stats
globeinteractive.com: Making the Business of Life Easier

   Finance globeinvestor   Careers globecareers.workopolis Subscribe to The Globe
The Globe and Mail /globeandmail.com
Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space


Search

space
  This site         Tips

  
space
  The Web Google
space
   space



space

  Where to Find It


Breaking News
  Home Page

  Report on Business

  Sports

  Technology

space
Subscribe to The Globe

Shop at our Globe Store


Print Edition
  Front Page

  Report on Business

  National

  International

  Sports

  Arts & Entertainment

  Editorials

  Columnists

   Headline Index

 Other Sections
  Appointments

  Births & Deaths

  Books

  Classifieds

  Comment

  Education

  Environment

  Facts & Arguments

  Focus

  Health

  Obituaries

  Real Estate

  Review

  Science

  Style

  Technology

  Travel

  Wheels

 Leisure
  Cartoon

  Crosswords

  Food & Dining

  Golf

  Horoscopes

  Movies

  Online Personals

  TV Listings/News

 Specials & Series
  All Reports...

space

Services
   Where to Find It
 A quick guide to what's available on the site

 Newspaper
  Advertise

  Corrections

  Customer Service

  Help & Contact Us

  Reprints

  Subscriptions

 Web Site
  Advertise

  E-Mail Newsletters

  Free Headlines

  Globe Store New

  Help & Contact Us

  Make Us Home

  Mobile New

  Press Room

  Privacy Policy

  Terms & Conditions


GiveLife.ca

    

PRINT EDITION
Wide gender-pay gap at Canadian firms revealed under new British rules
space
space
By TAVIA GRANT
  
  

Email this article Print this article
Tuesday, April 10, 2018 – Page B1

TORONTO -- Pay disparities at Canadian companies operating in Britain are being exposed for the first time under new rules that require large employers to divulge their gender pay gaps.

Regulatory filings, required for employers with 250 or more workers, show that Toronto-Dominion Bank and SNC-Lavalin Rail & Transit Ltd. have some of the widest gaps among Canadian firms in Britain. TD pays women 48 per cent less than men in Britain, with the gap widening to 84 per cent for bonuses. SNC-Lavalin's gap is 40 per cent, widening to 67 per cent for bonuses. Nearly all of its highest-paid workers, 93 per cent, are men.

Britain made gender-pay reporting mandatory with the hope that greater transparency will reveal where gaps exist, and - through more accountability - spur employers to address them. The disclosures, which show almost eight in 10 British companies pay men more than women, have already sparked a sea of rankings on best and worst performers that may affect employers' reputation and their ability to recruit workers.

No comparable reporting such as this is required yet in Canada.

"Gender is becoming a bigger issue worldwide ... and there's a sweep of legislation that has been happening that is focused on transparency," said Dionne Pohler, assistant professor at the Centre for Industrial Relations and Human Resources at the University of Toronto. "Even just in the process of having to report these numbers, companies are forced to actually pay attention to how wages are set and who's getting what inside their organizations."

Canada, where the gender wage gap is among the worst of 38 OECD countries, is taking some measures to boost pay transparency - moves already under way in peer countries such as Germany, France, Australia and Iceland. The federal government said in its February budget that it will publish clearer wage-gap information online of employers in the federally regulated sector, which includes such industries as banking and airlines. It noted that the median income for women in Canada is $28,120, compared with $40,890 for men, a gap of 31 per cent.

Ontario, meanwhile, has introduced new paytransparency legislation that will require large employers to track and report wage gaps to the province and disclose them to employees.

In Britain, the filings have made waves, revealing large pay gaps at airlines, especially Ryanair, and at banks, where bonus gaps are the biggest. The disclosures generally show that women are underrepresented in higher-paying positions and that no sector pays women more, on average, than men.

At least a dozen Canadian firms have published their pay gaps, including four of the five big banks (CIBC did not have to disclose, as it has fewer than 250 employees), Bombardier Transportation and BlackBerry UK. In nearly all cases, women earned less than men, and their pay disparities were larger than the average gap in the majority of instances.

"What is being shown is that those Canadian companies have a significant gender pay gap - and we're finding out because they have to report in England," said Fay Faraday, a Toronto-based lawyer and co-chair of the Equal Pay Coalition. "We need that transparency here at home so that we can hold companies accountable here, because we know those pay gaps exist here, too."

