stats
globeinteractive.com: Making the Business of Life Easier

   Finance globeinvestor   Careers globecareers.workopolis Subscribe to The Globe
The Globe and Mail /globeandmail.com
Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space


Search

space
  This site         Tips

  
space
  The Web Google
space
   space



space

  Where to Find It


Breaking News
  Home Page

  Report on Business

  Sports

  Technology

space
Subscribe to The Globe

Shop at our Globe Store


Print Edition
  Front Page

  Report on Business

  National

  International

  Sports

  Arts & Entertainment

  Editorials

  Columnists

   Headline Index

 Other Sections
  Appointments

  Births & Deaths

  Books

  Classifieds

  Comment

  Education

  Environment

  Facts & Arguments

  Focus

  Health

  Obituaries

  Real Estate

  Review

  Science

  Style

  Technology

  Travel

  Wheels

 Leisure
  Cartoon

  Crosswords

  Food & Dining

  Golf

  Horoscopes

  Movies

  Online Personals

  TV Listings/News

 Specials & Series
  All Reports...

space

Services
   Where to Find It
 A quick guide to what's available on the site

 Newspaper
  Advertise

  Corrections

  Customer Service

  Help & Contact Us

  Reprints

  Subscriptions

 Web Site
  Advertise

  E-Mail Newsletters

  Free Headlines

  Globe Store New

  Help & Contact Us

  Make Us Home

  Mobile New

  Press Room

  Privacy Policy

  Terms & Conditions


GiveLife.ca

    

PRINT EDITION
TESLA, MEET YOUR MATCH
space
The automaker's famed battery electric vehicles have seen no direct competition - until now. With the forthcoming Taycan, Porsche goes head-to-head with the Model S, Mark Hacking reports
space
By MARK HACKING
Special to The Globe and Mail
  
  

Email this article Print this article

space  Advertisement
space

Friday, September 6, 2019 – Page D1

ATLANTA -- Let's get the hyperbole out of the way right from the get-go: The 2020 Porsche Taycan is one of the most important production cars of the 21st century. The reason? This forthcoming allelectric sedan could deliver equal or better performance than the Tesla Model S - and it's a Porsche.

That's an important distinction.

Since the introduction of the Model S in 2012, "traditional" automakers have struggled to understand the feverish, unwavering and, at times, seemingly irrational support for Tesla from early adopters, investors and technophiles alike. Without question, Tesla has been a disruptive force in the industry, jump-starting the modern-day battery-electric vehicle (BEV) movement. To this point, though, the company's ability to disrupt has hinged on a few critical factors.

Among the most significant: No BEVs compete directly with the three Tesla models - at least, not in a head to head, dollar for dollar, kilowatt-hour-to-kilowatt-hour type of way.

But with the forthcoming Porsche Taycan, billed internally as "the world's first fully electric sports car," the Tesla Model S may have a direct competitor - and it may have met its match.

When the first BEV from Porsche hits the market, there will be two models to choose from: the Taycan Turbo and the Taycan Turbo S. (For clarification, neither model features a turbocharged engine. The nomenclature is intended to mirror that used for the Porsche 911 model line.) The difference between the two comes down to the output of the electric motor mounted on the front axle.

Both the Turbo and Turbo S feature the same 93.4 kWh battery pack, a network of lithiumion cells mounted in the floor to ensure a low centre of gravity. Both also have electric motors at the front and rear axles, giving the Porsche all-electric, all-wheel drive. Nothing revolutionary so far, but let's dig deeper into the technical details.

The Taycan has been engineered for "repeatable performance" - compared with the Tesla Model S P100D, it's slightly slower from a dead start and has less overall range.

However, it should have far more consistent performance.

In its famed "ludicrous mode," the Tesla can hit 100 kilometres an hour in a revelatory 2.5 seconds, but it would be unlikely to match this time immediately thereafter owing to battery-cooling challenges. The engineers at Porsche have spent the better part of four years tackling these precise challenges.

First, they opted for a permanent magnet synchronous motor for both axles. This design is more expensive than other types of motors, but it's more compact, more efficient and better able to manage heat. Next, the engineers linked a twospeed transmission to the electric motor at the back, which allows for maximum acceleration in first gear, and a higher top speed and longer range in second gear. (The front motor uses a single-speed transmission.)

The Taycan also features 800-volt technology and pulse-controlled inverters for both motors to manage the juice from the battery pack.

The Turbo S employs a larger inverter for the front axle motor, which allows for the increase in power and performance.

Lastly, there's an intricate thermal-management system that's designed to keep the battery within the optimal temperature range when driving, and when the Taycan is plugged in and recharging.

But enough with the words - let's get to the numbers.

