes to the imminent race in Ontario at least, is about shaping the narrative.

Mr. Ballingall's hope is to make it harder for Ms. Wynne to rebuild her poor image or change the channel, because many voters will see more of his content than anyone else's. He's not talking about "all-day news junkies like myself or people who are buying a newspaper every day," concentrated heavily in downtown Toronto. His targets are "people who passively consume the news" - those who may have turned away from local newspapers even before they were shuttered, in favour of Facebook feeds.

Challenging opinions and assumptions is not what those feeds have been designed to do. Facebook has been giving users what it thinks they want, such as attacks on politicians it figures they already dislike, if those attacks get enough traction with other users. Mr. Ballingall, for one, seems to expect that, in future campaigns, politicians on all sides will have people like him trying to drive up the negatives, with more polarization as a result.

"I think that's the way media is going.

It's going to get very, very tribal, with all these niche pages trying to reach niche audiences."

Dr. Owen, much less sanguine about that prospect, is inclined to agree. He's surprised, he said, that there hasn't already been more such proliferation, and Mr. Ballingall pointing the way only makes it likelier.

Meanwhile, Mr. Lavoie wonders whether at a certain point the phenomenon could pose a challenge even to parties ostensibly having dirty work done for them.

What will it mean for them if "an upstart which doesn't have to worry about consequences at the ballot box" suddenly has the ear of so many of their supporters?

Over coffee, it was pointed out that many of the people Mr. Ballingall is reaching likely reside in ridings where the Liberals aren't competitive. He replied that, as they struggle to adapt to their own campaign-finance legislation's ban on corporate and union donations to parties, the Liberals could be heavily counting on a new per-vote subsidy to keep them afloat financially. Any votes against them, anywhere, will make that tougher.

"If they hemorrhage votes all over the province," he said, "that's going to cripple them after the election."

Associated Graphic

Jeff Ballingall, at work in an office in downtown Toronto, is striving to become part of the narrative for the coming Ontario election campaign by targeting an audience that no longers relies on traditional media for news.

CHRISTOPHER KATSAROV/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

TELL EVERYONE
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When it comes to abuse, argues Ann-Marie MacDonald, there is never silence, only secrecy
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By ANN-MARIE MACDONALD
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Saturday, January 13, 2018 – Print Edition, Page O3


Playwright, actor and novelist.

Back when my children were toddlers, one of them told me I was being mean and said, "I'm going to tell Cecile on you!" Cecile was her preschool teacher. I don't recall what prompted my daughter's accusation - maybe I was insisting she finish her broccoli. Maybe I had lost my temper. But I do remember my reply: "You should tell on me." Tell Cecile, tell your babysitter, tell your aunt, I said. "You should always tell."

I believe Diana Bentley, Kristin Booth, Patricia Fagan and Hannah Miller. They have told on Albert Schultz and Soulpepper. Since the allegations, which have yet to be proven in court, surfaced last week, I have been thinking about a trope that is used repeatedly in the media and in conversation: "breaking the silence." I believe that what these women are doing now is not breaking the silence, because when it comes to abuse, there is never silence; there is only secrecy. And to break secrecy is far harder than to break silence. Secrecy - and the whispers, jokes, fear, denial and good intentions that sustain it - exudes a gummy, nightmarish layer of distortion that builds up over time and threatens to choke those who dare fight their way through it.

Here's another trope: "breaking the story." Why does it so often fall to the most vulnerable to break a story? Women who break a story such as this one do so at the risk of having the story break them.

The real question is, are we listening?

People have been publicly questioning Soulpepper's policies and practices for years. Last Monday, former Soulpepper associate artistic director Ravi Jain described on CBC Radio how, when he attempted to do the job he was hired to do - make positive, creative change - he met with such resistance he chose to quit. I am the wife of Alisa Palmer, who directed both the first production and the remount of Top Girls, along with 'Night Mother (2008) for Soulpepper. She has been part of the conversation about Soulpepper's practices for many years and has publicly directed attention to the conflict of interest relating to the fact that Mr. Schultz and executive director Leslie Lester were not only a professional team but a personal couple. After directing three productions for Soulpepper, Ms. Palmer turned down a fourth and declined to work further with the company.

She is also on record criticizing the double standard that, among some media and funders, has operated in Soulpepper's favour when it comes to diversity. Here I'll stress that gender equity is integral to diversity - in fact, it's the canary in the coal mine. Top Girls itself was the company's first production of a play by a woman playwright in its then-11-year history. In this domain, I believe Soulpepper has underachieved but been overpraised. When the company was founded, and when Mr. Schultz emerged as its driving force in the late nineties, issues of diversity were already on the radar of funding bodies, audiences and theatres across the country. Mr. Schultz did not inherit Soulpepper's mandate; he helped to establish it with its emphasis on "the canon" - the canon being mostly classic works by dead white males from the Western world. Lots of my favourite plays are by these men, but they are only one rich vein of an even richer heritage, and the great plays lend themselves to diversity and re-interpretation: That's what makes them classics. Larger, much older theatre companies such as Stratford and Shaw whose mandates also centre on "the canon" have moved more quickly than Soulpepper to make real strides with diversity - and the art, and the canon, are better for it.

I have my own history with Soulpepper.

In 2008, I rejoined the all-female cast for the remount of Top Girls. In January, we received an e-mail from Mr. Schultz announcing he had auctioned off a series of dinners with us as a "girls' night out package." Trouble was, none us had been informed or asked in advance. I declined and thought I'd heard the last of it. Fastforward to October and Day 1 of rehearsals, when every professional cast elects an equity deputy whose job it is to file paperwork and make sure Canadian Actors' Equity rules are followed. I am seldom on stage, so I volunteered to do what is usually just a chore. Later that day, the stage manager noticed a series of dinners on the schedule, to which the cast objected strongly. As equity deputy, my job was to speak up to management, and, if necessary, bring a formal complaint to Equity. I spoke up. Soulpepper management refused to cancel the dinners, blocked my attempts to contact either the donors who'd bought them or then-board chair, Roger Garland, and pressured me not to inform Equity.

Still, I brought a formal complaint to Equity. Equity instructed Mr. Schultz to apologize, but the dinners went ahead. I did not attend. Soulpepper had helped itself to our brands and pocketed $30,000. I bumped into a board member in the lobby during that time and told her the dinners had been sold under false pretenses and exploited the supposed guests of honour.

She literally laughed off my concerns.

I don't know to what degree the cast members who attended the dinners did so out of a sense of undue pressure, but I do know actors are by nature generous. They have to be; they put their whole self at the service of creating a life onstage. It's this same generosity that often prompts them to put a theatre's needs ahead of their own; a generosity all too easily abused.

Last October, Soulpepper announced that it had cut ties with director Laszlo Marton in 2015 after he was accused of sexual harassment. I sent a letter to Equity and ACTRA, and copied Soulpepper's board chair Shawn Cooper saying I was happy the board had taken the complaints against Mr. Marton seriously, and hoped they saw "the connection between sexual harassment and a context of intimidation" and that their response was "a sign that the unhealthy context I worked in is also a thing of the past..." My letter was calm, but the experience was gut-wrenching. I wondered: If I, a middle-aged married lesbian, mother of two, veteran of the civil-rights barricades, established actor, playwright, author and broadcaster, erstwhile friend of Ms. Lester, could be treated this way, how might someone more vulnerable be treated? The four brave women who have come forward are daring to answer that question.

If a culture of abuse thrives despite professional rules, stage managers and colleagues, we need to look at the organization as a whole. And that includes the board of directors. Here again, silence was not the problem; in fact, neither was secrecy. Arts boards are largely made up of generous individuals who give of their time and often their money, in exchange for the satisfaction of helping the arts while enjoying the milieu. No doubt Soulpepper's board is the same, but it differs from many theatre boards in that it includes numerous wealthy individuals and highly placed corporate executives, people most theatre companies would be grateful to have on side. Given their collective level of expertise, how is it that the Soulpepper board of directors allowed the jobs of artistic director and executive director to be filled by a life-partnered couple? And while I know it is not unheard of, it seems unwise that the director of human resources should also be a lawyer who doubles as Soulpepper Theatre's general counsel. I do not have an MBA. I don't even have a BA.

But this management structure strikes me as a disaster waiting to happen.

Where were the high-powered management-savvy heads on the Soulpepper board? Or do we as professionals in the arts not merit the due diligence and basic respect that these individuals bring to their own professional milieus? What are we?

An arts booty call?

So now the Soulpepper board has "severed ties" with Leslie Lester. No doubt there is a legal reason for this wording that escapes me. But on a human level, I find it disgraceful. For years, the board supported and enjoyed the fruits of Ms. Lester's extraordinary energy, dedication and labour. Now, they cut her off. Whereas Mr.

Schultz gets to resign.

Transformation is possible and essential, but it will not be achieved by removing the two people at the top. They did not make this alleged mess alone, and the alleged diseased culture will not heal itself just because they are no longer in charge.

Positive change in such cases ought not to be led from within. Acting artistic director Alan Dilworth is a well-respected theatre professional and a judicious choice in the short-term, but as a Drummond-Dorrance Fellow and thus a beneficiary of a "transformational gift" by a board member, and as former associate artistic director, I believe he is not in a position to lead the necessary changes, nor would I wish it on him. Still, I am optimistic. The alleged toxic culture at Soulpepper does not change the fact that our theatre community, including many Soulpepper company members and employees, are immensely talented and hard-working.

Through my 20s and 30s, I dealt with my share of sexism and harassment; one artistic director took me for dinner, ostensibly to discuss my play, but instead wanted to talk about "what lesbians do in bed."

As I rushed through the meal and evaded his questions, I thought, "And for this, I'm missing the lunar eclipse." The same man went on to reject my choice of director - a woman - arguing the Bluma Appel theatre was too big for her, but that she could be his assistant director instead. I took my play, and my director, elsewhere. During rehearsals for that same play, a prominent theatre critic asked me out. He wanted to discuss my script, an early draft of which he had somehow gotten hold of. I declined his invitation. His subsequent review stands as the most savage I have ever received for any work. It goes on... my garden-variety anecdotes of sexism. But I worked a lot in feminist and queer environments, so I came in for less sexist treatment, never mind outright abuse, than many of my peers.

I, too, am tired of what Kristin Booth so aptly called "the veil of art" being used as an excuse for abusive behaviour. Only last week, an unnamed director at Soulpepper was quoted referring to Mr. Schultz as a "maverick" who was only trying to "get the best" out of his actors. Abusive behaviour on the part of a charismatic figure is all too often excused with this kind of - there are other terms for it, but there is no better term - bullshit.

If we fail to make the connections among different types of abuse and insist on seeing sexual abuse as a separate issue, we perpetuate the conditions that give rise to it in the first place. Aided and abetted by fear and good intentions, secrecy depends on the creeping complicity of a lot of us mostly good people. It's the old frog-in-the-pot analogy: We know something is wrong, but we don't think it's that bad until we're boiling. The analogy breaks down, however, when it comes to a 24year-old woman, fresh out of acting school, who finds herself subjected to what these four women are alleging they experienced at the hands of Mr. Schultz and Soulpepper Theatre; in a case such as that, a young woman doesn't have the luxury of a slowboiling pot. She is thrown straight into the fire.

When the rules, when our tools, our professional training, our colleagues, our leaders and our courage fail us; when you feel like you can't tell anyone ... tell everyone.

B.C. motor club hit by sexual-harassment allegations
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Former employee says harassment caused a variety of health problems in a complaint filed with the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal
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By JESSICA LEEDER
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Saturday, January 20, 2018 – Print Edition, Page A14


For its members and occasional guests, the Vancouver Island Motorsport Circuit is a dreamlike playground.

Nestled among the trees in British Columbia's Cowichan Valley, the exclusive club ushers visitors in by helicopter before inviting them to speed some of the finest performance vehicles available over an adrenalinefeeding 2.3-kilometre loop.

Working at Canada's only private motorsport country club, though, was allegedly a harassment-filled nightmare for one former employee, who was asked to trade cargo pants for "skirts or something more revealing," and endure comments from a manager about "what he would do to me sexually if given the opportunity," according to a complaint she has filed with the B.C.

Human Rights Tribunal.

Charleen Smith is a paramedic who worked at the track from June, 2016, until midway through last year, when she left on a doctor-approved stress leave. She would not return. Throughout her nine months of employment, Ms. Smith alleges, she endured sexual and other harassment from her boss, track operations manager Brent Evans.

In her human-rights complaint, which also names the circuit and chief executive Peter Trzewik as respondents, Ms. Smith alleges she was aggressively pushed behind her desk by Mr.

Evans, who she says had a habit of leaning in to her from behind her chair so Ms. Smith could "feel his breath on my neck" and felt "cornered" without an escape route.

"At the Christmas Party, Brent told me that he had a 6-pack in his room," she wrote in her human-rights complaint, adding that "he asked if I wanted to join him for a drink, he smiled, looking at me sexually. He conveyed that his intentions were sexual in nature." Ms. Smith said she declined them.

The impact of Mr. Evans's alleged behaviour at the track, which included leering and "staring at my body parts," according to Ms. Smith's complaint, literally made the woman sick.

"I had anxiety and sleep deprivation, I have become physically sick. I have been suffering from headaches and insomnia," she wrote in her tribunal complaint.

A copy of the original complaint was obtained by The Globe and Mail.

Michael Bain, a lawyer for Mr. Evans, told The Globe in an e-mailed statement that Mr. Evans "denies each and every allegation made" and disputes the conclusion reached by the track's investigators.

The facility, as well as a nearby hotel and spa, Villa Eyrie, are owned by the GAIN Dealer Group, a B.C.-based network of more than a dozen luxury automotive dealerships. A large interest in the group is held by Mr. Trzewik's business partner, Sylvester Chuang, a Toronto-based radiologist at the Hospital for Sick Children, who did not respond to a request for comment.

Dr. Chuang also maintains the AWIN Group, an even larger network of luxury dealerships in the Greater Toronto Area. The automobiles sold at dealerships owned by the two groups include the world's most exclusive brands, including Alfa Romeo, Audi, BMW, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche, Maserati, Land Rover and more.

Several of the auto makers are patrons of the B.C. track and make use of it to host new car launches or training programs for employees, dealers or journalists.

In their formal response to the allegations, Mr. Trzewik and the track have denied discriminating against Ms. Smith and any associated allegations of wrongdoing, according to the filing, also obtained by The Globe. The company has temporarily removed Mr. Evans from his role at the track after an internal investigation determined that some "bullying and harassment" had taken place.

Employee accounts of day-today experience at the track are detailed in an internal interview with track officials, a copy of which was obtained by The Globe.

They stand in stark contrast to the sleek image of luxury and exclusivity its owners have worked to cultivate for a global clientele since opening the membership-only driving circuit in 2016.

Automotive journalists, including this writer in a former role, have lauded the track, a unique facility that is the first of its kind in Canada and designed to stoke automotive passion.

Ms. Smith, who also filed a complaint with WorkSafe BC, is speaking publicly about her experience because staying silent, she said, has left her with feelings of shame.

"I'm not telling any lies. Keeping their secret makes me feel like I did something wrong. And I didn't," she said. "I struggled immensely before I even came forward about it."

When Ms. Smith heard news of the track's opening, she was so excited about the prospect of working for the company that she e-mailed in hopes they might create a position for her. "I sought them out and sent a bold letter saying, 'I want to be a part of you. What do I have to do to work here?' " she told The Globe and Mail in an interview.

The fledgling club agreed to hire her as an on-site paramedic who would moonlight as a concierge. When she came on board, Ms. Smith was given GAIN's employee handbook, which includes a zero-tolerance harassment policy.

But she said it was not long before she and other employees found themselves referring to its terms.

In letters written to track management last February, Ms. Smith and several other employees who wrote anonymously outlined a list of grievances that included sexual harassment, harassment, bullying and intimidation. They all identified Brent Evans, the operations manager, as the offender.

"Myself and my teammates are constantly belittled, bullied and hit," wrote one male employee who went on to refer to Mr. Evans as "a rock in the middle of the road."

In her letter, Ms. Smith said she was "truly sorry to have to write this" and said she felt "privileged" to work at the track. She wrote that she was hoping for a solution to the situation and looking forward to continuing her employment.

Another employee requested that he not be forced to raise concerns outlined in the letter with Mr. Evans. "We have already tried and I feel that doing so will only make things worse," the employee wrote, adding: "I have not signed this letter as I am concerned about repercussions of this complaint if Brent were to find out who it came from."

In a formal response to Ms. Smith's human-rights complaint, a lawyer for Mr. Trzewik and the circuit denies that either party discriminated against Ms. Smith.

The document states that Mr. Trzewik and track officials were unaware of the harassment issues before they received employees' written accounts.

But Ms. Smith told The Globe that Mr. Trzewik, the track president, told her and other employees that they were "free to find another job" if they did not like working conditions at the circuit.

Asked about the alleged comment, Mr. Trzewik said his words were misunderstood.

"I honestly think she misinterpreted because I would never say that," he said, recounting a meeting with disgruntled employees convened for "fact-finding" after they submitted their letters.

"Because at that time we hadn't made the decision to transfer [Mr. Evans] out ... I just said to them, also please keep in mind you do not have to leave the company, you could also come to different parts of our company and become a technician, become a parts person," Mr. Trzewik said.

"We don't talk to people that way."

Ms. Smith alleges her employers were unwilling to investigate the allegations until she lodged a complaint with WorkSafeBC. Provincial law compels employers to formally investigate when a harassment complaint is filed with the authority.

Mr. Trzewik said his team "reacted as fast as we possibly could" to the complaints against Mr. Evans, which he said were the company's first dealings with harassment-related allegations.

Company officials, he said, followed a road map provided by WorkSafeBC to deal with the issue.

Still, Mr. Trzewik said, Ms. Smith's case is "not as black-andwhite as many other claims in the world can be."

"There hasn't been any physical contact in any of those claims," he said of Ms. Smith's allegations. "If something like what Brent has allegedly done were to be done to my sister or to my mother ... I wouldn't be happy because she felt uncomfortable.

"But there was no physical contact ... no physical harassment," he said, adding: "I think maybe Char Smith may be extremely sensitive to him as a person."

After WorkSafeBC inspectors discussed the need for track officials to formally investigate, company officials interviewed Mr. Evans, a nearly 10-year employee, about the allegations against him. In a transcript of the interview obtained by The Globe, Mr. Evans denied making comments about his sexual desire for Ms. Smith.

"The comment that I made in the lunch room was not out of an interest or desire, it was a poor statement that I made," Mr. Evans said. "I stated, 'I think she needs to get laid and someone needs to show her a good time,' " he told the interviewer, adding: "I have no interest in Char at all."

Mr. Evans went on to admit telling Ms. Smith she could wear "slacks or a skirt" instead of cargo pants and work boots. He said he did not knowingly pin Ms. Smith behind her desk or realize she was uncomfortable when he looked at her screen because "she did not communicate I was in her space." Regarding his postChristmas-party invitation to his room, Mr. Evans said he invited not just Ms. Smith but also other staff to "get together and have a few drinks."

In their human-rights tribunal response, Mr. Trzewik and the track confirm Mr. Evans's admissions. They say his behaviour "occurred without the knowledge and consent" of track officials. In his interview with track brass, Mr. Evans said the allegations "crushed" him and made him question "every fiber of who I am," according to the transcript.

"Have there been mistakes?

Yes, absolutely," he told the interviewer. "This is not my character," he said, adding that his behaviour was triggered by "stress and needing time off."

"I truly feel I have made some errors and have learned from them," he said.

Last June, GAIN's humanresources manager, Nicole Jimenez, concluded the internal investigation into the allegations. "It was identified that bullying and harassment did occur at the workplace," she wrote in a report submitted to WorkSafeBC.

Mr. Evans, who was suspended during the investigation, was notified via e-mail of the findings. He would be temporarily removed from the track, the e-mail said, and reassigned to a sales position at Subaru of Nanaimo, one of the company's dealerships, to undergo mentoring and retraining. If he was successful, the note said, he would be returned to his original position.

"No representation has been made to him that he can return if the claim is by any chance found to be true," Mr. Trzewik said.

A website for Subaru of Nanaimo lists Mr. Evans as an assistant sales manager there. Ms. Smith, who no longer works at the track, has declined an early settlement meeting and is considering a civil suit. A hearing date has been tentatively set for the human-rights tribunal hearing for next September.

Associated Graphic

Paramedic Charleen Smith pets one of her rescue horses at her home in Duncan, B.C. She says she endured sexual and other harassment from her boss throughout her nine months of employment at the Vancouver Island Motorsport Circuit.

DARRYL DYCK/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Charleen Smith walks outside her home. An anonymous letter she wrote with some of her former co-workers at the Vancouver Island Motorsport Circuit said they were bullied, belittled and hit.

DARRYL DYCK/ THE GLOBE AND MAIL

B.C. motor club hit by sexual-harassment allegations
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Former employee says harassment caused a variety of health problems in a complaint filed with the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal
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By JESSICA LEEDER
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Saturday, January 20, 2018 – Print Edition, Page A16


For its members and occasional guests, the Vancouver Island Motorsport Circuit is a dreamlike playground.

Nestled among the trees in British Columbia's Cowichan Valley, the exclusive club ushers visitors in by helicopter before inviting them to speed some of the finest performance vehicles available over an adrenalinefeeding 2.3-kilometre loop.

Working at Canada's only private motorsport country club, though, was allegedly a harassment-filled nightmare for one former employee, who was asked to trade cargo pants for "skirts or something more revealing," and endure comments from a manager about "what he would do to me sexually if given the opportunity," according to a complaint she has filed with the B.C.

Human Rights Tribunal.

Charleen Smith is a paramedic who worked at the track from June, 2016, until midway through last year, when she left on a doctor-approved stress leave. She would not return. Throughout her nine months of employment, Ms. Smith alleges, she endured sexual and other harassment from her boss, track operations manager Brent Evans.

In her human-rights complaint, which also names the circuit and chief executive Peter Trzewik as respondents, Ms. Smith alleges she was aggressively pushed behind her desk by Mr.

Evans, who she says had a habit of leaning in to her from behind her chair so Ms. Smith could "feel his breath on my neck" and felt "cornered" without an escape route.

"At the Christmas Party, Brent told me that he had a 6-pack in his room," she wrote in her human-rights complaint, adding that "he asked if I wanted to join him for a drink, he smiled, looking at me sexually. He conveyed that his intentions were sexual in nature." Ms. Smith said she declined them.

The impact of Mr. Evans's alleged behaviour at the track, which included leering and "staring at my body parts," according to Ms. Smith's complaint, literally made the woman sick.

"I had anxiety and sleep deprivation, I have become physically sick. I have been suffering from headaches and insomnia," she wrote in her tribunal complaint.

A copy of the original complaint was obtained by The Globe and Mail.

Michael Bain, a lawyer for Mr. Evans, told The Globe in an e-mailed statement that Mr. Evans "denies each and every allegation made" and disputes the conclusion reached by the track's investigators.

The facility, as well as a nearby hotel and spa, Villa Eyrie, are owned by the GAIN Dealer Group, a B.C.-based network of more than a dozen luxury automotive dealerships. A large interest in the group is held by Mr. Trzewik's business partner, Sylvester Chuang, a Toronto-based radiologist at the Hospital for Sick Children, who did not respond to a request for comment.

Dr. Chuang also maintains the AWIN Group, an even larger network of luxury dealerships in the Greater Toronto Area. The automobiles sold at dealerships owned by the two groups include the world's most exclusive brands, including Alfa Romeo, Audi, BMW, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche, Maserati, Land Rover and more.

Several of the auto makers are patrons of the B.C. track and make use of it to host new car launches or training programs for employees, dealers or journalists.

In their formal response to the allegations, Mr. Trzewik and the track have denied discriminating against Ms. Smith and any associated allegations of wrongdoing, according to the filing, also obtained by The Globe. The company has temporarily removed Mr. Evans from his role at the track after an internal investigation determined that some "bullying and harassment" had taken place.

Employee accounts of day-today experience at the track are detailed in an internal interview with track officials, a copy of which was obtained by The Globe.

They stand in stark contrast to the sleek image of luxury and exclusivity its owners have worked to cultivate for a global clientele since opening the membership-only driving circuit in 2016. Automotive journalists, including this writer in a former role, have lauded the track, a unique facility that is the first of its kind in Canada and designed to stoke automotive passion.

Ms. Smith, who also filed a complaint with WorkSafe BC, is speaking publicly about her experience because staying silent, she said, has left her with feelings of shame.

"I'm not telling any lies. Keeping their secret makes me feel like I did something wrong. And I didn't," she said.

"I struggled immensely before I even came forward about it."

When Ms. Smith heard news of the track's opening, she was so excited about the prospect of working for the company that she e-mailed in hopes they might create a position for her. "I sought them out and sent a bold letter saying, 'I want to be a part of you. What do I have to do to work here?' " she told The Globe and Mail in an interview.

The fledgling club agreed to hire her as an on-site paramedic who would moonlight as a concierge. When she came on board, Ms. Smith was given GAIN's employee handbook, which includes a zero-tolerance harassment policy.

But she said it was not long before she and other employees found themselves referring to its terms.

In letters written to track management last February, Ms. Smith and several other employees who wrote anonymously outlined a list of grievances that included sexual harassment, harassment, bullying and intimidation. They all identified Brent Evans, the operations manager, as the offender.

"Myself and my teammates are constantly belittled, bullied and hit," wrote one male employee who went on to refer to Mr. Evans as "a rock in the middle of the road."

In her letter, Ms. Smith said she was "truly sorry to have to write this" and said she felt "privileged" to work at the track. She wrote that she was hoping for a solution to the situation and looking forward to continuing her employment.

Another employee requested that he not be forced to raise concerns outlined in the letter with Mr. Evans. "We have already tried and I feel that doing so will only make things worse," the employee wrote, adding: "I have not signed this letter as I am concerned about repercussions of this complaint if Brent were to find out who it came from." In a formal response to Ms. Smith's human-rights complaint, a lawyer for Mr. Trzewik and the circuit denies that either party discriminated against Ms. Smith. The document states that Mr. Trzewik and track officials were unaware of the harassment issues before they received employees' written accounts. But Ms. Smith told The Globe that Mr. Trzewik, the track president, told her and other employees that they were "free to find another job" if they did not like working conditions at the circuit.

Asked about the alleged comment, Mr. Trzewik said his words were misunderstood. "I honestly think she misinterpreted because I would never say that," he said, recounting a meeting with disgruntled employees convened for "fact-finding" after they submitted their letters. "Because at that time we hadn't made the decision to transfer [Mr. Evans] out ... I just said to them, also please keep in mind you do not have to leave the company, you could also come to different parts of our company and become a technician, become a parts person," Mr. Trzewik said. "We don't talk to people that way."

Ms. Smith alleges her employers were unwilling to investigate the allegations until she lodged a complaint with WorkSafeBC. Provincial law compels employers to formally investigate when a harassment complaint is filed with the authority. Mr. Trzewik said his team "reacted as fast as we possibly could" to the complaints against Mr. Evans, which he said were the company's first dealings with harassment-related allegations. Company officials, he said, followed a road map provided by WorkSafeBC to deal with the issue.

Still, Mr. Trzewik said, Ms. Smith's case is "not as black-andwhite as many other claims in the world can be." "There hasn't been any physical contact in any of those claims," he said of Ms. Smith's allegations. "If something like what Brent has allegedly done were to be done to my sister or to my mother ... I wouldn't be happy because she felt uncomfortable. "But there was no physical contact ... no physical harassment," he said, adding: "I think maybe Char Smith may be extremely sensitive to him as a person."

After WorkSafeBC inspectors discussed the need for track officials to formally investigate, company officials interviewed Mr. Evans, a nearly 10-year employee, about the allegations against him. In a transcript of the interview obtained by The Globe, Mr. Evans denied making comments about his sexual desire for Ms. Smith.

"The comment that I made in the lunch room was not out of an interest or desire, it was a poor statement that I made," Mr. Evans said. "I stated, 'I think she needs to get laid and someone needs to show her a good time,' " he told the interviewer, adding: "I have no interest in Char at all." Mr. Evans went on to admit telling Ms. Smith she could wear "slacks or a skirt" instead of cargo pants and work boots. He said he did not knowingly pin Ms. Smith behind her desk or realize she was uncomfortable when he looked at her screen because "she did not communicate I was in her space." Regarding his post- Christmas-party invitation to his room, Mr. Evans said he invited not just Ms. Smith but also other staff to "get together and have a few drinks."

In their human-rights tribunal response, Mr. Trzewik and the track confirm Mr. Evans's admissions. They say his behaviour "occurred without the knowledge and consent" of track officials. In his interview with track brass, Mr. Evans said the allegations "crushed" him and made him question "every fiber of who I am," according to the transcript. "Have there been mistakes? Yes, absolutely," he told the interviewer. "This is not my character," he said, adding that his behaviour was triggered by "stress and needing time off." "I truly feel I have made some errors and have learned from them," he said.

Last June, GAIN's humanresources manager, Nicole Jimenez, concluded the internal investigation into the allegations. "It was identified that bullying and harassment did occur at the workplace," she wrote in a report submitted to WorkSafeBC. Mr. Evans, who was suspended during the investigation, was notified via e-mail of the findings. He would be temporarily removed from the track, the e-mail said, and reassigned to a sales position at Subaru of Nanaimo, one of the company's dealerships, to undergo mentoring and retraining. If he was successful, the note said, he would be returned to his original position. "No representation has been made to him that he can return if the claim is by any chance found to be true," Mr. Trzewik said.

A website for Subaru of Nanaimo lists Mr. Evans as an assistant sales manager there. Ms. Smith, who no longer works at the track, has declined an early settlement meeting and is considering a civil suit. A hearing date has been tentatively set for the human-rights tribunal hearing for next September.

Associated Graphic

Paramedic Charleen Smith, seen with one of her rescue horses at her home in Duncan, B.C., says she endured sexual and other harassment from her boss throughout her nine months of employment at the Vancouver Island Motorsport Circuit.

DARRYL DYCK/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Charleen Smith is seen outside her home in Duncan, B.C.

DARRYL DYCK/ THE GLOBE AND MAIL

BIRTH AND DEATH NOTICES
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Friday, January 19, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B20


WILLIAM WADDELL ALLAN "BILL"

January 11, 2018

William (Bill) Waddell Allan died January 11, 2018 at North York General Hospital in his 91st year. Bill was predeceased by his wife, Gavina Allan, nee Brown.

Thanks to the staff at North York General and the Teddington. Survived by nephews, Ian Brown, Randy Cousins; niece, Anne Goodchild; their families and by the late Kevin Brown's family.

A private celebration of Bill's life is planned for the spring.

Condolences may be left at http://www.aftercare.org

LAWRENCE BALLON M.D.

On Thursday, January 18, 2018 at St. Michael's Hospital. Dr. Lawrence Ballon, beloved husband of the late Jeraldene Ballon. Loving father and fatherin-law of Amy Ballon and Ian Schnoor, and Luke Ballon and Dalia Cohen. Brother and brotherin-law of Henry and Frances, Fred and Esther, and Marvin and the late Sheila Blackstien. Devoted saba of Jessie, Kyra, Lily, and Jack. Also sadly missed by Madelaine Roig.

At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Sunday, January 21, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. Interment at the Holy Blossom section of Pardes Shalom. Shiva will be held at 109 Walmer Road, Toronto. Memorial donations may be made to http://www.tafelmusik.org.

ROBERT BARCLAY

Born December 15, 1930, Robert Ewan Mackenzie Barclay left us peacefully, January 9, 2018 to join his beloved, Diana Jane Graham Barclay (August 5, 1930 - January 11, 2009) in the Green Room.

"Bob" Barclay was a gifted filmmaker who created dozens of intimate portraits of significant Canadians from Ian Tyson to k.d. lang, and directed Canada's centennial celebration in film "Canada '67", shown in the pioneering Circle-Vision 360° format at Expo '67.

Bob was an inspiration to young film directors, and a founding member of the Directors Guild of Canada. As President (1978-81), he established the first staffed DGC offices across Canada and first collective bargaining agreement.

Survived by his children Nicholas, Rebecca and Ben, five grandchildren, and two greatgrandchildren. His "Celebration of Life" will be co-produced with the DGC, April 7th in Toronto. mail@dgc.ca

MARION ISABEL COWAN

Passed away January 7, 2018.

Born in Galt, (Cambridge), Ontario.

Daughter of Thomas D.

Cowan and Ethel M. Turnbull.

Stepdaughter of Jennie F.

Turnbull. Sister of the late James E. Cowan, Cambridge, Ontario and Helen Cowan Virgo, Montreal.

Longtime social worker in Vancouver, BC and Toronto, Ontario. Member of St.

Andrew's Presbyterian Church, King Street West, Toronto.

At the request of Marion there will be no funeral.

RUTH JACOBI

Peacefully in her 92nd year with family by her side on Monday, January 15, 2018.

Beloved wife of the late Hans Jacobi (2004); predeceased by her sisters, Irmi and Edith; and parents, Auguste and Karl; devoted mother of John (Tracey); she will be sadly missed by her grandchildren, Heiden and Beck; and niece, Daisy (Claude-André).

Ruth lived a life full of love and adventure. Born in Davos, Ruth struck out on her own in 1955 arriving in Canada by ship to work in Toronto, where she would eventually meet Hans, the love of her life. A classical music, ballet, art and museum enthusiast, downhill skier, potter, avid flower gardener, wonderful cook and baker, chocolate lover, Swiss Women's Club member, yoga and Thai chi student.

Summers were spent at the hobby farm with its lovely restored log house and valley views. Trips to Switzerland were always a joyous event. The annual flower competition and ribbon awards a source of personal pride.

Always friendly to everyone, Ruth had a manner that endeared her to others.

Never one to shy away from a challenge or learn something new, she always completed whatever she set out to do.

I could not have asked for a more wonderful mother and I am eternally grateful for her love, wisdom, selfless devotion, strength and courage. She loved her small family deeply and was extremely proud of her grandsons who brought her much joy and love. Ruth was a strong woman with an infectious laugh who will be greatly missed by family and friends.

The family thanks Kensington Gardens and all staff for their support and care over 14 years; doctors and staff at Toronto Western Hospital, physiotherapist Sian and assistant Alicia and to her many friends including Helmut and Zaneida Kellen, Helen McNeil, Ruth Zürcher and Francoise Sutton.

Cremation has taken place. Visitation on April 26th from 1-2 p.m. followed by a celebration of life at 2 p.m. at Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Toronto (416-485-5572). Donations may be made to Kensington Gardens or a charity of your choice. Condolences may be sent to the family at contact.jacobi.family@gmail.com.

Liebe Mutter. Ich bin klein, mein Wunsch ist klein.

Liebe Mutti du sollst glücklich sein.

EVELYN ISABEL MCKEE (née McIntosh) June 25, 1928, to January 17, 2018

Evelyn McKee (Ev to everyone who knew her) passed away in Toronto in her 90th year. Ev was predeceased by her husband, David C. McKee; survived by her four children, David (Elaine McKee), Matthew (Heidi McKee), Mary McKee-McElwain (Alex McElwain), and Ramsay (Peggy McKee); proud grandmother of Yosef Rouch (David and Elaine), Ramsay, Jackson and Connor (Matthew and Heidi), and Hilary and Allan (Ramsay and Peggy); and great-grandmother of Liza McKee (Jackson and Aleksandra).

Ev was survived by her sister, Mary Campbell; and predeceased by her brother, Ramsay McIntosh.

Ev's twin passions in life were her family and the child-care movement in Ontario. Everyone familiar with the McKees knows she was the anchor that held the family together through all the good times and some challenging ones as well. Many more will know her through her tireless work and advocacy on behalf of children, child care, early childhood workers (ECWs) and child-care policy in Ontario. She was honoured for her dedication as the co-recipient of the Constance E. Hamilton Award in 1990 in recognition of her actions that had a "significant impact on securing equitable treatment for women in Toronto, either socially, economically or culturally."

We want to extend our many thanks to the wonderful staff at The O'Neill Centre in Toronto who made our mother's last years so warm and comfortable.

A service will be held in memory of Ev on Monday, January 22, 2018, at 2:00 p.m. at the Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Square, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1B1. In lieu of flowers, we ask you to make a donation in her memory to the Ontario Coalition for Better Child Care, at 489 College Street, Suite 206, Toronto, Ontario M6G 1A5, or to the Church of the Holy Trinity.

JOY ELEANOR MOORE January 23, 1928 January 13, 2018

Passed away at 5:20 a.m. on a Saturday morning in Toronto, Ontario, after a quiet night of sleep, in St. Joseph's Health Centre. Joy missed her 90th birthday by only ten days, though she was fond of telling people that she was 90. Close enough.

Joy was a teacher of students in the third grade. She lived directly across the street from her school in an apartment which she occupied with her husband, Bill, and after his death, for 54-years, long after she had retired from teaching with accolades from the school's Principal.

In earlier days, Joy was a keen traveler and an art buff-she attended lectures at the Women's Art Association of Canada for 25-years. She was a diligent crossword puzzler, but her true love was detective stories, the ones in which a body appears and the story begins there. Joy read two or three books each week, and her various Kindles had on them more than 1000 books.

Her family and friends will miss her black humour, and the fine clothes which made her the best dressed woman in her favourite restaurants.

Visitation: Turner & Porter, 4933 Dundas Street West, Toronto, Ontario M9A 1B6, Friday, January 19, 12:00-1:00 p.m.

YOLANDE RUTH MOSES "Lani" 1947-2018

Of Toronto, passed away after a brief illness on Tuesday, January 16th at Toronto General Hospital with her family at her side.

She is survived by her husband of 48 years, Charles; daughter, Alexandra (Kevin McKeag); sons, Michael (Esther Jun) and Jonathan; grandchildren, Ailis and Seamus McKeag and Lola Moses; sisters, Diane Cathro and Cynthia Ferris; and brother, Doug Nugent; and she was predeceased by her brother, John Eastwood.

Lani will be remembered for her love for life and her joyful creativity, which she celebrated with her many cherished friends, especially Julie Macdonald, Lynn Morgan and Susie Gunn.

The family will be holding a private service and a memorial will be held at a later date.

Condolences through Humphrey Funeral Home. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Garden Club of Toronto or the Toronto Botanical Garden.

DR E. JOHN WYLIE "Jack " OD, FAAO

On Tuesday, December 12, 2017 Jack passed away peacefully at the age of 86. Jack was born June 27, 1931 in Toronto to Ernest William and Margaret Kathleen (Sweeney). He will be forever remembered by his wife, Lynn of 64 years; daughters, Karen, Jill and Ann; grandchildren, Rebecca (Nick), Kim (Hector), Diana, Jasper (Kenny) and Dustin (Laura); greatgrandchildren, Maia and Maeve; brother, Bill (Jane); brother-in-law to Wendy and Don; and uncle to many nieces and nephews, as well as lots of friends and colleagues.

Jack was predeceased by brother Don and sister Margaret.

Jack graduated from the College of Optometry in 1953 and continued with a long and successful career.

He volunteered with numerous organizations including Outreach Programs with the University of Waterloo through CIDA, Ministry of Transportation, as well as serving on many boards including Kennedy House Youth Services and Scarborough Philharmonic Orchestra. Jack was the president of the North Scarborough Rotary Club and a Paul Harris Fellow, as well as being an honourary member. Besides being hard working, Jack also loved to travel both with the family and with Lynn within Canada and many places around the world. He especially enjoyed trips in the "old car", his vintage MG with Lynn and the car club members.

Jack had a competitive side with his hobbies of sailboat racing in his younger days, before moving on to sports cars and pit crews.

He built furniture for their home and was involved with many renovations as well. Jack also showed quite the artistic side in his painting, woodcarving and pottery creations. He also shared in Lynn's love of the Toronto Zoo and spent many an hour there with her.

A very special thank you from the family to the staff at the Scarborough Retirement Residence and Scarborough Centenary Hospital for your kindness and compassion.

Jack, as well, appreciated your thoughtful care.

A funeral will be held Saturday, January 20, 2018 at McDougall & Brown, Scarborough Chapel at 2900 Kingston Road. There will be a family receiving line and gathering at 11:00 a.m., service at 12:00 p.m., followed by a reception. Inurnment will take place at Resthaven Memorial Gardens at 2:30 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, memorials can be made to the University of Waterloo School of Optometry, Kennedy House Youth Services, The Toronto Zoo, Scarborough Philharmonic Orchestra or the organization of your choosing.

JOSEPH DAVID SHEARD

March 1, 1924 January 19, 2015

Dear Father and Friend Always Remembered, Always Loved By John and Michèle

ESTELLE MARGARET SKEAFF (nee Milne) In Loving Memory. b. April 30, 1900, in Aberdeen; d. January 19, 1991, in Ottawa. We miss you so.

