stats
globeinteractive.com: Making the Business of Life Easier

   Finance globeinvestor   Careers globecareers.workopolis Subscribe to The Globe
The Globe and Mail /globeandmail.com
Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space


Search

space
  This site         Tips

  
space
  The Web Google
space
   space



space

  Where to Find It


Breaking News
  Home Page

  Report on Business

  Sports

  Technology

space
Subscribe to The Globe

Shop at our Globe Store


Print Edition
  Front Page

  Report on Business

  National

  International

  Sports

  Arts & Entertainment

  Editorials

  Columnists

   Headline Index

 Other Sections
  Appointments

  Births & Deaths

  Books

  Classifieds

  Comment

  Education

  Environment

  Facts & Arguments

  Focus

  Health

  Obituaries

  Real Estate

  Review

  Science

  Style

  Technology

  Travel

  Wheels

 Leisure
  Cartoon

  Crosswords

  Food & Dining

  Golf

  Horoscopes

  Movies

  Online Personals

  TV Listings/News

 Specials & Series
  All Reports...

space

Services
   Where to Find It
 A quick guide to what's available on the site

 Newspaper
  Advertise

  Corrections

  Customer Service

  Help & Contact Us

  Reprints

  Subscriptions

 Web Site
  Advertise

  E-Mail Newsletters

  Free Headlines

  Globe Store New

  Help & Contact Us

  Make Us Home

  Mobile New

  Press Room

  Privacy Policy

  Terms & Conditions


GiveLife.ca

    

PRINT EDITION
Federer wastes match point, loses to Anderson in shock collapse
space
In a stunning turnaround, the top-seeded star blew all of his big lead in a marathon five-set game
space
By HOWARD FENDRICH
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
  
  

Email this article Print this article
Thursday, July 12, 2018 – Page B13

LONDON -- Roger Federer was a point away from a rather tidy straight-set victory in the Wimbledon quarter-final. One lousy point.

And then, slowly, over the next two-plus hours, all the way until the fifth set reached its 24th game, as the temperature dropped and the spectators' cries of "Let's go, Roger!" echoed through the shadows, everything came apart for the eight-time champion. Against an opponent who'd never beaten him nor made it this far at the All England Club.

In a stunning turnaround in an unfamiliar setting - No. 1 Court instead of Centre Court - the top-seeded Federer blew a third-set match point and, eventually, all of his big lead in a 2-6, 6-7 (5), 7-5, 6-4, 13-11 loss to No. 8 Kevin Anderson on Wednesday in a 4 hour 14 minute tussle.

"It was just one of those days where you hope to get by somehow," said Federer, who last played at No. 1 Court in 2015. "I almost could have. I should have."

While his tournament is over, two of his long-time rivals at the top of tennis set up a semi-final showdown: Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic. Nadal, who's won two of his 17 Grand Slam titles at Wimbledon, edged 2009 U.S. Open champion Juan Martin del Potro 7-5, 6-7 (7), 4-6, 6-4, 6-4 in a wildly entertaining match that featured diving shots by both and lasted 4 hours 48 minutes.

Djokovic, whose 12 major championships include three from the All England Club, got to his first Grand Slam semi-final since 2016 by beating No. 24 seed Kei Nishikori 6-3, 3-6, 6-2, 6-2.

In Friday's other men's match, Anderson will face No. 9 John Isner, the 33-year-old American who reached his first major semi-final in his 41st try by eliminating 2016 runner-up Milos Raonic 6-7 (5), 7-6 (7), 6-4, 6-3. Isner hit 25 aces, saved the only break point he faced and has won all 95 of his service games in the tournament.

Federer hadn't been broken until facing Anderson. Still, the 20-time major champion was leading by two sets and 5-4 in the third when, with Anderson serving, he got to ad-out. He could have ended things right then and there. Federer managed to return a 134 mph serve, but on his next stroke, he shanked a backhand. Back to deuce. From there, it all began to change. Anderson held for 5-all, broke to 6-5 with a violent return winner off a 97 mph second serve and then staved off three break points and closed the set with a 133 mph ace.

The comeback was just beginning.

"I had my chances," Federer said, "so it's disappointing."

This was only the third time in Federer's 20 years of contesting Grand Slam matches that he lost after taking the opening two sets; both of the other defeats came in 2011.

And, according to the ATP, it's the fifth time Federer lost a match at a major after holding a match point, something else that last happened seven years ago.

How hard was it to see this coming?