The Taycan Turbo produces 616 horsepower and 627 lb-ft of torque, all of that available from a standstill. With the overboost function of the electrified powertrain, the horsepower jumps to 670 for brief spells. The claimed zero-to-100-km/h time is 3.2 seconds and top speed rings in at 260 km/h. For the Turbo S, the numbers are more eye-popping: 750 horsepower when in overboost, 774 lb-ft of torque, the same top speed and the zero-to-100 km/h sprint in 2.8 seconds.

At the end of the technical presentation, attendees had the chance to ride shotgun in the Taycan Turbo S around the Porsche Experience Center, a test track facility in Atlanta. Based on this run, my belief is that Porsche is being conservative with the acceleration figures - my gut, which is still in the back seat of the car somewhere, says a time of 2.5 seconds is closer to the truth.

As evidence that the objective of repeatable performance has been achieved, the Porsche team put up some even more impressive numbers during development. There's the new lap record for BEVs around the Nordschleife race course in Germany, which now stands at 7 minutes 42 seconds - a fast time made more newsworthy when you consider there's been no official attempt made with a Model S. The Taycan also completed 26 consecutive sprints from zero to 200 km/h on an airfield in Germany. The news here: The last run was only 0.8 seconds slower than the first.

Finally, there was an endurance test that took place at the Nardo Technical Center in Italy.

Over the course of 24 hours, the Taycan completed 3,425 kilometres at an average speed of 143 km/h. Of note: This run included recharging sessions - and this is another area where Porsche looks to excel. When hooked up to a high-speed charger, the Taycan is expected to vault from a 5-percent charge to an 80-per-cent charge in just 22.5 minutes.

In terms of range, the Taycan may not be able to match the Model S. The Turbo offers up to 450 km in range according to testing standards in the European Union or roughly 400 km in U.S.

Environmental Protection Agency terms. But the goal for Porsche has not been to match Tesla, measure for measure. The goal has been to engineer a BEV that drives like a Porsche. So there are only two big question marks left: how the 2020 Porsche Taycan drives and how much it will cost.

Special to The Globe and Mail The writer was a guest of the automaker. Content was not subject to approval.

Associated Graphic

In creating the battery-electric 2020 Taycan, Porsche opted for a permanent magnet synchronous motor for both axles, which is more compact, more efficient and better able to manage heat than other types of motors.

The 2020 Porsche Taycan, above, boasts 800-volt technology and pulse-controlled inverters for both motors to manage the juice from its battery pack.


Huh? How did I get here?
Return to Main Leah_McLaren Page
Subscribe to
The Globe and Mail
 

Email this article Print this article

space  Advertisement
space

Need CPR for your RSP? Check your portfolio’s pulse and lower yours by improving the overall health of your investments. Click here.

Advertisement

7-Day Site Search
    

Breaking News



Today's Weather


Inside

Rick Salutin
Merrily marching
off to war
Roy MacGregor
Duct tape might hold
when panic strikes


Editorial
Where Manley is going with his first budget




space

Columnists



For a columnist's most recent stories, click on their name below.

 National


Roy MacGregor arrow
This Country
space
Jeffrey Simpson arrow
The Nation
space
Margaret Wente arrow
Counterpoint
space
Hugh Winsor  arrow
The Power Game
space
 Business


Rob Carrick arrow
Personal Finance
space
Drew Fagan arrow
The Big Picture
space
Mathew Ingram arrow
space
Brent Jang arrow
Business West
space
Brian Milner arrow
Taking Stock
space
Eric Reguly arrow
To The Point
space
Andrew Willis arrow
Streetwise
space
 Sports


Stephen Brunt arrow
The Game
space
Eric Duhatschek arrow
space
Allan Maki arrow
space
William Houston arrow
Truth & Rumours
space
Lorne Rubenstein arrow
Golf
space
 The Arts


John Doyle arrow
Television
space
John MacLachlan Gray arrow
Gray's Anatomy
space
David Macfarlane arrow
Cheap Seats
space
Johanna Schneller arrow
Moviegoer
space
 Comment


Murray Campbell arrow
Ontario Politics
space
Lysiane Gagnon arrow
Inside Quebec
space
Marcus Gee arrow
The World
space
William Johnson arrow
Pit Bill
space
Paul Knox arrow
Worldbeat
space
Heather Mallick arrow
As If
space
Leah McLaren arrow
Generation Why
space
Rex Murphy arrow
Japes of Wrath
space
Rick Salutin arrow
On The Other Hand
space
Paul Sullivan arrow
The West
space
William Thorsell arrow
space





Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space

© 2003 Bell Globemedia Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Help & Contact Us | Back to the top of this page