The rising star
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Coming off successful runs at the Rogers Cup and U.S. Open, 18-year-old Denis Shapovalov enters his first full year on the ATP Tour with high hopes, but his opponents won't be caught off-guard by the fist-pumping teeanger, Rachel Brady writes
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By RACHEL BRADY
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Saturday, January 13, 2018 – Print Edition, Page S11


It was no ordinary afternoon at the Mayfair Club on Toronto's Lake Shore Boulevard East, as fascinated members buzzed around the lobby, waving one another over to the glass walls overlooking the tennis courts for a glimpse of the wonder kid.

They steadied their phones and clicked away, snapping shots of the flashy, fair-haired teenager who had them glued to their televisions months earlier, fist-pumping as he dispatched ATP stars such as Rafael Nadal, Juan Martin del Potro and Jo-Wilfried Tsonga from late-season tournaments.

There he was, in the flesh, bounding around in his backwards cap, crushing his formidable one-handed backhand. It was a mid-November day and 18-year-old Denis Shapovalov was a surprise guest at the fitness and racquet club, slugging away as a camera crew filmed commercial footage for the sports nutrition company BioSteel.

Up since 4 a.m., Shapovalov had squeezed in a few in-studio TV interviews before the commercial shoot. As his ATP ranking skyrocketed from No.250 to 50, so had requests for his time.

So on a rare, brief trip to his hometown, his management team was being choosy.

When the shoot finished in the early afternoon, he sat down courtside for his last appointment of the day. He smiled and shook his head with a sort of boyish amazement as he ran through the events of 2017.

Winning Junior Wimbledon in 2016 turned heads, but his shocking runs at the Rogers Cup and the U.S. Open last year were life-changing. Fellow ATP players voted Shapovalov the tour's most improved player and he earned the Star of Tomorrow award as the youngest player in the top 100. The Canadian Press named him Male Athlete of the Year. His star was also rising off the court. He appeared in Vogue magazine and landed a global endorsement deal with Swiss watchmaker Tag Heuer.

His arrival on the ATP tour was brazen, resulting in a number of "youngest ever" and "youngest since" distinctions.

At Montreal's Rogers Cup, he became the youngest player ever to make the semifinals of an ATP Masters 1000 event. At the U.S. Open in New York, he was the youngest to reach the final 16. As his ranking climbed, he became the youngest to crack the top 50 since Nadal in 2004. After that whirlwind late-summer performance, many wondered: What could he do with a full season on the ATP World Tour?

That opportunity begins now. Shapovalov's ranking has landed him his first main draw entry to a Grand Slam - the Australian Open, which begins Monday.

He'll face 19-year-old Stefanos Tsitsipas of Greece, a former Junior No. 1, in the first round. Now ahead of schedule on his career path, Shapovalov won't need another season playing Juniors, Futures or ATP Challengers.

There will be other Canadians in Melbourne. No. 23 Milos Raonic and WTA No. 83 Eugenie Bouchard have gotten achingly close to an elusive Grand Slam title, enjoyed stardom and battled injuries, setbacks and plateaus. But at least for the moment, Shapovalov is stealing the spotlight as Canada's most intriguing tennis star.

Last off-season he was between coaches and ranked No. 250 with a focus on playing Challengers. He had no team of his own and instead trained in Tenerife, Spain with Dominic Thiem. He joined forces full-time with Tennis Canada coach Martin Laurendeau and a bright 2017 was under way.

"Now here I am this year and my team has grown, with full-time physio and fitness guys with me on the road every day too - way more professional," Shapovalov said. "The results I had were unbelievable - just crazy. But that's over now, and I know it's not realistic to believe I'll have a drastic leap like that every year.

I'm just so excited to get back at it."

Following his fourth-round exit at the U.S. Open, Vogue editor Anna Wintour personally invited him to fly back from Toronto to New York for a photo shoot with American supermodel Karlie Kloss.

Both posing in designer sportswear, Shapovalov also wore his signature backwards cap in a photo for the November issue. She was a grinning onlooker as the camera captured Shapovalov in mid-air, showcasing his athleticism in an exuberant game of ping pong.

"I was actually really nervous - I didn't know how models would act, but she was super nice and really cool and kept it fun for me because she could clearly see I had no idea what I'm doing in a magazine shoot," Shapovalov said. "They had her doing lots of changes of hair and makeup and clothes for various photos all day.

They took one look at me and said, 'Um, okay, yeah, your hair is fine, you're good to go.' "Several business offers filed in to Shapovalov's manager. Tag Heuer was quick to add him to its star-studded stable of athlete endorsers. Rare is the tennis star who doesn't slide an eye-catching timepiece on his or her wrist before news conferences and trophy ceremonies.

"His future is looking very bright indeed," said Jean-Claude Biver, CEO of Tag Heuer, when announcing the deal. "He will enable us to reach the younger generations."

Shapovalov was invited for a personal tour of the company's Swiss headquarters in La Chaux-de-Fonds. He perused the impressive watches in glass showcases and observed expert watchmakers turn tiny screws that looked to him like grains of sand.

"It is a big deal to get a watch deal, no doubt," Shapovalov said. "Tag has quite a list of athletes - Tom Brady, Cristiano Ronaldo, Henrik Lundqvist, Kei Nishikori - it's crazy. Pretty good for me to be part of a family like that."

The fall months brought no break from tennis. Shapovalov anchored Canada's Davis Cup victory over India in Edmonton.

Then John McEnroe chose him for his Team World at the inaugural Laver Cup to face Bjorn Borg's Team Europe in a glitzy Ryder Cup-style tournament.

Shapovalov played deep into the ATP fall calendar, Skyping home to his parents every day. On the road, combatting fatigue, illness and homesickness, there were far fewer wins. He lost out in the first round of tournaments in Shanghai, Antwerp and Paris but found one win at the Swiss Indoors in Basel. His hectic season ended in Milan at the Next Gen ATP Finals, an event for the tour's best eight players under 21, where he was eliminated in the round robin.

During that tough stretch, his mom, Tessa, flew to Europe to be with him.

"It was good to have her there. When my mom's there, I'm not as lonely," Shapovalov said. "It was really tough mentally with the sickness and being away from home for so long. I had a couple of chats with the team, telling them how tired I was and really just wanting to go home, but I pushed through and I think I did a good job of finishing on a good note in Milan. It's something I need to learn still - I'm still young, and travelling and being away from my parents is still hard."

If 2017 was his breakout year, his challenge for 2018 will be to prove he can sustain his hard-charging momentum while playing with the best on a regular basis. His coach has watched his teenage pupil adjust to life on the big tour. He says he has noticed Shapovalov's increased comfort around top players despite the fact he's only 18 and many of his counterparts are older players with wives and families. He sees more players stop to talk with the teen rather than just wave or nod.

"He's hitting the tour now feeling he belongs, unlike last year when he was like an uninvited guest springing up to crash some tournaments. That really shows in his demeanour," said Laurendeau, who was in Auckland, New Zealand, this week as Shapovalov competed in a tune-up tournament ahead of the Australian Open. "It's easier to find practice partners for him now, that's for sure.

I don't have to sell him like I did before, when I'd say, 'Hey, do you want to hit with this guy? His level is pretty good! They all know now they're going to get a good workout with him."

Not only do they know Shapovalov's name, they know his game.

"Tactically you can work on new patterns in the off-season, because the players last year didn't really know Denis and he was coming out of nowhere, so he had an element of surprise, which really favoured him," Laurendeau said.

"But now, guys have watched him practise, they've watched him play, they've studied him on YouTube. So we've been working to stay ahead of the game."

Laurendeau still considers this part of Shapovalov's rookie year on the tour - until the Rogers Cup comes around. He's never played many of the tour's premier stops, such as Miami, Indian Wells, Monte Carlo, Rome and Barcelona.

His mother, a former national team player for the Soviet Union who has coached him since he was five, remains one of his coaches, in collaboration with Laurendeau. She stays home running her tennis academy, TessaTennis in Vaughan, Ont., while Laurendeau is with Shapovalov every day. They talk regularly and make decisions together, and she joins them on the road when she can. He likes having his mother there.

Soon after Shapovalov's arrival in New Zealand, the ATP tour tapped him and some other players to make an appearance with the Skycity Breakers, Auckland's professional basketball team. He showed up in a Toronto Raptors shirt and played some 3-on-3 with some of his peers, including his first-round opponent, Tsitsipas.

"He's discovering that the obligations are not going to go away - all the top players have it and they all have to learn to manage how much fuel that will take from you and how much you need to leave in that tank for the match," Laurendeau said. "Guys like Federer and Nadal seem to juggle all of it in their sleep and even enjoy it."

Shapovalov has a 1-2 record so far in tune-ups for Melbourne, including a loss in Auckland to del Potro in the round of 16. Shapovalov's team focused on making the teenager stronger, faster and more explosive for 2018, equipped to match full-grown men at the top of their games on a daily basis.

"All the top 50 guys have a big team around them, and now he does too, and that's reassuring for Denis to know he's not alone and that he has people looking out for him all the time," Laurendeau said. "We hope that takes a little of the pressure off him."

Associated Graphic

Denis Shapovalov rose to prominence by advancing to the semi-finals in last August's Rogers Cup in Montreal.

PHOTOS BY MINAS PANAGIOTAKIS/GETTY IMAGES

The off-court demands on Shapovalov's time have risen. He has quickly become a favourite with fans and advertisers, such as Tag Heuer, which inked a global endoresment deal with the Canadian teenager.

Sky high
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With astro-tourism taking off in Yukon and New Zealand, Marsha Lederman chases the elusive Northern Lights
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By MARSHA LEDERMAN
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Saturday, January 13, 2018 – Print Edition, Page P6


It was the middle of the night and the cabin lights were dimmed as we flew through the Yukon sky. We had arrived without passports, checked no luggage.

We were on a circuitous ride to nowhere; our only destination was a tick off the bucket list. Sipping on green glow-in-thedark cocktails, we pressed our noses and cameras to the glass, seeking the real star of the show, the aurora borealis.

This flight - organized by Tourism Yukon, the Yukon Astronomical Society and Air North - was the first of its kind in North America, officials told passengers at a party prior to boarding. Half a world away, a similar concept is available in New Zealand, offering from-the-sky views of the aurora australis, or Southern Lights.

These flights are part of a growing trend: astronomy-related experiential travel. Or, as some call it, astro-tourism.

We can't fly to the moon or play among the stars yet. But we can travel to places where we can see them better. As was evident with all those tourists heading for the path of totality in parts of the United States during last summer's solar eclipse, people are keen to travel to witness an exceptional astrological event.

The hospitality industry, recognizing the opportunity, is developing experiences that are based not only on once-ina-blue-moon events but on more regularly scheduled astronomical experiences.

Stargazing is a big one; so are the Northern Lights. In Rovaniemi, Finland, for instance, you can don thermal underwear and a head-to-toe survival suit and "dry float" in the icy waters as you watch the Northern Lights (or hope they appear).

In recent months, I have been fortunate enough to give astro-tourism a try in both the northern and southern hemispheres, from the sky and on the ground (and in water). And the experiences were, yes, out of this world.

In November, Air North took off from Whitehorse for its inaugural "Aurora 360" flight, inviting passengers to view the aurora borealis from the sky. At 36,000 feet, you have an opportunity for an uninterrupted - and what's closer to a guaranteed - sighting.

"You're above the clouds, you're above the dust," Anthony Gucciardo, a key organizer of the Aurora 360 experience, told The Globe and Mail. "We're improving the odds; we're removing an entire barrier."

New Zealand is well positioned for astro-tourism offerings, thanks to the absence of light pollution in large areas.

About 4,300 square kilometres of its South Island has been recognized as an International Dark Sky Reserve. And this year the International Dark Sky Association designated Great Barrier Island, about 100 kilometres northeast of Auckland, a Dark Sky Sanctuary - the first island and third place in the world to receive the designation (the other two are in Chile and New Mexico).

In 2017, New Zealand played host to its first aurora flight. The flight, last March, taking off from Dunedin in a chartered 767, was a success - it sold out in less than five days despite pricey tickets.

"The flight experienced the aurora for over four hours and we also had amazing views of the night sky from far south," organizer Ian Griffin, director of New Zealand's Otago Museum, explained from Dunedin. Flight to the Lights II - 12 hours on a Boeing 787 Dreamliner, from (and to) Christchurch, travelling over the Antarctic Ocean - is scheduled for March 22 (tickets start at $3,536 for a pair in economy and go up to $5,330 a seat for business class).

If you would rather enjoy the view from terra firma, you can spend a night or two in a PurePod, an all-glass structure that allows for an immersive experience in nature, while also providing shelter from the elements. The PurePods have been erected in several private, isolated locations on the South Island - perfect for all-night star-gazing.

I didn't make it to a PurePod while in New Zealand recently, but I did see my share of celestial bodies, first with Big Sky Stargazing near Mount Cook Village.

Guides laser-pointed constellations and stars for us in the unfamiliar (for me, anyway) southern hemisphere night sky, and focused large telescopes on star clusters and distant galaxies. In Tekapo, about an-hour-anda-half southeast of there, I took part in a new experience at Tekapo Springs: a guided talk with telescopes, after which we put on our swimsuits to do some stargazing from natural hot pools. Floating around on buoyancy pillows, we listened to our guide explain what we were seeing (and some things we weren't able to see) in her mellifluous Glaswegian accent.

It's not a coincidence that Canada and New Zealand launched their aurora-viewing flights in the same year.

There is a connection - and it's a personal one. According to Gucciardo, who is past president and one of the founders of the Yukon Astronomical Society, Griffin - an astrophysist who calls himself an aurora hunter - was in Yukon to film footage of the aurora borealis for his planetarium. But there were some cloudy nights and while he ultimately got the footage he needed, it was frustrating. It got the two men discussing how to overcome those variables - a plane would do the job. Back in New Zealand, Griffin was working on his aurora australis tour - and Gucciardo pitched the idea to officials in Yukon. The Astronomical Society (which is also building an observatory in Whitehorse, scheduled to open next year), Air North and Yukon Tourism signed on and the flight was announced in September.

Gucciardo did the predictive work, coming up with a weekend in late November when the auroras were likely to be putting on a show. Closer to the event, he crunched the data to determine which of the two potential nights showed probability of a higher aurora strength.

For us, it was Friday.

The experience in Whitehorse started with late afternoon talks at the Beringia Interpretive Centre about the aurora borealis and other "orbital shenanigans" as one of the speakers, UBC postdoctoral fellow Christa Van Laerhoven, put it.

Then at 10 p.m., we gathered at the Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre in town for the pregame show. As part of the $950 experience, and to celebrate the inaugural flight, we were shown to tables laden with the polar opposite of airplane food: gold-dusted chocolates (this is gold-rush country, after all), butter-poached elk on crostini, an assortment of house-cured game, buckets of sweet Alaska shrimp kept cool with buckets of snow.

Following this, we were treated to an Indigenous dance performance. The troupe's leader Sean Smith, who is of Tuchone and Tlingit (and Irish and Scottish) heritage, offered a warm sendoff. "That's our ancestors that you're going to be seeing tonight," he told us.

"They are an iconic symbol of the north and tonight we will join in their dance," Yukon's Minister of Tourism and Culture, Jeanie Dendys said, at the ceremony.

Then we boarded warm buses for a trip to the airport. There were about 50 paying passengers, as well as dignitaries and media from around the world.

Despite the late hour - it was about midnight at this point - the feeling as we took our assigned seats was electric. Passengers swapped photography tips; many selfies were snapped.

We were not in the air very long when the captain announced that the auroras were strutting their stuff.

They were much more visible on the left side of the plane; I was on the right, missing the initial glow, but enjoying the stars, which were spectacular. Eventually, the Northern Lights did put on a show - muted, but a show nonetheless - for those on the right side of the plane as well. Seatswapping was not officially sanctioned, but many passengers eager for the best view just did it on their own. Still, people seemed satisfied, if not ecstatic. The guy behind me, taking long-exposure shots with his camera, was over the moon with the results.

Potent gin drinks were served with ice cubes that glowed green and glow sticks were distributed toward the end of the three-hour flight. An unnecessary distraction, I thought - after all, this part of the world is a terrific astro-tourism destination in part because of the lack of light pollution.

The Aurora 360 was considered a pilot project, to be reviewed. Debra Ryan with Air North says the airline has been "bombarded" with inquiries from people hoping for a repeat, and she says there will be another flight this year, although a date hasn't been scheduled. "It will happen in 2018," she says.

On the inaugural flight, we had fun and felt like we were part of something big - even if we didn't get the ooh-and-ah bright greens and reds painting the sky fantastic that I had envisioned.

The next night, on a separate adventure, dozens of us were bused out to a dark viewing site to view the aurora borealis from the ground. Alas, they remained out of sight (other than a slight greenish glow to the north I may or may not have imagined). But there was good company, a crackling fire and a cabin full of snacks. And the stars filled the sky - if not exactly the gaping chasm some of us felt due to the absence of the auroras.

Mother Nature is unpredictable and not always co-operative, but she can offer you wonders when you least expect it. The day after the flight, a group of us went snowmobiling at Sky High Wilderness Ranch.

Our guide led us across Fish Lake, then up a hill where we stopped to take a few photos before heading back. As we stood at the lookout snapping pictures, a member of the group pointed west, where two sundogs had appeared. The sundogs - which resemble vertical rainbows - framed the sun, growing more vivid, to our absolute delight, reaching down and bathing the snowy trees below in rainbow colours.

We jumped for joy - we really did.

Some of us (ahem) were near tears. It was that exhilarating. Here, during an experience that I thought would be more about speed and brute force than peace and nature, we found exhilaration in the sky; a cosmic pot of gold.

The writer was a guest of Tourism Yukon and Tourism New Zealand. Neither reviewed nor approved this article.

YOUR TURN

Air North flies to Whitehorse and other northern cities, including Yellowknife, Inuvik and Dawson City.

flyairnorth.com.

STAY

Edgewater Hotel: A historic hotel in a great location - on Main Street, near the Yukon River - that has recently undergone a multimillion-dollar renovation. edgewaterhotelwhitehorse.com.

DO

Northern Tales Aurora Borealis Tours: View the auroras (you hope) from a selection of dark-sky areas. northerntales.ca/ aurora-tours.

Sky High Wilderness Ranch: Enjoy snowmobiling and dog-sledding tours in the winter (also snowshoeing); horseback riding tours in the summer. skyhighwilderness.com.

Associated Graphic

Although the views of the Northern Lights were not quite as dramatic as this particular appearance in the Yukon, top, Marsha Lederman did manage to see them from the plane. In New Zealand, PurePods, above, ensure a sighting by providing unobstructed views from every direction.

ANDREW FUSSELL

RURAL MEDICINE: How a gamble to bring doctors north is paying off
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Twelve years after the first class began at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, many remote communities have 'gone from crisis mode to planning mode' thanks to graduates, the majority of whom opt to practise in rural areas, André Picard writes from Sudbury
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By ANDRé PICARD
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Monday, January 15, 2018 – Print Edition, Page A6


When the Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM) was created, it was based on a simple - but untested - premise: If you educate and train physicians in rural and remote northern communities, they will be more likely to practise there.

Twelve years later, the gamble is paying off better than anyone expected: 94 per cent of NOSM graduates who do a family-medicine residency in the North stay there to practise, and 69 per cent of all graduates, specialists and general practitioners alike, have opted to work in remote and rural areas, particularly in Northern Ontario.

"Has it worked?" asks Dr. Roger Strasser, the dean of NOSM.

"Yes, it has. Many northern communities have gone from crisis mode to planning mode thanks to our graduates. But we're still a long way from having the medical care we need in Northern Ontario."

One of the success stories is Chapleau, located 850 kilometres north of Toronto. The blue-collar town went years without a physician before three NOSM graduates decided to set up shop for the 3,000 people in a catchment area that includes the township and the nearby reserves.

The trio established a familyhealth team that operates a family-medicine clinic, and they staff the emergency room in the small local hospital, oversee home care and long-term care and run clinics in the two nearby First Nations communities, Brunswick House and Chapleau Cree First Nation.

"The area went seven years without a family doctor, so there was no continuity of care and a lot of people's health was neglected. So, yes, they appreciate us," says Dr. Doris Mitchell, who graduated from NOSM in 2010.

A member of the Brunswick House First Nation, Dr. Mitchell worked as a nurse for 15 years before applying to medical school.

"I had aspirations to be a physician, but I didn't want to leave the North, so NOSM was a perfect fit for me," she says.

Dr. Mitchell says that, after several years of practise, she really appreciates the school's handson approach to learning and its emphasis on rural medicine.

"They prepared us not only for the work environment, but for the emotional environment," she said.

Small-town medicine is rewarding because physicians dabble in a bit of everything, from minor surgery (sometimes even on patients' pets) through to trauma care and palliative care.

"The sense of community is wonderful, but the reality is that working in your hometown can also be horrible," Dr. Mitchell says. There are unwanted pregnancies, suicides, heart attacks and deaths, and none of the patients are anonymous strangers - sometimes they are even family members, and that can be awkward and ethically challenging.

The resources and technology can also be limited. Dr. Mitchell recounts the case of a car-crash victim with five fractures, as well as a perforated bowel and kidney, all of which had to be diagnosed without a CT scan or MRI, and whose care was complicated by the fact a snowstorm delayed the arrival of the air ambulance.

THE RIGHT FIT

The dream of a northern medical school dated back decades.

When McMaster University was granted a medical school in 1972, there was hope that a school would also be established at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay. Instead, McMaster created a program to send its students to Northern Ontario for training and residency.

In 1999, the Ontario government established a commission to examine the province's supply and distribution of physicians. That report featured a single line saying the idea of a rural or northern medical school should be investigated.

An expert panel was appointed and they recommended against establishing a school, saying they had reservations about the ability to attract qualified staff and quality training opportunities.

But access problems in the North were dire and the mayors of northern cities lobbied for a homegrown solution.

The Northern Ontario School of Medicine was approved in 2001, and the first class began in 2005, with two campuses, one at Laurentian University in Sudbury and the other at Lakehead University.

Today, NOSM has 64 spaces, split between the two cities. It gets more than 2,000 applicants annually. Tuition fees are $20,000 a year - middle of the pack among Canada's 17 medical schools.

The selection process favours students from Northern Ontario, those from other parts of ruraland remote Canada, francophones and Indigenous students, but there is no affirmative-action program. "We consulted with the community and they don't want a quota because they feel it creates stigma," Dr. Strasser says.

NOSM does not use the Medical College Admission Test, because it has never been validated for francophone or Indigenous students. Instead, applicants undergo multiple mini-interviews, many of them involving community members such as patients, activists and First Nations elders.

Kimberley Edwards, a thirdyear medical student, says NOSM is the only medical school she applied to.

"Because of who I am, it felt like the right fit."

Ms. Edwards is Cree, but was brought up in Carleton Place, a small town outside Ottawa. Like many NOSM students, she is older - she is 36 - and took a circuitous route to medicine. After high school, she studied human kinetics at the University of Guelph. "But, to be honest, it didn't go so well. I was one of the only Indigenous students and I didn't feel like I fit in," Ms. Edwards says.

She left school and took a job in a sleep clinic, then went to Mohawk College to learn diagnostic heart sonography. That led to a job at the Ottawa Heart Institute, which sparked an interest in both medicine and the North. (Cardiac patients from Nunavut travel to Ottawa for care and the institute operates regular clinics in Iqaluit, something Ms. Edwards loved.)

"Because my grades weren't great, I decided to return to school and see if I could qualify for med school," she says of her decision to study in the physician-assistant program at the University of Toronto. From there, she applied successfully to NOSM.

"I want to practise family medicine, to work with Indigenous people in the North, so the program has been great," Ms. Edwards says.

That decision on her future career was sealed when she spent a month in Moose Factory, not far (in northern terms) from Attawapiskat, where her father was raised.

George Payne, a first-year student, was brought up in Sault Ste. Marie, but went south for school, at the University of Guelph, then Waterloo. He was accepted to three medical schools, but chose NOSM because he wanted to be back in Northern Ontario. "I really missed the winters," he says.

Mr. Payne also loves the intimacy of NOSM. At the Thunder Bay campus, his class is only 28 students, and they mostly do problem-based learning in small groups with lots of field work.

"They really prepare you for the real world here," he says, excitedly recounting how he just returned from a placement with paramedics.

In first year, NOSM students must do a four-week placement in a remote Indigenous community.

In second year, there are two two-week stints in rural areas, again often Indigenous communities. (There are more than 200 reserves in Ontario, most in the North.)

In third year, there is an eightmonth clerkship in one of 15 communities and, in the final year, students spend time in a tertiary hospital in places such as Sudbury or North Bay.

Almost two-thirds of NOSM graduates choose family medicine for their residency, double the national average; one-third choose general specialties; and only 5 per cent choose a subspecialty.

Andrew Ferrier is one who took the subspecialist route. He just began a five-year dermatology program at the University of Alberta in Edmonton.

He has studied both at Lake Forest College near Chicago (on a hockey scholarship) and University of Ottawa - where he earned a PhD in neuroscience - but, as a Métis from Cape Breton, he says rural life "has a big pull on my heart."

Dr. Ferrier had a placement in a dermatology clinic in second year and found his passion. He plans to return to Northern Ontario to practise. That's good news for patients - the wait-list to see a dermatologist in Sudbury is more than 18 months. And patients in the North often have to travel to Toronto or Ottawa to see specialists.

Paul Heinrich, chief executive officer of the North Bay Regional Health Centre, says NOSM has played an important role in attracting physicians to the region and retaining them. One in three new doctors at the hospital are NOSM grads.

But other measures have also helped.

A physician who chooses North Bay can qualify for a $25,000 relocation bonus from the regional health centre, and the city matches that amount; the provincial Northern Health Programs also provides an additional $80,000 over four years.

In return, the doctor must commit to staying in the city for five years and taking on 1,200 patients.

"But the biggest draw isn't the money; it's the lifestyle," Mr. Heinrich says.

Dr. Renée Gauthier agrees.

She and three partners - all NOSM grads - opened the Northern Shores Medical Clinic after graduation.

"We all wanted to come back home because this is a nice place to live and raise a family," she says.

The clinic has room to take on a dozen physicians in total, and the need is there. North Bay, a city of 50,000, has an estimated 15,000 orphan patients.

Dr. François Doiron was a nurse with a family-health team in Marathon, Ont., when he discovered his passion for rural medicine.

He applied and was accepted to three medical schools but chose NOSM. Dr. Doiron just graduated and is doing his family-medicine residency with the Harbourview Family Health Team in Thunder Bay.

"I plan to practise in the North, so I wanted to be trained in this environment," he says.

While Dr. Doiron is almost two years away from completing his residency, he is already being wooed by several communities to set up a family-medicine practice.

"The need is there, that's for sure," he says. "But I want to be careful not to be wooed by the money or the perks. I want to practise where I plan to spend my life."

Associated Graphic

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRISTOPHER KATSAROV

François Doiron visits patients at the Thunder Bay regional hospital on Dec. 21. Dr. Doiron was a nurse when he discovered his passion for rural medicine; he just graduated from NOSM and is doing his family-medicine residency with the Harbourview Family Health Team in Thunder Bay.

George Payne, above and left, was brought up in Sault Ste. Marie, but went south for school, at the University of Guelph, then Waterloo. He was accepted to three medical schools, but chose NOSM because he wanted to be back in Northern Ontario. 'I really missed the winters,' he says.

The Northern Ontario School of Medicine was approved in 2001, and the first class began in 2005, with two campuses, one at Laurentian University in Sudbury and the other at Lakehead University. Today, NOSM has 64 spaces, split between the two cities. It gets more than 2,000 applicants annually.

The women of Hollywood
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Several new books explore how the so-called golden age of cinema began a cultural legacy of sexism that haunts the industry to this day
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By NATHALIE ATKINSON
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Special to The Globe and Mail
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Saturday, January 13, 2018 – Print Edition, Page P19


For readers of Hollywood biography, the insidious smear campaign is a familiar plot.

In December, director Peter Jackson claimed that Harvey Weinstein attempted to take his revenge on Ashley Judd and Mira Sorvino, who rejected the movie producer's sexual advances, by blackballing them, characterizing them to his colleagues as "difficult" - that vague but damning catch-all.

Workplace intimidation and sexual harassment are part of Hollywood's tangled cultural legacy, a continuum of sexism that dates back to the early days of talking pictures.

When, in the 1930s, Hollywood's social and economic control was consolidated into a few large studios run by men, it was arguably a de-evolution from the industry's more egalitarian origins. In the first decade of talking pictures, women could talk on screen, but woe betide if they spoke out of turn anywhere else.

In late 1934, studios adopted the Motion Picture Production Code, which was a pre-emptive move engineered to prevent government censorship in the wake of several scandals and the public's subsequent outcry.

The Code further denied women professional and personal agency, on screen and off. As an example of the effect it had, look no further than the swift and dramatic shift in top female box office draws between 1934 and 1935 which, according to film historian Jeanine Basinger in her book A Woman's View, shifted from sexually provocative Mae West to innocent Shirley Temple.

The moralizing depictions imposed on film persisted until the demise of the studio system in the 1960s and a New Hollywood was born to bury the old ways.

Now, fresh allegations are coming to light in every corner of the entertainment industry.

As we enter what might be considered a golden age of Hollywood reckoning, a new generation of books is challenging accepted history and dismantling Hollywood myth, offering reappraisals of the industry's classic golden age.

Some recontextualize misunderstood icons such as Hedy Lamarr or debunk oft-repeated stories frequently underpinned by conjecture and dubious (if any) sourcing, while others restore reputations of female stars such as Miriam Hopkins, long reduced to thumbnail histories.

Her reaction to Bette Davis's Academy Award win, for example, is thus memorialized on TCM's "Trivia and Fun Facts about Jezebel": "Miriam Hopkins celebrated with a temper tantrum during which she trashed the drawing room of her New York apartment."

There's no dispute that the incident happened. What isn't included in this shorthand are most of the frustrating facts and surrounding career circumstances that are explored in Miriam Hopkins: Life and Films of a Hollywood Rebel (University Press of Kentucky, 424 pages, $56). For this latest in the publisher's Screen Classics series, Allen Ellenberger spent a decade researching the actor, conducting original interviews with the remaining people who knew her and getting access to her 100-page FBI file. Hopkins is a timely case study of a woman whose ambitious nature was undermined, framed as aggressive, abrasive and difficult. You could read Hopkins as a golden age Cassandra who challenged the patriarchy even when it came to pay equity: Although she was more popular than her Trouble in Paradise co-star Herbert Marshall, for example, Paramount paid her only half his weekly salary, so she went freelance.

Yet her reputation as a thrower of tantrums leaves her denigrated and discredited.

In the 1930s, the Broadway actor Hopkins was a gifted comedienne at the height of her popularity. Today, if she's remembered at all, it's for that "difficult" reputation. (To give you an idea: the early manuscript of the Hopkins biography had the working title Magnificent Bitch, which was playwright Tennessee Williams's admiring description of his close friend.) Judged by her performances, she should be as iconic as peers Carole Lombard and Claudette Colbert, but she was less compliant in the studio system.

Hopkins backed and starred in Williams's first produced play and acted in 39 other major theatre productions, and as a result also made fewer films: Just 35 movies, with directors such as William Wyler, Howard Hawks, Michael Curtiz and Rouben Mamoulian - and two with arch-rival Davis. Their now-infamous lifelong feud eclipsed even that of Davis and Joan Crawford depicted in Ryan Murphy's TV series Feud, but was not petty. For one thing, before the two women co-starred together in anything, Davis had an affair with the director Anatole Litvak, to whom Hopkins was married at the time.

Although it's more career chronicle than analysis, Ellenberger's chronology still paints the picture of why Hopkins battled with studio heads or walked out on projects that didn't live up to her creative ambitions. If the thumbnail portrait of the actor were to be believed, it would be a miracle Hopkins got any work at all.

That she did - and in as many plum roles as she lost or outright rejected - is a testament to her talent and personal magnetism.

Director Ernst Lubitsch's advice to Hopkins, who openly criticized the Production Code, was to, "Never play 'just nice girls. Always try to get part that are a little off center.' " Her daring parts included the freethinking third corner of the love triangle of his own ménage à trois screwball comedy Design for Living (and the rape victim in The Story of Temple Drake, based on William Faulkner's provocative novel Sanctuary).

Hopkins also starred as Thackeray's anti-heroine Becky Sharp, the titular film role about a cynical and opportunistic social climber that earned her the only Academy Award Best Actress nomination of her career.

In the weeks before Becky Sharp opened, Hopkins appeared on the cover of Time magazine. "Women today might be able to support themselves, and to earn big salaries and hold high positions," she also candidly told Motion Picture magazine while promoting the film, and likened the tactics necessary for a modern woman's survival to those of the 19th century. "But [women] are paid by men, and given positions by men, and it is to men they have to look for everything." Hopkins attempted to take control of her career, renegotiating her contract with pay cuts in exchange for script, director and co-star approval.

Being vocal about the stories and working conditions she wanted is what cost her the lead in the Warner Bros. production of Jezebel - a stage property Hopkins not only partly owned but had originated on Broadway. It instead cemented Davis as the studio's top star. Hopkins's adversarial relationship with studio bosses over her contracts did not stop there. A reputation for combativeness is what shut her out of the part of Scarlett O'Hara in Gone with the Wind, in spite of the fact she was author Margaret Mitchell's own choice for the part.

Ellenberger's take on Hopkins would be at home in Too Fat, Too Slutty, Too Loud, Anne Helen Petersen's examination of how modern culture demonizes transgressive and unruly modern women (Plume, 288 pages, $16.51), and is a fitting companion to Sass Mouth Dames (Amazon, 166 pages, $9.10), wherein Megan McGurk analyses the cultural impact of a slew of women's pictures from 1929-39.

Women such as Hopkins deserve better than to be demonized by Hollywood - though some, in the case of Hedda Hopper, deserve worse. Variously played by Helen Mirren in Trumbo, Judy Davis in Feud and Tilda Swinton in Hail, Caesar!, Hopper should be a more polarizing figure. But to borrow a line from that last one, would that it were so simple.

Depictions of Hopper fall short of painting a cautionary tale about the complicity and toxicity of her regressive contemporary counterparts such as TMZ. Those recent biopic makeovers of classic Hollywood still have nostalgia on the lens and play down the effects of gossip columnist Hopper's acid malice - and often affectionately employ her comic zingers and famously elaborate hats for comic relief. But not only was Hopper competitive about getting scoops on the personal lives of key industry players, biographers interpret that she pushed a dangerous agenda of political and moral conservatism and mobilized her legion of readers to do the same.

Jennifer Frost's Hedda Hopper's Hollywood: Celebrity Gossip and American Conservatism (NYU Press, 304 pages, $40) is a chilling close reading of the infamous columnist's politics.

Hopper, a former actor, launched a movie column in 1938 and soon became a powerful figure in the Production Code heyday, when movies dominated mass entertainment and even the private lives of Hollywood stars (particularly its female stars) became the carrier of cultural meaning.

With her column nationally syndicated in 110 newspapers, by the 1950s, Hopper's reach had grown to 32 million daily readers. Frost traces her influence as a powerful tool of white supremacy. As a strident anti-Communist working closely with the FBI and the House of Un-American Activities Committee, she was also an important ally in furthering the Hollywood blacklist. She hampered the civil rights movement by supporting stereotypical and retrograde representations of AfricanAmericans. Frost outlines, for example, how Hopper championed James Baskett and Hattie McDaniel, because of their Uncle Remus and Mammy roles, to further her paternalistic racial agenda.

This sort of excavation and reputational correction is usually the purview of film historians such as Basinger, or niche imprint and academic press biographies. But mainstream titles are now also combining hindsight with insight to dramatize elements of these narratives. In The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo, for example, Taylor Jenkins Reid offers an astute and empathetic read about fictional composite of mid-century female stars and the challenges they faced under the oppressive gender bias of the institutional studio system.

In Backwards and in Heels: The Past, Present and Future of Women Working in Film by critic Alicia Malone (Mango, 242 pages, $25), the writer surveys the careers of notable filmmakers dating back to Mary Pickford and influential screenwriter Frances Marion (the first writer to win two Oscars), while in her new novel, The Girls in the Picture (Delacorte, 448 pages, $37), bestselling writer Melanie Benjamin offers a lively fictional take on Pickford's and Marion's creative friendship and how it shaped the early movie business.

In an open letter published in the New York Times on New Year's Day, 300 prominent women in entertainment, from Oprah, Shonda Rhimes and Constance Wu to Ava DuVernay and Reese Witherspoon, launched Time's Up, an ambitious multipronged initiative to combat workplace sexual harassment not just in show business but in low-wage industries. Time's Up also called for female celebrities to adopt another code - an allblack dress code - for the Golden Globe Awards. The red carpet blackout was symbolic as a demonstration of solidarity and protest of an industry that for too long has treated women as ornamental. With a new wave of inspiring books and biographies, it was a welcome reminder that before it turned into an assembly-line glamour factory, Hollywood was pioneered by women who did more than strike poses and smile for the camera.

Associated Graphic

Miriam Hopkins, who was arguably one of the best film and stage actors of the 1930s, was marginalized by Hollywood for wanting equitable pay and better roles for women.

KEYSTONE/GETTY IMAGES

Kelowna: What Vancouver used to be like
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With prices in line with average incomes, Okanagan Valley communities have become a magnet for Gen-Xers
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By KERRY GOLD
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Friday, January 12, 2018 – Print Edition, Page H9


Construction has begun on a condo C tower in downtown Kelowna that, when completed in 2020, not only will be the tallest building between Vancouver and Calgary, it will symbolize a remarkable change in the real estate market dynamics of British Columbia's Lower Mainland.

The building known as One Water Street will occupy a site that once was planned as a kind of retirement playground, but that fell by the wayside when the market went bust. Now, the new project is geared to younger people who want to live and work in Kelowna - attracted by prices that are significantly lower than those in Vancouver.

"In just over two months, we sold well over $100-million of product," says Chilliwack-based developer and builder Leonard Kerkhoff, who partnered with Toronto-based North American Development Group (NADG) to build 36-storey One Water Street. Kerkhoff Construction is completing another project nearby, the 21-storey condo at 1151 Sunset Dr. Sales for One Water Street's second tower, which will be 29 storeys, will begin in the middle part of this year. The project will include 1.3 acres of amenity space, including two swimming pools, a fire pit and a pickleball court.

The developers acquired city council approval to go higher than the 26 storeys allowed. They say the proposal was met with community support because, for years, the site had been called "the dirt pile," after a hotel project was abandoned over a lack of funding - a symbol of the economic downturn from a decade before, when the real estate boom went bust. As a sign of a robust market, in February, developer Westcorp will go to council to seek approval for a 33-storey hotel, condo and commercial project that would be similar in height to One Water Street.

In the previous boom, the market was geared to downsizers who wanted golf course and waterfront resorts, life-of-leisure homes appealling to retirees. The current boom is different because it's targeting people at the peak of their careers who have tired of the unaffordability in the Lower Mainland. Far from fairways, their options now mean a decent job, home ownership and a liveable city.

Sales for One Water Street began in late September, and within two months, 80 per cent of the tower sold. More remarkable than the height of Kelowna's newest condo project are the prices, which are reasonable by Vancouver standards. The 434-square-foot studios start at $300,000; 990 square-foot two-bedrooms start at $635,000; 1,702 square foot town homes start at $885,000 and three bedroom units start at $804,900 for 1,373 square feet of space. The subpenthouses, with lake views, are priced at about $1.8 million, and, although, the penthouse doesn't yet have a price tag because the developer is selling it as a blank slate, the expectation is somewhere in the $6-million-plus range.

"The difference between the condo market in Kelowna and the Lower Mainland is that ours is much less investordriven and more end-user driven," says Henry Bereznicki, a partner with NADG.

"It's way more stable. We sold 170 or 180 odd units [in One Water Street] and of those units, we've sold one to an American couple and everything else we sold to Canadians, and maybe a handful to Chinese investors. These are end users, or people like me, who will have it as their second home. As a condo developer, that's what you want. You don't want them buying them as investments. You want them to buy them to live in them."

Kelowna developer Randall Shier, president of Mission Group Homes, and a former Vancouverite, says Kelowna is benefitting from Vancouver's predicament, and growing in population by roughly 300 people a month. Census data show the 30- to 34-year-old cohort in Kelowna grew by 21.8 per cent between 2011 to 2016, significantly higher than the 8-per-cent growth for that age group in Canada.

"The labour -orce growth - and this is phenomenal to me - grew 7.2 per cent in one year," Mr. Shier says. "Can you imagine? That's a lot of jobs. We are seeing the Vancouver Millennial and the Vancouver Gen Xer are moving here. They are moving here because they can have a life.