First of all, Federer was 4-0 against Anderson, winning every set. But there was more. So much more. Federer was attempting to reach his 13th semi-final at Wimbledon and move closer to title No. 9, both of which would have broken his own records.

He came into the match having won 32 consecutive sets at Wimbledon, a run he stretched to 34 before faltering.

"I just kept on telling myself, 'I have to keep believing.' I kept saying that today was going to be my day," Anderson said, "because you really need that mindset taking the court against somebody like Roger."

Anderson was the runner-up to Nadal at last year's U.S. Open, but he never made it beyond the fourth round at Wimbledon until this week.

He hit 28 aces against Federer, saved nine of 12 break points and managed to hold his own in the rare lengthy baseline rallies.

As the fifth set became as much a test of mental strength as anything, from 4all to 6-all to 8-all to 10-all, Anderson stayed steady. It was Federer who blinked, doublefaulting to face a break point at 11-all, then slapping a forehand into the net.

Anderson, a 32-year-old South African who played college tennis at Illinois, served it out, ending things with a 128 mph service winner before raising both arms.

Djokovic got his wish to play in the main stadium, and he showed that he might completely be back from right elbow troubles that lasted more than a year until he finally had surgery in February.

He's been flashing some anger this fortnight and did so again in the second set, bouncing his racquet off the turf after failing to capitalize on three break points at 1all. That earned a code violation from chair umpire Carlos Ramos. When Nishikori let his own racquet fly in the fourth set, he wasn't chastised, which prompted Djokovic to yell "double standards" toward Ramos - drawing boos from fans.

"He claims that he didn't see what Nishikori has done, but apparently he always sees what I do," Djokovic said afterward, "something that I don't think is fair."

Later, Ramos warned Djokovic for a time violation, but that didn't seem to faze the Serbian.

Soon enough, Djokovic was on his way to the semi-final, where he will meet Nadal.

"I like the level of tennis that I'm playing on right now.

I really do. I think with the performances I've had, I deserve to be in the semi-finals," said Djokovic, whose last major title came at the 2016 French Open. "I don't want to stop here. I hope I can get a chance to fight for a trophy."

He'll have to get past Nadal first.

Associated Graphic

Roger Federer of Switzerland leaves the court after losing his men's quarter-final match against South Africa's Kevin Anderson at Wimbledon on Wednesday.

BEN CURTIS/AP


Huh? How did I get here?
Return to Main Brent_Jang Page
Subscribe to
The Globe and Mail
 

Email this article Print this article

space  Advertisement
space

Need CPR for your RSP? Check your portfolio’s pulse and lower yours by improving the overall health of your investments. Click here.

Advertisement

7-Day Site Search
    

Breaking News



Today's Weather


Inside

Rick Salutin
Merrily marching
off to war
Roy MacGregor
Duct tape might hold
when panic strikes


Editorial
Where Manley is going with his first budget




space

Columnists



For a columnist's most recent stories, click on their name below.

 National


Roy MacGregor arrow
This Country
space
Jeffrey Simpson arrow
The Nation
space
Margaret Wente arrow
Counterpoint
space
Hugh Winsor  arrow
The Power Game
space
 Business


Rob Carrick arrow
Personal Finance
space
Drew Fagan arrow
The Big Picture
space
Mathew Ingram arrow
space
Brent Jang arrow
Business West
space
Brian Milner arrow
Taking Stock
space
Eric Reguly arrow
To The Point
space
Andrew Willis arrow
Streetwise
space
 Sports


Stephen Brunt arrow
The Game
space
Eric Duhatschek arrow
space
Allan Maki arrow
space
William Houston arrow
Truth & Rumours
space
Lorne Rubenstein arrow
Golf
space
 The Arts


John Doyle arrow
Television
space
John MacLachlan Gray arrow
Gray's Anatomy
space
David Macfarlane arrow
Cheap Seats
space
Johanna Schneller arrow
Moviegoer
space
 Comment


Murray Campbell arrow
Ontario Politics
space
Lysiane Gagnon arrow
Inside Quebec
space
Marcus Gee arrow
The World
space
William Johnson arrow
Pit Bill
space
Paul Knox arrow
Worldbeat
space
Heather Mallick arrow
As If
space
Leah McLaren arrow
Generation Why
space
Rex Murphy arrow
Japes of Wrath
space
Rick Salutin arrow
On The Other Hand
space
Paul Sullivan arrow
The West
space
William Thorsell arrow
space





Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space

© 2003 Bell Globemedia Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Help & Contact Us | Back to the top of this page