TD's British operations, largely in capital markets, have 284 employees, of which 31 per cent are women. In its top pay quartile, the representation of women drops to 14 per cent. The bank's analysis shows its pay gap "is caused by having more men than women in higher-paying senior roles." By addressing barriers that can affect the attraction, retention and career progression of women, and by working to raise the share of women at senior levels, it expects "to make progress in closing the gender pay gap."

Royal Bank of Canada's British operations have a median hourly pay gap of 39 per cent. A breakdown of its businesses there shows RBC Europe Ltd. has one of the wider gaps in the sector, where the hourly pay gap is 57 per cent - meaning women earn 43p (equivalent to 77 cents) for every £1 ($1.80) that men earn. Women's median bonus pay is 86 per cent lower than men's.

RBC chief executive officer Dave McKay told reporters in Toronto on Friday that the industry "has struggled to attract more diverse talent into some of those roles at the upper end of the compensation market" - roles that could be made more flexible to attract women. "We don't have the mix of diversity in our wealth franchise, in the broker roles, that we aspire to. And our customers are increasingly more diverse, and therefore it's a long-term market requirement."

The 10,200 filings have some data limitations and do not reflect whether workers receive pay for equal work. The gender pay gap is a complex issue, and results should be interpreted with care, said Prof. Pohler, who is also faculty research fellow at the Institute for Gender and the Economy at the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto.

"There are things that happen prelabour market - for instance, if women on average in a particular firm have less education or less experience, then the question is: 'What are these numbers telling us?' Is [the gap] because of discrimination ... or something prior to entering a firm?" Still, these disclosures "paint a pretty clear picture of where we need to focus as a society and as businesses," said Karen Gill, co-founder of everywoman, a London-based organization that works to advance women in business.

"It's put a focus on the massive need for societal change, in terms of occupation choice for girls, and then organizations making sure that they have got the right things in place to enable equal opportunity." With files from James Bradshaw in Toronto


Huh? How did I get here?
Return to Main Heather_Mallick Page
Subscribe to
The Globe and Mail
 

Email this article Print this article

space  Advertisement
space

Need CPR for your RSP? Check your portfolio’s pulse and lower yours by improving the overall health of your investments. Click here.

Advertisement

7-Day Site Search
    

Breaking News



Today's Weather


Inside

Rick Salutin
Merrily marching
off to war
Roy MacGregor
Duct tape might hold
when panic strikes


Editorial
Where Manley is going with his first budget




space

Columnists



For a columnist's most recent stories, click on their name below.

 National


Roy MacGregor arrow
This Country
space
Jeffrey Simpson arrow
The Nation
space
Margaret Wente arrow
Counterpoint
space
Hugh Winsor  arrow
The Power Game
space
 Business


Rob Carrick arrow
Personal Finance
space
Drew Fagan arrow
The Big Picture
space
Mathew Ingram arrow
space
Brent Jang arrow
Business West
space
Brian Milner arrow
Taking Stock
space
Eric Reguly arrow
To The Point
space
Andrew Willis arrow
Streetwise
space
 Sports


Stephen Brunt arrow
The Game
space
Eric Duhatschek arrow
space
Allan Maki arrow
space
William Houston arrow
Truth & Rumours
space
Lorne Rubenstein arrow
Golf
space
 The Arts


John Doyle arrow
Television
space
John MacLachlan Gray arrow
Gray's Anatomy
space
David Macfarlane arrow
Cheap Seats
space
Johanna Schneller arrow
Moviegoer
space
 Comment


Murray Campbell arrow
Ontario Politics
space
Lysiane Gagnon arrow
Inside Quebec
space
Marcus Gee arrow
The World
space
William Johnson arrow
Pit Bill
space
Paul Knox arrow
Worldbeat
space
Heather Mallick arrow
As If
space
Leah McLaren arrow
Generation Why
space
Rex Murphy arrow
Japes of Wrath
space
Rick Salutin arrow
On The Other Hand
space
Paul Sullivan arrow
The West
space
William Thorsell arrow
space





Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space

© 2003 Bell Globemedia Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Help & Contact Us | Back to the top of this page