"Certainly, it's a significant portion of the real estate market, people from Vancouver moving here. To us, that's a great thing. We're benefitting from the affordability crisis in Vancouver." Mr. Shier says his own son, who lives in Vancouver, is struggling to afford a reasonably sized condo.

"I don't know what the solution is for Vancouver. I love the city, but a correction is needed. I just don't know how - you don't want to be killing a market like Kelowna, or Victoria or Nanaimo, or other centres that are healthy," he says.

In Vancouver, there's been a disconnect between jobs and housing. In the past year or so, many shops have cut back on their hours because of a shortage of hourly labour.

Minimum-wage workers simply can't afford to live in the city and commuting a long distance doesn't make sense. And even workers in higher paying jobs in white-collar industries, such as tech or engineering, are finding themselves pushed outside of the central core. In Kelowna, incomes drive the housing market, which means developers are building to answer local demand.

Raghwa Gopal is the chief executive officer of Accelerate Okanagan, a non-profit that helps tech entrepreneurs get started and take business to the next level. Mr. Gopal started his own successful tech company almost 40 years ago in Kelowna.

In the past five years, he says, the industry has grown.

"About 200 people could be hired tomorrow," he says of tech jobs in the city.

"The pay isn't quite the same as Vancouver - probably 90 to 95 per cent in some cases, but the median home price for a single family house here is $700,000. And the average rent is around $1,000."

Lisa Lock, who'd lived most of her life in the Lower Mainland, worked as vicepresident of development for Concert Properties in Vancouver before moving to Kelowna a year and a half ago. When she and her husband Eric discovered their West Vancouver house was worth $2.5million, they reassessed their lives. They decided they wanted a lifestyle where they spent more time with their kids and less time in traffic.

They purchased a house in Kelowna that was double the size of their West Vancouver home, with a media room, pool and hot tub. After buying the house, they had money left in the bank. Both she and her husband lined up jobs before they left Vancouver. She now works for Mission Group Homes, and he opened a Kelowna office for a commercial insurance company.

"Everybody we meet - the electrician, the plumber - they are all from Vancouver.

Ms. Lock says "Everyone in our neighbourhood that we have run into - and I mean everyone - is from Vancouver."

The boom is not confined to Kelowna. Smaller communities outside the city are seeing growth, such as Penticton, which is an hour away.

"The big story to me that is not getting told is the Gen-X, the mid-to-late-career professional is moving here," says Penticton city planner Blake Laven. "They waited in line to buy condos in Vancouver 10 years ago, got married, had maybe one kid, they want another, and find their condo or duplex has gone up a ton.

They're now saying: 'Hey, we can get X dollars and go to the Okanagan and get more square footage, good schools, and each kid gets a bedroom.' "When we post jobs in City Hall, those are the people we are getting - the 35- to 50-year-old that has a kid or two and wants more room."

Penticton realtor Karrie Grewal says she just had the best year of her 10-year career because of people from the Lower Mainland buying up properties in and around her small city of 32,000. She says realtors averaged more than $200,000 in commissions as a result of the boom, including the junior ones.

"We just wrote an offer ... on a home in downtown Penticton that was all cash and no financing from a retired couple from the Lower Mainland," she said. "And we were in multiple offers, too."

In a healthy market, new housing that responds to demand generally translates into lower prices. That's why developers such as Mr. Shier expect prices to soften a year from now, when new market rate condos and purpose built rental units have come online. From January to September, 2017, there was a 90-per-cent increase in housing starts from a year earlier in Kelowna, according to the Central Okanagan Economic Development Commission third quarter report for 2017. Median household income increased in the Kelowna census metropolitan area by 41 per cent over a 10-year period (2005 to 2015).

Mr. Shier's own company, Mission Group Homes, will deliver about 250 rental units in the next year, which will help ease a near zero vacancy rate. In Vancouver, an increase in supply over the years has not translated into lower prices because of speculator activity, where units are purchased and left empty. Instead of providing housing, they are commodities for profit. In the condo market, presales are routinely flipped before the units complete, driving prices upward. Many experts argue that the ongoing increase of supply, without government intervention - such as stiff taxes on speculation - will do little to offset the crisis. Also aggravating the situation is the fact that luxury condos offer the greatest profit margins for a developer and there's a ready and willing offshore market that will pay the high prices.

Mr. Shier says his company does not allow a single buyer to purchase more than two units in any building in order to deter speculation. As well, the company requires large down payments in order to make flipping more difficult. "We are not seeing the pressure that Vancouver sees. It seems like a more normal market here.

The demand is from people who want to live here."

But Mr. Bereznicki says it's only a matter of time before the Kelowna market also attracts foreign money looking for safe investment.

"I think it will happen, unfortunately. I think if you are living in Mainland China you are going to think Vancouver first, but if your friends and neighbours buy in Kelowna, and you hear about it, you'll go there, and you'll say, 'I get it.' I think it will happen. But the good news is that my project is, to my knowledge, 95-per-cent Canadian buyers, residents of Canada. That's good for the project."

Associated Graphic

The condo development One Water Street in Kelowna, B.C., saw 80 per cent of its units sold out within two months, helped by prices as low as $300,000 for a studio, and $804,900 for three-bedroom units.

NORTH AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT GROUP AND KERKHOFF

Toronto's first female mayor
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A political pugilist, she fought for affordable housing and advocated for a smoking ban, while asserting a feminist position on a range of other issues
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By JOHN LORINC
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Special to The Globe and Mail
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Wednesday, January 17, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B22


In early 1991, Toronto's long-serving mayor Art Eggleton announced he wouldn't seek a fourth term. That decision set off a fiercely competitive and fractious political season that ultimately culminated in the election of the city's first female mayor: June Rowlands, then a 15-year council veteran from Rosedale who had already broken through three other important municipal glass ceilings.

The six-month campaign began with a wide open field featuring two other women on the centre-right - west-end councillor Betty Disero and former provincial Tory cabinet minister Susan Fish - and downtown councillor Jack Layton on the left.

After more than a decade of Mr. Eggleton's bland centrism, many veteran Liberal and Tory backroomers panicked at the possibility that the rightof-centre votes would be split, allowing Mr. Layton, the NDP standard bearer, to cruise to victory. With Bob Rae's NDP government at Queen's Park barely a year into its majority, the prospect of the political left controlling both poles of power was seen as too threatening.

Ms. Rowlands, who died in Toronto on Dec. 21 at the age of 93, had served as Mr. Eggleton's budget chief and later a member of his executive committee. Not surprisingly, she was best positioned to inherit his political machine. Influential operatives such as lawyer Ralph Lean and strategist John Laschinger (who later managed David Miller's 2003 centre-left victory) joined her team, while pressure mounted on Ms. Disero and Ms. Fish to bow out (both eventually did).

Yet, as she showed on the campaign, Ms. Rowlands was anything but a female version of Mr. Eggleton. Given to crusty - and, to her critics and opponents, "racist" - pronouncements about crime, black youth and poverty, Ms. Rowlands emerged on the trail as a flinty political pugilist unafraid to speak her mind. When Mr. Layton pledged to create red-light areas for prostitution and prohibit cars from downtown, Ms. Rowlands countered with grim warnings about urban decay and polarization.

She famously revealed that she used to carry a hatpin to defend herself against assailants, and even encouraged other women to use cans of spray paint.

By voting day, with her leg in a cast from a fall outside her Bay Street campaign office, Ms. Rowlands was firmly in the lead, prevailing over Mr. Layton in an election that saw an unusually high turnout. "A victory of moderation and extreme caution," the Toronto Star's city-hall columnist David Lewis Stein sniffed.

Clearly emboldened by her hard-fought victory, Ms. Rowlands turned up at a mayors conference in Winnipeg a few weeks later, opining fearlessly in a scrum that white people may be genetically predisposed to heroin addiction.

But that shoot-from-the-lip manner didn't last long. At a press conference early in January, 1992, Ms. Rowlands declared that as the new mayor of a city in the throes of a bruising recession, she would focus her attention on the municipality's finances.

"What I am going to try to do for the next six months is not to accept assignments or engagements outside City Hall. I am not going to respond so much to media for the next six months and I'm going to try not to leave town too often."

June Pendock was born on May 14, 1924, in SaintLaurent, Que., and grew up in North Toronto, attending Lawrence Park Collegiate and the University of Toronto. She eventually landed a job as a service representative for Bell Canada in the 1940s.

She met her future husband, Harry Rowlands, at Bell. The couple had five children, including two sets of twins, before they divorced. They lived in Rosedale, on Douglas Drive, although she later moved to Leaside.

In the 1950s and 60s, Ms. Rowlands became increasingly involved in various charities, residents associations and other groups, such as the Family Service Organization and the National Council on Welfare. In particular, she became increasingly active in the Association of Women Electors, an influential proto-feminist network whose members monitored developments at City Hall and regularly issued reports or briefs on issues such as poverty, public housing and the municipal budget. Ms. Rowlands, in fact, served as the AWE's president.

Her AWE activism led Ms. Rowlands into the thick of one of modern Toronto's defining battles - the proposed demolition and redevelopment of Trefann Court, an enclave south of Cabbagetown slated for "urban renewal."

"That was my first run-in with June," former Toronto mayor John Sewell (1978-80) recounts.

Mr. Sewell, then a community activist, backed efforts by local homeowners to block the demolition, while Ms. Rowlands came to the fight via a friend who was advocating for poor tenants looking for better housing.

She cut a curious figure in a conflict set against the backdrop of nearly derelict Victorian row houses and a poor neighbourhood. "A tall striking, platinum-blond woman" whose Rosedale attire and airs summoned images of Lady Bountiful, noted journalist Graham Fraser (currently the Commissioner of Official Languages) in his 1972 account of the fight, which Mr. Sewell ultimately won.

Both were elected to council, with Ms. Rowlands representing Ward 10, encompassing Rosedale and Moore Park, in 1976. By then, she had established ties to the city's Liberal machine, working first as a researcher for the party caucus at Queen's Park and later standing for election in the 1975 provincial race (she lost).

Ms. Rowlands would say she represented the "militant middle."

"She and I ended up getting along relatively well," Mr. Sewell says. "She cared a lot about social policy."

Indeed, Ms. Rowlands's early political/policy preoccupations included issues such as the development of more affordable housing for low-income families. At one point, she and another member of council, Joanne Campbell, staged a filibuster to block the conversion of thousands of rental apartments into condos - a move she later described as her proudest moment.

Through the 1980s, she was also a driving force on council behind repeated attempts to ban smoking from restaurants and other public spaces (her husband was executive director of the Ontario division of the Canadian Cancer Society).

Yet in the aftermath of the 1977 murder of shoeshine boy Emanuel Jaques, Ms. Rowlands threw her lot in with the council faction that sought to clean up Yonge Street, restrict body-rub parlours and regulate strip joints. She dismissed a proposal to establish a group home for gay youth as "a bloody disgrace" - a comment that reflected the wider homophobic backlash triggered by the Jaques murder.

When Mr. Eggleton defeated Mr. Sewell in 1980 after the latter spoke out about the importance of gay rights, Ms. Rowlands' star began to rise. She secured appointments as not only the budget chief and a member of the executive committee, but also to the Toronto Transit Commission and eventually the Metro Toronto Police Services Board. She was the first woman to serve as chair.

Mr. Eggleton, who is currently serving as a member of the Canadian Senate, recalls her as a "stickler for detail" who was known for her thoroughness and interest in health issues. Despite her caustic political profile, he says, "She was a very happy person. You didn't often see her grumpy."

While Ms. Rowlands isn't generally seen as a politically progressive figure, she nonetheless asserted a feminist position on a range of issues, pushing, at one point, for the use of hiring quotas to increase the number of women in the senior ranks of Toronto's civil service. As part of a pioneering generation of female politicians, along with figures such as Anne Johnston, Joanne Campbell and Ann Vanstone, she put her name to a push to replace "alderman" with "councillor," rejecting terms such as "alderwoman" and "alderperson."

That sensibility may have led to the most memorable move of her mayoralty - banning the Barenaked Ladies from performing at a 1991 New Year's Eve event at Nathan Phillips Square because the group's name was deemed to be sexist.

While accounts of who precisely was responsible for this decision vary - Mr. Eggleton describes it as "a misunderstanding" - Ms. Rowlands undeniably wore public responsibility both for the decision and, ironically, the band's huge success due to the record sales triggered by the media coverage of the ban.

As mayor, Ms. Rowlands stuck to her promise to keep a low profile, and even took on the role of budget chief in an era marked by an exodus of large companies to the suburbs, plummeting house prices and soaring wage increases for the city's public-sector unions.

City officials recall her capacity for taking a briefing well - a largely unrecognized but critically important skill for politicians - and her impatience with functions that had little to do with city business, such as gatherings of Greater Toronto mayors, which she routinely skipped.

Kyle Rae, a former long-serving downtown councillor, recalls that one of council's major accomplishments during her term was the city wresting control over hundreds of hectares of the polluted Port Lands from the Toronto Harbour Commission - a move that laid the groundwork for the waterfront revitalization efforts of the past 15 years.

But Ms. Rowlands's term was marked mainly by in-fighting and factionalism on council. In 1994, she was caught flat-footed when asked to comment on a riot on Yonge Street precipitated by the Rodney King jury ruling in Los Angeles. By the time the 1994 municipal election rolled around, she was facing a challenge from Barbara Hall, who was younger and considered to be more progressive and much more accessible to ordinary Torontonians.

Although early polls showed the two women running a close race, Ms. Hall began to pull ahead in the final weeks as the mayor's base of support wavered and the large portion of undecided voters shifted their support to the former human-rights lawyer. When the votes were tallied, she had prevailed over Ms. Rowlands.

Unlike almost every other living Toronto mayor, Ms. Rowlands clearly viewed the 1994 outcome as the end of a career in public life that had extended almost two decades. She left the limelight completely. She didn't do interviews or seek other appointments or elected positions with other levels of government.

Ms. Rowlands leaves her children, Doug, Joyce, Murray, Bruce and Alec; and grandchildren.

To submit an I Remember: obit@globeandmail.com Send us a memory of someone we have recently profiled on the Obituaries page.

Please include I Remember in the subject field

Associated Graphic

Although not often regarded as a politically progressive figure, June Rowlands, seen in 1983, pushed for the use of hiring quotas to increase the number of women in the senior ranks of Toronto's civil service and was part of the effort to replace the term 'alderman' with 'councillor.'

JAMES LEWCUN/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Then-mayor June Rowlands assists Ed Mirvish in handing out turkeys at Honest Ed's in 1993.

ROGER HALLETT/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Survey says: Investing fees are opaque as ever
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Despite changes meant to increase fee transparency, studies show few Canadians feel they fully understand the true cost of financial advice
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By CLARE O'HARA
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Saturday, January 20, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B12


The sweeping changes made last year to investment statements, heralded as a pivotal moment in providing clarity on the cost of investing, has had only a minimal impact on Canadians' understanding of how much they are paying for financial advice and how well their portfolios are performing.

The second phase of the client relationship model - known as CRM2 - was an industrywide initiative introduced last year to provide further clarity in the way investments and fees appear on an investor's annual statement from financial institutions.

Since July, 2017, all Canadian financial firms have been required to provide annual statements that highlight how well investments have performed in dollar amounts, as well as the dollar figure an investor has paid for financial advice. The majority of investment firms began mailing out the yearly reports, known as the annual report on charges and compensation, at the end of 2016.

But six months after the final deadline has passed - and a year since the first annual reports were popped in the mail - investors appear not much better off in understanding what the true cost of investing is.

A 2017 study conducted by Credo Consulting Inc. found that 62 per cent of investors still think that they do not pay for the financial advice they receive, only a five-percentagepoint drop from approximately six months earlier.

Another 2017 report by J.D. Power found that only 24 per cent of investors say they fully understood the fees they are paying to their financial advisers.

"Disclosure is not the same as transparency," says Mike Foy, senior director of wealth-management practice at J.D. Power. "The percentages of investors who said their advisers were having those kinds of conversations didn't really significantly change, and again we certainly didn't see any impact in terms of improvement in a client's understanding of their fees, which would presumably be the ultimate motive behind the policy to begin with."

Part of the blame may rest with financial advisers, who may have little to gain by increasing their clients' awareness of the fees they are paying.

Mr. Foy says financial advisers need to play a bigger role in the communication of fees.

Nearly one-third of investors said their financial adviser didn't explain fees at all, and even among those who did receive an explanation, complete understanding increased only to 35 per cent, suggesting advisers are not consistently doing a very effective job at ensuring their clients really understand the fees they are paying, adds Mr. Foy of the J.D. Power survey.

For Cherise Berman, an adviceonly financial planner and principal at Bespoke Financial Consulting Inc., the number of clients still unaware of the new reporting remained high; many clients didn't even know if they had received a statement reporting their individual returns or fees.

"Some individuals just don't pay attention to their statements, while others confess they don't even open their statements on a regular basis," Ms. Berman says.

Ms. Berman says the initiative is a good start but that financial advisers still have more work ahead of them to educate clients about the new information and what it means to each client individually.

"Clients need to take some ownership, too," she adds. "If they are not having periodic reviews with their adviser already, they should be requesting a review at least annually."

A BULL-MARKET TAILWIND

The degree to which the results of CRM2 are a disappointment is hard to determine, as regulators never established measurable goals. But it's clear a lot more work still needs to be done for investors to truly understand performance and fees.

"If the goal of CRM2 was to get performance and fee information into the hands of Canadian investors, that goal was achieved," says Dave Carr-Pries, vice-president of client engagement for InvestorCOM Inc., who led investor research and the development of CRM2 training materials for many of Canada's investment dealers. "But, if the goal of CRM2 was to have Canadian investors understand how they are doing and the cost of investing, then the answer isn't quite as straightforward."

For starters, many Canadians continue to lack the education required to understand what the cost of financial advice is.

"Disclosure is often intended to drive transparency, but it often creates more confusion where people are either overwhelmed and they tune it out, or even when they try to engage with it, they can't quite figure it out at all," Mr. Foy says. "As a result, CRM2 is not achieving what people want it to achieve, which is to make people more aware of what they are actually paying for the services they get."

Financial markets could be partly to blame for investors shrugging off a close inspection of their statements.

"The industry has been lucky in having CRM2 implemented with a very strong bull-market tailwind," says Dan Hallett, vice-president and principal with HighView Financial Group. "Investors are seemingly not paying as much attention to fees because account values have been rising at a healthy clip. And this puts investments on the back burner of household priorities when everything seems to be going just fine. But a combination of future enhanced disclosure and an eventual bear market will likely prompt investors to have a closer look at what they're paying and the value they perceive in their advisory relationships."

Several studies by industry regulators and associations have surfaced over the last year praising the new initiative. But upon closer inspection, the industry still has a long way to go, says Ken Kivenko, a prominent investor-rights advocate.

"Some industry reports are trying to imply we have reached the promised land where every investor knows what they are paying and everyone understands their performance, so why do we need to do anything further?" Mr. Kivenko says. "That worries me. It worries me that [regulators] may try and use what is essentially an information initiative called CRM2 and call it investor protection and then delay other investor protection initiatives that are on the table." Such initiatives would include the best-interest standard, targeted reforms or the ban of embedded commissions - all aimed at reducing potential conflict of interest that may exist.

'CLEARLY, KNOWLEDGE FADES'

Last fall, the British Columbia Securities Commission (BCSC) published a report that outlined the results of an survey that examined the impact of the new annual investment reports had on those individuals working with a financial adviser. In addition, the BCSC rolled out an educational online tool to help investors navigate and understand the new reports, including a short video and an improved fee calculator. In the report, it stated that 52 per cent of investors who had expressed less confidence and investment knowledge at the outset of the study increased their general understanding of fees after receiving CRM2 reports.

The report also showed that while there was an overall increase in fee knowledge among less-confident investors, that knowledge was shortlived. The report states that while "many" of those investors surveyed in March and then again in June saw their knowledge level increase upon receiving their CRM2 reports, that knowledge later declined during a follow up study several months later.

"Clearly, knowledge fades," the BCSC says in the note.

Of 400 respondents who answered questions on specific fees, such as the total amount of fees paid to an adviser, investor knowledge improved among 34 per cent of survey participants, but 35 per cent saw no change.

Curiously, 31 per cent said it actually worsened.

"The initial research on CRM2 shows that it is working, but we still have a long way to go," said Pamela McDonald, director, communications and education at the BCSC. "Our research shows that there is an overall positive effect on investor knowledge and behaviour; but what we also want to see is whether the fee reports will cause investors to have a conversation with their advisers about the fees they pay, is there a different mix of products that could work for them, or would they consider changing their firm or adviser. And while that 52 per cent learned more - which is great - they didn't do anything with that knowledge."

In an annual survey released in November, initiated by the Investment Funds Institute of Canada and conducted by research firm Pollara, 72 per cent of mutual-fund investors said they were confident that they understand the fees they pay for mutual funds, a statistic that has held relatively steady since 2011.

Yet, only 30 per cent of those investors with an adviser could "definitely" indicate that a part of the fees charged are used to compensate their financial adviser. Forty-eight per cent of investors said they "think so," while the remaining 22 per cent included those investors that did not believe mutual fund fees went to their adviser or did not know.

The CSA Investor Index - a survey conducted last September by Innovative Research Group for the Canadian Securities Administrators - found less than half (47 per cent) of its survey respondents know exactly how much they pay their financial adviser in the past 12 months, up by only 3 per cent from 2012.

AND THEN THERE'S THE MER ...

Hugh Murphy, managing director with Credo Consulting, believes CRM2 has moved the needle in investor awareness - even if it's minimal.

"There is a massive incongruence between what is going in an investor's mind and what is going on in adviser's mind; and there is a lot of ambiguity around these results, and CRM2 was designed to initiate better understanding among investors and truth be told our research says it has - but only marginally," Mr. Murphy says. "I think it's going to take a lot of time, a lot of energy and a massive commitment to improve financial literacy among investors."

Along with financial education, another hurdle for investors is understanding that the new reports do not include the management expense ratio (MER) an investor also has to pay when buying mutual funds and exchange-traded funds. The addition of the MER to investment statements has already brought up industry buzz around the possibility of a "CRM3" initiative - although nothing has been formally announced. In an industry that has more than $1.4-trillion in assets under management, the exclusion of the MER means several billions in fees that Canadian investors pay that are being brushed aside when it comes to full disclosure.

"CRM2 is a step in the right direction but it doesn't include all costs, says Tom Bradley, president of Steadyhand Investment Funds, who has been advocating for full transparency for over a decade. "I think we have to keep pounding that away."

Associated Graphic

Since July of last year, all Canadian financial firms have been required to provide an annual report to increase the transparency of investments' performance and costs, but so far, the results of CRM2 have proved to be disappointing. ISTOCK

'It's safer out here'
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As temperatures dip, the city's homeless must often choose between freezing conditions and sometimes dangerous public shelters
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By JESSE WINTER
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Monday, January 15, 2018 – Print Edition, Page A8


Shawn stamped his feet in the -23 C cold, slapping hands against his thighs to beat some warmth back into his fingers.

"I'll be back in an hour," he said, before heading off into the freezing night.

Behind him, from inside a yellow tent in an alcove near the downtown Toronto intersection of Queen Street and Spadina, his partner Barb offers a muffled acknowledgment. The couple are homeless and have been sleeping outdoors even through the depths of this winter's potentially lethal cold weather.

Together with two dogs and a friend who calls himself Chibi, they've lived in their tent setup for almost two months, preferring the street to the city's shelters and drop-in centres.

"It's safer out here," Barb said.

"There's no bugs. No one's going to beat you up or steal your shit."

As temperatures have plummeted this winter, Toronto's emergency housing system has been stretched to the max, sparking an emotional public debate about whether the city has underfunded services for its most vulnerable residents. Shelters are running around 95-percent full. During the recent twoweek cold snap, drop-in centres and emergency respite sites were overflowing.

After first voting against it in early December, Toronto Mayor John Tory this month asked the federal government to open the Moss Park Armoury as an emergency warming centre, which includes 100 cots and access to showers. It will stay open until the province finishes renovations to a building on George Street, which then takes over with space for 75 clients until April 15.

The discourse has focused mainly on the number of beds, but those who use the shelter system say the real problem is the quality of accommodations.

During the recent cold spell in Toronto, with record-low temperatures that could cause frostbite in just half an hour, The Globe spoke to numerous homeless people who said the conditions inside the existing drop-in centres and shelters are so deplorable or dangerous that they'd rather brave the elements. (Most of the people The Globe interviewed asked not to be identified because of the circumstances that led them to the streets.)

The city and shelter workers acknowledge the system is deeply flawed, but say they are doing the best they can with limited resources and increasing demand. That's an unacceptable answer for activists who have urged the city for years to overhaul the system that some users feel forces them to choose between warmth and safety.

"I can leave my stuff here when I go work and know it won't be stolen," Chibi said of his makeshift home.

By work, Chibi means anything from panhandling to collecting bottles and cans, or "flying a sign" - seeking change from cars stopped at red lights during rush hour.

Chibi's friend Matt Buckaway does the same work, rotating between various locations downtown, depending on traffic, weather and how many other people he's competing with. On a good day, he can make $30 to $50 an hour, he says. On a bad day he makes less than $5.

But it's not just the charity of strangers the group relies on.

When Barb and Shawn first set up their tent, outreach workers started dropping off occasional supplies, such as hygiene products and warm clothes. It wasn't long before the couple had more than they needed, so they started giving them away to anyone else who needed them.

"The outreach workers are angels," Shawn said. "The shelters they work for, though, not so much." Chibi joined Barb and Shawn in the fall, at first using just a sleeping bag on the sidewalk. He was drawn to the spot because there can be safety in numbers, he said. Soon, other street youth started showing up, asking if there were any supplies to share.

Barb, Shawn and Chibi were happy to help.

"We were actually getting referrals from other people," Chibi said. "We call it streets to streets.

We the poor, for the poor." He even found discarded cellphones while dumpster diving, got them fixed, and gave them to friends who needed them, he said.

Mr. Buckaway himself is 25 and has spent the past five of those years homeless. During past bouts of extreme cold, he says he's tried calling the phone line at 129 Peter St., the location of the city's central intake for people needing access to the shelter system. He said he usually gets referred to a warming centre or the Seaton House shelter.

"It's basically drug central," Mr. Buckaway said. "So I'm, like, 'No way.' I'd rather go find a stairwell or something."

Many of his friends feel the same way. On a recent afternoon, as the cold deepened, Mr. Buckaway met up with a man who calls himself Eyrish. He was panhandling outside the Yonge and Dundas subway station with his dog, Nez Paw.

"Those places are garbage," Eyrish agrees, sloshing around a can full of beer freezing faster than he was drinking it. Though he is precariously housed now, Eyrish says he spent the night of Jan. 4 at the All Saints Church drop-in centre on Dundas Street East.

"It's chaos in there, man," Eyrish said. "I froze last night, and my phone got stolen."

A visit to the All Saints dropin centre is illuminating. Around midday on Jan. 5, dozens of people were huddled under blankets on mats on the floor.

Although it was warmer than the -18 C it was outside, the old church was still chilly inside.

The smell of urine hung in the air.

"Oh, honey, your feet!" one woman said to another woman wandering listlessly towards the bathroom. "You have nothing on your feet!" The woman appeared not to hear her. Near the door, a young man was yelling incoherently.

The drop-in at All Saints Church is run by Margaret's Housing and Community Support Services. It took in upward of 100 people a night between the site's two spaces during the cold snap. Inside the church, there are three toilets and only one sink. The washroom has no door.

Margaret's executive director, Diane Walter, acknowledged the cold-weather crowding situation isn't ideal, but says staff do the best job they can.

"We have not had an incident of extreme violence where blood was shed or anything like that," she said. "We've had skirmishes."

During this month's cold snap, Ms. Walter said some of her organization's clients were holed up at the drop-in around the clock for 13 days straight. In such conditions, it's natural for nerves to get frayed, she said.

Police had to be called twice.

The drop-in at All Saints faced some of the worst overcrowding during the recent cold snap in part because of its location at the corner of busy Dundas and Sherbourne Streets, which Ms. Walter called the "epicentre" of the shelter crisis.

"It may not look like the Ritz, it may not smell like the Ritz or feel like the Ritz, but for some people it is the Ritz," she said. "I don't think it's optimal, obviously, but it serves a purpose and it saves lives."

While the drop-ins and warming centres can be rough, some say the conditions inside the city's permanent shelters are often as bad or worse.

"The shelters, they're very dangerous," said one shelter user who asked to remain anonymous and sleeps at the Salvation Army's Maxwell Meighen Centre shelter for men. "I got my nose broken, my eyes blackened. I was in the hospital three times. Once, I got stabbed."

During one incident two weeks ago, he said, another shelter client interrupted a card game. When things got heated, the other client started spitting in his face, he said. They got into a fight, and the police had to be called.

Salvation Army spokesperson John McAlistair said a "disagreement" between two clients fitting that description did occur at the Maxwell Meighen shelter recently. Without disclosing the frequency of incidents, he said staff at the shelter are trained in non-violent crisis intervention and only call the police when situations escalate.

City Councillor Kristyn WongTam said she can understand why, even in record-breaking cold, some people would still choose to sleep outdoors.

"We have to tackle this in a holistic manner by defusing the volatile situation in the shelters," and adding at least 1,000 new shelter spaces by the end of the year, Ms. Wong-Tam said.

"We probably need more than that by my count, but I think we should be able to ... at least get those 1,000 shelter beds open before the next winter hits."

Last week, the city made a small dent in that number. The Salvation Army's New Hope men's shelter opened in the eastern part of downtown Toronto, adding 60 new spaces to the city's 5,861 total.

Toronto housing and shelter spokesperson Patricia Anderson said nightly shelter demand has increased by 30 per cent over the past year. The city plans to open a total of 690 new spaces by the end of 2018. Three new shelters will be built next year, and three more added to the 2019 plan, Ms. Anderson said.

Back on the street, as Jan. 5 slowly became Jan. 6, Mr. Buckaway made one last stop to visit friends under the busy Gardiner Expressway. There, with his tent pressed up against a concrete pillar, was Jordan. He's been on the streets for 20 years, he said, and - like his friends - prefers his tent to a shelter or drop-in because he feels safer.

"Plus, I can't make eggs at a drop-in," Jordan said with a grin, pointing to a full carton and a single-burner propane camp stove.

Mr. Buckaway's night ends in the basement of an empty house he's squatting in. It's in a row of others downtown, all slated for eventual demolition to make way for a condo development. There is no heat, power or running water, but Mr. Buckaway doesn't mind.

Inside the basement, it feels warmer than the All Saints drop-in, and is definitely warmer than the -23 C outside.

"With a few candles and a good sleeping bag, it's not too bad," Mr. Buckaway said, before turning in for the night.

Associated Graphic

Jordan has been on the streets for 20 years and prefers his tent to a shelter or drop-in because he says he feels safer.

Among Toronto's homeless people - such as Chibi (below), Matt Buckaway (bottom), Barb (far left), Eyrish (left) and Jordan (above) - many say they would rather sleep on the street than go to a shelter or drop-in site because of safety, drug-use and theft concerns.

PHOTOS BY JESSE WINTER/ THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Tech giants promised to change the world. Did they go too far?
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Criticism of Facebook, Apple and Google is nothing new. But this time, the calls for change are coming from inside Silicon Valley
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By TAMSIN MCMAHON
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Saturday, January 13, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B1


SAN JOSE, CALIF. -- It's been a week of soul searching for the tech industry.

Facebook Inc. announced it was making a "major change" to its news feed in what's seen as a response to growing controversies over fake news and foreign political interference on its platform. And two major Apple Inc. shareholders issued a letter pressing that company to help protect young children from smartphone addiction.

The moves are just the latest in a reckoning that is rocking Silicon Valley as some of the technologists and investors who have helped build the world's most powerful tech firms are raising the alarm over the negative consequences of their innovations. Technology companies have faced an onslaught of criticism over the past year about sexist workplace cultures, congressional inquiries into Russian political interference in online political advertising and a growing body of evidence that smartphone addiction is becoming a public health crisis.

Many of the concerns aren't new. But what has changed is that the loudest warnings are coming from within . Facebook shares fell nearly 5 per cent on Friday after chief executive Mark Zuckerberg said the company would dramatically overhaul its news feed to place more focus on reduce the amount of posts by advertisers and publishers in favour of more content from users' friends and family.

"We feel a responsibility to make sure our services aren't just fun to use, but also good for people's well-being," Mr. Zuckerberg wrote. The announcement is largely seen as a sign that the company is worried about the growing backlash over how its technology has been used to manipulate public opinion and is now looking for ways to fix it.

Former Apple executive Tony Fadell took to Twitter this week after investment firm Jana Partners and the California State Teachers' Retirement System, who collectively own $2-billion (U.S.) in Apple stock, pushed the company to do more to protect children from the effects of digital technology. "We believe there is a clear need for Apple to offer parents more choices and tools to help them ensure that young consumers are using your products in an optimal manner," the investors wrote in an open letter.

"Device addiction is real," Mr. Fadell added in a lengthy series of Twitter posts. He called on devicemakers to help. "Our smartphone 'bottle' needs to tell us we've had enough."

Apple responded by saying it has already added parental controls to its phones and was planning to introduce "even more robust" safeguards.

The events top off what has been a steady stream of condemnations from high-profile entrepreneurs and investors over the past several months. Early Facebook executives Sean Parker and Chamath Palihapitiya have warned of social-media companies' ability to manipulate human behaviour. Twitter co-founder Ev Williams mused that the micro-blogging site had helped fuel the rise of online hate speech.

The backlash comes at a time when Big Tech is seemingly unstoppable. Major tech firms' stock prices are at record highs. The four largest Silicon Valley companies - Apple, Facebook, Amazon.com Inc. and Google's parent company, Alphabet Inc. - now have a combined market capitalization larger than the GDP of Russia.

But as their power has grown, tech companies are starting to see a sharp reversal from the sense of idealism that has long underpinned the industry. Digital skepticism is becoming the new normal in Silicon Valley, leading to questions over whether tech companies can fix themselves, or will be forced to by regulators.

"There's a tectonic shift in the public's perception of Big Tech," said Scott Galloway, a marketing professor at New York University who published The Four, a book about the big four tech firms last year. "A year ago, we were talking about which CEO was more Jesus-like or was going to run for president. Now, [tech] companies are being referred to as the new tobacco."

Among the most vocal proponents of those downsides is Silicon Valley venture capitalist Roger McNamee.

An early investor in Google and Facebook, Mr. McNamee mentored Mr. Zuckerberg on what he saw as the vast potential of the nascent socialmedia company starting around 2006.

Over the past year, however, Mr. McNamee - who still holds Facebook stock - has dedicated himself fulltime to bringing public attention to the harmful effects of smartphone technology: how it is helping to expose children to inappropriate video content, contributing to a rise in teen suicide, leaving adults lonely and isolated and undermining democratic elections.

"All of those things add up," he says. "It suggests we've passed a tipping point and that these companies who have won on every objective measure - they've succeeded beyond their wildest dreams - they can afford to now go and do the right thing."

Mr. McNamee brought some of his concerns directly to both Mr. Zuckerberg and Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg in early 2016.

They responded quickly and he spent four months talking to executives about how to deal with the threat of bad actors manipulating Facebook's platform.

But eventually, he says, Facebook made it clear it wasn't interested in seriously tackling the problem. That's when Mr. McNamee went public.

"The notion was never to cause a problem," he says. "The goal from the beginning has been to have a conversation about what is the appropriate role of social networks in our society."

Many tech insiders who are raising concerns point to the combination of ever-present smartphone technology that can collect reams of data on users, algorithms using that data to develop highly targeted content and the ad-based business model that has made smartphone users a highly lucrative market.

"As soon as you have smartphones, you have constant surveillance of people all the time and it naturally progresses from what you could call advertising to ... [what] you have to call a constant behaviour-modification technology," says Jaron Lanier, a computer scientist who is widely credited as the father of virtual reality. "Now, you have these behaviour-modification empires that are paid to change society."

Investors are taking notice of the growing chorus of worried voices emanating from Silicon Valley.

The decision by large shareholders to target Apple over smartphone addiction is a smart strategy, said Kellie McElhaney, a business professor at the University of California, Berkeley.

The smartphone-maker has historically been responsive to pressure on social and environmental issues.

While Apple isn't solely responsible for the attentiongrabbing apps that run on its phone, it's in the best position to push the industry to change.

"Apple has a significant amount of influence on every provider to Apple, from the materials in the phone to the app providers," she said. "So that's where I do see a responsibility on Apple to use their power."

This year "is going to be a turning point for the tech companies," said Jonas Kron, director of shareholder advocacy at Boston-based Trillium Asset Management, an investment firm that focuses on social-impact investing. "I think they're going to be confronting investors' interest and investor attention in a way that they have never had to in the past."

Trillium has filed several shareholder proposals pressing companies including Apple, Tesla and Alphabet over issues such as privacy concerns, workplace diversity and environmental reporting. It recently filed a proposal asking Facebook's board to consider establishing a risk-oversight committee to help the social-media company combat issues such as fake news and the use of its platform by terrorists.

Mr. Kron isn't surprised to see the tide of public opinion is turning.

Many other industries have introduced new technologies and products to an initial wave of enthusiasm that eventually gives way to concerns about the negative consequences. He points to the food and beverage industry, where decades ago pesticides and monoculture farming were seen as important developments that helped to dramatically reduce the cost of food, but eventually provoked a consumer backlash over environmental and health concerns.

"It's not that one day everybody is going to wake up and Facebook or Google is going to find that it has lost half the user base," he says. "It's going to be a much more slow erosion that will leave them scrambling for relevance."

Having sounded the alarm on Silicon Valley's ethical shortcomings, investors and entrepreneurs are turning their attention to how to fix the problems they've created.

Mr. McNamee offers up several solutions: Facebook, Google and Twitter should directly contact every user who was exposed to the Russianbacked election content to tell them they were being manipulated. Company CEOs should testify publicly before Congress. Regulators should ban fake social-media accounts - or bots - and block technology companies from acquiring competitors until they can prove they've fixed their problems. Users should be given more control over their own data, which could include imposing a statute of limitations on how long tech companies can use the information they collect.

Social media companies ultimately have only a handful of options, Mr. Lanier says. They can allow the backlash to grow until they are eventually forced out of business, or they can shift their business models away from advertising and toward low subscription fees for users along with paying those who produce content.

Netflix has used a similar model to usher in a golden era of so-called "peak television."

Without major changes by the industry itself, Prof. Galloway predicts that European competition regulators will issue their first fine in excess of 10-billion ($15-billion Canadian) against one of the major tech firms within the next 12 months.

There is also an "outside chance" that a European country could restrict access to U.S. social-media businesses within their borders in order to help local entrepreneurs build their own domestic online platforms.

"Some nation is going to wave their middle finger at Big Tech and say: We're not as fascinated and adoring of you as your colleagues in the U.S.," he said.

Mr. McNamee hasn't heard from anyone at Facebook for nearly a year, but says he would welcome the chance to help the company solve these issues before the backlash starts to weigh on their financial performance. The default strategy to deflect responsibility for the harmful effects of technology isn't working, he says. "If they continue to fight, they'll succeed in avoiding regulation for a time. But they're going to harm their brands in some really profound ways."

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In the face of accusations Facebook helped perpetuate fake news and aided in the spread of online hate speech, chief executive Mark Zuckerberg has announced changes to the platform's news feed feature that will focus more on content related to users' friends and family.

STUART RAMSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chamath Palihapitiya

Roger McNamee

Sean Parker

Tony Fadell

HIPSTERS OF THE HOLY
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With glossy social media, a gospel of self-help and services that look more like Arcade Fire concerts, a Toronto congregation is bucking the global trend of aging Christian faithful. Eric Andrew-Gee checks it out
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By ERIC ANDREW-GEE
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Saturday, January 20, 2018 – Print Edition, Page A16


Until recently, Aimee Burke was a cartoon of her generation. She cut hair on Toronto's gentrified Ossington Avenue. She partied a lot and was partial to coke. Her hookups comprised partners both male and female. She was unhappy.

Her life began to change, she said, with the appearance of an unusual tattoo. (Even her epiphany had a millennial cast.)

About two years ago, a client at her salon flashed a wrist inked with an image of Christ. When Ms. Burke asked about it, the tattooed client said she belonged to a new Toronto church.

Soon after, having confirmed that she could attend in ripped jeans, Ms. Burke went to her first C3 Church service.

There was no guarantee she would be won over by a Pentecostal movement founded in Australia 35 years earlier as the Christian City Church and rebranded in the course of its rapid, worldwide growth.

"I'm pretty sure I went to the service hungover from the night before," she recalled.

But as the service wore on, she found herself weeping. "I just felt less empty."

"Everyone was within about 10 years of my age and I was 24 years old at the time. They were talking about God, but they looked like people I could party with," Ms. Burke said. "I felt like I could be myself right away."

The church had won a convert.

"As the Christians would say, I've surrendered over my life," she said recently. "I do everything. I pray in the morning, I pray at night, I read my Bible every day. ... Now I'm waiting for marriage. I've been sober for almost two years."

Across the West, Christian congregations are aging and young unbelievers now outnumber their religiously committed peers in Canada, according to an Angus Reid survey last spring.

But amid the general greying of the religious population, C3 has found a niche as a hipster church.

Although it will perform a water baptism if you so desire, its focus is a self-help message geared to the practical worries of young, alienated urbanites and a glossy social-media presence. It is making worshippers out of people who might otherwise have spent their Sundays scrolling through Tinder in a coffee shop. C3 has grown to include more than 450 churches around the world, including 11 congregations across Canada with about 3,000 parishioners total, and a Toronto branch so big it recently split into eastern and western "campuses."

"I think people are looking for something to believe in," Ms.

Burke offered, "even if it's just themselves."

'DO LIFE TOGETHER'

On a recent Sunday, the foyer of Toronto's Central Technical School looked like the orchestra pit of an Arcade Fire concert.

Many forearms were covered with tattoos, many male faces were covered in beards and the median age was about 30.

The morning's second service at C3's western campus was about to begin, with close to 300 people in attendance.

The church does not have a bricks-and-mortar place of worship in Toronto, but in virtually every other way it presents as a thriving and exceptionally wellfunded religious community.

Volunteers had placed little Christmas trees spangled with candy canes in the dank public school bathrooms.

Inside the school auditorium, volunteers with walkie-talkies in their back pockets arranged children artfully on a Persian rug in front of the stage for "Kids Takeover Service," in which the pastor's wife interviewed kids from the congregation on stage.

From the vantage point of most Christian churches in Canada, every day at C3 is Kids Takeover day. The youth of the place cuts sharply against the national trend.

"They've managed to do something a lot of people haven't managed to figure out," said Brian Clarke, a lecturer in the History of Christianity at Emmanuel College, Toronto School of Theology. "In 1961, the United Church of Canada looked like Canada, in terms of age profile, in terms of ethnic diversity.

... You look now and it doesn't.

United Church is not alone in that. All the larger Protestant churches have gone through that."

C3's demographics are no coincidence. The church carefully gears its message and outreach to striving young city-dwellers.

The Toronto congregation has an Instagram page and a podcast.

Photographers buzz around parish events snapping deftly lit photos for diffusion on social media. Sunday services open with a Christian rock concert.

Pastor Sam Picken started C3's Toronto chapter in 2012 with his wife, Jess Picken, and it has been a family affair ever since. They and their two small children are the face of the church.

On a recent Sunday, Jess introduced the congregation to Rocco, the C3 kids' mascot - an adult dressed in a plausible-looking raccoon costume - and recounted how "dope" the church Christmas party had been.

"We crowd-surfed people at our Christmas party," she said.

The church's upbeat, easygoing style attracted many of the parishioners at its west end campus.

"The big thing here is people come and they don't feel pressured to be anything other than who they are," said Jonathan Li, 30. "It's more about having people to do life together.

"I think people are a lot lonelier these days, even with social media. ... I think there's a false sense of connectedness there."

Mike Sexsmith, 32, is part of a church Connect Group - like a Bible study group, but not necessarily for studying the Bible - that meets to play a game called Spikeball.

The Greater Toronto Area has millions of people, he said, "but it's like the loneliest place in the world." At C3, "Guys just invite you to hang out."

EMBRACING INADEQUACY

When Mr. Picken walked on stage to deliver his sermon, he looked like a guy just inviting you to hang out. Dressed in tight black jeans and a denim shirt, his hair shaved on the sides, he carried a Bible and an iPad in the same hand, eventually reading from them both.

"God's presence is in this place," he said, as the band played softly in the background.

"Thank you, Jesus."

His sermon that day was a riff on the theme of inadequacy, drawing widely from Biblical scripture.

"God is doing something massive in your life," he said in a rough-hewn Australian accent.

"God has a strong plan for 2018."

"God is higher than your thinking," he went on. "If you are inadequate, he is adequate."

Parishioners urged him on.

"Right!" "Yep!" "That's good!"

"Come on!"

"Nobody understands why you give your money to the church," Mr. Picken said. "They don't understand why you give your time to the church."

It's true that some parishioners are misunderstood by their friends - colleagues at the salon call Ms. Burke "crazy Jesus lady" - and also that many parishioners give generously of their time and money. C3, which has a staff of seven including Mr. and Ms. Picken, is funded entirely by donations, like many churches.

Worshippers at the Sunday service were given a card indicating giving options, including PayPal and regular automated debit transfers. "Take a moment to thank God for his faithfulness," it said.

The sermon gained urgency and intensity as it went. The overriding message was that inadequacy is something to embrace, not shy away from, because it brings one closer to Jesus.

"God wants to point a finger at your owie," Mr. Picken said, using the idiosyncratic, modern evangelical diction in which giving a sermon is "preaching a word" and caring for someone means "loving on" them. "Jesus is excited ... to work in your stuff."

"Dear Jesus, I thank you that you died on a cross to work in my mess."

Mr. Picken was born in Australia 33 years ago and while he was raised Christian, he came across C3 while he was a musician playing bar-band classic rock covers.

His intense, declamatory style in the pulpit seems less inspired by the great rock n' roll frontmen than by self-help gurus like Tony Robbins. He said during his sermon that he listened to the podcasts of other preachers for inspiration; asked about his influences later in the day, Mr. Picken said: "Business books."

"Just like anyone else in an industry, you want to be the best you can possibly be."

His comfort with modern, secular rhetoric mirrors the church's ease with modern forms of communication.

"We use technology to try and advance the Gospel," Mr. Picken said. "I think Jesus would have had an Instagram account if he had been alive today."

RELATIONSHIP, NOT RULES

The church's modernity also extends to its social teaching.

One of C3's selling points for the young and spiritually curious is that it avoids the language of judgment and sanction.

"We don't present ourselves in any sense as know-it-alls," Mr. Picken said. "We're trying not to offer rules, but relationship."

The church's disinclination to tell people how to live their lives seems to extend even to the fraught realm of same-sex relationships, which have so bedeviled modern Christianity. Mr. Picken tiptoed painstakingly around the subject, but ultimately deferred judgment.

"Sexuality is such a personal thing that to make a blanket statement about it feels really objective and impersonal," he said. "I see my role not to tell people what's right or wrong or what to do, but to point them to having a relationship with Jesus."

Prof. Clarke suggested that C3's studied neutrality on hotbutton moral issues was a canny move for a growing church.

"I think a lot of churches realized part of their legacy was that they were judgmental and that turned a lot of people off," he said. "You've got to meet people where they are."

Aimee Burke is glad the church met her where she was.

At C3, she felt like she could be herself, without feeling "self-condemned," she said. All the jokes about saying Hail Marys when she swears at work are worth it, Ms. Burke insists.

"This is going to sound really Christian-y," she said, "but it felt like the chains came off of me."

Associated Graphic

Pastor Sam Picken, who started C3 in Toronto in 2012, leads worship in December.

PHOTOS BY CHRISTOPHER KATSAROV/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

A group of young people pray together following service at the C3 Christian church in Toronto.

Julien Hyacinthe, one of the church's many young worshippers, prays during the C3 service.

Volunteers take down signs at Central Technical School after a service. C3 lacks its own building and so uses the high school's gymnasium.

After its shopping spree at U.S. luxury retailer Neiman Marcus, CPPIB is left holding the bag
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By TIM KILADZE, JACQUELINE NELSON
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Monday, January 22, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B1


At the height of the holiday shopping season in 2013, the head of private investments for Canada Pension Plan Investment Board flew to Dallas to promote his latest retail conquest.

A few months earlier, CPPIB and its private equity partner, Ares Management, revealed they were the new owners of Neiman Marcus, the largest luxury retailer in the United States. The company sells couture apparel, designer accessories and fine jewels to affluent customers online and in department stores. A strengthening American economy, coupled with visions of international expansion, made CPPIB see nothing but growth.

The $6-billion (U.S.) price tag ranked among the richest buyouts the pension fund had ever participated in, but André Bourbonnais, its private-investment head, told a crowd at the historic Adolphus Hotel in downtown Dallas that the deal would pay off because this was an exclusive asset. "These iconic brands don't come to market often."

When people called to say congratulations, he would reply: "We're really happy about the deal, but call me in five years when we've tripled our investment," according to a report on the breakfast event.

But it's looking increasingly unlikely that the phone will ring. Neiman Marcus is saddled with nearly $5-billion (U.S.) in debt, and in early January, the retailer announced that it's turning to a new chief executive to revive it in a difficult market for shopping malls. This came after the company cancelled plans to go public and abandoned efforts to sell itself. Rating agencies have suggested a balance-sheet restructuring is inevitable. Depending on the severity, it could ultimately wipe out CPPIB's $690-million equity investment. (Much of the total purchase price was paid for with debt.)

How did Neiman Marcus - and CPPIB - get here? Some problems, such as the energy-sector crash that squeezed core Texan consumers and the natural disasters that have disrupted tourist shopping, were beyond their control. Other woes, such as the surge in online shopping and the sudden emergence of new, niche brands in high-end fashion and cosmetics have forced the retailer to play catch-up - and it has struggled.

The experience illustrates just how risky private investments can be. But Canadians will have to get comfortable with them, because the Toronto-based fund is pouring more and more money into alternative investment strategies - such as developing real estate, buying infrastructure assets and directly investing in businesses - all to eke out better returns for pensioners than can be found in public securities. (At the end of its last fiscal year, nearly half of CPPIB's $317-billion portfolio was in private assets, with 28 investments specifically in direct private equity that were valued at $17.6-billion.)

As the Neiman Marcus case shows, picking winners isn't easy - and it's arguably getting harder, because asset values are scorching almost across the board. At the same time, a record $1-trillion in cash has been raised by global private equity funds and they're all out competing for deals, making it harder to discern value.

A "RISKY" INVESTMENT

When CPPIB bought Neiman Marcus, which operates 42 of its brand name stores across the United States, as well as two Bergdorf Goodman department stores in New York City and an off-price chain named Last Call, the retail sector was reconfiguring to adapt to monumental structural shifts, such as the rise in online shopping.

The company bought a luxury Germane-commerce company Mytheresa.com in 2014 as part of an effort to keep pace.

The expectation, though, was that high-end brands would be more stable because their rich clientele would be loyal and less price sensitive in market downturns - and who better to benefit than Neiman Marcus, which had been around for more than a century after opening its first store in downtown Dallas in 1907?

CPPIB also envisioned international expansion, with the Asian market looking particularly lucrative.

To some, it was wishful thinking. "When CPPIB bought into [Neiman Marcus], I shook my head. I just didn't understand it," said Maureen Atkinson, senior partner of research insights at consulting firm J.C.

Williams Group. "High-end fashion is very risky. It comes and goes. And I know they've been around for a long time, but they also haven't done well for long time."

The skepticism proved to be justified.

Neiman Marcus primarily caters to women, with more than 60 per cent of its revenue coming from women's clothing, shoes, handbags and accessories.

Although the company has kept its designer base diverse, with only two designers representing more than 5 per cent of total revenue last year, its business has been disrupted by the emergence of new brands. On top of that, designers continue to open their own independent stores to cut out the middleman.

Consumers are also more impatient than ever before; they want to buy new fashion trends much more quickly.

Fashion shows, for one, are splashed all over social media and customers tend to want what they see on digital platforms almost immediately - a trend sometimes referred to as "see it now, wear it now." And despite Neiman Marcus's scale benefits as the largest luxury goods department store in the United States, as judged by sales, mall traffic has been falling.

Internally, the retailer has wrestled with operational issues, including data breaches and major setbacks tied to the bungled launch of its new NMG inventory system that caused major problems when trying to view inventory as well as when handling accounts payable.

As for any expansion, the vision of taking the brand name to new markets has yet to materialize. "What was hot, and may have been part of the logic for buying this business, was the emergence of the Asia market," Ms. Atkinson said. "That all sounds very easy, but [Asia's] a different world. And there are department stores in Asia that carry these brands." As all of these woes compounded, revenue fell for two fiscal years straight and operating losses climbed to $531.8-million in its 2017 year. In early January, the retailer announced a chief executive change, with departing CEO Karen Katz replaced by Geoffroy van Raemdonck, who last worked for Ralph Lauren Corp.

A turnaround may be possible, but the retailer's debt burden makes it much more difficult. Neiman Marcus continues to churn out sizable cash flow, but much of it is eaten up by interest payments.

As of March, 2017, right before the leverage woes took centre stage, its total debt burden amounted to 9.7 times its earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization, according to rating agency Moody's Investors Service - an extremely high ratio.

As of Friday, the largest tranche of Neiman Marcus's senior unsecured debt was yielding more than 24 per cent, an indication of the market's view that the risk is high. (The bonds, due in 2021, trade at around 61 cents on the dollar, according to Bloomberg data.)

The company's overall debt, which includes a term loan, starts to mature in 2020.

When downgrading Neiman Marcus's $1.6-billion in unsecured debt to CC from CCCminus last June, rating agency Standard & Poor's said a restructuring is likely, noting that the retailer's operating performance "will not rebound sufficiently to support its very highly leveraged capital structure" and that it sees "heightened risks of a distressed exchange."

The terms of these exchanges differ each time, but debt investors are typically forced to writedown a portion of their holdings in return for a higher interest rate on the remaining position, a situation that just transpired at J. Crew, another troubled retailer owned by private equity firms. It is possible a full-blown restructuring could materialize, and in that scenario, there is the potential for all of the company's equity to be wiped out.

CPPIB and Mr. Bourbonnais declined to comment for the story. Neiman Marcus did not respond to requests for comment.

A LONG-TERM OUTLOOK

Even if CPPIB writes off its entire equity position, the massive fund can absorb the loss.

CPPIB has also had large private equity wins in the past few years that help offset any writedown.

However, the pension fund's executives often speak about their long-term outlook, and this longevity is supposed to be tied to compensation. This scenario suggests even the bestdesigned pay systems can't account for every variable, as staff changes have complicated matters.

Mr. Bourbonnais left CPPIB in 2015 to run PSP Investments, a pension fund for Canada's public-sector employees. Mark Wiseman, the head of CPPIB at the time of the Neiman deal, has also moved on to become Global Head of Active Equities at BlackRock in New York.

With such turnover, it is hard to know if strategies get executed as planned, and it is difficult to pin executives to the performance of their assets - in outcomes both good and bad.

Any writeoff would also hurt one of the key metrics CPPIB relies on most to measure its success: dollar value add. The fund measures its annual returns relative to an internal benchmark to judge whether its riskier active management strategy is worth it. In years when the DVA is positive, the fund outperforms its equivalent passive management strategy; when it is negative, CPPIB would have been better off investing in vanilla stocks and bonds.

CPPIB has delivered $8.9-billion of "net dollar value add" - meaning it has made $8.9-billion more than it would have under its old passive strategy, after accounting for the active strategy's costs. Yet, last year it underperformed the benchmark by $8.2-billion. If the fund does so again by a similar amount when the current fiscal year ends - which is possible because public markets have been extremely hot of late, boosting the passive strategy - it will have erased practically all of the active gains since implementing this riskier strategy about 10 years ago. In that scenario, a Neiman Marcus writeoff certainly won't look good.

Associated Graphic

Luxury retailer Neiman Marcus, which operates stores such as this one seen in West Palm Beach, Fla., in 2015, generates much of its revenue from women's items, but has been disrupted by new brands.

RYAN STONE/NYT

Geoffroy van Raemdonck

Flames' introspection starts to pay dividends
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Drafting and developing franchise's own players is the stock for a roster supplemented by smart trades and signings, David Shoalts writes
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By DAVID SHOALTS
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Saturday, January 20, 2018 – Print Edition, Page S1


Doing things by the book is bringing the heat for the Calgary Flames.

In the NHL's salary-cap era that means draft and develop your own players, supplement them with some smart trades and make sure your free-agent signings emphasize value rather than enormous payouts. It was a philosophy often talked about by those who ran the organization, but not always done well until Brad Treliving became general manager in April, 2014.

"Absolutely," Treliving said.

"To have success in this league you have to do it. You have to grow your own. We put an emphasis on that when we got here. It takes some time. You have to draft them, work with them. But we're starting to see the fruits of that labour pay off."

Treliving would never say so, of course, but right now the Flames' development plan is working a lot better than the one employed by their bitter rivals to the north, the Edmonton Oilers.

After giving Oilers fans their first playoff team in 10 years last season, Connor McDavid and the rest of the Edmonton's high draft picks have fallen back to earth this season. They sport a mediocre 20-23-3 record, sixth in the Pacific Division, 13 points behind Calgary with the playoffs only a faint hope. The Flames also made the playoffs last season, in their case, for just the second time in eight years. Like the Oilers, they did not start this season well. But goaltender Mike Smith, acquired last summer for some spare parts from the Arizona Coyotes, reverted to his form of a couple of years ago to backstop the Flames' resurgence in the past two months.

That, combined with a group of top-four defencemen who rank among the best in the NHL, the ascension of young forwards Johnny Gaudreau and Sean Monahan to elite status and some help from the farm team, brought the Flames to the attention of fans across the league.

The Flames went into their five-day break this past week on a seven-game winning streak.

On the last day of their minivacation, the Flames were still tied for second place in the Pacific Division with the San Jose Sharks before Friday's games with a 25-16-4 record.

Calgary's next game is at home against the Winnipeg Jets on Saturday afternoon.

"That little run we went on at least gives us a chance to be in the mix," said Treliving, who brushes aside any suggestion his team has a good grip on a playoff spot. "It's going to be tight.

There's a lot of hockey left."

It is easy to assume the recent success was spurred by the famous tirade from head coach Glen Gulutzan at a practice on Jan. 5 that was capped by tossing his stick into the seats at the Scotiabank Saddledome. It quickly went viral on social media, of course, and it is safe to assume there was a certain calculation on the part of the coach, as he was not happy with the way some of the veteran players were working at the practice and there was a large media contingent on hand, complete with cameras.

However, the outburst came two games into the Flames' seven-game winning streak, the morning after a 4-3 come-frombehind win over the Los Angeles Kings. It served more as reinforcement than a wake-up call, as the team was playing well but a little loose defensively.

Gulutzan was worried the players were getting a little too satisfied with the way things were going. At the time, the Flames were still outside of a playoff position.

"We weren't as good as we needed to be this morning," Gulutzan told reporters after the stick-toss. "Feeling pretty good about ourselves, which is great, but these reminders come best when you win. There's a level we need to be at on a daily basis. It's an everyday league. It's not warm-and-fuzzy. It's every day.

What you saw was a coach reminding his team that one game doesn't make a season."

Treliving says the team's success starts in goal with Smith and the top two defence pairs of Mark Giordano and Dougie Hamilton and Travis Hamonic and T.J. Brodie. Smith is the Flames' first-half most-valuable player with a record of 20-13-3, goals-against average of 2.46 and save percentage of .924.

Smith's success at shoring up a problem spot for the Flames was a surprise to a lot of NHL observers. He is 35 years old and coming off a few tough seasons with the Coyotes. But Treliving, who was the Coyotes' assistant GM before coming to Calgary, did not view the trade, which cost only backup goaltender Chad Johnson off the team's NHL roster, as any kind of a gamble.

"I knew what he's all about," Treliving said of Smith, a latebloomer who did not make the NHL until he was 24. "He was ready to be in this situation now.

We know he's 35 but I look at it as he's got a low odometer on him. It's not like he's been in the league since he was 18.

"He matured as a person and he was really looking forward to playing in this situation, in a Canadian market where everything is magnified and the game matters a lot. I think he's been rejuvenated and you're seeing what he's capable of."

The defence took a couple of years to come together, which is a relief for management since it was the most expensive to build in terms of assets. Giordano was signed as a free agent in 2004 and his partner Hamilton came along in 2015 from the Boston Bruins at the cost of a firstround pick and two secondround selections in the 2015 NHL entry draft. Treliving sent his first- and second-round picks in this year's draft to the New York Islanders last June for Hamonic, who makes up the second pair with the homegrown Brodie.

Those are a lot of early round picks to give up for a team dedicated to developing its own players. But Treliving can argue that Hamilton, 24, who had 50 points last season and has 22 in 45 games this season, is just entering the prime of what looks to be a star career. Hamonic, 27, also has a lot of years ahead of him as one of the better defensive defencemen in the NHL.

"Giordano and Dougie Hamilton, that pair is as good as any pair in the league," Treliving said. "The foundation of our team is from the net out and that group of [defence], with Hamonic and Brodie on the second pair, they've been really good in the last eight weeks.

And [third pair] Mike Stone and Brett Kulak give support. We rely on them, they are a deep group.

They're mobile."

The pride of the Flames' development program is found in the forwards, a deep and young group. The first line of Gaudreau, Monahan and Micheal Ferland had its struggles early in the season but found the gas pedal in November. During the seven-game win streak the trio has combined for 10 goals and 32 points.

Ferland is the surprise of the group. A fifth-round draft pick in 2010, he was put on the first line as a physical presence but has 19 goals in 44 games this season. Gaudreau, 24, and Monahan, 23, were both first-round picks and both made strides this season to live up to their billing as future superstars.

Gaudreau is cut from the same cloth as the Toronto Maple Leafs' Mitch Marner, a small and flashy winger. But unlike Marner, who is finding his sophomore NHL season a tough one, Gaudreau had a career-high 78 points in his second season, 2015-16. He is now on pace to eclipse that mark with 54 points in 45 games.

"We're a young team and rely on young players to really drive us, in particular Johnny Gaudreau and Monahan," Treliving said. "You can see a real step they took this season.

"I think Johnny in particular took a real step toward being a top player in the league. People realize how talented he is. What they don't realize is how competitive he is. He is driven to win and be a top player in the league. Since December and really in January he's been as good as anybody."

But the best example of the depth now found in the Flames' farm system is the third line of Mark Jankowski, Garnet Hathaway and Andrew Mangiapane.

They started the season as the top line on the Stockton Heat farm team. They were promoted separately as Flames veterans Michael Frolik, Kris Versteeg and Jaromir Jagr were lost to injuries.

Jagr, by the way, is more of a failed experiment than someone lost to injury. The NHL's oldest player was signed as a free agent this season but before he was injured it was clear Jagr, who will turn 46 on Feb. 15, could no longer keep up with his teammates. He is expected to negotiate a settlement with the Flames and perhaps return to the Czech Republic to play.

When the break ends Saturday, Jankowski, Hathaway and Mangiapane, who were reunited in early January by the Flames, are expected to continue as the third line. They showed they can kill penalties and provide some offence.

"Those guys came up and did a good job for us," Treliving said.

"We think we have more [prospects] on the way at some point.

It's always tricky with young guys; they develop at their own rate.

"Young players bring energy, speed and excitement. But it's all about how they get slotted in.

We did not ask them to come in and save us. But they provide energy from underneath as well as speed."

Associated Graphic

Calgary Flames winger Johnny Gaudreau celebrates after scoring against the Lightning in Tampa last week. Gaudreau is on a career-best pace, with 54 points in 45 games this season.

KIM KLEMENT/USA TODAY SPORTS

BRILLIANT CHIEF OF STAFF TO BRIAN MULRONEY
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The former PM says he was 'one of the most outstanding public servants of our country'
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By DAVE GORDON
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Special to The Globe and Mail
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Saturday, January 13, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B24


One day in 1990, when Stanley Hartt was chief of staff to then prime minister Brian Mulroney, Mr. Hartt's call-waiting beeped and it was George H.W. Bush on the other line. The U.S. president was calling to inform him that the United States was about to launch Operation Desert Shield against Iraq.

Domestically, it was a time of lively debate over initiatives such as the Meech Lake Accord, the Canada-United States free-trade agreement, the Acid Rain Treaty, tax reform and the GST. Other pressing issues included the fight to free Nelson Mandela, the abolition of apartheid in South Africa and the creation of the Sommet de la Francophonie.

In his role as a top political aide, Mr. Hartt participated actively in the major initiatives of the government, according to Mr. Mulroney.

Prior to his year-long tenure as chief of staff, which started in 1989, Mr. Hartt served for three years as deputy finance minister under Finance Minister Michael Wilson.

During this time, Mr. Mulroney says, Mr. Hartt distinguished himself as "one of the most outstanding public servants of our country."

When he left the public service, Mr. Hartt used his keen intellect to devise a restructuring plan for the bankrupt Campeau Corp., where he became president and CEO.

Mr. Hartt died of cancer of the spine on Jan. 3 at Toronto's Sunnybrook Hospital. He was 80.

Stanley Herbert Hartt was born in Montreal on Nov. 11, 1937, to Rose Gertrude (née Gallay) and Maurice Hartt. He grew up in the city's predominantly Jewish garment district. His brother, Joel, was born three years later.

The family patriarch, Maurice, who in 1907 at age 12 had fled Romanian pogroms for the safety of Canadian soil, became a lawyer and eventually gave back to his adopted country by becoming a public servant. He was elected twice as a provincial Liberal representative for the Montréal-Saint Louis riding, and twice as a federal parliamentarian in the Cartier riding, under prime ministers Mackenzie King and Louis St. Laurent.

Stanley was in Grade 7 when his father died. In his unfinished autobiography, he wrote that he was "stunned, as he emerged from Paperman's Funeral Home, on St. Urbain Street, to follow the casket to the cemetery," when he saw the students from the Jewish People's School - which Stanley attended - pay tribute to his father by "lining both sides of the streets out of respect for the man."

Stanley Hartt would later attend McGill University, where, in 1958, professor H.D. Woods was so impressed with the young man's academics that he recommended him for the Guy Drummond Fellowship, a study-abroad program in Paris.

Mr. Hartt earned money to pay for university by working as a summer camp counsellor at Camp Hiawatha, where he would meet his wife-to-be, Linda Joan Bloomfield.

The couple married on March 2, 1961, six months after Mr. Hartt was admitted to McGill's faculty of law. (The marriage lasted 17 years.)

When he achieved the highest grade in bar exams five years later, he earned the Bar of Paris Prize.

By 1965, Stikeman Elliott founders H. Heward Stikeman and Fraser Elliott took a liking to Mr. Hartt, who had already been articling there.

Mr. Hartt practiced tax and corporate law, and later founded the firm's employment law practice.

At Stikeman Elliot, he worked two blocks away from Mr. Mulroney - also a labour lawyer - who was then starting out at Howard, Cate, Ogilvy (later Ogilvy Renault). Their paths crossed when their firms dealt with issues related to the Montreal waterfront.

"Then we grew from acquaintance to friendship," Mr. Mulroney said.

What prompted Mr. Mulroney to choose Mr. Hartt over other candidates for the chief-of-staff job was that he "was the most brilliant young man of our generation. He had a remarkable mind, with a great capacity to look at complex issues and crunch them into coherent options for anyone with whom he was associated."

As deputy minister of finance, Mr. Hartt was so respected by Mr. Mulroney that he was the only public servant to sit with cabinet at all times, Mr. Mulroney said.

Mr. Hartt played a major role in some vital areas of economic policy, Mr. Mulroney said, including the privatizations of Petro Canada and Air Canada, "along with 29 other Crown corporations," according to the former prime minister. Its positive byproduct, he said, was taking 100,000 people off of the federal government's payroll. Additionally, he noted, Mr. Hartt helped engineer oil-price deregulation, resulting in the National Energy Program's demise. He also had a hand in steering the country's economic rudder during the Mulroney administration, at a time when inflation dropped from 12 per cent to 4 per cent.

As Mr. Hartt would later describe in his self-written posthumously published obituary, "I made the snowballs and Brian threw them." Mr. Hartt was a loyal defender of the Prime Minister, even during turbulent times, such as the introduction of the unpopular goods and services tax, which even members of his own caucus grumbled about.

In decades following, the two would see each other socially on occasion.

"When we worked together, it was all business," Mr. Mulroney said.

"When the business was over, it was just like our early years in Montreal, when we had such fun together."

Air Canada CEO Calin Rovinescu became acquainted with Mr. Hartt in 1979, when Mr. Rovinescu was articling at Stikeman Elliott in Montreal.

"[Mr. Hartt] encouraged us to think on our feet, in front of the most difficult situations," he said. "Typically, you were expected to deliver your work with excellence, and your bonus would be the hope of getting a more interesting and complicated assignment afterward."

As senior counsel, Mr. Hartt would engage with junior colleagues as though they were family, regularly inviting them for meals at his home and allowing them to babysit his children, Mr. Rovinescu said.

Mr. Hartt, as a mentor, taught Mr. Rovinescu such life lessons as "Embrace curiosity. Think big. Think on your feet," as well as "Don't be afraid of crazy ideas; the crazier the better. Throw stuff against the wall and see what sticks."

After his stint as chief of staff, Mr. Hartt returned for four months to Stikeman Elliott, where Mr. Rovinescu had since become managing partner.

"While it was odd to be 'managing' my mentor ... Stanley relished this with humour, saying that he expected our work to be at least as interesting as his recent interactions with presidents Reagan and Gorbachev."

In late 1990, Mr. Hartt took over as president and CEO of Campeau Corp., Robert Campeau's bankrupt multibillion-dollar real estate empire, for which Mr. Hartt developed a restructuring plan. He later served as chairman of Macquarie Capital Markets Canada and Citigroup Global Markets Canada.

In his spare time, he was "the innovator behind the new film tax credit financings," Mr. Rovinescu said, adding that he acted as a "behind the scenes, de facto" producer on many Canadian motion pictures in the seventies and eighties.

"He helped save a lot of films," according to Mr. Rovinescu, including the Bruce Dern vehicle Harry Tracy, Desperado, the comedy Porky's and the Robert Lantos-produced film In Praise of Older Women.

Mr. Hartt's love for the arts extended to a penchant for classical music and opera, and he often donated to symphonies in Montreal, Toronto and Israel. He also supported the MS Society of Canada, United Way, Heart and Stroke Foundation, Mount Sinai Hospital, St. Michael's Hospital and Sunnybrook hospital, as well as several Jewish organizations.

Michael Hartt said his father's charitable works once led to an invitation to throw the first pitch at a Blue Jays game.

"Just like every other task in life, he took it very seriously and wanted to make a good throw," Michael noted. With grandchildren in tow on the field, Mr. Hartt threw a straight pitch, clean into the catcher's glove.

At Michael's Grade 8 hockey games, Mr. Hartt would not only play the trumpet, but would come up with witty remarks when the referee made what he thought was a bad call.

Even in recent years, the elder Mr. Hartt continued to be involved politically, be it to raise funds or lend his support.

During the Conservative Party leadership campaign last year, he hosted a fundraiser for Kellie Leitch.

Former finance minister Joe Oliver said he was grateful for Mr. Hartt's assistance in helping raise funds for Mr. Oliver's four campaigns, over the course of nearly a decade.

"He had no reluctance to roll up his sleeves," Mr. Oliver notes. "He was a source of good judgment, and counsel, even when I asked him to help with personal issues. He was a great Canadian. I'll always remember his humour, warmth, and lively and engaging personality.

He was a mensch."

When Mr. Hartt was named an officer of the Order of Canada, the citation read: "Whether a lawyer, public servant, political adviser, journalist or businessman, he is an articulate advocate for Canada."

In January, 2014, Mr. Hartt was asked to join then-prime minister Stephen Harper's delegation to Israel.

Reflecting on 50 years of friendship and working together, Mr. Mulroney said that he believes Mr. Hartt's public service "was driven by the fact that he was an eternal optimist, and that he appreciated leadership and achievement. That's what he'd gone to Ottawa to do, and that's what he achieved."

"I'll tell you, Canada was lucky to have him."

Mr. Hartt leaves his four children, Heather Hartt-Sussman, Michael Hartt, James Hartt and Douglas Hartt; their mother, Linda Hartt; and his grandchildren, Scotty, Jack, Ethan, Kyla, Aaron, Ian and Mickey. He was predeceased by his brother, Joel.

To submit an I Remember: obit@globeandmail.com Send us a memory of someone we have recently profiled on the Obituaries page.

Please include I Remember in the subject field

Associated Graphic

Stanley Hartt speaks on the phone in his downtown Toronto office in 2001. Mr Hartt was 'an articulate advocate for Canada,' according to the citation that named him an officer of the Order of Canada.

CRAIG CHIVERS/MACLEAN'S/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Murder charges laid in cases of two missing Toronto men
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Just weeks after seeking to quell fears of a serial killer in city's LGBTQ community, police say they believe 66-year-old man killed two victims and likely others
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By MOLLY HAYES, TU THANH HA, PATRICK WHITE
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Friday, January 19, 2018 – Print Edition, Page A1


TORONTO -- Just weeks after attempting to quell fears of a serial killer in Toronto's LGBTQ community, police have arrested a man they say is responsible for the murder of two missing men - and they believe there are more victims.

Bruce McArthur, a 66-year-old freelance landscaper from Toronto who was well known in the city's Gay Village, was arrested on Thursday and charged with first-degree murder in the deaths of 49-year-old Andrew Kinsman and 44-year-old Selim Esen.

"We believe he is responsible for the deaths of Mr. Kinsman and Mr. Esen," Detective Sergeant Hank Idsinga of the homicide squad told reporters.

"And we believe he is responsible for the deaths of other men who have yet to be identified. In other words, we believe there are other victims."

He was reluctant to label the suspect a serial killer. "He's killed at least two people that we know of, and we believe there are more victims. Whether you want to attach that label or not is up to you."

Mr. McArthur's apartment in the Leaside Towers building in the city's Thorncliffe Park area was one of four Toronto properties police scoured on Thursday as part of their investigation, as well as another in Madoc, Ont., north of Belleville. Mr. McArthur is scheduled to appear at the College Park courthouse on Friday morning.

A portrait began to emerge on Thursday of Mr. McArthur, whose social-media profile includes photos from past travels, social gatherings and what appears to have been a stint as a mall Santa.

According to his profile on Silver Daddies, an online dating site for older gay men, Mr. McArthur was looking to chat with some "nice looking" guys and maybe make some new friends. In that profile, Mr. McArthur says that he can be "a bit shy until I get to know you, but [I] am a romantic at heart" and describes himself as a self-employed landscaper who loves to cook. Police said he works for a landscaping firm called Artistic Design.

A neighbour who lives two doors down from Mr. McArthur's two-bedroom unit in the high-rise building described him as amiable and said he has lived in the building for about a decade. His door always had a wreath at Christmas and a bunny at Easter, she said. She did not want to be identified because she feared for her safety.

Mr. McArthur lived in apartment #1915, with a partner whom the neighbour said she has not seen for at least a month and a half. She described them as kind guys. She said she often spoke to Mr. McArthur in the pool and last saw him there two and a half weeks ago.

Police have not found Mr. Kinsman or Mr. Esen's bodies, but said they are executing the search warrants in an effort to locate them. They believe they have evidence of the cause of their deaths, as well as those of other victims.

"I am well aware of the difficulties in prosecuting people without recovering a body, but, in this case, we believe we have strong enough evidence that we can do exactly that," Det. Sgt. Idsinga said.

Mr. McArthur had a sexual relationship with Mr. Kinsman for some time, he said, and had come to the attention of investigators several months ago - but it was only on Wednesday that police found grounds to arrest him.

"We haven't been able to make that definitive link until yesterday," Det. Sgt. Idsinga said.

Mr. McArthur and the victims used dating apps. "We're still digging through that as well," the detective said.

Mr. Kinsman, who was active in the LGBTQ community, was known to be using the dating phone app Scruff.

The arrest brought some solace to his relatives, who had spent months searching Toronto's ravines, hoping to find clues about his disappearance.

"I'm relieved finally. I'm so relieved," one of Mr. Kinsman's sisters, Karen Cole, said in an interview shortly after police told her of the arrest.

"Andrew's dead. He's gone. But they have a person [in custody]."

Less is known about Mr. Esen, whom police had previously described as transient. A friend of his, Richard Harrop, spoke at a community meeting last summer about Mr. Esen, recalling that he was proud of a certificate he had recently earned after a week-long peer counselling course at St. Stephen's Community House.

Mr. Harrop said Mr. Esen arrived from Turkey about three years ago and had struggled with substance issues, but had been getting on track before his disappearance.

On Facebook on Thursday, a man who identified himself as an employee from St. Stephen's posted that Mr. McArthur had also been a client there. However, the centre said it cannot by law confirm whether either man had been a client.

The arrest comes after the several missing-person cases raised fears in the community. The disappearances of Mr. Esen and Mr. Kinsman - in April and June, respectively - led to a police task force called Project Prism.

An earlier task force, Project Houston, had looked, unsuccessfully, into the disappearances of three Village regulars, Abdulbasir Faizi, Skandaraj Navaratnam and Majeed Kayhan, between 2010-12.

Mr. Navaratnam appears to be listed as a friend of Mr. McArthur on Facebook, although police have not confirmed any connection between the cases.

On Thursday, Det. Sgt. Idsinga said police are aware of other missing men from the Village, and noted police "are trying to identify whether they may have become victims of Mr. McArthur as well." He said identifying the other victims is a priority.

Toronto police were criticized in the fall for their handling of the disappearances of Tess Richey, whose body was found in the Church and Wellesley area by her mother just doors away from where she had last been seen, and Alloura Wells, a transgender woman whose body was found in August, but was not identified until November. In a news conference in December, Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders announced an internal review into the way his service handles missingperson reports, acknowledging his officers could have responded better to disappearances and deaths linked to the Village.

At that news conference, Chief Saunders said there was no evidence a serial killer was at work in the area.

"In policing, what we do is we follow the evidence," he said on Thursday. "And what I said was accurate at that time."

He said investigators are still looking for evidence. "The investigation has not stopped. In fact, it has just begun."

Late on Thursday night, police were still at a property on Cooper Road, about 20 kilometres outside of Madoc. The property includes a two-story house similar to other farmhouses along the road, with a number of outbuildings.

Ivan and Phyllis Vallieres, who live just up the road from the property, said they met Mr. McArthur only once, when he was mowing the lawn shortly after he moved in this past summer. Mr. Vallieres describes him as a nice man, who often travelled back and forth from Toronto delivering flowers, and to do other landscaping work in the city.

McArthur is also said to be a lover of rare birds. "He told me he had 150 exotic birds in his garage that needed to be fed every couple of days," said Mr. Vallieres.

Mr. Vallieres said there are multiple buildings on the property including four trailers and the large garage, which Mrs, Vallieres estimated to be the size of five regular garages. "We knew something was going on when we saw the police cars," Mrs. Vallieres said. "We were going to go and try to help, to see what all the trouble was, but they have the place all gated off."

Elliott Leyton, a Canadian expert on mass killers and the author of Hunting Humans: The Rise of the Modern Multiple Murderer, said the early allegations in this case point to a sadly common pattern, although he said he was immediately struck by the accused's age, 66.

"That's pushing it for someone that age to be involved in that activity," he said, adding that it is particularly odd given the accused is alleged to have been "quite active."

"It's unusual for it to be that late that it would suddenly pop out of nowhere," he said. "But, there's a very long nurturing period. People don't just get up one morning and think, 'I'll go murder the category which I'm sexually attracted to.' They nurture it first as a thought, and then as a fantasy, then as something that is becoming developed and refined, then finally a decision is made to go ahead. ... It doesn't begin or end there."

Dr. Leyton said he understands police hesitancy to call the accused a potential serial killer - even though he is suspected of multiple murders - given that it is such a loaded and sensational term. Dr. Leyton notes it also carries a certain mystique that can be misleading.

"There's been a tremendous amount of glorification of so-called serial or mass killers in the last 20 years, and people have come to think of them as incredibly strong and smart and that they can outwit the police," said Dr. Leyton, a professor emeritus of forensic anthropology at Memorial University of Newfoundland. "But it's only because the nature of the crime, the murder of strangers, is very difficult for police to solve."

For now, Dr. Leyton says he expects a "wall of silence" from police, as investigators try to determine the full scope of the situation and establish how many victims there might be. "It's a developing case, and we don't know where it's going to go," he says.

With reports from Jana G. Pruden and Jesse Winter

Associated Graphic

Police have not found the bodies of Selim Esen, left, and Andrew Kinsman, but said they are executing search warrants in an effort to locate them.

An OPP cruiser sits outside the Madoc, Ont., property connected to Bruce McArthur on Thursday.

LARS HAGBERG/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Bruce McArthur

Critics upset about Empty House Tax
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Vancouver's attempt to address the issue of vacant properties is hurting the wrong people, citizen group says
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By KERRY GOLD
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Friday, January 19, 2018 – Print Edition, Page H6


VANCOUVER -- When Samantha Reynolds got a reminder from the city in the mail that she had not yet submitted her Empty Homes Tax declaration, she shook her head at the irony.

Ms. Reynolds lives a few houses down from a house owned by the city that has been vacant for almost two years.

Last summer, the city-owned character house at 3030 Victoria Dr. became a case of bad publicity when it was revealed in this column that the city purchased the house in February, 2016 and left it empty.

City hall and the park board, had plans to tear it down and leave it as a vacant lot, with the expectation that the other homeowners on the block would also sell. All the houses would then be torn down to create more parkland. The block is adjacent to John Hendry Park, better known as Trout Lake. But the residents on the block are part of a tight-knit community and have no plans to leave. After neighbourhood push back, the city said the house would remain and it was to be rented out. However, it has remained empty for almost two years.

There are 25,502 unoccupied or empty homes across the city, according to the last census. The rental vacancy rate is less than 1 per cent.

"I would like them to be accountable to their empty promise; to rent the house out," Ms. Reynolds says.

She'd also like the city to give up its plan to create more parkland and put the house back on the market, since there's a housing crisis.

"As a neighbourhood we are not backing down. We want them to reverse the whole plan."

When I contacted the city last week, staff said they were just about to put out a request for a co-op operator who could take on a lease and find tenants for the house. The operator would also have to do repairs according to the building code. (The first winter the city owned the house, no one turned off the water and the pipes froze and broke.)

There was no explanation as to why that process had not begun several months ago.

Double standard aside, the Empty Homes Tax (EHT) is well intentioned. It was introduced in order to address the practice of purchasing properties and leaving them empty as mere land banks. Rich property owners who can afford to leave a perfectly good home empty is just the sort of crass wastefulness that is making Vancouver residents apoplectic. Kerrisdale and Dunbar are full of empty new homes that symbolize the hypercommodification of housing that's become a Vancouver specialty.

The EHT becomes a reality on Feb. 2, also the deadline for Vancouver homeowners to declare whether they are holding a property that has been empty for more than six months. The tax amounts to 1 per cent of the home's assessed value, which will be due by April 16. People who make false declarations will face fines up to $10,000 a day, as well as the tax.

But some are arguing that the tax is sweeping up a good many innocent citizens in its attempt to net those homeowners who have turned housing into a mere money-maker.

Developer Michael Geller calls the approach well intentioned but "absurd" - a tax that will only incentivize people to find ways around it.

"They will either figure out a clever way to get around it, or sell their places. That's what's happening. A number have sold them, but others have come up with clever legal structures to avoid paying the tax."

He also questions what will happen when someone purchases an empty house. If audited, will the new buyer be stuck with the previous owner's EHT?

"There is a whole series of unintended consequences which the city should have remedied and instead they are simply standing by it," Mr. Geller says.

There's the case of Jane Macdougall, who owns a lot that has never had a house on it. In 2005, she had restored and saved a significant Tudor Revival heritage house on a large lot, and, with the help of a Heritage Revitalization Agreement, she subdivided the adjoining empty lot. The grand house, with its striking Gothic arch entrance, was designed by Hodgson & Simmonds in 1930. That same year, Simmonds designed the Stanley Theatre.

Ms. Macdougall says she will owe around $60,000 in total taxes for the lot, including the EHT.

She says she's being punished for not providing housing, while the City - which will face no penalty for leaving 3030 Victoria Dr. standing empty - is held to a different standard.

("City of Vancouver-owned properties are exempt from payment of property taxes under the Vancouver Charter and are therefore exempt from the Empty Homes Tax," city staff said in an e-mail.)

Despite its significance, Ms. Macdougall could have torn the house down and made a fortune from the three city lots that it occupied. It happens all the time in Vancouver. Instead, she sold off the house and planned to build on the lot that remained.

However, building on a property that had limited access proved to be a case of endless bureaucratic red tape.

Instead, Ms. Macdougall bought a house elsewhere and allowed the owners of her former house to use the lot as a garden in exchange for maintaining it.

Now, she has discovered the EHT also applies to empty lots such as hers. The city had included empty lots in the tax because they quite rightly realized that some homeowners would rather bulldoze their houses than pay the tax. Ms. Macdougall is in a unique predicament. She says city staff have advised her to take out development permits.

"I'm thinking, 'Okay, do you want to give me the $2-million it's going to take to build on this?

And who am I building it for?

And to what end? And how does that address the ridiculous crisis of affordability in housing that we have found ourselves in as a result of, in my estimation, some people not being pro-active when they needed to be?" Dr. Rainer Borkenhagen started the citizen group, Unfair Vancouver Vacant Homes Tax Coalition, last spring, and it has hired legal counsel to advise them on whether they should take action against the bylaw.

The group, which numbers about 80 people, is made up of retirees, artists and working professionals who come and go from Vancouver. Dr. Borkenhagen lives on the Sunshine Coast and owns a small condo in Vancouver, which was intended for family gatherings since their family has become dispersed.

Once the tax was announced, they found a family friend to rent it last year, and this year they intend the condo for their own use. If they hadn't rented the unit last year, they'd be looking at an EHT of about $8,000, Dr. Borkenhagen says.

They feel the tax unfairly targets tax-paying citizens who've done nothing wrong.

The way the bylaw is written, only people who are working in Vancouver can occupy a secondary unit for a minimum of six months of the year. It doesn't apply to retirees, which, he says, is discriminatory.

"If it's your secondary home, you have to prove that you are there for six months working," says Dr. Borkenhagen, who still works, but will retire this year.

"What the city is saying is there is no room for retired people who used to be full-time in Vancouver."

Dr. Borkenhagen makes a number of strong points. The tax is retroactive, which means it affects people who would have never purchased a secondary unit if they had known about the tax.

He says that if he does rent out his secondary unit, he doesn't have to prove that the tenant is working, or even spending a lot of time in it. So, the tenant can come and go, but not the retired owner. As well, with housing costs the way they are, a pied-à-terre is often the only way that parents can visit their city-dwelling children, he argues. The family has become decentralized.

"The other thing is, how are they going to monitor it? Right now it's the honour system, what you declare. And then they threaten to audit you, and industrial-size penalties of up to $10,000 a day. The threat is there."

It is not a tax, but a fine, he says. And it's a substantial fine for retirees on a fixed income.

"They should just across the board increase taxes and put the increase towards social housing," he says.

"People like us, taxpayers who've paid our dues in everything, do not throw us in the pot and say, 'you're a culprit.' They should recognize that the issue is much bigger.

"They see us as a necessary collateral damage," he adds. "But they want to keep it clean and easy and not look at too many exceptions to the bylaw, because it becomes too difficult to administer."

As of last week, 62 per cent, or 116,000 property owners had made their declarations. The city says it will release the number of declared vacant properties later this year. It's unclear how the bylaw will be enforceable, other than an audit, if the city asks for it. In that case, the homeowner will have to prove that they qualify for one of several exemptions.

Empty homes represent speculative buying by mystery buyers who often have no other connection to the city than real estate.

Local incomes can't compete.

Until government gets tough on foreign money, the empty home will remain what it is - a symbol of an empty promise to meaningfully do something.

Associated Graphic

A view of the lot at 6161 Macdonald St., Vancouver, owned by Jane Macdougall. Ms. Macdougall restored the house at the right, then subdivided the property, with plans to build on the lot. She sold the house, but retained ownership of the lot. She is now facing around $60,000 in taxes.

JANE MACDOUGALL

RENOWNED B.C. CARVER WAS PART OF A DYNASTY
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A major figure in West Coast native art, he crafted totem poles alongside his maternal grandfather, master carver Mungo Martin, at Victoria's Thunderbird Park
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By LISA FITTERMAN
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Special to The Globe and Mail
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Saturday, January 20, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B23


Plainspoken and proud, renowned artist Tony Hunt Sr. lived a life that was marked by nicks and cuts as he painstakingly transformed cedar logs into stories of creation, lineage and kinship. A hereditary chief of the Kwakiutl people of Fort Rupert - or Tsaxis as it is called in Kwak'wala, on the northern tip of Vancouver Island - his world was steeped in the tradition of the ceremonial "Big House," where potlatches and other rituals are held.

"Tony was a natural leader who always had all the answers," said his sister, Leslie Dickie. "He lived the old knowledge. I expect it will be a long time before we stop hearing the phrase, 'If Tony was here, he'd know what to do.' Maybe we never will."

Mr. Hunt Sr. died in hospital in Campbell River on Dec. 15 after undergoing what was supposed to be a simple surgery to cauterize a bleeding ulcer. He was 75 years old, a man who worked hard, played hard and had suffered a series of health setbacks since the death of his oldest son - Tony Hunt Jr., also a noted artist - last October.

"He was devastated. You aren't supposed to survive your children," said John Livingston, a protégé and long-time friend of Mr.

Hunt. "How do you recover from something like that?" Mr. Hunt was a major figure in the world of West Coast native art, Mr. Livingston continued. The head of a large, sprawling family of artists, he was instrumental in pushing their métier out of kitschy tourist shops and into galleries frequented by monied international collectors.

He had honed his craft by working with his maternal grandfather Mungo Martin, the master carver, singer and teacher, at Thunderbird Park in Victoria. All his life he felt an acute sense of responsibility to pass on what he had learned and fight for respect for the work, for the land and for his people.

"Tony was able to change what the public wanted," Mr. Livingston said. "When he started, there was a lot of bad art being created but he was able to persevere through the dark ages of that time and stake his place in contemporary art history."

Part of his legacy derives from the groundbreaking gallery in Victoria, called Arts of the Raven, that he co-founded with Mr. Livingston. The two men opened it in 1969 as a space where quality was the rule, no matter an item's cost. Even pieces at lower price points - partly hand-made graphics and prints, for example - had to meet their high standards. The gallery also incorporated a studio where artists, sometimes up to five at a time, could properly learn their craft.

"Tony had a critical eye and a no-nonsense way of speaking," Mr. Livingston said. "If something was bad, he'd say so, just like that.

You'd get this snowball effect, with Tony teaching people and his students teaching others, so that directly and indirectly, he influenced a huge portion of artists working today."

Even as he ran the Arts of the Raven, Mr. Hunt won commissions around the world and was featured in shows in larger centres such as Toronto and Chicago. His career and mission continued unabated after the gallery closed in 1989, a victim of its own success and higher rents in the city's downtown neighbourhood.

"Tony was a teacher and an ambassador," Mr. Livingston said. "He opened the world to us, and he opened us up to the world. If I close my eyes right now, I can see him saying in his special way, 'Everybody, listen to me.' And you know what? We would."

Tony Hunt was born on Aug. 24, 1942, in Alert Bay, a village on Cormorant Island, traditional Kwakiutl territory about 40 kilometres southwest of Port Hardy on Vancouver Island. The oldest of Henry and Helen Hunt's 14 children, he spent his early years in Fort Rupert - or Tsaxis - where he attended elementary school. He was an indifferent student who preferred to try his hand at carving - just like his father.

In 1954, Henry Hunt, who'd worked as a logger and fisherman before taking up carving full time, uprooted the family, moving everyone down to Victoria, where he began to work as the chief apprentice carver to Mr.

Martin. (Mr. Martin was the adoptive father of Mr. Hunt's wife, Helen.) Their base was Thunderbird Park, which surrounds the Royal B.C. Museum, and their mandate was to repair and replicate existing totem poles and create new ones.

At first, the family bunked at Mr. Martin's home, located behind the provincial legislature. But Ms. Hunt, who managed to be a homemaker, community volunteer and cultural activist, all while working at a local fish processing plant, saved her wages to make the down payment on a two-storey house.

"None of us had any idea, not even our Dad," Ms. Dickie said. "The day she bought it, Mom simply phoned two cabs, loaded us all in and had the drivers take us to 1320 Johnson St. 'This is our new home,' she announced, and she held up the key."

Built in the early 20th century, the house featured lots of mahogany wood and had five bedrooms, three fireplaces and one bathroom. Every Sunday, there was a big dinner with relatives and friends. There was another on every holiday. When the family moved in, Ms. Dickie was two years old and Tony Hunt, who was 18 years older, was living on his own and making a name for himself; following the death of Mr. Martin in 1962, he had become the chief apprentice carver to his father at Thunderbird Park. Together, they created a series of important works, including a totem pole that stood sentry outside the Indians of Canada Pavilion at Expo 67 in Montreal and a 9.75-metre pole that was erected in 1970 in Alert Bay in memory of Mr. Martin, their mentor.

When Tony did show up at Johnson Street for visits, his little sister would answer the door and call out, "Mom, it's that guy who comes over sometimes!"

All of that changed in 1972, when their mother died and Mr. Hunt took over the rearing of his youngest sister, making sure she got good grades and graduated from high school.

"Sometimes, it seemed he had no rules for himself but he always said that Mom made him promise to look after me," Ms. Dickie recalled. "He took that promise extremely seriously."

At the time, he'd left Thunderbird Park to open and run the Arts of the Raven gallery with Mr. Livingston, while also teaching and pursuing commissions outside of B.C. Calvin Hunt, a cousin and former apprentice of Mr. Hunt, remembered travelling with him to Europe and the United States, where people were sometimes ignorant of native peoples' cultures and way of life.

"Tony was so proud of lifting up our culture, in telling the truth about us," he said.

"And in Europe, he'd tear apart ideas of how we lived, informing people that we also had things like telephones and cars."

He loved the ceremony of the potlatch, Calvin Hunt continued; how it conferred status, defined kinship and created solidarity between clans. When an intolerant federal government introduced an amendment to the Indian Act in the mid-1880s to ban the potlatch - ostensibly because it treated personal property in a wasteful, un-Christian way - the Kwakiutl people secretly kept the tradition alive until the amendment was repealed in 1951. The first legal, public potlatch in more than six decades was held in Thunderbird Park in 1953, with Mr. Martin at the helm. Tony Hunt inherited the role after his grandfather's death.

Mr. Hunt's totem poles can be found in Victoria's sister cities of Morioka, Japan, and Suzhou, China, in international museums and in the Canadian embassies in Bonn and Mexico City. He gave the Queen three works of his art.

He was awarded the Order of B.C. in 2010 and has also received an honorary doctorate of law from Royal Roads University and citation of merit from the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts.

Along the way, he married Marilyn (Lyn) Tacfor and they had two sons and a daughter.

When they split up, Mr. Hunt had a fourth child, a daughter, from another relationship.

She was raised by her mother, Suzie Baker, in North Vancouver and only met her father's family 18 years ago.

In 2014, Mr. Hunt moved from Victoria to Fort Rupert to be with family. He was lonely living down south; back home, he knew there were people who would ensure he had a hot dinner and take care of him if he fell ill.

"He had that golden finger," Ms. Dickie said. "He'd point and people would do what he wanted. And he had such a wicked sense of humour. He could make us all laugh."

And so he did, the last time members of his family saw him conscious, lying on a hospital gurney, waiting to be wheeled into an operating room. He grinned and raised his hand to give a wave like the Queen, as if he were royalty saying goodbye to his subjects.

He never woke up from the anesthetic.

"One day, we'll hold a potlatch for both Tony Sr. and Tony Jr.," Ms. Dickie said. "They would love that - and we'll erect a totem pole in their memory."

Besides Ms. Dickie, Mr. Hunt leaves his siblings Richard, Stanley, Henry, Noreen, Dorothy and Val Hunt, Shirley Ford, Fran Gourdine and Darlene Peeler; his three surviving children, Debbie and Steven Hunt and Nadine Baker; eight grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

To submit an I Remember: obit@globeandmail.com Send us a memory of someone we have recently profiled on the Obituaries page.

Please include I Remember in the subject field

Associated Graphic

Tony Hunt with his Sun Mask in 1974. The mask is designed to hold a family crest for display at a potlatch.

ERIK CHRISTENSEN/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

NEW YEAR, NEW PROMISES
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Several plans and due dates for the Vancouver Art Gallery's new location have fallen through. Marsha Lederman looks at when the paint on the VAG's future will finally dry
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By MARSHA LEDERMAN
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Saturday, January 13, 2018 – Print Edition, Page R1


The plot of land across the street from the Queen Elizabeth Theatre in Vancouver is still a parking lot. By now, the EasyPark was supposed to have been a construction site.

Now that it's 2018, another target date for the Vancouver Art Gallery's proposed new building has come and gone: The slated 2017 groundbreaking did not take place, despite assurances in the spring from the VAG that the project was "on target, on budget, on time."

Groundbreaking at the site known as Larwill Park (long before it was a parking lot, it was an actual park - and in between, a bus depot) has now been pushed back to 2018.

Still, the director of the gallery, Kathleen Bartels, says all is well regarding the plans for the new building, on both the design and fundraising fronts.

The reason for the delay revolves around funding - and the chief reason for the funding delay has to do with the change of provincial government this year, according to Bartels.

"We haven't been able to move forward as quickly as we'd like when we talk about the potential of groundbreaking ... but we're moving forward," she said during a year-end interview with The Globe and Mail.

The Vancouver Art Gallery's current home is a former provincial courthouse in central downtown, originally designed by Francis Rattenbury and renovated in the early 1980s by Arthur Erickson Architects. Its exterior is a gathering point for the city, but the building has all kinds of problems when it comes to exhibiting art - it's too small, to begin with.

Bartels joined the gallery in 2001 from the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, and began what has become a lengthy campaign to build a new gallery. Expansion on the current site - the solution favoured by some vocal supporters - was not the best option, study found.

At one point, the province gave the VAG $50-million and a deal was reached to build the gallery at a site on False Creek. "The goal is to break ground shortly after the [2010] Olympics with a target completion date of late 2013 or early 2014," read a Globe story published in May, 2008.

But in 2010, that plan died and the VAG landed on Larwill Park, a few blocks east of the current gallery, as the right site for a new building. A crucial vote at City Council in 2013 granted twothirds of that parcel of land to the VAG (the rest of the site is slated for commercial use) with conditions attached. In 2014, the VAG selected Swiss architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron to design the building. The Pritzker Architecture Prize winners are working with the Vancouver office of Perkins + Will.

The concept design was revealed in September, 2015: a 310,000-square-foot, 230-foothigh vertically oriented architectural statement with a wood exterior; a 40,000-square-foot publicly accessible courtyard; and more than 85,000 square feet of exhibition space - more than double the gallery's current capacity. Response to the stacked-box design was mixed.

The expectation was that the VAG would break ground in 2017 with a targeted opening date of 2021.

In a spring 2017 interview with The Globe, Ann Webb, the VAG's associate director, director of engagement and strategic initiatives, said the project was "on target, on budget, on time."

The budget is $350-million - $300-million for construction and $50-million for an endowment. In spite of the length of time it is taking to realize the project, Bartels says that figure hasn't changed.

"We are designing to budget, which I think is a very critical element. And we've been very rigorous in our budget oversight," she says. "Through the whole process we've always carried money for [cost] escalation.

So we've been very mindful of that - that prices change as you move forward with a project. So we've been carrying escalation to ensure that we're covered for any of those sorts of issues."

The VAG is seeking $100-million from Ottawa and an additional $50-million from the province. The rest is to come from the private sector. The VAG has until the end of 2018 to reach its government fundraising targets. (The city gave the VAG an extension to the memorandum of understanding after the gallery failed to meet its first deadline.)

In April, the VAG submitted its business case to the provincial government, which the province is to send on the VAG's behalf to the federal government in an application to the New Building Canada Fund (which supports infrastructure projects deemed to be of national, regional or local significance that contribute to economic growth, the environment and stronger communities). The VAG's ask - for $100-million over the period of a few years - has not yet been sent to Ottawa, as the province determines its priorities, Bartels explains. (Priorities for this fund are set by the provinces and communicated to Ottawa.) But she calls government feedback about the project "extremely positive."

Bartels has met with several provincial and federal ministers about the proposed building, including federal Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly, federal Infrastructure Minister Amarjeet Sohi, and provincial minister of Tourism, Arts and Culture Lisa Beare. She has not yet met with B.C. Premier John Horgan but points out that his chief of staff is Geoff Meggs, a former Vancouver city councillor who used to sit on the VAG board. "He's been very helpful and instrumental so I think that relationship is very important," Bartels says.

(A request for an interview with Beare was turned down; The Globe was told the minister is not speaking on the subject at this time but would be happy to talk at an "appropriate moment.") In the meantime, the VAG has been targeting its fundraising efforts at the private sector, with results: Bartels says the VAG has raised $40-million in private money; $10-million of that in the last eight months of 2017. That brings gallery officials close to the point where they can launch a public capital campaign.

"Our goal before we go public with the campaign is to at least get to, I would say, probably $50to $60-million [from the private sector]. So we're closing in," she said shortly before the holiday break. "We have a series of asks out there right now, which could push us over that top."

The upside of the delay, Bartels says, is that the VAG has had more time to work on the design.

Now in the design development phase, they are looking at public spaces, the configuration of the galleries, lighting and circulation - how people move through the building.

"I think at this point now we have our kind of final circulation plan. That doesn't mean there won't be tweaking along the way, but as we know visiting many museums, some museums get it right and some don't. And it's so critical in a vertical museum to get it right," she says.

Upstairs at the current VAG, they have constructed a large 1:40 scale model for the permanent collection area on the lobby level, and have been playing with layout using images of artworks. "By doing that, you really have an understanding and a sense of 'Okay, well maybe the doors need to go here versus there.' " The groundbreaking is not the only big development anticipated for 2018. The VAG is also expected to name a new chief curator in the first quarter to replace Daina Augaitis, who left this year (she is now chief curator emerita). They're down to a "very short shortlist," Bartels says, after having contact with more than 1,200 people about the position.

Another unresolved matter at the VAG has to do with 10 sketches attributed to Group of Seven co-founder J.E.H. MacDonald and acquired by the institution about two years ago. As The Globe has reported, questions have been raised about the works - which the VAG revealed with much fanfare had been buried for decades on MacDonald's property outside Toronto. Some of the sketches were sent to the Canadian Conservation Institute for testing. While the VAG received the results of that testing in September, 2016, the gallery has refused to disclose those results. (The CCI has referred The Globe's inquiries to the VAG.) In our interview, Bartels again declined to share the contents of the report, nor would she say why they're not being made public.

"We know there are varying opinions about the authorship of some of the J.E.H. MacDonald paintings that the gallery acquired and these works have been and will continue to be the subject of further study and research," she said. "And that's the gallery's position at this point."

She said the gallery "has been doing our due diligence and we will continue to do further research on these particular paintings."

As someone who reports on the Vancouver Art Gallery, I have heard some skepticism about those paintings - but also a great deal of skepticism about the new building. What would Bartels say, I asked, to anyone feeling skeptical that the VAG is actually going to build the new facility?

"I would say it's going to happen. We have no skepticism on our front," she says. "We've been doing our good work on the design front and the fundraising front. These sorts of projects cannot be rushed and they need to be thoughtful. It's a very big project and it's a project that is for generations to come and we want to get it as close to right as we possibly can."

Associated Graphic

The new Vancouver Art Gallery will be built at Larwill Park, a former park that currently serves as a parking lot in the city's downtown.

RAFAL GERSZAK/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Conceptual designs by architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron show what the new Vancouver Art Gallery - years in planning - could ultimately look like.

IMAGES COURTESY OF HERZOG & DE MEURON

Am I a bad feminist?
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Canadian author Margaret Atwood examines how she landed in such hot water among her peers for signing an open letter regarding UBC's handling of a sexual abuse case
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By MARGARET ATWOOD
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Saturday, January 13, 2018 – Print Edition, Page O5


Author of more than 40 books of poetry, fiction and essays, including The Handmaid's Tale.

It seems that I am a "Bad Feminist." I can add that to the other things I've been accused of since 1972, such as climbing to fame up a pyramid of decapitated men's heads (a leftie journal), of being a dominatrix bent on the subjugation of men (a rightie one, complete with an illustration of me in leather boots and a whip) and of being an awful person who can annihilate - with her magic White Witch powers - anyone critical of her at Toronto dinner tables. I'm so scary! And now, it seems, I am conducting a War on Women, like the misogynistic, rapeenabling Bad Feminist that I am.

What would a Good Feminist look like, in the eyes of my accusers?

My fundamental position is that women are human beings, with the full range of saintly and demonic behaviours this entails, including criminal ones. They're not angels, incapable of wrongdoing. If they were, we wouldn't need a legal system.

Nor do I believe that women are children, incapable of agency or of making moral decisions. If they were, we're back to the 19th century, and women should not own property, have credit cards, have access to higher education, control their own reproduction or vote. There are powerful groups in North America pushing this agenda, but they are not usually considered feminists.

Furthermore, I believe that in order to have civil and human rights for women there have to be civil and human rights, period, including the right to fundamental justice, just as for women to have the vote, there has to be a vote. Do Good Feminists believe that only women should have such rights? Surely not. That would be to flip the coin on the old state of affairs in which only men had such rights.

So let us suppose that my Good Feminist accusers, and the Bad Feminist that is me, agree on the above points. Where do we diverge? And how did I get into such hot water with the Good Feminists?

In November of 2016, I signed - as a matter of principle, as I have signed many petitions - an Open Letter called UBC Accountable, which calls for holding the University of British Columbia accountable for its failed process in its treatment of one of its former employees, Steven Galloway, the former chair of the department of creative writing, as well as its treatment of those who became ancillary complainants in the case. Specifically, several years ago, the university went public in national media before there was an inquiry, and even before the accused was allowed to know the details of the accusation. Before he could find them out, he had to sign a confidentiality agreement. The public - including me - was left with the impression that this man was a violent serial rapist, and everyone was free to attack him publicly, since under the agreement he had signed, he couldn't say anything to defend himself. A barrage of invective followed.

But then, after an inquiry by a judge that went on for months, with multiple witnesses and interviews, the judge said there had been no sexual assault, according to a statement released by Mr. Galloway through his lawyer. The employee got fired anyway. Everyone was surprised, including me. His faculty association launched a grievance, which is continuing, and until it is over, the public still cannot have access to the judge's report or her reasoning from the evidence presented.

The not-guilty verdict displeased some people. They continued to attack. It was at this point that details of UBC's flawed process began to circulate, and the UBC Accountable letter came into being.

A fair-minded person would now withhold judgment as to guilt until the report and the evidence are available for us to see. We are grownups: We can make up our own minds, one way or the other. The signatories of the UBC Accountable letter have always taken this position. My critics have not, because they have already made up their minds. Are these Good Feminists fair-minded people? If not, they are just feeding into the very old narrative that holds women to be incapable of fairness or of considered judgment, and they are giving the opponents of women yet another reason to deny them positions of decision-making in the world.

A digression: Witch talk. Another point against me is that I compared the UBC proceedings to the Salem witchcraft trials, in which a person was guilty because accused, since the rules of evidence were such that you could not be found innocent. My Good Feminist accusers take exception to this comparison. They think I was comparing them to the teenaged Salem witchfinders and calling them hysterical little girls. I was alluding instead to the structure in place at the trials themselves.

There are, at present, three kinds of "witch" language. 1) Calling someone a witch, as applied lavishly to Hillary Clinton during the recent election. 2) "Witchhunt," used to imply that someone is looking for something that doesn't exist.

3) The structure of the Salem witchcaft trials, in which you were guilty because accused. I was talking about the third use.

This structure - guilty because accused - has applied in many more episodes in human history than Salem. It tends to kick in during the "Terror and Virtue" phase of revolutions - something has gone wrong, and there must be a purge, as in the French Revolution, Stalin's purges in the USSR, the Red Guard period in China, the reign of the Generals in Argentina and the early days of the Iranian Revolution. The list is long and Left and Right have both indulged. Before "Terror and Virtue" is over, a great many have fallen by the wayside. Note that I am not saying that there are no traitors or whatever the target group may be; simply that in such times, the usual rules of evidence are bypassed.

Such things are always done in the name of ushering in a better world. Sometimes they do usher one in, for a time anyway. Sometimes they are used as an excuse for new forms of oppression. As for vigilante justice - condemnation without a trial - it begins as a response to a lack of justice - either the system is corrupt, as in prerevolutionary France, or there isn't one, as in the Wild West - so people take things into their own hands.

But understandable and temporary vigilante justice can morph into a culturally solidified lynch-mob habit, in which the available mode of justice is thrown out the window, and extralegal power structures are put into place and maintained.

The Cosa Nostra, for instance, began as a resistance to political tyranny.

The #MeToo moment is a symptom of a broken legal system. All too frequently, women and other sexual-abuse complainants couldn't get a fair hearing through institutions - including corporate structures - so they used a new tool: the internet. Stars fell from the skies. This has been very effective, and has been seen as a massive wakeup call. But what next?

The legal system can be fixed, or our society could dispose of it. Institutions, corporations and workplaces can houseclean, or they can expect more stars to fall, and also a lot of asteroids.

If the legal system is bypassed because it is seen as ineffectual, what will take its place? Who will be the new power brokers? It won't be the Bad Feminists like me. We are acceptable neither to Right nor to Left. In times of extremes, extremists win. Their ideology becomes a religion, anyone who doesn't puppet their views is seen as an apostate, a heretic or a traitor, and moderates in the middle are annihilated. Fiction writers are particularly suspect because they write about human beings, and people are morally ambiguous. The aim of ideology is to eliminate ambiguity.

The UBC Accountable letter is also a symptom - a symptom of the failure of the University of British Columbia and its flawed process. This should have been a matter addressed by Canadian Civil Liberties or B.C. Civil Liberties. Maybe these organizations will now put up their hands.

Since the letter has now become a censorship issue - with calls being made to erase the site and the many thoughtful words of its writers - perhaps PEN Canada, PEN International, CJFE and Index on Censorship may also have a view.

The letter said from the beginning that UBC failed accused and complainants both. I would add that it failed the taxpaying public, who fund UBC to the tune of $600-million a year. We would like to know how our money was spent in this instance. Donors to UBC - and it receives billions of dollars in private donations - also have a right to know.

In this whole affair, writers have been set against one another, especially since the letter was distorted by its attackers and vilified as a War on Women. But at this time, I call upon all - both the Good Feminists and the Bad Feminists like me - to drop their unproductive squabbling, join forces and direct the spotlight where it should have been all along - at UBC.

Two of the ancillary complainants have now spoken out against UBC's process in this affair. For that, they should be thanked.

Once UBC has begun an independent inquiry into its own actions - such as the one conducted recently at Wilfrid Laurier University - and has pledged to make that inquiry public, the UBC Accountable site will have served its purpose. That purpose was never to squash women. Why have accountability and transparency been framed as antithetical to women's rights?

A war among women, as opposed to a war on women, is always pleasing to those who do not wish women well. This is a very important moment. I hope it will not be squandered.

BIRTH AND DEATH NOTICES
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Thursday, January 11, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B15


DAVID J. BEESLEY

October 2, 1948 January 6, 2018

It is with great sadness that David's family announces his passing after a courageous battle with lung cancer. He will be deeply missed by his loving wife and partner of 35 years, Mary Opper; his three children and their spouses, Simon (Monica), Matthew (Lesia) and Dan (Lynda); his three grandchildren, Emily, Madeline and Isabella; his two brothers and their spouses, Michael (Margaret) and Mark (Margaret); his brother-in-law and sisters-in-law, Tom (Jennifer), Carol and Jane; as well as his many nieces and nephews.

David was born in London, England and immigrated to Canada 41 years ago to build a better life for his family.

After working many years in advertising, sales and marketing he hit his stride at The St. Clair Group where he embraced the sport of curling, eventually taking over the sponsorship sales and marketing. In 1996, David and his partner, John Dunlop formed the Canadian Sponsorship Group, fulfilling a 25 year association with Curling Canada and the World Curling Federation. David was widely respected and loved by the many colleagues and friends he made along the way.

David remained remarkably optimistic throughout his illness, maintaining his usual positive attitude, good humor and generous spirit. He had great enthusiasm for life, including his cars, fine wines and leisurely meals, his time at the family cottage on Lake Muskoka, playing golf with his friends and years as a member of the Metro Toronto Dart League. David loved his life and spending time with family and his many friends. Those who know him well will raise a glass of Macallan in his honour.

There will be a private family service: a celebration of life for friends and colleagues will be announced later in the spring. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation where David was very grateful to the nurses, doctors and staff that took care of him as well as UHN.

FLORENCE BROWN

Passed away at home on Friday, January 5, 2018 at the age of 90 years. Beloved wife of the late Basil Brown.

Loving mother of David and his wife Wanda, Wendy Brown and her husband John Cameron, and Hugh and his wife Shelley. She cherished her family which now extends to 7 grandchildren and 7 great-grandchildren. They brought her joy. Curling and her time spent at Georgian Bay were a close second.

Memorial services will be held at the McDougall & Brown Funeral Home, 2900 Kingston Road, 416-267-4656 on Monday, January 15, 2018 at 5 p.m. Visitation from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. prior to the service.

Private cremation. Online condolences at http://www.mcdbrownscarb.ca

ROBERT HOCKING "Bob"

It is with sadness that the family announces his passing after a battle with cancer on Tuesday, January 9, 2018 in Toronto at the age of 60. Bob will be forever remembered by his beloved wife, Lynne; his loving children, Davis Robert and Madison Lynne; and his dear siblings, Bruce, Beth and Gordon.

Predeceased by his parents, Reginald and Marguerite Hocking.

Friends may call at the Turner & Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., at Windermere, east of Jane subway on Friday, January 12, 2018 from 4 - 8 p.m. for a memorial visitation. For those who wish, memorial donations may be made to Canadian Cancer Society. Online condolences may be made through http://www.turnerporter.ca

MARY HELEN KELLOGG (née Rutherford)

October 10, 1925 December 28, 2017

Peacefully at Christie Gardens in Toronto on Thursday, December 28, 2017 in her 93rd year. Wife of the late Rev. James Clare Kellogg.

Mother of Jean, Paul, Ian, Andrew and Catherine. Mother-in-law of Don, Abbie, Kim and Ruth.

Grandmother of Erin, Hugh, Meredith, Adam, Rachel, Sean, Samuel, Kerry and Katrina.

Memorials January 13, 2018 in Toronto and July 7, 2018 in Cobourg. For details, go to http://www.maccoubrey.com/ notice/4850

ARIEL LUKE ROMOFF

Luke Romoff was born on November 20, 1987 and died on January 6, 2018 in Toronto.

Much loved son of Jordan and Susan Romoff. Loving brother of Claire Romoff.

Ari was strong and fiercely determined. He had a very tender and loving heart. Ari enjoyed conversation and delighted in sharing funny moments and stories. Keen observer and clever wit, always making us smile. An athlete, with a very special talent for pitching. He loved baseball, it was his passion. Ari was creative and excelled at whatever art form attracted his interest. Recent years brought several health problems that Ari faced with a strength that was admired by many. Ari valued a strong connection to his large family and many friends. We will miss him every moment but will always treasure the happy times and joy he brought to us.

Funeral service at Toronto Necropolis, 200 Winchester Street, Toronto, ON M4X 1B7 on Friday, January 12, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. The family requests that donations in memory of Ari Romoff be directed to The Schulich Heart Centre, in care of The Sunnybrook Foundation, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M4N 3M5.

MARY AGATHAANNEO 'GRADY SAVAGE June 20, 1934 January 8, 2018

Mary Agatha Anne O'Grady Savage, aged 83, passed away peacefully January 8, 2018 at the O'Neill Centre in Toronto. She was born in Kinvara, Ireland on June 20, 1934 and was predeceased by her parents, John Peter and Anne Bridget O'Grady; and her brother, Martin; as well as her loving husband of 43 years, Patrick John Savage.

Remembered for her feistiness and devotion to her students and family, Mary Agatha will be fondly missed by her sons, Grady (Julia) and Francis (Cagla former spouse); grandsons, Declan, Ronan, Efe and Spencer; as well as many dear friends and relatives.

Special thanks to all the staff at the O'Neill Centre, particularly the 5th Floor, for their wonderful care and kindness over the years.

Friends may call at the Turner & Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W. (east of the Jane subway) on Friday from 6-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Our Lady of Sorrows Roman Catholic Church the following day, Saturday, January 13, 2018 at 1 p.m. For those who wish, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be greatly appreciated.

Online condolences available at http://www.turnerporter.ca

MARIA SOLECKI 1927 - 2018

Life is a journey and we, Joanna Balaski and Christopher Solecki, with heartfelt sorrow announce a journey's end to our beloved mother, Maria Solecki (nee Kolodziej), on January 8, 2018.

Maria, or 'Marynia', as she preferred to be called, was born on July 13, 1927 in Bialozorka in southeastern Poland. She was the third of four children born to Jozef Kolodziej and Stephania Sawicki. Maria was predeceased by her husband (our father), Zbigniew Romauld Solecki; her parents; a baby sister, Stefcia; older sister, Hela; and brother, Adolf. She is survived by her daughter-in-law, Hania; son-inlaw, Norman; and grandchildren, Dominique Johnston (Tyler), Andre Solecki (Carla Salaj), Christopher Balaski (Sacha) and Jennifer Greenlaw (Derek). Greatgrandchildren include, Samantha Johnston, Marek Balaski, and Alexandra Greenlaw. She is also survived by relatives in other parts of the world.

The Second World War uprooted Maria's family and as a young girl she lived through many challenging times in far off places including Siberia, the Middle East, Pakistan en route to India, where she lived with her mother for four years. These experiences recounted often to her family remained a part of her identity throughout her life. Following the war, Maria's family was reunited in Sheffield, England where Maria married Zbigniew. The couple immigrated to their new home in Toronto, Canada, where we, her children, were born. Our parents were very grateful for the opportunities that this land presented and were as proud of Canada as their native land of Poland. Our mother loved to sing and dance. She would waken us for school with her singing, much to our chagrin. Her home was always filled with an abundance of love and food, things that she didn't necessarily have enough of growing up. She taught her daughter to Polka (but had less success with her son). Maria was resourceful, practical, hardworking and humble. It was important for her to pass on her values, heritage, experiences and lessons learned from her and our father to both of us. She was thankful for the life she lived, the children and grandchildren that she had, and was especially joyful for the great-grandchildren that she was blessed with and anticipating.

A funeral Mass will be held at Holy Angels Roman Catholic Church, 61 Jutland Rd., Etobicoke on Friday, January 12, 2018, at 10 am. Interment Sanctuary Park Cemetery. If desired, donations to the Heart & Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

Arrangements entrusted to Turner & Porter Butler Chapel 416-231-2283. Online condolences may be made at http://www.turnerporter.ca "Don't think of her as gone away, her journey's just begun. Life holds so many facets - this earth is only one."

- Jeanne Christine Miller

ELIZABETH SZPIKA (nee Lendvay)

Passed into the presence of her Lord and Saviour suddenly on Monday, January 8, 2018. She is survived by her devoted husband, Peter; and her loving children, Andréa and Viktor. Very sadly missed by her sister-in-law, Marina; and brother-in-law, Reinhart. Also survived by her sister, Teresa (John) Liggett; and brother, Daniel Lendvay. Along with various cousins, nieces and nephews.

Friends and family will be received for visitation to be held on Friday, January 12, 2018 at Queensway Baptist Church, 950 Islington Avenue, Toronto from 10 a.m until the time of the Funeral Service at 11 a.m.

Interment at York Cemetery.

Arrangements entrusted to Turner & Porter Butler Chapel (416-231-2283). Online condolences may be made through http://www.turnerporter.ca.

Ocean view, bitcoin accepted
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By SHANE DINGMAN
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Friday, January 12, 2018 – Print Edition, Page H3


Want to buy some ocean front property in British Columbia? It'll only cost you 180 bitcoin, or maybe 160 - no wait, it might change to more than 500 bitcoins.

That's the volatile reality Camilla Stephan-Heck and her husband are facing with their decision to accept the cryptocurrency bitcoin in exchange for their Vancouver Island house. Priced in dollars, they are seeking $2.7-million for the fivebedroom, 18-room bluff's edge mansion.

She's a dentist, he's a lawyer, and they bought their dream property on 1885 Widgeon Rd., near Qualicum Beach, in 2001, right on the waterfront of the Georgia Straight.

In 2010, the couple retired and moved their three children from Sherwood Park (outside Edmonton) into a custom-built 5,788 squarefoot dream home on the 6.7-acre site.

Ms. Stephan-Heck says the couple's children are moving out, scattering across Canada, and the couple wants to downsize and have property near where they settle.

They listed in November, and started advertising on cryptocurrency websites in January.

"I read an article about the utility of bitcoin and I said, 'Would we accept bitcoin for our house?' [Her husband] said, 'I'd be open to it.' It's not done every day," Ms. StephanHeck said.

It may not have been done in Canada before, even though along with their house there are a dozen other Canadian listings from British Columbia to Quebec on the Bitcoin Real Estate website: everything from other luxury properties, condos, a farm and even one buyer who claims to have $450,000 in bitcoin ready to spend on a house in Calgary.

In recent months, there have been reports in the United States of houses selling for bitcoin, everywhere from Texas to Florida and nearby Seattle.

In part, what's changed is the value of bitcoin itself: The digital currency started 2017 valued at about $980 (U.S.) a "coin," and hit a high of more than $17,500 in December.

"We dabble in cryptocurrency ourselves," Ms. Stephan-Heck says.

She says they jumped on the bandwagon in October, 2017, buying some bitcoin and another crytpocurrency named ethereum. "We're fairly diversified in our investments, bitcoin was gaining notoriety and we started doing some research.

We've done reasonably well on it. ... It's enough to have fun with."

She says the couple would accept either a full or part bitcoin offer, but her real estate agent has told her he still expects to be paid in Canadian currency. The couple has no mortgage on the property, and is in no rush to sell; they are waiting for the right offer.

Ms. Stephan-Heck is also not sure if she would keep all or just some of her new bitcoins, saying she will be looking at the currency's pricing trend when deciding whether to keep or convert it to Canadian currency.

VANCOUVER, TORONTO RENTS SHOW STEADY RISE

Rental site Padmapper.com says that as 2017 ended, its data suggest Toronto's average one-bedroom apartment rent was close to drawing even with Vancouver rates.

The site reported that, in December, the average new rental listing prices for one-bedroom units in Vancouver was $1,990, down 4.3 per cent from the month previous. Toronto's average one-bedroom price was $1,970 (up 2.6 per cent).

Those figures differ from other recent data sources and may not accurately capture cost of renting in either city, because Padmapper just calculates its own current listings and doesn't survey the entire rental market. For example, in Toronto it currently has 5,346 condos, houses and apartments listed; of those, 2,903 were one-bedroom apartments. In Vancouver, it has 1,420 current listings for all types, and 793 onebedroom ads.

Padmapper's numbers also mash together rented condominium units, sub-units in low-rise housing stock and purpose-built units in rental apartment blocks. It's also likely the makeup of its listings is skewed toward the tech-friendly and may not include a representative share of the city's older units.

According to Urbanation Inc., which focuses on the condominium portion of the rental market in Toronto, the pricing for those categories is quite different.

Urbanation doesn't cover Vancouver's market, but in October, 2017, it reported that condo apartment rental transactions recorded in Toronto by the MLS system saw a year-over-year jump of 10.3 per cent in the third quarter of 2017, reaching an average rent of $2,219 for all unit types, and $1,839 for one-bedroom units (up 9.7 per cent). Padmapper's one-month sample may also be slightly skewed: "The rental market is influenced by seasonal factors as well, and it is not uncommon to see average rents decline slightly on a monthly basis during the last couple months of the year, following the very busy late summer/early fall period," says Shaun Hildebrand, senior vice-president with Urbanation.

The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. publishes rental market surveys that collect far more data about the existing market. In its third-quarter report, it said that, as of October, 2017, the average rent for a onebedroom apartment in the City of Vancouver was $1,223 (up 5.5 per cent from 2016). Across the city, average rent on all types of homes increased 5.9 per cent - the third year that rents grew faster than the provincially allowable 3.7-per-cent increase.

The CMHC data do show the average rent in Toronto is nipping at Vancouver's heels: The CMHC figures for a one-bedroom unit's average rent is $1,202 (up 5.7 per cent from 2016). The city-wide average for all bedroom types is $1,308 (up 5.8 per cent).

Looking specifically at one-bedroom condos, CMHC data for October shows the average rent in Vancouver at $1,692 (up 4.1 per cent from 2016.) Toronto came in at $1,847 (up 8.3 per cent from 2016), but for the core downtown area, it was $2,019 (up 8.5 per cent).

Toronto also has many more - and rents a larger share of - condo units: Of the city's 384,481 units in 2017, 32.7 per cent (125,801) are rented out.

The CMHC estimates there are 232,638 condominium units in the Vancouver area, 59,930 are rental units, or 25.8 per cent.

NEW PLANNING BOARD, OLD GRIEVANCES

It took three tries and more than a year for the City of Ottawa to settle on the shape of its new provincially mandated planning advisory committee, but in the waning days of 2017, it voted into effect a 15-member body that will involve residents in planning discussions between city staff and politicians and developers.

But even the lead councillor behind the committee isn't entirely happy about its existence.

"We wouldn't even have been considering it if we weren't mandated to. ... We already do an excellent job of consulting the public on planning matters," says Jan Harder, the councillor for Barrhaven and chair of the city's Planning Committee, referring to recent changes to Ontario's Planning Act that sought to better involve residents in civic planning. "We do communication constantly, and we do it not because we were forced to do it; we do it because it makes sense."

The committee is only intended to meet twice a year to review the annual work plan of the Planning, Infrastructure and Economic Development Department.

"All necessary groups appear to be represented. I think, as an industry, as the group that's building these projects, it might be appropriate to have more than one person from our industry sitting on this group," says John Herbert, executive director of Greater Ottawa Home Builders' Association.

Mr. Herbert says that in the context of the Ontario Municipal Board reforms, which will limit a private developer's ability to appeal a civic decision, the Ottawa planning committee has stacked the deck with six citizen members (two each from the city's urban, rural and suburban areas), three councillors and a representative of the city's resident's associations.

"In a sense, the system is now rigged fairly strongly in favour of communities and residents - in other words, anti-development factions," Mr. Herbert says.

The 10-vote block of residents (who will be chosen and vetted by the city councillors) and politicians leaves only five votes for professional opinions: one for developers, one vote for the commercial real estate group the Building Owners and Managers Association, and three other professional advisers (a member of the Ontario Professional Planners Institute, a landscape architect and one more architect who is a member of the Ontario Association of Architects).

"The problem, generally speaking, with citizen participation; all these people know is they don't want a project in their neighbourhood," says Mr. Herbert, who expects he will represent builders on the committee.

Ms. Harder couldn't disagree more with Mr. Herbert's view about resident input, but again stresses that the city has already been making strides to get great community buy-in on new developments.

"As evidence of the fact that we're doing a lot more than others are, in the last two years the OMB cases in Ottawa have dropped by 68 per cent," says Ms. Harder, falling from 19 hearings in 2015, to six in 2017.

Associated Graphic

This property near Qualicum Beach, B.C., is seeking $2.7-million - which can be paid partly or fully in bitcoin.

Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson, left, and Infrastructure and Communities Minister Amarjeet Sohi last year. Mayor Watson has been left off a new city planning committee.

ADRIAN WYLD/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Class act: Canadian invests in school for Syrian refugees Jordan: 'Help us cope with all these students'
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By SARA ELIZABETH WILLIAMS
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Friday, January 12, 2018 – Print Edition, Page A1


AZRAQ, JORDAN -- In a brightly painted prefab caravan on a desolate stretch of the Jordanian desert, 32-year-old teacher Ghadaa Tinieh is working miracles.

Amongst her class of 15 Syrian refugee children in this far-flung outpost, three had never been to school before. More than half could barely read or write, and nearly all were struggling under the weight of trauma, poverty and exile.

Yet here, they are thriving. In the words of 12-year-old Mohammad, in school for the first time in his life: "My teacher started with me at zero and I'm a 10 now."

The class is part of a school designed to teach basic skills and offer enrichment to kids who have gone years without formal education or are struggling to stay afloat in Jordanian schools.

Unlike most education projects, it specifically targets children whom aid agencies warn are at risk of becoming a lost generation of unskilled adults.

It fills a critical gap in programs for refugees and has an unlikely benefactor: 79-year-old Canadian Martine Stilwell.

"It's a very concerning thing to think that all these children would end up illiterate or semi-literate and in a poverty trap," Ms. Stilwell told The Globe and Mail.

After stints in Ecuador and Indonesia as the trailing spouse of a hydro engineer, the West Vancouver retired psychiatrist and mother of three had witnessed how conflict and destitution often hit children hardest. She had been reading about Syrian refugee children without access to school and was haunted by thoughts of what their future might hold.

"How can they rebuild Syria later? And it leaves people more vulnerable to extremism and so on. I was lucky enough to have a quality education and I was concerned," she said.

In March, 2014, Ms. Stilwell received a sizable inheritance and decided to help these children. She set her sights on Jordan: A poor country shouldering the costs of close to a million Syrian refugees, it offered enough political stability to ensure any project she funded might last.

While nearly all Jordanian students attend primary school, just six in 10 Syrian refugee children in 2014 were taking part in formal education. Classes were swelling and some oversubscribed schools were turning Syrian students away.

The education system offered no re-entry for children who had been out of school for three or more years; schools just weren't equipped to deal with catching these kids up. Children whose parents hadn't brought the right paperwork from Syria or hadn't completed often-onerous administrative procedures in Jordan were also locked out of classes. This left a growing group of young Syrians illiterate and innumerate.

A few schools ran double shifts, with Jordanian students attending in the morning and Syrian students in the afternoon. But according to a 2016 report by Human Rights Watch, this left both groups with fewer hours of instruction than children in single-shift schools. The rights watchdog also noted that in many schools, "Facilities like libraries were closed during afternoon shift classes, which only Syrian students attend."

Ms. Stilwell approached several NGOs with an offer to fund an education project but got no response. After a second round of e-mails again yielded no interest, she heard of a smaller charity called Helping Refugees in Jordan. She joined Facebook to connect with the group - "I still can't figure out how to close that account" - and received an enthusiastic response from founder Catherine Ashcroft within hours.

"Martine didn't want the money to be lost somewhere in the ether of large agencies," recalled Ms. Ashcroft. "She wanted to be involved but was totally open to learning about how and when, rather than going in with a preconceived idea. She was keen for it to be a learning process for herself, too. So she got it right."

In May, 2014, Ms. Stilwell boarded a plane for Amman - her first time in the Middle East. She met up with Ms. Ashcroft and the two asked school administrators in Azraq, a poor village where four in 10 are refugees, how they could help. The response: "Help us cope with all these students." By the time she flew home at the end of the month, Ms. Stilwell had paid for two portable classrooms and funded a skills-training program for teens.

But it was during a second visit to Jordan six months later that the project to help Syrian children would truly take off.

In October, 2014, Ms. Stilwell met 10-year-old Mariam, who hadn't been to school since Grade 1 in Syria. Her mother had tried and failed to get her into Jordanian schools for three years running.

Overweight and losing her hair, Mariam was clearly depressed, Ms. Stilwell recalled. The encounter put everything into focus.

"I looked at Catherine and I said, 'I know we're trying to do something for teenagers, but here comes a whole generation who can't even be skill trained because they can't read and write. Maybe we should set up a small classroom for these kids,' " she said.

With further support from The Syria Fund, a U.S.-based NGO, a plan took shape to create an education centre that could help support and complement the teaching in formal schools.

Within months, what Ms. Stilwell calls the "keep-up, catch-up school" was up and running in Azraq. A second inheritance further expanded facilities and paid for a school bus to bring in kids from rural areas.

The school consists of five portable classrooms positioned around a small playground. There's a computer lab and one of the portables has had a second storey added that functions as a library, where English classics such as Goodnight Moon and One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish sit alongside Arabic board books and readers.

It's a fleck of colour on an otherwise bleak, poverty-choked frontier.

The chain-link fences that surround the school are riddled with garbage, old United Nations tarps and plastic blown in by a gritty desert wind.

Next door there's a burnt-out car with flat tires and, beyond that, a wasteland of houses in varying states of dilapidation. The school's nearest landmark is the Muwaffaq Salti Air Base, which serves as a major launch point for the war against the Islamic State, and the sky booms with the sound of warplanes.

Classes are for children aged 6 through 14 and they run from 8:30 a.m. to noon. Students then head to the nearby government school, where they attend afternoon classes. Teachers at both schools strategize together on the best ways to help students.

Many of the Azraq school's students are traumatized and plagued by a sense of hopelessness and loss, said 24-year-old school administrator Israa Shishani.

"You feel they don't care in the beginning, so you have to get their attention before you can teach them anything," she told The Globe.

"They feel they have lost everything, so why do they have to continue?" In the classroom for children with the highest level of need, Ms. Tinieh, the teacher, described the difference in her students since beginning school.

"Tarek is one of our biggest successes. He's 12 and was very weak in basic skills but with our help, after a year in regular school, he has found his footing," she said.

Hearing his teacher's words, the shy boy from Homs glows.

For many parents, the school has been a lifeline.

"I feel comfortable with my kids here, more than with the government school. Teachers here take more care, especially with my daughter," said Amani Al-Hash, a mother of two from Damascus whose son and daughter have attended for three years. She cited English and reading as two areas where her children had improved the most.

Across Jordan, the situation for Syrian students has improved since the Azraq school opened.

Children who have been out of school for more than three years can now re-enter the education system, as can children without formal documentation.

But there are still a host of practical challenges.

Jordan is a poor country with crippling unemployment levels and its education system, despite support from humanitarian organizations and countries such as Canada, is chronically underfunded.

Ms. Stilwell, who visits the school a couple of times a year and keeps in close touch via Skype, is realistic about the effect of her and her partners' efforts. "It's an infinitesimal drop in the bucket," she said.

At the end of the school day, as the last stragglers head off hand-in-hand with moms and dads, that drop in the bucket has a sound. Above the wind, the warplanes and the highway traffic, there it is: the lilts and peals of children's song and laughter, trailing away in all directions.

Associated Graphic

The school in Jordan targets children at risk of becoming a lost generation of unskilled adults.

Top: In addition to basic courses in math and English, Syrian refugee students are also exposed to music and art in classes held in Azraq, Jordan. Middle: Azraq native Israa Shishani, the school's administrator, has been with the institution for the past two years. Bottom: Nine-year-old Ahmad, a new student, plays on the swing set after class.

PHOTOS BY ALISA REZNICK /THE GLOBE AND MAIL

The school consists of five portable classrooms positioned around a small playground. A school bus brings in students from rural areas.

A student in math class completes a problem on the whiteboard. For many parents, the school has been a lifeline.

Daydream believers
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A carefree family ski holiday in the French Alps can be a reality thanks to Club Med. Catherine Dawson March finds the all-inclusive resort makes vacationing with the kids a breeze, and even allows time to enjoy the food and wine
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By CATHERINE DAWSON MARCH
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Saturday, January 20, 2018 – Print Edition, Page P10


Star Wars skis. Brilliant. I wish I'd had those when I was trying to lure my little Star Wars fan onto the slopes. You'd feel invincible strapped to Darth Vader and Stormtroopers.

Every parent learns that teaching children something new (from fastening shoes to brushing teeth) is a little easier if the new thing is emblazoned with a beloved character. The 440 pairs of skis lined up in the children's rental room at Club Med's new resort in the middle of the French Alps shows they've already got that figured out. It's the first of many hints that Grand Massif Samoëns Morillon, Club Med's new 420-room resort, is intent on smoothing out the bumps of a family ski holiday.

A vacation here is a game changer for most Canadians: The all-inclusive ski resort (one price for a week of lessons, guides, meals, drinks, child care and entertainment) doesn't really exist in Canada. At least not until Club Med opens its recently announced resort in Charlevoix, Que., in 2020. Some heli-ski operators give it a try with week-long trips into remote chalets, but they are not as amenity-driven or family focused. "For all you get for the price," says Jennifer Brousseau, who specializes in selling ski holidays at Montreal travel agency Sportvac, "they offer the best value."

VIEWS TO KNOCK YOUR SKI SOCKS OFF

You're in France - France! - to ski. Your friends are already envious, so don't fall asleep on the hour-long drive from Geneva airport. The final approach wends its way through an evergreen forest, passing old stone churches and rough barns, and shaving by alpine chalets perched on the slope. It's hard to take your eyes off this Brothers Grimm scenery. I keep expecting a troll to step out and block our passage until we answer three riddles.

Daydreaming out the window, I find, is less nerve-racking than watching our driver cut blind corners up this long and winding road. Eventually, we pass into a clearing - and the newly built, $120-million (U.S.) resort appears above us, spread out over the Plateau des Saix and into the slope so that every room has a view. Before you even step inside the hotel you'll note the ski in/ski out access to Grand Massif's 300 kilometres of slopes and stare, gobsmacked, at the 360degree views of the Alps.

If the kids are a bit wrangy from the travel, the enormous, light-filled lobby should offer some distraction - cathedral ceilings, furry pillows on sleek couches, even a few sleigh beds to stretch out on.

Send them out to the patio in search of the soft "log" furniture to play, er, sit on and stare, again, at more mountain views. And the free hot chocolate starts now; one of the resort's many espresso/ hot-drink machines sits near the front desk.

Family rooms at this Club Med resort swing from basic - two bedrooms with a balcony and more than enough closet space - to larger, fancier family suites. All rooms are sleek, bright and functional (kids' closets thoughtfully offer shorter clothing racks) but amenities vary: Hand lotion (a staple in even bargain-basement North American hotels) is, for some reason, only available in the higher-priced rooms.

If it's too late in the day to start skiing, explore the high-design pool area with, naturally, more large windows to let in more mountain views. The unisex change room can work well for families - nixing that six-year-old-boy awkwardness when forced to use the women's area with mom - but it will take some getting used to for those without kids. Smaller rooms with doors that lock make this a bit easier. Poolside "cabanas" are recessed into the wall to offer privacy, but they're not as cool as the pillow-stacked tepee hideaways the kids get to hang out in.

You'll see an outdoor pool, too, surrounded by snow drifts that looks great in Instagram photos, but it's not open for swimming in winter. And while you can hang outdoors in the tiny hot tub, it's often full of other guests with the same idea.

A BUFFET FOR FOODIES (SERIOUSLY)

The only thing that beats the view at Grand Massif is the food - and floor-toceiling windows in two restaurants mean guests can enjoy both at the same time.

During my visit, freshly prepared stations in the buffet featured Marennes oysters, duroc pork, black Angus steak, fresh salmon and trout, beef carpaccio and, of course, foie gras. I counted at least seven types of fresh breads one morning and every meal offers a salt and pepper bar stacked with different grinders of flavour.

If your kid is not into fancy food, surely the daily hand-made burger and fries, jasmine rice pots, freshly made ravioli pastas and thin-crust pizzas will fill them up.

In the more formal eatery on the hotel's top floor, two-star Michelin chef Édouard Loubet guides the gastronomy. Reservations are required here, just as they are for the families-only restaurant in the kids' club area. This is where your children will do the ordering and even some sous-chef prep; families dine a little less formally but, perhaps, have a lot more fun.

THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT

But you really came to get the kids skiing, right? Since the resort takes your rental details before you arrive, your ski locker (the same number as your room) is already stocked with boots, poles and adjusted skis. The kids' clubs/childcare start at four months of age and, for an extra fee, children as young as 3 can learn to ski with the resort's ESF (École du ski français) instructors. Children aged 4 and up join the daily complimentary ski classes. The ski clubs extend to the age of 17, with a special après-ski hideaway for teens that includes an Xbox, foosball, a (wishful thinking) crop of board games and a darkened corner full of big pillows where they can whip out their phones and chill.

Parents can ski solo but really should take advantage of the ESF guides who work here to show them around the 265 kilometres of runs and 71 lifts, which connect to five villages. Private guides in Europe are an expense that can cost up to 400 ($600) a day. Beginner to expert groups in both English and French are sorted out on Day 1 and you can stick with them every day of your stay - making ski buddies at your own level is invaluable. No more being forced onto too-easy or too-wild runs just to keep up with your partner. Après-yoga and Pilates class - yes, they're included too - help work out the kinks after a long ski day and make dancing at the nightclub all that much easier.

GET OFF THE RESORT

One of the best reasons to come this far to ski is to revel in the Haute-Savoie culture, practise your French, eat real cheese and drink glorious wine (here, even the house wine is incredible). You can do most of this by just eating at the Club Med restaurants but you really should get off the resort at least once. Just outside the ski room door, a gondola heads down the mountain to the medieval village of Samoëns. (Watch for chamois nibbling on the bushes during the eight-minute ride.)

At the bottom, there's a shuttle you can catch into town, but why? It's a lovely 15minute stroll along a tree-lined route that lets you appreciate the majesty of the mountains. Samoëns is renowned historically for its stonemasons, artisans whose work is on display all over the village and which was once commissioned by Voltaire and Napoleon. The stone church in the central square is a mustsee, with sections that date to the 13th century. Pick up local treats at the boulangeries and cheese shops, and if you need more snow gear, ski shops in all price ranges abound. But what you should really do is sit back in one of the bistros with a steaming mug of vin chaud.

You deserve it: You've just brought your brood to the Alps to ski and experience a new culture: "#familygoals," as my teenager would say.

The writer was a guest of Club Med. The resort did not review or approve this article.

Associated Graphic

Club Med's Grand Massif Samoëns Morillo in the French Alps has 300 kilometres of slopes, and plenty of opportunity to indulge in cheese and wine at onsite restaurants, below.

COURTESY CLUB MED

The pointless struggle of mainstream TV to reflect the real America
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From S.W.A.T. to Star Trek, network television is offering the illusion of progress, but it looks like truly challenging storytelling might be long gone from basic cable
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By JOHN DOYLE
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Saturday, January 20, 2018 – Print Edition, Page R3


A lot of mainstream U.S. TV is simply escapism. Most series on traditional broadcast networks follow templates. The letters in "CBS" could stand for "crimes being solved," such is their devotion to eccentric geniuses who help out the cops with crime solving. ABC has a lot of family comedies. Across the networks there is a saturation of music talent shows.

But in this increasingly tumultuous and divisive climate, even escapism is under the microscope. Where is the diversity that reflects the population? Why are so many female characters in subordinate roles? Is the mainstream TV industry doing anything to combat sexual misconduct behind the scenes on TV productions? If mainstream TV is not just mindless escapism but holds a mirror to society, something that is increasingly expected as cable and streaming services offer more sophisticated storytelling, then is the mainstream changing at all?

Here at the TV critics press tour last week, CBS arranged a panel on "Political and Social Issues," with executive producers Jermaine Fowler from the sitcom Superior Donuts, Robert and Michelle King from The Good Fight, Barbara Hall of Madam Secretary, Shawn Ryan from S.W.A.T. and Gretchen Berg and Aaron Harberts from Star Trek: Discovery.

The Star Trek duo had an interesting take on the role of seemingly innocuous TV. Harberts explained: "Over the 51-year history of the franchise, starting with Gene Roddenberry, the show has tackled many social issues, from having a Russian on the bridge during the Cold War to having the first interracial kiss on television.

Discovery is continuing with that legacy with a diverse cast that not only includes the first African-American woman to lead the show, but also the first gay couple on Star Trek. In our way, through a futuristic lens, it's very important for us to foster debate and discussion and to shine a light on things that are happening in our world."

This is all very well, but it is inside the Star Trek universe, and it is clear that wellmeaning people are trying to avoid obvious stereotyping but mainstream TV is rooted is tradition. It is almost immovable and there is a nervousness about what the audience is willing to absorb.

The defensive statements from the producers reflect woefully on the state of network TV. What is seen as progress are often merely ripped-from-the-headlines storylines.

S.W.A.T., for instance, is a traditional CBS show in many ways. It's about an L.A. police S.W.A.T. team doing what S.W.A.T.

(Special Weapons and Tactics) teams do.

It has a lead actor, Shemar Moore, who is biracial. This in itself borders on radical.

And to hear Ryan tell it, even reflecting L.A. itself, the show's setting, is a major move forward.

"We dealt with Black Lives Matter issues in our pilot, but subsequently we've been able to expand all across Los Angeles, tell stories that take place in the Filipino community," Ryan said.

"We have an episode coming up in a week and a half that takes place in Koreatown, and in the Latino community in Boyle Heights, but really we're focusing on how police interacts with the community."

There's something odd about this. An issue in the Trump era is divisiveness. Some Americans have no experience of "others" - people who aren't middle-class white Americans. On conventional TV, they only see them in the context of police actions.

As for politics, forget it. Even on network shows that deal with political figures, there is a deep reluctance to reflect reality.

Madam Secretary is a about a female secretary of state (Tea Leoni) dealing with foreign-policy issues and her home life, but there is nothing about Democrats or Republicans in it. The president figure is conveniently identified as an independent to avoid connecting with reality.

Creator and executive producer Hall said, "The mission statement for Madam Secretary from the beginning was to create a show where people could come to talk about politics in a way that wasn't so polarized and polarizing, and this was two years before the election. So one of the ways we did that was that we didn't identify a political party."

Hall defends the show as a window on the world, though: "Because we go into every country and every culture, we get to deal with every issue around ethnicity, religion, gender identity and how those things affect everyone on a global scale. So that's what really we try to do."

Mind you, The Good Fight plans to tackle the subject of a possible Trump impeachment in its second season but, the producers say, it will be done in a manner that points fingers at the inflamed belief among Democrats that removing Trump would solve everything. The drama, which returns March 4, also has plans for an episode "inspired" by the allegations of sexual misconduct against Harvey Weinstein. The episode will, it seems, be based on Ronan Farrow's struggle to get major media to pay attention to his reporting on the issue.

We'll have to see how it plays out but that, right there, sounds no different than a Law & Order episode ripped from the headlines about a notorious crime.

The days of Archie Bunker and reflection of raw prejudices and rage are clearly long over on network TV. An episode of a crime drama set in a Latino community is considered a huge step, not a tiny step toward reflecting reality.

The CBS sitcom Superior Donuts might, in fact, be the most substantive of the shows under discussion. The show is set in a Chicago neighbourhood doughnut shop and treads very carefully around social and political issues. Fowler, a young African-American standup comedian, who is both executive producer and star, controls a lot of it.

"We try to make sure we don't lean too far to the left or to the right," Fowler said.

"We don't want to make the viewer's mind up. We got seven characters on the show from different walks of life who have different viewpoints. We got a guy from Iraq who is the most Republican, conservative guy on the show, which we thought was hilarious because he's Muslim, and most of those people don't like Muslims and we thought it was hilarious and satirical. We got myself as a character who works with this old Jewish guy, and I don't really trust too many white people that much. I don't really hang out with them that much."

On the other hand, it's understandable that there is such little appetite for confronting issues. Mainstream entertainment can be a minefield, with the case of Star Trek: Discovery and its female AfricanAmerican lead serving as a cautionary tale.

"There was a fragment of the audience that was very upset," Roberts said. "A lot of white men felt very marginalized by our show, and it threatened a lot of people. In terms of winning over hearts and minds, what was interesting was on social media our audience policed itself, and our audience rose up and sort of said to those people, 'This is what Trek is.' " As for the continuing divisiveness in the United States, Roberts believes viewers will draw their own conclusion. "And we've addressed the conflict in our own country the way that we were able to," he said, "which is to say that Trump was elected before we shot the pilot and, again, we were in the news quite a bit because people thought that [long-time Star Trek villains] the Klingons represented Trump supporters."

Obviously, CBS doesn't want that - audience and advertisers feeling that characters representing the enemy are stand-ins for Trump supporters. And the issue is the audience, not the producers.

There are so many conundrums for mainstream, network TV. It could do a lot better, but if you want a mirror to the tumult of the Trump era, stick to cable dramas and comedies.

Associated Graphic

Left: Madam Secretary follows a female secretary of state (Tea Leoni) dealing with foreign-policy issues and her home life - yet there is nothing about Democrats or Republicans in it. Right: Anthony Rapp, left, and Wilson Cruz star in Star Trek: Discovery, the first TV series in the five-decade-old franchise to feature a gay couple.

The CBS sitcom Superior Donuts, set in a Chicago neighbourhood doughnut shop, treads very carefully around social and political issues. 'We try to make sure we don't lean too far to the left or to the right,' executive producer and star Jermaine Fowler says.

Dara Howell returns to Olympic spotlight
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2014 gold medalist had a long, slow and challenging recovery, one that involved finding a life away from skiing
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By DAVID EBNER
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Tuesday, January 23, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B13


VANCOUVER -- The pressure of the Olympics didn't derail Dara Howell. It was everything after that was difficult.

After winning gold in women's ski slopestyle at the 2014 Winter Olympics, Howell was celebrated - but, privately, the glare of attention burned. Five thousand people cheered the 19-year-old at a party in her hometown of Huntsville, in Ontario cottage country. She walked the red carpet at the Junos. In the summer, Howell was on the cover of Sportsnet magazine's beauty of sports issue in a bikini holding her skis.

Beyond all the appearances and attention, it was the many intimate moments that Howell found the hardest, when strangers would congratulate her, tell her she had done the country proud, that they were so proud of her.

"I never really knew how to respond," Howell says - and then pauses, "... properly. I would say, 'Thank you, and I appreciate it,' but I always felt so ashamed. I didn't know what to say. I would step back and feel awkward and shy. I would slowly hide myself."

Howell struggled. There were recurring bouts of anxiety. She found herself sapped of energy. She slept in late and, when she got up, she feel didn't like doing much.

She skipped a whole World Cup season and most of another. Her skiing started to slip and younger stars emerged.

Today, with the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea in February, Howell is rallying to vie for a medal. She was named to the Canadian Olympic freestyle team on Monday.

It has been a long, slow and challenging recovery, one that involved finding a life away from skiing, connecting with new coaches to rebuild her skiing on the slopes and finding a sports psychologist who helped her rediscover her passion.

"I'm lucky to ski for a living," says Howell, now 23. "I took it for granted.

I'm ready. I'm excited.

Everyone struggles. It's not talked about. People think it's a fairy tale.

There's fairy-tale parts to it. But there's also not." Howell grew up in skiing. In Huntsville, her grandfather and her dad were community pillars and taught skiing on the modest slopes of the Hidden Valley Highlands ski area. As a girl, Howell was a ski racer and a figure skater. But as a teenager, her eyes turned towards the jump park.

She had a short stint as a ski instructor, but the fun of the park exerted a powerful pull. Howell was a natural and she was soon on the national team, just as her event, slopestyle, had been added to the Olympics roster. Howell, at 19, arrived in Sochi, Russia, as a contender for gold. She had won silver at the world championships a year earlier and bronze at X Games in Aspen a couple weeks before Sochi.

There had been a concussion, too, several months before, but Howell was poised.

She had always put intense pressure of herself to succeed. In Sochi, her performance was dominant. She qualified first and then won gold. No one had better runs. But there was unseen stress, before the finals, as the weather worsened and Howell's practice runs were off. There were tears. Her dad, Doug Howell, helped her refocus. When it counted, Howell delivered. Her gold was the fourth of four early golds for Canada at the Sochi games.

The payoff came quickly, as a sponsorship with Red Bull that had been in the works was signed - the biggest name in action sports. But trouble soon hit Howell.

"I was super overwhelmed," she says. She had a constant feeling of not wanting to let others down, and sometimes wondered what would happen if she decided to just give it all up. "I had a lot of bad days. I would call parts of it depression.

Lots of anxiety. Worry. Stress. I didn't want to get out of bed. Just lazy. Not feeling good. The opposite of me. I felt so lost."

One issue, Howell says, was the lingering effects of a concussion. She was hurt in late 2013 but recovered. But she says symptoms such as sensitivity to light lingered through 2014.

"Once I came down from the high of it all, I think my symptoms came through, or I was aware of them more. I just didn't feel like myself," she says. It contributed to what she calls her "turtle shell."

Another big problem, Howell has realized with the perspective of time, was that she didn't really have a life or identity outside of skiing. It is the same for many athletes, who dedicate themselves so wholly to their sports. For Howell, so much happened so soon, and beyond skiing there wasn't really a Dara Howell.

She invested time in cooking and reading. Howell was drawn to books of struggle and recovery, such as Brain on Fire by Susannah Cahalan, which chronicles the young reporter's experience with illness caused by a brain inflammation, and Wild by Cheryl Strayed, about a woman on a long hike to overcome personal traumas.

A key connection for Howell came in the summer of 2016. She started to see Dr.

Dana Sinclair, a sports psychologist who works with the Detroit Lions and other pro teams and athletes. Sinclair remembers the Howell she first met: "Open and full of energy and clearly wanted to get better."

The first thing Howell needed to do, Sinclair says, was to think about motivation, whether she really wanted to ski at the top level. By the time Howell connected with Sinclair, Howell knew what she wanted and where she was going. Her work toward the Olympics in Korea began in earnest.

But time away from a rapidly evolving new sport, as younger talent emerged in women's ski slopestyle, had cost Howell.

Howell's strength on big jumps was not enough to outweigh her weakness on rails. The results in competition, last winter, did not look good: On the World Cup circuit, in five events, Howell finished 16th, sixth, 22nd, 11th and 15th.

A return to the podium in Korea for Howell seemed a long way away. But even with the so-so results, Howell felt her life in skiing had come back into focus. With Sinclair, Howell learned to become sturdier. A botched rail or a flubbed jump or a string of unimpressive results did not daunt Howell.

"Tough resilient people - it's not that they're not making mistakes, it's that they stay calm and refocus," Sinclair says.

Last spring and summer, Howell redoubled her work. "I didn't put in the time," says Howell of the necessary training she had missed. Working on her rails was essential. She trained inside at Axis Freestyle Academy, north of Toronto, and leaned on the tutelage of new coaches, Geoff Lovelace and Sian Llewellyn of Agenda Freeski.

In early June, indoors at Axis, she landed a difficult rail trick, starting backwards, jumping on 90 degrees, rotating 180 degrees on the rail and jumping off, landing forward. A week later, on snow at Mammoth Mountain in California, she did a difficult variant of the trick and, coming off the rail, her legs landed wide, cut into the soft snow. She faceplanted.

In 2014, when the attention dizzied Howell, it came in part because she's never been a natural for the spotlight. As a girl in school, she was terrified of public speaking. Now, Howell has come into her own. She's having fun. In early September, she was all smiles throwing out the first pitch at a Toronto Blue Jays game.

Howell has shown promise on the slope in recent months. In the first World Cup of the season, in August in New Zealand, Howell was third in qualifying before finishing seventh. In mid-December, she was sixth at Dew Tour in Colorado. In mid-January, at Snowmass, Colo., she finished last, as she tried out new tricks but stumbled. She improved at the last World Cup before the Olympics, at Mammoth in California, where she finished 13th. Simply being back at the Olympics is no longer the goal for Howell.

"I don't want to go to the Games to say, 'Yeah, I made it through what I went through - and I'm back,' " Howell says.

"For a time, I thought I would be okay with that. I've had a hard two years. But the person I am, my goal is to go back and win a medal."

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Canadian gold medalist Dara Howell holds her medal after arriving at Toronto's Pearson Airport from the Sochi Winter Olympics in 2014.

CHRIS YOUNG/THE CANADIAN PRESS

The drive of the FUTURE
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Auto makers look into their crystal balls - and their shops - to get an idea about what's fuelling the car of 2025
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By MARK RICHARDSON
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Special to The Globe and Mail
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Friday, January 12, 2018 – Print Edition, Page D1


Most car makers agree: The next 10 years will see more change in the auto business than the past 20 - and there's been a lot of change in those last two decades.

At the turn of this century, there were no electric or semi-electric production cars; the most advanced vehicle powertrain was in the firstgeneration Toyota Prius hybrid. There was no radar available to sense other vehicles on the road and most cameras still used film. Car radios had either tape decks or CD players and texting while driving just didn't exist.

Today, vehicles are so far advanced from that it's mind-boggling. So what can we expect in just another decade?

The next target date cited by auto makers as a technical tipping point is 2025: That's when they're aiming for cars to drive themselves and for electric batteries to be more popular than internal-combustion engines.

What will it take for a vehicle in 2025 to be named the Car of the Year?

We asked four car makers to look into their crystal balls (and their vehicles already in development) to help us glimpse the future.

Stephen Carlisle

PRESIDENT, GENERAL MOTORS CANADA

"The technology that would go into the car is certainly under development now," Stephen Carlisle says. "Do we know what the car is that we'll be launching in 2025? It's a little too soon to say, but you can start to draw some assumptions."

General Motors has given itself some very public deadlines for the next few years: 20 new allelectric vehicle models by 2023 and one million electric GM vehicles on the road by 2025.

It's working on hydrogen-powered vehicles and just debuted its Silent Utility Rover Universal Superstructure (SURUS) concept, a truck platform that's quiet and autonomous. The U.S. Army is already interested because SURUS would be very difficult to detect on a battlefield.

The Car of the Year won't be an armoured personnel carrier - or at least we hope not - but Carlisle says it will probably be influenced by the SURUS's development.

"By 2025, there'll be a lot more electric vehicles in the market. But for the Car of the Year, it'll be something that breaks through, so will it be just another electric car? Maybe we're not so far from it being something like a [hydrogen] fuel-cell, but it has to be something with zero emissions.

"It'll challenge some of the physical parameters that we deal with now, where battery electric vehicles have some limitations with their batteries, with the types of vehicles we can put them in - whereas fuel cells don't."

Don Romano

PRESIDENT, HYUNDAI CANADA

"Our business plans in Canada go out 10 years, so we have a forecast of where we're going to be in 2025," Don Romano says. "We believe the direction is definitely going to be electric, but it's about what powers the electric. I would say the electric car of the future is going to be a hydrogen car."

Hyundai already has a fuel-cell-powered Tucson on the road. It's available to lease to a handful of qualified drivers who live near the Vancouver hydrogen fuelling station that's open to the public.

There's no point having others available elsewhere because there's nowhere else they can be easily refuelled. There aren't any public service stations in Canada that sell hydrogen - yet.

"If the plug-in electric car gets to the point where it can be recharged in five minutes and you can get a 1,000-kilometre range, then I think it's game over. There's your Car of the Year, and it will say Hyundai on it because we'll be leading in that technology.

But I don't see that happening."

Will it drive itself? "It's going to have incredible autonomous systems in it, but you're still going to require a driver behind the wheel," Romano says, in part because the legislative question of who's at fault in an accident will make progress slow.

And behind the wheel of the Car of the Year in 2025 - what will the cabin look like?

"There will be very few knobs. You'll talk to your car," Romano says. "In the same way Alexa or Google Home interact with us today, your car will interact the same way. It talks to you, you talk to it. It has full connectivity with your digital world - definitely by 2025."

Stephen Beatty

VICE-PRESIDENT, TOYOTA CANADA

More than just a lack of knobs and switches in the best car of 2025, Toyota predicts there will be greater use of screens to control it and enhance the drive.

"It'll start as heads-up displays on the windshield, but I think you'll see glazing become part of intelligent displays," Stephen Beatty says. "The glass on the side windows, as well - life is turning into a screen.

"We used to build a lot of vehicles with drop-down screens and DVD players, but the reality is, people in the back seat are already carrying all types of screens with them.

They've got glass all around them and it's relatively easy to turn that into display space."

Beatty is more ambitious in his prediction for cars that drive themselves, but sees limits to their practicality. "I think they'll be on the road, but they'll be operating in pretty welldefined spaces," he says, such as only permitted on controlled expressways or perhaps in downtown cores. "It will be very difficult to have the level of reliability in autonomy when you have a mixed roadway of cars with full autonomy and cars with no intelligence at all." However, as aerodynamics and safety improve, cars are becoming standardized in their shapes and features. Beatty says car makers must not lose sight of the basic appeal of the vehicles.

"By 2025, I hope to be able to pick up The Globe and Mail and read that Toyota is the car company that's still talking about enthusiastic driving," he says.

Brian Fulton

PRESIDENT, MERCEDES-BENZ CANADA

Mercedes-Benz's plan for the next decade is to move forward with CASE, which is Connected, Autonomous, Shared and Electric.

Brian Fulton believes many more drivers will share vehicles; Mercedes'S Car2Go program already has more than 14 million people signed up around the world to share ownership of Mercedes and Smart cars.

Those people will want to be instantly connected to whatever car they're getting into, and in a 2025 Mercedes, "the digital experience will be second to none," he says.

"The customer does not want to step into the vehicle and be disconnected from their phone. We want to bring it all into the interior design.

"Will there be a key fob? No. Will the dash look different? Absolutely. The car is going to be able to analyze the driver's behaviour and interpret their needs and adapt accordingly to the customer's mood. ... It will really make the driver experience very customized and very user-friendly."

It almost goes without saying that, as with those other auto makers vying for Car of the Year in 2025, Fulton believes the winner will be electric and "mostly" autonomous and it could well be powered by a hydrogen fuelcell. Mercedes has already announced that at least 25 per cent of all the cars it sells in 2025 will be either pure electric or plug-in hybrids.

And none of this is fanciful, or pie in the sky.

"We know what our product infrastructure is going to look like," he says. "We're going out 10 years and we're projecting what the product lineup will look like in all the markets, and we know the products that are coming.

"I can tell you, by the time we get there, we're going to take the whole connected car for granted. The vehicle is going to be more than just a car. It will be an extension of everything you do."

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Toyota's Fine-Comfort Ride vehicle is a concept, but its hydrogen powertrain, customized cabin and information screens available on all windows offer a glimpse at what may be on offer in 2025.

TOYOTA

Top: Mercedes-Benz's plan for the 10 years is to move forward with CASE: Connected, Autonomous, Shared and Electric. Above: GM just debuted its Silent Utility Rover Universal Superstructure concept, a truck platform that's quiet and autonomous.

TOP: MERCEDES-BENZ; ABOVE: GENERAL MOTORS

YEAR OF THE TRUCK
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GM launches an all-new Silverado, FCA debuts the next Ram 1500 and Ford brings back the Ranger
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By MARK RICHARDSON
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Special to The Globe and Mail
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Friday, January 19, 2018 – Print Edition, Page D1


DETROIT -- It's the year of the truck here at the North American International Auto Show, with the main product debuts from the Detroit Three all being pickups.

General Motors officially launched its all-new Chevrolet Silverado at the annual Detroit show, which opened to the public on Saturday and runs through Jan. 28. FCA pulled the covers off its allnew Ram 1500, while Ford debuted its mid-size Ranger truck after a seven-year absence from the North American market.

Both the Chevy and Ram are significantly lighter and have much improved aerodynamics and engine management for greater efficiency. They're also stronger.

Pickups are by far the biggest-selling segment for auto makers - and among the most profitable, as most half-tonne pickups earn around $10,000 each for their makers.

"This is arguably the most important product in the Chevrolet portfolio," said Alan Batey, president of GM North America. "Trucks are a very complicated business. No segment has a wider range of buyers, with each person using their truck for a different purpose."

Sales of pickups and SUVs have steadily risen over the past decade, while sales of passenger cars have declined.

"Certainly, the money has shifted toward SUVs and pickup trucks," said Reid Bigland, president and chief executive officer of FCA Canada. "They generally have a much higher transaction price than passenger cars, and I think if you talk to most [original equipment manufacturers], they generally command a higher margin as well.

"Fifty years ago, the pickup truck was an extension of somebody's tool kit, but today they're really doubling as the luxury family vehicle," Bigland said. "You have amenities now in pickup trucks that rival some of the most luxurious vehicles on the market."

The new Silverado will have eight different trim levels when it becomes available this September, ranging from "work truck" to full-on luxury, and will feature three new engines and a new 10-speed automatic transmission. Its highest-level versions will even include a powered tailgate that can be raised and lowered from the cabin or with the key fob.

The entire truck is as much as 204 kilograms lighter than the current generation thanks to lighter-weight materials. It now uses aluminum for the doors, tailgate and hood. Forged aluminum and available carbon-composite springs help save additional weight in its independent suspension.

Chevrolet has not gone as far as Ford's F-150 in its use of the lighter metal, however, sticking with high-strength steel for 80 per cent of the all-new frame. The cabin's safety cage uses seven different grades of steel, and fixed panels, including the bed, are all steel.

"The working end of every pickup is the bed," said Mark Reuss, GM's executive vice-president for global product development, setting up for a jab at the F-150. "It's like the head of a good hammer. It's the end that does all the work and gets all the abuse. I don't think you'd get much work done with an aluminum hammer."

The bed is larger, thanks to thinner but stronger side-sheet metal that varies from two to five millimetres in thickness.

The body is 10 per cent stiffer, but the bed is almost 18 centimetres wider - the short-box edition has 1,784 litres of volume. Lockable storage bins will be available to fit over the wheel wells inside the bed.

There are two new gasolinepowered engines - a 5.3-L and a 6.2-L V-8 - and a completely new 3.0-L inline-six turbo diesel. GM did not reveal any horsepower or torque figures for them, although Reuss said he was confident they'd be the most powerful on the market.

The larger V-8 and the diesel engine will be available with the new Hydra-Matic 10-speed transmission that GM developed jointly with Ford, as well as start-stop technology. All engines will have a "dynamic fuel management" system that can switch off one to seven cylinders when they're not needed.

The vehicle itself is slightly larger than before, with a wheelbase as much as 100 millimetres longer, and there's more space in the cabin: Crew cab models will have 113 centimetres of front legroom and 111 cm in the rear - the latter an increase of 7.6 cm. There's extra cabin storage, too, with clever optional cubbies under the seats and even behind the seat backs.

The new Ram 1500 also has a larger cabin, with more than 10 cm of additional length and double the storage capacity of before. There's so much room now that the rear seats of its crew cab can recline.

The Ram is 102 kilograms lighter, again thanks to lighterweight materials and improvements in metal technology: 98 per cent of its frame is made from high-strength steel, though the bed is stamped and not roll-formed like that of the Chevrolet.

Off-road 4x4 versions are available for almost every version, with a dedicated Rebel edition the most rugged of all.

There are two engines available for the Ram: a 3.6-L V-6 that creates 305 horsepower and 269 lb-ft of torque and a 5.7-L Hemi V-8 that's good for 395 hp and 410 lb-ft. Both now include an "eTorque" mild hybrid system, which combines a motor generator with a 48volt battery to add 90 lb-ft and 130 lb-ft of torque respectively.

Both also include stop-start technology and cylinder deactivation, shutting off as much as half the engine when the power isn't needed. An eight-speed automatic transmission is standard for all 1500s.

Inside, the Ram has full connectivity with FCA's fourthgeneration Uconnect system and all the leather luxury the maker could think of, as well as 360-degree surround cameras and an optional 12-inch central display screen on its high-end editions.

Like the Silverado, the new Ram will be available in early fall, but drivers who want the smaller Ford Ranger will have to wait longer, perhaps even until early 2019, before the midsize truck becomes available.

For Ford, it can't come soon enough.

Sales of the Ranger ended in North America seven years ago when Ford made the corporate decision to concentrate on its half-tonne F-150, which is the bestselling vehicle on the continent. Many buyers did not want the larger F-150, however, especially those who live in cities.

Chevrolet's Colorado, Toyota's Tacoma and Honda's Ridgeline all increased sales while Ford could offer no true alternative.

Production continued in the rest of the world, though - it's been the bestselling vehicle in South Africa forever - and the new North American Ranger is a development of that popular off-shore vehicle. It was designed in Australia but will be built in Michigan.

Only one powertrain is available: a 2.3-L, turbocharged, four-cylinder Ecoboost with a 10-speed transmission, similar to the one in the new Explorer, which makes 280 hp and 310 lbft of torque. It's a body-onframe five-passenger truck with a steel body and bumpers and an aluminum tailgate.

It looks generally more rugged than the version sold in the rest of the world, with an available 4x4 off-road package. And while everywhere else it's sold with a basic cabin, here it will be sold with supercab and supercrew cabins, both with four full-size doors.

The Ranger will be as easy to drive and park as a regular SUV and will feature a full range of options - to ensure both choice for the buyer and profitability for the maker. It will help fuel even more pickup truck sales when it comes to Canada, so don't expect passenger cars to make a comeback any time soon.

Associated Graphic

From top to bottom: The new Ram 1500 features double the storage space; the 2019 Chevy Silverado will have eight trim levels, from work to luxury; Ford brings the Ranger back after a seven-year absence.

TOP: BRENDAN MCDERMID/REUTERS; ABOVE PHOTOS: JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Only one powertrain is available on the new Ford Ranger: a 2.3-litre, turbocharged, four-cylinder Ecoboost.

JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

The Dodge Ram 1500 has full connectivity with FCA's fourth-generation Uconnect system and all the leather luxury the maker could think of.

BRENDAN MCDERMID/ REUTERS

Dementia and the loss of autonomy
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Having your ability to drive taken away is a big adjustment for those suffering from degenerative brain disorders, but doctors caution that with planning and some compromise, people can still maintain some normalcy beyond the onset of cognitive impairment
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By ADRIANA BARTON
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Monday, January 22, 2018 – Print Edition, Page A14


THE LONG VIEW

One of the biggest shocks for someone with dementia comes the day a doctor says, "I'm sorry, but you can't drive any more."

For older adults who depend on their cars to get around, it's the equivalent of banning a millennial from using a smartphone ever again. Driving is a ticket to freedom, a privilege of adulthood few expect to give up.

But those with Alzheimer's disease may have no choice. As it progresses, dementia impairs not only memory, but also reaction time, judgment and the ability to multitask, such as checking a blind spot while paying attention to what's ahead.

The evidence is clear: People with moderate to severe dementia should not be behind the wheel.

The loss of driving privileges might come as less of a shock if Canadians had greater awareness that cognitive changes can affect road safety, says Dr. Gary Naglie, chief of medicine at Baycrest Geriatric Health Care Centre in Toronto, and a co-investigator in CanDrive, a multiyear research project focusing on driving fitness in older adults.

"It astounds me that most of my patients have no clue that there's any relationship between driving and dementia."

An estimated 564,000 Canadians have some form of dementia, according to the Alzheimer Society of Canada. Within 15 years, that number is projected to rise to 937,000.

Yet, public education and transportation programs for seniors who can no longer drive have not kept pace with the surge in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.

Physicians, health authorities, caregivers and older adults need to co-ordinate their efforts to prepare for this reality, Naglie says. Here are five ways:

GETTING THE MESSAGE ACROSS

Canada could use more public-health campaigns along the lines of a 2010 television commercial called "Not if but when," Naglie says.

The spot, now on YouTube, shows an elderly man at the wheel as he narrowly misses a couple of pedestrians. His wife in the passenger seat gives him a concerned look, but says nothing, even after he swerves past an oncoming truck.

Next, he fails to notice a girl on a bicycle about to ride in front. The picture fades with screeching brakes and a voiceover that says, "When it comes to dementia and driving, accidents will happen. It's not if, but when."

The footage highlights the role of caregivers in preventing dementia-related accidents, says Dalhousie University's Geriatric Medicine Research Unit, which produced the spot. But it also underlines the reality that with Alzheimer's disease, driving cessation is a matter of time.

"People need to hear that message," Naglie says.

Physicians can help patients plan for how they would cope without a driver's license by discussing the possibility "before people develop cognitive impairments."

DEALING WITH DECLINE

In the early stages of cognitive impairment, patients should start planning for their eventual retirement from driving, according to the Driving and Dementia Toolkit, available online from the Regional Geriatric Program of Eastern Ontario.

Limiting one's driving to short trips to the grocery store, gym or church is not enough to reduce the potential safety risk, since most accidents occur in streets and parking lots close to home.

The guide lists warning signs of dementia-related driving impairment, such as frequently getting lost while driving, forgetting where one is going, or mixing up the brake and gas pedals.

Since people with dementia are often unaware of these changes, it may be up to others around them to point them out.

In most provinces, physicians are legally required to flag patients with medical conditions, including dementia, that may increase the risk of a vehicle collision (except in Quebec, Alberta and Nova Scotia, where reporting is at the doctor's discretion).

But unsafe drivers may fall through the cracks if they refuse to see a doctor, or if family members don't notice the warning signs.

In a 2009 survey, 28 per cent of Canadians 65 and older with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or other dementia had a valid driver's licence. Of that group of 20,000 adults, 14,600 had driven in the previous month.

Milder cognitive impairments do not necessarily interfere with driving, Naglie says.

But patients should undergo cognitive evaluations, which may include road testing, to confirm they are fit to drive.

Even if the patient gets a green light, he or she should be prepared for follow-up evaluations every six to 12 months, he says, since dementia can lead to rapid cognitive changes.

RECOGNIZING THE LOSS

Health-care professionals and family members should be aware that the loss of a driver's licence has a "tremendous emotional aspect," Naglie says.

Driving is a symbol of autonomy, a connection to one's youth.

For adults who have been on the road for six or seven decades, driving cessation can feel like "a loss of self."

Naglie describes it as a major life transition, similar to widowhood or moving into a nursing home. Physicians should discuss the transition with genuine empathy, he says, adding that some patients may need support from a psychologist or social worker to cope with the loss.

STAYING MOBILE

Without an alternative transportation plan, older adults who can no longer drive are at high risk of social isolation, depression, decreased mental and physical functioning and earlier death, research has shown.

Family members, health-care providers and social workers may need to join forces to come up with a comprehensive plan that meets the person's transportation needs.

Driving someone to a doctor's appointment isn't enough. Older adults need access to social events, fitness clubs and other activities that were part of their lives before they stopped driving, Naglie says.

A good plan draws from a range of sources - buses, taxis, volunteers from church, friends willing to lend a hand.

"You don't want to create a single burden for a child or spouse," Naglie says.

He adds that Canada needs to get more creative about helping seniors stay mobile. Models to follow might include the Independent Transportation Network, an American non-profit organization that arranges rides for older adults in two-dozen U.S. communities. Seniors open accounts to pay for rides that include personal door-to-door service, at a lower cost than cab fare.

The network relies on volunteer drivers, who provide their own vehicles and go through background checks. Volunteers earn 30 cents a mile to cover expenses, but they also build up "ride credits" for every mile they drive. These credits can be transferred to older family members living in different cities, or accumulated for the driver's own use down the road.

PLANNING AHEAD - WAY AHEAD

No one expects to get Alzheimer's disease. But by the ages of 75 to 84, more than 10 per cent will have some form of dementia. After 85, the rate increases to more than a third.

Adults in midlife can save themselves and their families future grief by planning for the possibility.

Older adults could ask themselves how they would get to the grocery store, pharmacy, swimming pool or a friend's house without a driver's licence.

House hunters nearing retirement could consider moving to communities that offer amenities within walking distance, combined with good bus, train or streetcar service.

When retirees choose to live in car-oriented communities, it can curb the amount of time they can live independently, geriatricians point out.

Another way to make peace with possible driving cessation is to write an advance directive to give to family members and a physician. The Driving and Dementia Toolkit offers a sample "letter of agreement" expressing the wish that family members take necessary steps to prevent the letter writer from driving - such as using a club to lock the steering wheel - if he or she is deemed unfit to drive.

Older adults can always hope they'll be among the lucky ones who can drive safely until the day they die (peacefully, in their sleep).

But there's no harm in planning for the reality that dementia and driving don't mix.

564,000 Estimated number of Canadians who have some form of dementia, according to the Alzheimer Society of Canada.

937,000 Amount previous number is expected to reach within 15 years.

Associated Graphic

The loss of a driver's licence can have a 'tremendous emotional aspect' for patients suffering from dementia, one physician says, as it is a symbol of autonomy.

ISTOCK

A crossover showdown
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By DAVID MILLER
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Special to The Globe and Mail
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Friday, January 19, 2018 – Print Edition, Page D4


FACEOFF SUBARU CROSSTREK VS. NISSAN QASHQAI

The subcompact crossover segment is thriving as Canadian consumers search for that extra height and clearance in their everyday ride. Since August, 2017, the segment's two biggest volume sellers are its latest all-new products: the 2018 Subaru Crosstrek and 2017 Nissan Qashqai.

Both offer up decent styling, interior comfort and familyhauling versatility, as well as a manual gearbox that aids in setting a low starting price point.

The Qashqai begins at $19,998, while the Crosstrek rings in at $23,695. That gap appears large, but when comparing apples to apples, the Qashqai AWD, with its automatic continuously variable transmission (CVT) starts at $24,198 compared with $24,995 for the Crosstrek CVT - an ideal matchup for this faceoff.

2018 Subaru Crosstrek Limited with EyeSight package $34,920 (AS TESTED)

Engine: 2.0-litre, flat-four cylinder

Transmission/drive: CVT/all-wheel

Fuel economy (litres/100 km): 8.8 city, 7.2 highway

Alternatives: Buick Encore, Chevrolet Trax, Fiat 500X, Honda HR-V, Kia Soul, Mazda CX-3, Mini Countryman, Nissan Juke, Nissan Qashqai, Toyota C-HR

LOOKS

Subaru was involved in the subcompact crossover game before it became sexy. The Crosstrek - formerly known as the XV Crosstrek - is the second vehicle to be built on Subaru's new Global Platform. It essentially keeps the same silhouette with a long and wider stance, but more importantly, an accentuated rugged feel. Key additions include black side- and wheel-arch cladding, lower rocker panels, as well as sleeker LED hawkeye headlights and chrome accents for its signature hexagonal grille found at higher trim levels.

INTERIOR

The Crosstrek's insides are a combination of style and function with neither one taking ownership. That's not a good or bad thing; it simply highlights a more conservative, but comforting interior. Its most striking feature is its leather seating with orange stitching found at the top-of-the-line trim. That orange stitching trickles down the trim line (minus the base) and is sewn on premium cloth, but when combined with dark grey leather, the Crosstrek takes on an elevated appearance. Front passengers will enjoy heated front seats and heated steering wheel, while travellers in the second row receive added legroom thanks to its wider makeup.

PERFORMANCE

A 2.0-litre flat-four propels the Crosstrek that spits out 152 horsepower (up from 148) and 145 lb-ft of torque. Not a big change, but a new addition comes in the aforementioned standard six-speed manual gearbox to go along with the optional CVT. The CVT will take the majority of sales and offer up a smooth and quiet ride with adequate power geared toward better fuel economy. But, as with most in this category, the Crosstrek can get sluggish when going up in rev range to make a pass.

The combination of its all-wheel drive, brake-based torque vectoring and responsive steering provide a balanced ride without too much correction or vibration. A new addition for 2018 is Subaru's trademark X-Mode for some offroad action. By pressing the button situated near the gearshift, the Crosstrek is able to provide a lower gear setup, changes in throttle response, hill-descent control and heightened stability.

TECHNOLOGY

Subaru focused on improving tech features by adding Apple CarPlay and Android Auto as standard equipment to its 6.5inch or upper-tier 8-inch multimedia touch screen. Even though the touch screen doesn't look as dynamic as it could be, it's responsive and easy to use. A separate yet sleek secondary screen situated above tells the time, climate control and outside temperature. On upper trims, Subaru offers up some of the best safety technology in its signature EyeSight bundle and adds Reverse Automatic Braking that warns drivers of obstacles while reversing and will automatically apply the brakes when needed.

CARGO

With its all-new design comes a wider, squared-off trunk for easier cargo entry. This will be especially helpful for golf bags and bicycles, which makes sense considering the Crosstrek is for that family with an active lifestyle.

The second row folds easily and flat for a total of 1,565 litres and 588 litres for just the trunk. In addition, there's a covered storage area under the floor.

THE VERDICT

The all-new 2018 Subaru Crosstrek improves on an already hot crossover commodity. With its rugged looks, added technology, handling prowess with standard AWD and off-road capabilities, the Crosstrek checks many boxes at a reasonable price that will resonate with both young families and first-time buyers.

2017 Nissan Qashqai SL AWD $34,283 (AS TESTED)

Engine: 2.0-litre four-cylinder

Transmission/drive: CVT/all-wheel (comes standard in FWD)

Fuel economy (litres/100 km): 9.1 city, 7.5 highway

Alternatives: Buick Encore, Chevrolet Trax, Fiat 500X, Honda HR-V, Kia Soul, Mazda CX-3, Mini Countryman, Nissan Juke, Subaru Crosstrek, Toyota C-HR

LOOKS

The Nissan Qashqai is built on the same platform as its larger Rogue sibling and it doesn't deviate too much on style. Outside of its smaller frame, the Qashqai utilizes the same V-Motion chrome grille (albeit smaller), swept-back headlights and boomerang-shaped taillights. Its body adds character body creases for a little edge before hitting its curvy hatchback rear. The top-of-the-line SL trim adds roof rails to continue that sporty touch, but falls short of the mark by not having the height or sharpness found on the Crosstrek.

INTERIOR

The Qashqai is well appointed with luxury treatments at higher trim levels. Passengers are treated to soft leather throughout, a flat-bottomed steering wheel and sunroof, but those touches whittle away as they always do in the base version. One luxury every Qashqai owner receives are heated front seats that will be a thankful pleasantry during those cold winter months. Both rows have comfortable seating minus the back middle with ample headroom, legroom and storage space, surprising for a subcompact with a sloping roofline.

PERFORMANCE

Powering the Qashqai is the 2.0litre inline-four that produces 141 hp and 147 lb-ft of torque matched to either a standard sixspeed manual transmission or optional CVT. When looking at the numbers, there's not much difference from the Crosstrek (11 less horsepower and 1 less lb-ft of torque), but that gap appears evident on initial acceleration, which dulls the overall driving experience. That disappointment is made up for at cruising speeds by a smooth and stable ride without much road noise.

On city roads, the Qashqai is in its element with the ability to manoeuvre around narrow streets, make precise turns and successfully parallel park in small spaces.

TECHNOLOGY

Two infotainment choices are offered: a base five-inch colour screen and an upgraded seveninch touch screen. Neither represents what the modern buyer is looking for in responsiveness, graphics, or ingenuity, and is something Nissan should look to improve. Outside of heated front seats and a rear-view camera, a lot of top technology features are found in upper trims including a plethora of safety technology and an Intelligent Around-View Monitor that uses four cameras to create a 360-degree view, perfect for parallel or perpendicular parking.

CARGO

The Qashqai's cargo capacity is larger than the Crosstrek with 643 L of trunk space and 1,730 L behind the first row. The only downside is that the second row doesn't fold fully flat creating an upper tilt that hopefully won't become too much of an inconvenience. A neat feature found on the mid-tier SV trim and up is a Divide-N-Hide cargo system that utilizes a flip-up panel to store and, like its title says, divide. This becomes very handy when storing electronic equipment, valuables or stressful liquid or frozen substances.

THE VERDICT

In a subcompact crossover segment that's continually gaining market share, the 2017 Nissan Qashqai provides one of the best value propositions without compromising on style, comfort, fuel economy and versatility.

When opting for the AWD option, the Qashqai loses a bit of that value and its performance comes in slightly below that of the Crosstrek. But power delivery isn't what this segment focuses on and a choice between the two or all the other options will come down to personal preference.

Associated Graphic

The Crosstrek and Qashqai both offer up decent styling, interior comfort and family-hauling versatility.

DAVID MILLER/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

With vivid vehicles, China's colour kids buck conformity - and point to lingering inequality
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For a new generation of wealthy Chinese motorists, changing their cars' hue is as easy as changing clothes. Nathan VanderKlippe looks under the hood of a social phenomenon
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By NATHAN VANDERKLIPPE
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Monday, January 22, 2018 – Print Edition, Page A10


BEIJING -- Zhaozhao bursts onto the body shop floor behind the wheel of his lime green 700-horsepower Lamborghini Aventador, its tailpipe shrieking.

The driver door scissors up and he stumbles out with a harried look as he watches two police officers walk in behind him. They demand to see his documents.

"Didn't you stop me on the street few days ago?" asks Zhaozhao, 20, his face solicitous behind oversized square wireframe glasses.

One of the officers laughs. "Did I?" "You don't remember?" Zhaozhao says.

"My car was blue then."

The police glance at his papers, nod and leave.

Then Zhaozhao explains how he became one of China's colour kids, a generation of hue-swapping car owners - many of them born into money and lusting to buck an upbringing that still often demands conformity, although their taste for extravagant vehicles also puts an exclamation mark on China's widening social inequality.

Car lovers the world round modify their rides. But in China, the biggest automotive market on Earth, changing colours is particularly popular, as people treat their personal transportation like outerwear.

Some apply new colours a few times a year. Some even switch colours to attend a party. Applying a full-body colour wrap costs $2,000 to $4,000, and can take as little as a day.

"It's just like your clothes - you want other people to notice what you're wearing, right?" said Kengo Quan, a manager with the Chinese company that makes CYS brand automotive colour wraps. Its sales figures alone show that people in China changed car colours millions of times this year.

CYS offers 198 colour options, including a hue-shifting "rainbow storm grey," mirror-finish "iridescence chrome gold" and, for those looking to match their latest gadget, the shade of each new model of iPhone.

"Why do they do it? Because it's fancy and cool," Mr. Quan says. "Black and white are very ordinary. What if I don't like ordinary things? What if I want something different, something that can reflect my uniqueness, that separates me from the masses?" Sometimes, that means going outrageous: zebra stripes on an Audi A6 and hundreds of LV logos on an A5; kitty ears on a hot pink McLaren 650S; a blue-andblack Holstein pattern on a Nissan GTR; a Land Rover in a red-and-black patchwork; a C63 AMG Mercedes-Benz in camouflage; a gold-plated Infiniti and a Tiffany-blue Maserati.

Sometimes, that means using colour to escape the law.

When Zhaozhao first took delivery of the Aventador, his second Lamborghini, it was orange - "arancio," in the manufacturer's lexicon.

He soon had reason to switch it up.

His $35,000 exhaust system, he boasts, is the loudest in Beijing, a wailing screech that generates fighter-jet volumes and tongues of flame. Neighbours aren't impressed when he screams home in the wee hours and have called police to complain.

"To get away, he came to our shop and changed the colour of his car," laughs Kang Yue, whose Top Clean operation, its logo styled after BBC's Top Gear show, is a popular destination for the city's motorheads.

"The cops didn't know what to do, because they honestly could not be sure which car belonged to him," Mr. Kang said. (Zhaozhao doesn't affix a licence plate to his car, preferring a paper version he can show police.)

This happened more than once, as Zhaozhao quickly cycled through colours: stormy black, a Tron-like scheme with glow-in-the-dark lines, prancing-horse red, baby blue and, most recently, a bright lime green called Pantone: greenery.

"Basically I change colours once a month," he said.

"I just love having different colours all the time. I get fed up quickly."

None of this is particularly sensible, he acknowledges. The application of colour wraps hurt resale value. Then there is the matter of the law: Chinese rules restrict the ability of car owners to switch colours.

Those who do risk fines or worse if police stop them.

Zhaozhao's car has been towed twice; he has lost count of the times he has been pulled over. (Asked what he does for work, he calls himself a "labourer" who drives for his father and his uncle, both wealthy.)

But the desire to stand out is not his alone. China's 1990s-born generation, who number among the country's most enthusiastic colour-swappers, value appearance and style in cars more highly than similarly aged buyers in international markets, a 2015 report by CITIC bank found. Reliability and quality are secondary considerations. Young car owners "place more importance on diversity and customization in their consumption habits," the report found.

The topic of automotive decoration has even prompted academic study in China.

A 2013 social-sciences paper by Nie Demin, a scholar at Nanchang University, called such alterations "part of human freedom, and we should be tolerant toward this kind of expression."

At the same time, the sight of a bubblegum-pink McLaren driven by a teenager is a striking symbol of China's most intractable problems. Although President Xi Jinping has declared "war on poverty," the country's rich continue to fare much better than its poor.

The top 1 per cent now command a third of the country's wealth, and the China's Gini co-efficient, a measure of inequality, actually worsened last year. In an era of "new socialism," China remains among the most unequal societies on Earth, boasting more U.S.-dollar billionaires than the United States itself. For a child born into that wealth, changing the colour of a Ferrari becomes something akin to an imperative, as a way to stand out from a crowd of friends with the same model.

Corruption in China, too, continues in plain sight despite an anti-graft campaign that has been a hallmark of Mr. Xi's tenure. Some parents of Top Clean's young customers are in business, but "some are government officials," Mr. Kang says.

At the same time, the colour kids offer a particularly vibrant window into the ways people in China continue to open, bucking political trends in the opposite direction.

"I've been in this industry for nearly 16 years, and I have totally witnessed the changes in Chinese society," said Lang Hongwei, management operations director at AFK, a Beijing paint and shine shop. When he started, "the cars were basically the 'Chinese old three' " - VW Santana, VW Jetta and Citroen Fukang - and "almost of them were old models," he said. If people altered their car, they might add a seat identical to those in the Great Hall of the People, the legislature commanded by the Chinese Communist Party.

Today, a customer might install a glossy black steering-wheel cover to match the finish of her iPhone, or add a starry-night pattern to the interior ceiling of his Rolls-Royce. Internet censors may block Instagram, but young people still trawl it for ideas.

"We are now in an era where everyone's uniqueness and personality is encouraged.

We no longer praise uniformity; we praise difference," said Ma Zheng, planning department manager at AFK.

That's not always obvious on vehicle lots: In 2014, fully 57 per cent of cars sold in China were white, according to the China Automobile Dealers Association.

Black, the preferred colour of government vehicles, was the next most popular at 10 per cent.

But Zhu Yumo, 26, a Beijing tattoo artist who has swapped colours on both of his cars - including a Lexus that now sports a mirror-face grey coat - expects the ranks of the colour kids to continue swelling.

"Because people are getting richer, the number of cars per household is increasing," he said.

"And young people are chasing after ways to demonstrate their personality.

They want to grab any possible opportunity to show off what they have."

WITH REPORTS FROM ALEXANDRA LI

Associated Graphic

Kang Yue, top, owns Top Clean, a popular destination among Beijing's motorheads, many of whom customize their cars with colour wraps. These so-called colour kids, according to a 2015 CITIC bank report, 'place more importance on diversity and customization in their consumption habits' than the generations before them. Some, such as Zhaozhao, left in the green car, swap their ride's colour a few times a year.

NATHAN VANDERKLIPPE/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

John Mann's spirit, on the stage
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A new play by Jill Daum, wife of the Spirit of the West front man, examines the effects of Alzheimer's disease
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By MARSHA LEDERMAN
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Saturday, January 20, 2018 – Print Edition, Page R4


VANCOUVER -- Few people knew that John Mann had early-onset Alzheimer's when his wife Jill Daum started writing what would become a play about a couple dealing with the disease.

Mann was a public figure: front man for the band Spirit of the West and a busy actor. They were worried about the impact of going public on his career and their lives. They kept his diagnosis quiet.

Now, as that play, Forget About Tomorrow, is about to have its world premiere, Mann's situation is well-known: revealed by Mann, Daum and the band in 2014, reported widely in the media and subject of a feature documentary, Spirit Unforgettable.

The one person who is probably not aware of what's going on now is Mann himself.

"That's the heartbreaking thing," says Daum from Victoria, during rehearsals at the Belfry Theatre. "I really don't know if he'll be able to see it."

Mann was 50 when he was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's. He continued to perform until 2016, when Spirit of the West played their final shows. But his decline has progressed into what Daum calls the "brutal" part of the disease. He is now living in a care home.

"He's agitated a lot and uncomfortable and uncertain of what's going on," she says. "He doesn't get very many moments of calm or peace or loving, and it's challenging for people to be with him."

Making art can bring light to the darkest places. And for Daum, who in the years I have observed her navigate this nightmare appears to be nothing short of saint-like, writing her first play single-handedly has been not just a respite, but a joy.

Daum is best known for being part of the Mom's the Word collective; co-creating and co-starring in the laugh-a-minute stage shows about motherhood. Forget About Tomorrow is the first play she has written on her own, and it marks the first time she and Mann - her husband of 29 years - have collaborated on a script.

She says Mann was "really jazzed" about the project and wanted to contribute. He wrote two songs for the play. "And they're the last two songs he ever wrote."

Daum began writing the scenes that would become this play during an intensive theatre workshop for women. It began as the story of an everywoman character who works in a highend children's store (Daum was working at a Vancouver children's bookstore, Kidsbooks, at the time). But the Alzheimer's content kept creeping into the scenes she was writing, which would be read out at the workshops.

"But nobody in the group knew that John had Alzheimer's," Daum explains. "So they would read the scenes out loud and they would discuss it and nobody knew and it was so therapeutic to me. It was like I got to discuss it with people without having to deal with the ramifications of it all. So it was like this little secret pocket. And they had no idea the therapy that they were providing me; they just thought they were giving me feedback on these scenes." The play begins prediagnosis, when Tom (Craig Erickson) is struggling at work and in his private life, but it's unclear why.

This is taking a toll on his marriage to Jane (Jennifer Lines), who can't understand his odd, inexplicable behaviour. It is not uncommon, Daum has learned, for marriages to struggle at this point. This was her experience, too. She was unsure what was going on: Was it a midlife crisis?

A mental-health issue? Anxiety?

"It's like, why can't you get better?" she recalls. "Can't you just kick this thing? Because we thought it was mood-related. Nobody, nobody, thought John had Alzheimer's." So imagine if at that stage, somebody new came along - someone who was infatuated with you, the wronged wife, and came on really strong? And this is going on at the same time you are learning your husband has Alzheimer's? Could this new guy be your way out of an inevitably deteriorating and devastating situation? This is the tricky question explored by the play.

"I'm hoping it creates a dilemma for the audience, too," Daum says. "What should she do?" While the play is clearly informed by Daum's own experience, this particular aspect is not.

"It's fictional fantasy, that's for sure," Daum says with a laugh, when asked about it. She adds that Mann enjoyed reading the part of the extramarital love interest, back when he could read.

He enjoyed the flirting and connection between the two characters and getting an insight into what Daum thought was attractive in a man.

He was so supportive of the project, Daum recalls, that she would often set him up with Netflix downstairs at their home while she went upstairs to work on the script. "He would always say, 'You go write - I'll be just fine here. Go write, Jilly. Go write.' " Michael Shamata, artistic director of the Belfry, was invited by Daum to see the play at a staged reading during the 2015 Vancouver Fringe Festival. The room, he recalls, swelled with emotion.

"Oh my God, I was bawling.

Everyone was bawling," Shamata says. "There wasn't enough Kleenex to go around. People were sobbing out loud. It was a remarkable afternoon."

Shamata signed on to direct.

"For me it's a gift to be allowed into their world. It's tragic but beautiful, the grace with which both of them are navigating it."

The play goes to unexpected places - and it's funny, which might also be unexpected in a play about the effects of Alzheimer's on a family.

The development of Forget About Tomorrow was supported by Vancouver's Arts Club Theatre Company. As part of that process, a staged reading took place at ReACT: New Plays in Progress in 2015. Mann was in the audience.

"It was actually really beautiful," Daum says. "He stood up.

He stood up and applauded."

Since then, his cognitive abilities have declined. His condition is such that Daum can't bring him to the world premiere in Victoria and it's unclear if he'll be able to sit through the show when it opens at the Arts Club in Vancouver in March. She's thinking about bringing him to watch it from the booth or the back of the house, where he can be taken out easily if things don't go well. "But I really don't know how much he would be able to comprehend," she says.

It's a grim situation that sometimes makes its way into the rehearsal hall.

"Certainly, there are times when the emotion overtakes the actors and there's no denying that John is in the room with us in spirit," Shamata says. "Everyone's very, very respectful of where this play started and what it means to Jill. There's a sadness around it. Because it just gets worse, John's situation. So for hours and hours, we just work like we would work on any play, and then, once in a while, there's a wave of that that hits."

One might question the healing value of immersing oneself in a play about Alzheimer's when one's real life is being consumed by the disease on the home front, but Daum says working on the play has had a very positive effect.

"There's something about adversity: If you can see any point to it, that it can help you.

And it's such a pointless, horrible disease. So if the point was we could tell this story and do what stories do for people with it, then that helped us. It has helped us so much," she says. "And now I'm just really hoping it helps somebody else too."

Forget About Tomorrow is at the Belfry Theatre in Victoria Jan. 23 to Feb. 18 (belfry.bc.ca) and at the Arts Club's BMO Theatre Centre in Vancouver March 1 to 25 (artsclub.com).

Associated Graphic

Jill Daum embraces her husband, John Mann. Mann, a well-known Canadian musician and actor, was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's at the age of 50.

LISA MACINTOSH

Newfoundland's only midwife tasked with a special delivery
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By JESSICA LEEDER
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Monday, January 22, 2018 – Print Edition, Page A1


ST. JOHN'S -- Crisp and unmarked behind its framed glass, the new registration certificate on Gisela Becker's office wall already has historic status.

The document, awarded earlier this year, makes Ms. Becker Newfoundland and Labrador's first registered midwife. She is also currently the province's only midwife.

Her job, though, will not involve catching any babies.

The province has hired Ms. Becker to help bring midwifery back to Newfoundland and Labrador, from which, despite a rich historical presence, midwives have been absent for more than half a century. The same is true for much of Atlantic Canada.

Until earlier this year, only Nova Scotia offered midwifery care to expectant mothers, although services are limited and overstretched, with a total of nine midwives working at capacity in just three areas of the province. New Brunswick's first midwife-delivered baby arrived in November. Three midwives now offer their services out of Fredericton (recruitment efforts are under way for a fourth).

Newfoundland and Labrador is one of the last jurisdictions in Canada to legalize midwifery, which involves providing prenatal, postnatal and primary care during low-risk births at home and in hospitals.

Prince Edward Island and Yukon are the only remaining governments in Canada that do not allow it.

In the provinces where midwifery is well established - some have been funding it for more than 20 years - the profession has made great strides. In British Columbia, nearly a quarter of the babies born in 2015-2016 were delivered by a midwife; in Ontario, more than 20,000 babies, or 15 per cent of newborns, were caught by midwives during the same time period. In all, midwives delivered 10 per cent of the babies born in Canada in 2015-2016, according to statistics collected by the Canadian Association of Midwives.

Katrina Kilroy, president of the Canadian Association of Midwives, said national and international data increasingly support the provision of midwifery in small and rural places, which can realize health-care cost savings and better patient outcomes. "In the provinces and territories where midwifery has been supported and spread to rural and remote areas ... the outcomes have been excellent," Ms. Kilroy said. "And it may turn out that it's easier to keep a midwife in a small community than it is a doctor."

Midwives are trained to provide complete care during pregnancy, and can order diagnostic tests and conduct routine blood work, and are often available 24 hours a day. While they oversee some low-risk births in private homes, most have hospital privileges and do deliveries there as well, including for mothers who elect to have epidurals (although midwives do not administer them). Midwives consult with obstetricians and pediatric specialists when required; in busy healthcare systems, their case load of low-risk births allows obstetricians, who are trained surgical specialists, to focus more on high-risk and complicated cases. It is common for midwives to care for mothers and their babies up to six weeks after delivery.

In Newfoundland and Labrador, it will be months before midwives are seeing patients. The reason for this is the big gap between regulating midwifery and putting actual midwives on the ground, said Ms. Becker, who has held several professional leadership positions, including a term as president of the Canadian Association of Midwives. She trained in Germany and has worked and taught across Canada, including in Alberta, Nunavut, Quebec and the Northwest Territories.

It is Ms. Becker's job to figure out how to get the system up and running by the fall of 2018, which the government has set as its soft target.

"What do we need to do? Yes, hire a bunch of midwives and get going," she said, adding it is crucial to lay the groundwork for a receptive climate and a health-care system designed to include midwives. That includes educating other practitioners, including nurses and doctors, about the care midwives are qualified to provide, which ranges from helping women make informed choices about how they want to give birth to delivering primary care for mothers and babies until six weeks postpartum.

"When people have a good sense of what midwives do, they often start feeling more comfortable," Ms. Becker said.

"In working relationships, it's about building trust. This is just all very much at the beginning." Midwifery's roots in the province run as deep as the 1890s, according to a chronology published by the College of Midwives of Newfoundland and Labrador. A licensing regime was established in the 1920s, but when the province joined Canada in 1949, the landscape of health care began to shift; midwifery services were not offered in the rest of Canada. When hospital visits - and delivering babies there - became free under health insurance, interest in hiring midwives dwindled.

By the 1980s, a group of dedicated organizers was lobbying for the return of regulated midwifery, said Ann Noseworthy, president of the Association of Midwives of Newfoundland and Labrador.

"Newfoundland, being socially conservative ... it takes a little while for us to take on new ideas," said Ms. Noseworthy, who teaches in the School of Nursing at Memorial University in St. John's. "But of course, midwifery is not a new idea here."

The exception to this is a pair of remote communities in northern Newfoundland and Labrador: St. Anthony and Goose Bay. Until last year, the health authority there allowed a small number of nurses with midwifery training, many of whom immigrated from Britain, to double as midwives when required.

"We had to wear two hats - you might be working on the pediatric floor as a nurse, but if someone came in in labour, you'd hand your duties as an RN to someone else and go do your midwifery bit," said Sylvia Patey, who arrived from Britain in 1994 to work in St. Anthony and stayed on.

Ms. Patey retired from clinical practice in 2006, but has continued to advocate for fully regulated midwifery. Her colleagues in the community practised right up until last year, when the new legislation was passed that recognized midwifery as a regulated health profession.

Midwives must have a certificate of registration from the province. The northern nurse-midwives, now technically unregistered, were unintended casualties of the fledgling system.

"One day you'd be at work as a midwife, and tomorrow when you came in you weren't able to do it," Ms. Patey said.

"You could attend a woman in labour as a nurse, but you couldn't deliver the baby or make decisions based on your training as a midwife."

While Ms. Becker and the province's health officials figure out how to lay the groundwork for the province-wide system, the northern nurse-midwives will remain in limbo, which Ms. Patey said her friends find demoralizing. "Your profession is a passion," she said. "It was taken away overnight: here today, gone tomorrow."

Health officials have not yet decided how to handle the northern nurse-midwives' situation.

Across Canada, midwives have been hoping their trade would one day make its way back to Newfoundland and Labrador and perhaps bring them with it.

Inquiries from midwives who want to practice there have been arriving on Ms. Becker's desk in a steady stream, including from those who grew up in the province and were forced to choose between staying or pursuing their passion.

A few years ago, Stephanie Simon chose her passion. When she left to go to midwifery school in Sudbury, Ont., she knew her move was likely permanent.

"Stepping into a career of midwifery meant I was taking a chance of not coming back home after I finished my degree," she said.

Ms. Simon, whose father was delivered by a midwife, graduated a year and a half ago and joined a rural practice in Halliburton, Ont. But her dream is to practice midwifery at home. "I was very hopeful that midwifery would eventually return to Newfoundland, and there would be options for working, teaching or being somehow involved," she said.

"Because there are no midwives in Newfoundland right now, people don't know there is a different approach out there."

Associated Graphic

As Newfoundland and Labrador's first registered midwife, Gisela Becker - in St. John's last month - is tasked with launching the province's midwifery system by the fall, which the government has set as a soft target.

PAUL DALY/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Correction

A Monday news story on Newfoundland's only midwife incorrectly said until earlier this year, only Nova Scotia offered midwifery care. In fact, this referred to earlier in 2017.

Die job
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Margareta Magnusson's new book aims to help others make a tidy leap into the afterlife. Gayle MacDonald speaks to the author about the benefits of death cleaning
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By GAYLE MACDONALD
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Saturday, January 20, 2018 – Print Edition, Page P19


Most people fear death. Or as Leonard Cohen once put it: "There's so little that you can do about [death]... We've got to live our lives as if they're not going to end immediately. So we have to live under those - some might call them - illusions."

Few of us plan for it - except to draw up a will. And God forbid we talk about it.

Not so the pragmatic Swede Margareta Magnusson, who sees her inevitable demise - which, at the age of 83, is creeping ever near - as a natural rite of passage. For years, she's been getting her house in order before she heads off to the "Great Beyond!", as she enthusiastically puts it. She's also written a book to help others make a tidy leap into the afterlife, called The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning: How to Free Yourself and Your Family from a Lifetime of Clutter.

"I have death cleaned so many times for others, I'll be damned if someone else has to death clean after me," says Magnusson, a feisty mother of five (grandmother of eight) who recently downsized from a roomy house on Sweden's west coast to an efficient, twobedroom Stockholm apartment after her husband of 48 years passed away. "Some people can't wrap their heads around death ... and they leave a mess after them.

Did they think they were immortal?" she asks in her 110-page book.

"The only thing we know for sure is that we will die one day."

In Sweden - where citizens are known for their organization and practicality - death cleaning, or dostadning, is a tradition. "Even our ancestors, the Vikings, used to bury their relatives with many objects together with their body," she writes. "Can you imagine that scenario today? With all the skrap (junk) people have now, they would have to be buried in Olympic-sized swimming pools. There are so many serious matters in the world. Having too many things should not be one of them."

Magnusson's book taps into the current minimalist craze championed by Japanese declutter queen Marie Kondo, whose books, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up and Spark Joy, have sold more than six million copies. But where the KonMari method is aimed at young professionals who want to improve their own personal space, Magnusson's book is geared to baby boomers cleaning up their personal space to the benefit of others. Kondo's philosophy is to only keep objects that "spark joy." Magnusson's is get rid of anything "your eyes do not like."

Despite the sobering tone of the title, Magnusson's book is a gentle, almost soothing read. She peppers the text with anecdotes about her travels with her husband and memories of her children. We get a sense of her full life. But she warns death cleaning comes with sad moments. After all, as you move from room to room, through desks and drawers, your life is laid starkly bare. But mostly, death cleaning is therapeutic, she insists. "The more I focused on my cleaning, the braver I have become," she writes. "I often ask, 'Will anyone I know be happier if I save this?' If after a moment of reflection I can honestly answer no, then it goes... [But] I have had a moment to reflect on the event or feeling - good or bad - and to know that it has been a part of my story and my life."

Over the years, Magnusson has become something of a deathcleaning aficionado. She started with her parents' home, then her in-laws' house, and, finally, her own. The key, she says, is taking your time [so you don't get stressed]. "I took a year," she says, "and I spent a week on each room, and then took a well-deserved break. The ideal age to start is 65, but you can begin anytime. The sooner the better."

Her death-cleaning credo is simple: Size matters, so start with the large items in your home, and finish with the small. Every item can be divided into categories: furniture, clothes, books, linen, for example. With books, she only kept what she hasn't read or keeps returning to. Kitchen stuff? She kept one set of dishes to match the number of guests at her table, plus favourite serving pieces. "Whatever you do, don't start with photographs or personal papers," she warns. "If you start with them you will definitely get stuck down memory lane and may never get around to anything else." (Magnusson eventually downloaded all her favourite family photos onto her computer and gave each of her children a USB memory stick for Christmas).

As the population continues to age - and more baby boomers downsize - Russell Belk, a professor of marketing at Toronto's Schulich School of Business at York University, says many people have naturally begun the process of death cleaning without even realizing it. "The minimalist aesthetic is everywhere. It's the ideal we see in advertising and home decor magazines. The concept of the family home - passed on through generations - is becoming a thing of the past. As people get older, it's a time to reflect and get your life in order.

And, yes, to be sensitive to one's children who will have to go through all your possession and even things on line. The world is faster paced, our kids are more mobile, and they're also less receptive to keeping all our old things."

Magnusson found her children - who are far-flung - wanted very little. The odd piece of furniture or heirloom. Some jewellery. A concise file of letters, written by Magnuson to her mother-in-law, that details the family history. "I have collected many things over the years, and it gives me such joy to go through them all. Sorting through everything is sad sometimes, too, but I really do not want to give my beloved children and their families too much trouble with my stuff after I'm gone." Her death-cleaning philosophy? If you're capable, do it yourself. Save your kids the hassle.

Toronto author Plum Johnson is from an entirely different camp.

She decided long ago her three grown kids were going to have to deal with all the stuff in the family home. "My children know I'm leaving them the entire mess," says Johnson, whose 2004 memoir, They Left Us Everything, chronicles the experience of cleaning out her parent's half-century old home in Oakville, Ont. "They can just back a truck up to the door, and send it all to the garbage. And that's fine. I'll be dead so it won't matter."

Despite the months it took Johnson and her three brothers to sort through her parents piles (it was a 23-room home), she loved every moment of it. "I was fascinated by what I found. I also had the luxury - that many people don't - of the time and help. But I learned so many things about my parents that I didn't know, including some things I may not have wanted to know. But the sorting-through gave me a whole different perspective.

"I understand the value of selfediting, but my kids will find things - pieces of paper stuck in books, notes I've received, my own musings. Some of it might shock them, but I don't care, at the end of it they'll know me better."

Magnusson discovered a thing or two about her own parents after cleaning out their house. Her mom stashed cartons of smokes in the linen closet; her dad had a large piece of arsenic in his desk drawer, likely a holdover from when the Swedes feared invasion during the Second World War. She believes her kids know enough about her. And she's content to leave this world with a bit of mystery intact.

"If I'm remembered for anything, I hope they remember me as someone they have laughed a lot with," she says on the phone. "And as someone who did not leave a mountain of garbage behind."

The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning: How to free yourself and your family from a lifetime of clutter BY MARGARETA MAGNUSSON SCRIBNER, 128 PAGES, $24.99

Associated Graphic

GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO

Police broaden missing men investigation
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Home of Toronto man facing two first-degree murder charges searched as well as other properties in city and rural Ontario
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By TU THANH HA, ANNIE BURNS-PIEPER, JILL MAHONEY, JOE FRIESEN, RICK CASH
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Saturday, January 20, 2018 – Print Edition, Page A12


As a man accused of murdering two gay men made his first court appearance, police forensic investigators intensified their examination of several properties in Toronto and rural Ontario on Friday, bringing in sniffing dogs, towing vehicles and seizing at least one computer.

Bruce McArthur, 66, made a brief appearance in the Ontario Court on Friday morning to face two charges of first-degree murder in the deaths of Selim Esen and Andrew Kinsman. Both men went missing last year from the area around Church and Wellesley streets in Toronto, igniting fears in the LGBTQ community that a predator was targeting gay men.

Mr. McArthur was remanded in custody and will appear again, by video, on Feb. 14.

Police have said they have evidence that there are more victims. Although Toronto police on Thursday would not use the term "serial killer," the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation defines it as someone who unlawfully kills at least two people in separate events.

The arrest came weeks after police issued public reassurances that no evidence indicated the men were dead, connected to other missing cases or that a serial killer was at work.

Investigators in white protective suits continue to search Mr. McArthur's home on the 19th floor of an apartment building in Toronto's Thorncliffe Park neighbourhood. The Globe and Mail also confirmed a search is under way at a two-storey home on Conlins Road in the Toronto suburb of Scarborough. The home is owned by Brendan and Patricia Horan. According to property records, Brendan Horan also owns the Madoc, Ont., property that police are searching in connection with Mr. McArthur's case.

Multiple neighbours said Roger Horan, believed to be Brendan Horan's brother, lives in the Scarborough home. A phone number in the name of R. Horan that was listed for that house has been disconnected.

The Globe has been unable to reach Roger or Brendan Horan, who one neighbour said does not live in Canada.

Toronto Police said Roger Horan has not been reported missing, and would not comment on whether he is connected to the investigation.

As with Mr. McArthur, Roger Horan works as a landscaper. He specializes in rock gardens and is advertised as a speaker at an event in March at the Toronto Botanical Garden.

Neighbours said they saw Mr. McArthur visit the home, which was recently renovated, including extensive landscaping in the backyard, before being put up for sale.

The property at 227 Conlins Rd. sold for just over $1-million on Dec. 12, but the sale does not close until late February. The selling price was more than $100,000 below the asking price of $1.15-million.

Two police cruisers came to the house on Thursday at midday, shortly after Mr. McArthur was arrested, and remained there until forensic vans and a canine unit showed up on Friday.

A police dog was taken into the home and a truck was towed from the front driveway.

Other officers also removed items, including a computer, from Mr. McArthur's Thorncliffe Park apartment. Police have said Mr. McArthur and his two alleged victims used online dating sites.

A woman who lived two doors down from Mr. McArthur, and declined to give her name because she was unsettled by the case, said he used to live in the two-bedroom unit with a male partner and described them both as friendly. She had not seen the partner in several weeks. On Friday, police said a man seen in multiple photos on Mr. McArthur's Facebook page had not been reported missing, and his employer told media outlets he was alive. The Globe has been unable to reach the man and has chosen not to name him.

The neighbour said she had recently become irritated by Mr. McArthur loudly taking items to the garbage chute late at night.

She relayed the activity to police officers when they interviewed her on Thursday night.

Homicide detectives have stated they are searching four Toronto properties and one in Madoc that are associated with Mr. McArthur.

The rural Madoc home, which features several trailers and a large garage, was bought by Brendan Horan in June, 2017.

Roger Horan was seen there regularly.

Neighbour Ivan Vallieres said he met Roger Horan after he moved into the house last summer. He said Roger shuttled between Madoc and Toronto because he was delivering flowers, doing landscaping jobs and had exotic birds at the country house.

"He told me he had 150 exotic birds in his garage that needed to be fed every couple of days," Mr. Vallieres said.

He said Mr. McArthur was also seen at the Madoc property two or three times.

Mr. Vallieres and his wife, Phyllis, said they last saw Roger a few weeks ago. Then police showed up on Thursday night.

"We knew something was going on when we saw the police cars," Ms. Vallieres said.

"We were going to go and try to help, to see what all the trouble was, but they have the place all gated off."

Mr. McArthur's Facebook page, which featured extensive photo albums of vacations, family celebrations and him working as a mall Santa Claus, was taken down on Friday, along with his dating profile. On Silver Daddies, an online dating site for older gay men, Mr. McArthur had described himself as a bit shy, but romantic. He said he was looking to chat with some "nice looking" guys and maybe make some new friends.

Andrew Kinsman's sisters held a press conference on Friday afternoon. They said that the loss of their brother had torn a hole in their lives, but they were relieved, after a six-month search, to have an explanation for his disappearance.

Mr. Kinsman, 49, went missing last June. His disappearance mobilized members of the city's Gay Village, who created social media accounts to draw attention to the disappearances of numerous gay men over the past decade.

In December, police launched an internal review into how they handled the cases. An earlier police task force, Project Houston, had looked into the disappearances of three village regulars, Abdulbasir Faizi, Skandaraj Navaratnam and Majeed Kayhan, between 2010 and 2012. It's not known if those cases are connected to this investigation.

On Thursday morning, Mr. Kinsman's sister said she received a brief phone call from a Toronto police detective informing her of an arrest in connection with her brother's death.

Patricia Kinsman said she asked only one question: Had they found his body? The answer was no. Ms. Kinsman said she will urge police to keep searching for his remains in the hope the family will one day be able to lay their brother to rest.

None of Mr. Kinsman's sisters had heard of Mr. McArthur, nor did they know of any relationship between the two men. They said they still have many questions, and will attend as much of an eventual trial as possible.

Patricia Kinsman said she was satisfied with the police investigation, and was not frustrated that they initially said there was no evidence to suggest a serial killer was at work.

"I think seven months is pretty quick," Ms. Kinsman said.

"There were no clues. He just didn't come home."

Greg Downer, a friend of Mr. Kinsman's, said he had thought no one would ever know how or why Mr. Kinsman disappeared.

Now, the community may face difficult revelations.

"I was fearful of this outcome, and now I'm fearful of the gruesome details," Mr. Downer said.

"I expect this is going to be deeper and darker than we expected."

Mr. McArthur has a criminal record. In 2003, he was convicted of assault causing bodily harm.

The Globe contacted Mr. McArthur's former wife and some of his previous in-laws, who either hung up or refused to comment.

With reports from Molly Hayes, Patrick White and Jesse Winter

Associated Graphic

A police forensic unit works in the hallway outside Bruce McArthur's home in Thorncliffe Park, Toronto, on Friday.

CHRISTOPHER KATSAROV/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Andrew Kinsman

A Toronto police dog is escorted from a home in Scarborough on Friday, which is connected to the suspect in the alleged murders of two men.

J.P. MOCZULSKI/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Selim Esen

U.S. corporate tax cuts blunt Canada's competitive edge amid trade worries
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By ERIC ATKINS, DAVID PARKINSON
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Wednesday, January 17, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B1


A big drop in the U.S. corporate tax rate along with growing worries about cross-border trade threaten to undermine Canada's competitiveness.

The United States slashed its corporate tax rate in December to 21 per cent from 35 per cent as part of reforms that include repealing the alternative minimum tax and lower income taxes for some people.

This compares with Canada's federal tax rate of about 15 per cent, one of the lowest in the developed world. However, once state and provincial taxes are included, the corporate tax rates in both countries are about 26 or 27 per cent.

The U.S. tax reduction undercuts Canada's tax advantage amid growing doubts about the future of the North American free-trade agreement and tarifffree access to the U.S. market, said Douglas Porter, chief economist at Bank of Montreal.

"At least on the surface, we've gone from having significantly lower tax corporate rates than the U.S. to having the same if not a little bit higher than the U.S. So one big potential attraction of investing in Canada has essentially been removed with a stroke of a pen," Mr. Porter said.

"If [the U.S. tax cut] happened in isolation I would not be overly concerned about it. But the fact that it comes at a time when the core of our trading relationship with the U.S. is at question is what really concerns me," Mr. Porter said.

To be sure, the U.S. tax cut is not expected to spur a flood of Canadian businesses across the border, given the narrowness of the tax difference and the high costs of moving a company. Also, Mr. Porter noted, Canada has other key advantages that include publicly funded health care, a more open immigration system that helps employers fill job openings, and a more sound fiscal picture.

Kevin Milligan, an economics professor at the University of British Columbia, said he doubts Canada will suffer any immediate hit from the U.S. tax cut. "But I think we should take note. We've lost a tax advantage that we've had over the past 20 years. So that's not good. But there are other sources of advantage."

He noted that with the U.S. cuts, the corporate tax rates in the two countries are now "pretty much at the same level." But he argues against Canadian lawmakers making their own tax cuts in an attempt to restore Canada's upper hand.

"If the United States was clearly below us, I'd be quite worried that there would be a growing incentive to shift profits out of Canada," he says. "But that's where we are. We're about tied."

Gavin Semple, chairman of Reginabased farm-equipment maker Brandt Group, isn't as sure. He said the tax cut makes the United States an even more attractive market in which to operate.

In December, privately held Brandt announced the purchase of a 200,000square-foot plant in Illinois. Since then, the company has been hiring workers and retooling the factory to produce crop-handling machines for growers in the U.S. grain belt.

With all levels of governments combined, Canada and the United States have comparable corporate tax rates, Mr. Semple said. But at the state and local levels, there are tax credits and rebates that are unmatched in Canada, he said.

For instance, some states have no corporate taxes, while others, including Illinois, give employers a tax credit worth 5 per cent of their total payroll. This reduces Brandt's state tax rate to 4.5 per cent from 9.5 per cent.

Mr. Semple, speaking from Florida, said the Canadian government's efforts to reform the tax system appear to be adding to the burdens faced by businesses.

"There is no doubt in my mind if we continue on the road we are on in Canada, wealth will move, capital will move from Canada to the United States," he said. "We see the U.S. going in one direction, namely tax reductions and reduced regulations, improved business environment to attract business and in Canada the federal government is going in the opposite direction, increasing taxes and making it more difficult."

Dennis Darby, chief executive officer of Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters, said companies that make, process and exports goods are most affected by the U.S. changes. That's because they compete for investments and market share with U.S. counterparts.

"You can't underestimate the impact of this kind of change," Mr. Darby said.

Spending on manufacturing plants and equipment has fallen by 40 per cent since 2008, and risen by a similar amount in the United States in the same period, Mr. Darby said.

The industry group, which represents more than 10,000 companies, has asked the Canadian government to reduce the combined federal and provincial tax rates to 20 per cent, from about 27 per cent currently.

"Companies that are domestic and foreign owned have not been investing.

That's worrisome in itself," Mr. Darby said.

But Ray Simmons, president of Torontobased industrial caster and wheel manufacturer Darcor Ltd., argues that the U.S. tax cut could actually be good news for Canadian manufacturing exporters - especially those with high exposure to the U.S. market.

"It may, in fact, benefit us, if it helps strengthen the U.S. economy," Mr. Simmons said. "We do about 65 per cent of our business in the U.S.

If this creates an investment atmosphere down there, and manufacturers are growing, and growing their investment in capital equipment - that's going to expand our market down there. So there may actually be more of a silver lining in it. ... I'm excited about that possibility," he said.

Canada has reduced its federal general corporate tax rate nine times this century - cutting it almost in half in the process, from 28 per cent in 2000 to 15 per cent today. Yet critics say that the cuts have done little, if anything, to stimulate corporate investment in this country.

Business investment, as a share of gross domestic product, has been essentially flat in that time, and is among the lowest in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development.

David Macdonald, an economist at Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, said recent history shows there is little connection between corporate tax cuts and capital investments.

The Ottawa-based think tank points to data that shows corporate taxation and business spending on machinery and equipment have remained at the same respective levels since the mid-2000s.

During the same period, after-tax profits have risen by 50 per cent.

"Lower taxes lead to higher profits, but those profits have not found their way into machinery and equipment," Mr. Macdonald said.

Instead, he said, businesses have invested in commercial real estate, the stock market and corporate acquisitions.

"I suppose businesses are just like regular Canadians that don't want to pay tax.

They'd like to keep all the money they make," said Mr. Macdonald.

"The issue unfortunately for government is that governments provide services that Canadians use and make Canada an attractive destination for business and Canadians to live, like health care and infrastructure and so on.

So while nobody wants to pay taxes, everybody benefits from taxes."

One possible corporate tax reform that could spur investment, UBC's Mr. Milligan suggests, would be to allow businesses to immediately expense their investments in capital assets, rather than depreciate them gradually over multiple years of tax bills.

This, he argues, would increase the incentive for companies to invest, by rewarding them with immediate tax relief.

"That's the kind of thing that you could imagine a Canadian government looking at, to try to focus our tax efforts on what we want - which is productive investments. If you just cut the rates, you're rewarding past investment, you're rewarding economic rents, you're rewarding monopoly profits ... If you focus on the depreciation angle, you focus our tax efforts where we want them," he said.

"The bigger picture is that it's clear we have lost a tax advantage that we had; we're now tied. We want to think about ways to ensure that businesses want to start and grow and invest in Canada."

Mothers take harm reduction into their hands
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As the Public Health Agency of Canada reports on the devastating impact the opioid crisis is having on Canadian families, mothers and other activists are running needle exchanges in the hopes of preventing more tragedy, Lindsay Jones writes
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By LINDSAY JONES
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Wednesday, January 17, 2018 – Print Edition, Page A8


When Tina Kavanagh's son David got out of rehab last September, she got a knot in her stomach.

"I was really worried knowing he was out because fentanyl was introduced to Cambridge [Ont.] six months prior to him getting out of rehab," she said.

She suppressed the urge to warn her 24-year-old about the potentially lethal opioid and instead listened to his cheerful chatter about the future.

"He was on cloud nine," said Ms. Kavanagh, who grew up on Newfoundland's Bell Island but now lives in Mississauga, Ont. "It was almost too good to be true when I look back on it. He said, 'Mom, when are we going to go to Newfoundland for a trip, for a holiday? I'm back to work, Mom. I've still got my job!"

David never made it back to Newfoundland.

On Oct. 12, two weeks after he left a halfway house in Kitchener, Ms. Kavanagh got the call. David had received his first paycheque - from a job mixing chemicals to make vinyl - and was living with his cousin in Cambridge.

At 6:15 in the morning, his cousin's wife went to wake him for work and found his lifeless body on the floor, a syringe in his hand.

The toxicology report is not yet complete, but Ms. Kavanagh believes David injected heroin laced with fentanyl, a prescription painkiller 100 times more potent than morphine.

A recent Public Health Agency of Canada report called the country's opioid crisis "serious and growing" and said it's devastating families and communities nationwide. The number of opioid-related deaths was expected to hit at least 4,000 by the end of last year. In November, 2016, the federal government launched an action plan to address the far-reaching crisis with the provinces and territories.

So far-reaching, in fact, that it has found the town of Wabana on Bell Island - Ms. Kavanagh's hometown - where a group of mothers of intravenous drug users are taking the problem into their own hands, stocking an RV with clean needles and information on harm reduction, recovery options, rehab programs and drug counselling.

In the excruciating days after David's death, Ms. Kavanagh connected with the women on the island, which is about a 40-minute ferry and car ride from St. John's.

One of them was Susan Boone, who had come up with the idea of establishing a needle exchange in Wabana after her 24-year-old daughter, Nicole, almost died of an accidental overdose a year and a half ago.

"Harm reduction is paramount. If they're sick and dying of disease, they're never going to get better," said Ms. Boone, who is caring for Nicole's three young daughters.

The problem was space. The mothers were in a desperate search for somewhere to house a needle exchange after a verbal agreement to use town property fell through. "At this time, we do not have sufficient space to offer your group what is required for your program," said the letter from Tourism Bell Island, which was using the property.

As a stopgap, Sheila Lahey, whose son is also a drug user, has been running a needle exchange out of her home with support from the province's Safe Works Access Program and from Brian Rees, a local man who has worked as a harm reduction activist in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside. Mr. Rees voluntarily makes the four-hour return journey to exchange the dirty needles for clean ones. Mrs. Lahey said about 12 people use the service daily. In a three-month period, more than 12,000 needles were collected and disposed of in Wabana, which has a population of about 2,500.

"I was shocked at how much they're going through - how really bad this situation is," said Mrs. Lahey, whose 33-year-old son went from being a full-time electrician to a social assistance recipient with debts stemming from a cocaine habit. "Before this, one needle would be shared between four and five people. This was a common thing - like an everyday thing."

When Ms. Kavanagh heard about their plight, she reached out, at first offering to help pay for rental space.

But when that didn't pan out she bought an RV for $1,200, using her son's life insurance money, to be used as a needle exchange. She christened it "In Good Hands."

"Everybody hopefully will be in good hands because [David is] going to be watching over them, right," she said.

Wabana Mayor Gary Gosine, who lost his 35-year-old nephew in February to an overdose, is also leading grassroots harm-reduction efforts and addiction support. About 20 people, including parents and drug users, regularly attend the education meetings he has organized.

"It's a big problem," Mr. Gosine said. "I don't think there are a lot of users in this community, but the people who are using are fully addicted."

He wants the province to offer more addiction support on the island.

"There's no one here helping the individual. The addiction problem in our province is overwhelming, and I don't think they're doing anything on our island," Mr. Gosine said.

Bell Island and Wabana fall under the jurisdiction of Eastern Health, the largest health authority in the province. Currently, a mental health and addictions counsellor is available on Bell Island once a week. Families can get free naloxone opioid overdose reversal kits through the public health nurse.

But drugs used to treat opioid addiction, such as methadone or Suboxone, are not available on the island.

However, Eastern Health says it's exploring how to make them more accessible in the area.

While more counselling and support is available off the island in Torbay and St. John's, residents say the ferry is sometimes unreliable, and some people don't have access to a vehicle.

In a statement, Eastern Health said it is working with a local support group to develop a drug prevention and promotion plan for the public and the local school.

Meanwhile, the mothers of Wabana have trained in the use of naloxone and continue to advocate for harm reduction - despite pushback from some in the community who suggest the RV is just a spot to do drugs.

"It all comes back to mothers," Mrs. Lahey said. "If we don't try to do something to help, they don't get any help. These are young people that put themselves in this situation, yes, but now it's out of control. My son cannot function if he doesn't have some form of opiate in his system. He can't move.

"To see your child's life crumble before your eyes and be absolutely helpless - ... [The needle exchange] at least gives us parents hope that our children can stay alive until they come to the realization that this is not the life they want and will get the help."

Ms. Kavanagh, meanwhile, is spending her days keeping David's memory alive amid a tide of grief. She still can't bring herself to wear the heart-shaped silver locket that contains some of David's ashes. But every day she cracks the books, staying on track to complete a McMaster University addiction studies program and become a counsellor - something David also wanted to do.

"As long as I keep myself busy with keeping David's memory going, I'm okay," she said. "I just want to keep his memory alive."

Associated Graphic

Tina Kavanagh, right, and her sister Michelle Kavanagh look through their inventory of syringes, swabs and other supplies under photos of Tina's deceased son, David, in the In Good Hands RV.

PHOTOS BY DARREN CALABRESE/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Michelle Kavanagh holds her necklace, which contains some of her nephew David's ashes, as she sits in the RV her sister purchased to turn into a mobile needle-exchange program in Wabana on Bell Island, Nfld., last month.

Tina Kavanagh purchased an RV for $1,200 to turn into a mobile needle-exchange program in Wabana on Bell Island, Nfld., after her 24-year-old son David died of an overdose in October, 2017.

TOUGH JOURNALIST HAD A PASSION FOR JUSTICE
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He was part of a legendary team that put the Kingston Whig-Standard on the map and later headed the journalism program at King's College
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By LINDSAY JONES
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Special to The Globe and Mail
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Friday, January 19, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B21


On Sept. 17, 1964, Michael Cobden stepped up to the home of an undercover police agent in Hillbrow, Johannesburg, and rang the doorbell.

He was 24 and working as a reporter for the Rand Daily Mail, a scrappy anti-apartheid newspaper.

The man, who had recently been named in a sabotage trial, opened the door and struck Mr. Cobden with a large leather belt.

He spewed expletives and slammed the door.

Undeterred, the young journalist rang the doorbell again. Later, he sued the man for civil damages.

Suitably skeptical, the judge said, "Come, come Mr. Cobden, you're not a lily in a hothouse."

(In the end, Michael was awarded the equivalent of $150 in damages.) The judge was spot on.

Throughout Mr. Cobden's illustrious career as a journalist at the Rand Daily Mail, the Toronto Star and the Kingston Whig-Standard - and also as director and instructor at the University of King's College School of Journalism in Halifax - his relentless devotion to social justice, crusty curiosity and unapologetic perfectionism assured no one ever mistook him for a hothouse flower.

Mr. Cobden died of acute myeloid leukemia on Dec. 24 in Halifax at age 77. He leaves his wife, Jane; children Josh, Joe and Daisy; and grandchildren Jane and Livie.

Though his colleagues and students often described him as intimidating and critical, his eldest son, Josh, 48, (from Mr. Cobden's first marriage, to Gabrielle Blair) says he was really just optimistic about what people could achieve.

"He didn't come across as a glass-half-full guy or Pollyanna by any stretch, but when it came to what he believed in and expected people could accomplish, his half-empty glass sort of ran over with optimism," Josh said.

"If he was hard on you, it was just because he thought you could do better."

Michael Cobden was born in Johannesburg on March 18, 1940, the second of two sons of Sarah Marsh (née Davidson) Cobden, a Montreal-born psychologist who was educated at the University of Toronto, and Harry Cobden, who managed a factory that made trousers.

When he was around eight years old, his mother became ill and he was sent to Kingswood College, a boarding school in Grahamstown, South Africa, where corporal punishment was a daily occurrence. This proved difficult for Michael who, even in the early days, was known for challenging authority.

At 18, he started out in journalism at the Johannesburg weekly newspaper the Jewish Herald and the Benoni City Times, a weekly outside the city.

In 1962, he began at the Rand Daily Mail, reporting fearlessly on violent crime in Soweto and how the apartheid regime exploited black people.

Bernard Melunsky met Mr. Cobden at the Rand Daily Mail and the two later became lifelong friends.

"He had this great style and he also wrote with great perceptiveness," said Mr. Melunsky, who now lives in London.

"I found him a bit reserved, but underneath that crust I very soon discovered a certain shyness and a very, very warm, sensitive, caring person."

While working at the Rand Daily Mail, Mr. Cobden helped start a library in the Alexandra Township. He was devastated when, the night before it was set to open, the police raided it and burned the books.

Frustrated that Johannesburg would never change, he and his wife moved to Toronto in 1968.

Armed with a glowing reference letter, within three days of their arrival he had a job at the Toronto Star, where he remained until 1975.

He started out on the rewrite desk, later becoming assistant city editor and an editorial writer, while also completing a bachelor of education degree at U of T.

Journalist Harvey Schachter worked under Mr. Cobden at the Toronto Star.

"He sparkled as a writer. He was a very challenging person in many ways and sometimes it could be exasperating, but when you reflect back on it, it was the best kind of challenge because it was around an idea," Mr. Schachter said.

Around 1970, while at the Star, Mr. Cobden launched a community newspaper called the Toronto Citizen with the late Arnold Amber, a fellow Star journalist.

The paper was outspoken against Pierre Trudeau's invocation of the War Measures Act during the October Crisis and criticized the Spadina Expressway plan, which the government cancelled in 1971 due to a public outcry.

Mr. Cobden was a single father when he began a new job as information officer of the Toronto Board of Education in 1975.

There, he met his future wife, Jane Morley, a school social worker.

Ms. Cobden said she knew he was the one when she witnessed him greet his son after school.

"Michael just picked him up, held him and said 'This is my Joshi!'" Ms. Cobden said.

The couple married in 1977 and the next year Joe was born.

Mr. Cobden worked for the Kingston Whig-Standard from 1979 to 1988, part of the legendary team of journalists who put the small daily newspaper on the map, earning it multiple national newspaper awards.

Mr. Schachter remembers Mr. Cobden at the Whig-Standard as being "wonderfully supportive."

"When he was the editor of the Whig-Standard, he was wonderful to work for and this was a big surprise because he had been so challenging," he said.

Mr. Schachter recalled Mr. Cobden striving for perfection in his writing, poring over his words while smoking cigarettes at his computer terminal.

In 1988, Mr. Cobden accepted a post as director of the University of King's College School of Journalism. Stephen Kimber, a journalism professor there, described him as a "blunt force" and said he could be intimidating.

"He would say things that if you wanted to, you could take offence at. ... He had a way of essentially saying to you that you weren't doing enough, that you weren't as good as you should be, whether that was as a student journalist or as an academic," Mr. Kimber said. "But having said that, the more I got to know him, the more I respected where he was coming from and what he was trying to do. Then as time went on, I realized what a wonderful person he was: generous, giving, supportive."

During Mr. Cobden's tenure as director from 1998 to 2005, Mr. Kimber said, he was instrumental in bridging the divide between the academic and trade school aspects of King's. As a journalism professor, he became known as a hands-on, passionate instructor who, above all else, wanted to see his students succeed.

The annual awards for students and faculty were called the Golden Cobdens - beer bottles sprayed in gold.

The arrival of his daughter, Daisy, began a new chapter in his family life.

He and his wife decided to adopt after watching a BBC documentary about Chinese state orphanages. It was 1997 when a social worker showed the couple a photo of a Chinese girl and asked them to take it home and consider it.

They didn't have to.

"We both said 'This is our daughter,' " Ms. Cobden recalled.

"We're not going to think about this. This is our daughter."

After retiring from King's in 2005, Mr. Cobden kept busy with various projects, most notably writing a biography of Holocaust survivor Simon Spatz, teaching journalism in India and teaching writing and ESL at Dalhousie University.

He was often envious of the candour with which his wife and her female friends shared their feelings and so in his last days he encouraged his closest friends, including Chris Murphy, to be more heartfelt and say "I love you."

The last time they spoke, Mr. Murphy leaned in and told his friend to "take care."

Mr. Cobden would have none of it.

In his clipped South African accent, he repeated the mantra he truly believed for himself and everyone in his life. He said: "Chris, you can do better." To submit an I Remember: obit@globeandmail.com Send us a memory of someone we have recently profiled on the Obituaries page.

Please include I Remember in the subject field

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Friends say Michael Cobden was a hard-driving man who was passionate about bettering his peers.

EPIDEMIOLOGIST VOICED HER CONVICTIONS
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She revelled in standing up to power and was unafraid to express herself, even when her beliefs ran counter to conventional wisdom
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By LISA FITTERMAN
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Special to The Globe and Mail
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Monday, January 22, 2018 – Print Edition, Page B17


A self-described loudmouth who always stood up for underdogs, a fierce mentor and an epidemiologist whose opinions sometimes ran counter to conventional wisdom, Abby Lippman had what her younger brother called a "shell of crankiness that was almost impenetrable."

"We argued all the time about most everything," said Marc Lippman, a breast-cancer specialist and professor at the University of Miami. "I disagreed with many of her positions - but she was my dear, my closest sister."

Arguments with Dr. Lippman, a professor emeritus in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health at McGill University, were de rigueur, for she revelled in standing up to power and was unafraid to express herself in plainspoken, pointed terms. She campaigned against what she called the "geneticization" of reproductive technologies, against hormone replacement therapy and for better, longer research before the approval of discoveries such as the vaccines against the human papillomavirus, an affliction that scientists have linked to cervical, anal, mouth and throat cancers.

Indeed, in October, 2015, Dr. Lippman teamed up with Geneviève Rail, a kinesiologist and professor in the Simone de Beauvoir Institute at Concordia University and Luisa Molino, a Concordia research associate, to write an op-ed against the vaccine in Le Devoir that called for authorities to stop administering it. Given that the vaccines are recommended by practically every major medical body in the developed world, including the World Health Organization and the Canadian Cancer Society, the article caused a furor.

"The Quebec trio's attempt to frame their criticism of the HPV vaccine as part of a 'debate' is both self-aggrandizing and ludicrous," stated one letter signed by 42 academics and scientists from across Canada. "So far, they have contributed nothing to science but their strident voices. And they certainly are not victims; rather, they are making victims of children who might not receive the HPV vaccine because of their actions."

In another, experts noted the authors were confusing coincidence with causality: "In effect, after getting the HPV vaccine, certain people may have won the lottery. Is that to say that the vaccine caused these fortunate monetary gains? Definitely not!"

Then, there was Dr. Lippman's passion for causes such as the rights of Indigenous women, gender equality and the Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions movement, which targets Israel for its treatment of Palestinians. If there was a protest, she'd be there, wielding a placard, chanting and speaking to the crowd, even when she was in her 70s, her son said.

And even when it was -25 C outside.

"I'd ask, 'Do we really want to go on that protest march?' She'd reply, 'Yes,' and so we would," Chris Hand recalled.

It was Mr. Hand who found Dr. Lippman's body on Dec. 26, in her home after what appeared to be a tumble down two steps. She was 78 years old.

Abby Lippman was born in New York on Dec. 11, 1939, the elder by eight years of Abbott and Ruth Lippman's two children. Her father was a prominent psychiatrist and her mother sold hats at Abraham & Straus, the fabled department store, before becoming a formidable volunteer for institutions such as New York Mental Health Association.

The family lived in a comfortable home in Brooklyn, where young Abby attended Erasmus Hall High School, the alma mater of luminaries such as Barbra Streisand and author Bernard Malamud. She would earn a bachelor of arts at Cornell University, and a PhD in biology at McGill. Her thesis was titled Genetic Counselling: Parents' Responses to Uncertainty.

Dr. Lippman had ended up in Montreal in the summer of 1973 because her husband at the time, geneticist Roger Hand, had accepted a professorship at McGill's medical faculty. The couple, who met in high school, had married on Dec. 24, 1961; as she became more self-aware and rebellious, their relationship became ever more tempestuous.

"One time, my father got so angry, he hurled a glass of vodka at her. Fortunately, he missed," Mr. Hand said. "Because she was such an ardent feminist, I once asked her why she married our father.

She said 'At that time, I could not imagine being a person unless I was married.' "When the family moved to Montreal, there was one place Dr. Lippman was determined never to live: Westmount, the leafy municipality just west of downtown. It was too English, she determined from her research, and too federalist. She had developed a soft spot for the Parti Québécois, which had been founded less than five years earlier, and for francophones, whom she saw as suffering from the prejudice of the monied anglophone elite.

But when the couple fell in love with one grey stone house on Mount Pleasant Avenue, their real estate agent neglected to name the area, instead carefully describing it as "downtown-adjacent." It was only as Dr. Lippman signed papers during the closing that she realized it was located exactly where she did not want to be. But the deed was done and she would remain in the house until she died.

As a professor at McGill, she could be acid of tongue about people she did not like and extraordinarily generous of her time with people who needed help, former colleague Barry Pless said.

"In a course we taught together, one of the major problems we faced was trying to help people whose first language was not English," Dr. Pless said. "Abby would habitually encourage them to come to class for private tutelage by her.

"I could be irritated by some of her aggressivity - it was hard to have a whole conversation with her when the subject was something she didn't agree with - but she did such good in all sorts of ways," he continued.

Dr. Lippman was a familiar figure, with her cropped grey hair and often wearing a black sweater, loose jeans and white sneakers. Over the years, she was involved with a number of organizations, aside from the BDS movement.

Lucy Anacleto of Montreal's Centre for Gender Advocacy said issues such as missing women, misogyny and systemic racism were visceral and difficult to deal with but, somehow, her friend, who sat on the board, found a way through it.

"I first connected with her because of her love of language, of words and puns," Ms. Anacleto said.

"She taught me the meaning of 'growlery,' a place to retreat to when you're hurt or in a bad mood, and of 'Pollyanna.' She was the opposite of 'Pollyanna,' of course, for she was very much a realist."

Another friend, Anne Rochon Ford of the National Network on Environments and Women's Health at York University, said Dr. Lippman eschewed any kind of official recognition for her work, including the Order of Quebec.

"Years ago, when we tried to nominate her, she wouldn't hear of it because she said those kinds of institutions were set up to reward people who would get rewarded anyway," Ms. Rochon Ford recalled.

"She was engaged to the last minute, whether it was attending meetings of the various organizations she belonged to, working for the causes she put her name behind, writing letters to the editor or going to demonstrations."

After her death, as Dr. Lippman's daughter, Jessica Hand, went through papers in the Westmount house, she discovered receipts for bail her mother had paid on behalf of people charged during Quebec's "Maple Spring" of 2012, when the province was rocked by protests sparked by a proposed hike in university tuition.

"In her will, she emphasizes the bail payments are not loans but gifts," Dr. Lippman's son said.

"They couldn't have afforded to bail themselves out, so our mother did."

She leaves her two children and two grandchildren, who were the lights of her life.

To submit an I Remember: obit@globeandmail.com Send us a memory of someone we have recently profiled on the Obituaries page.

Please include I Remember in the subject field

Associated Graphic

Abby Lippman, seen here in an undated photo, was an epidemiologist who was known for being extraordinarily generous with her time for people who needed help.

COURTESY OF THE FAMILY

Skating towards Bethlehem
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Living among British Columbia's evangelicals taught Alix Hawley that the call to join the congregation is always undercut with the idea that a wrong team exists, too
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By ALIX HAWLEY
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Saturday, January 13, 2018 – Print Edition, Page O9


Author of All True Not a Lie in It.

Every haircut, my dad's barber asks if he's been saved.

My dad is okay with this.

He replies no, and the barber carries on unperturbed. This has been going on since the 1980s.