stats
globeinteractive.com: Making the Business of Life Easier

   Finance globeinvestor   Careers globecareers.workopolis Subscribe to The Globe
The Globe and Mail /globeandmail.com
Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space


Search

space
  This site         Tips

  
space
  The Web Google
space
   space



space

  Where to Find It


Breaking News
  Home Page

  Report on Business

  Sports

  Technology

space
Subscribe to The Globe

Shop at our Globe Store


Print Edition
  Front Page

  Report on Business

  National

  International

  Sports

  Arts & Entertainment

  Editorials

  Columnists

   Headline Index

 Other Sections
  Appointments

  Births & Deaths

  Books

  Classifieds

  Comment

  Education

  Environment

  Facts & Arguments

  Focus

  Health

  Obituaries

  Real Estate

  Review

  Science

  Style

  Technology

  Travel

  Wheels

 Leisure
  Cartoon

  Crosswords

  Food & Dining

  Golf

  Horoscopes

  Movies

  Online Personals

  TV Listings/News

 Specials & Series
  All Reports...

space

Services
   Where to Find It
 A quick guide to what's available on the site

 Newspaper
  Advertise

  Corrections

  Customer Service

  Help & Contact Us

  Reprints

  Subscriptions

 Web Site
  Advertise

  E-Mail Newsletters

  Free Headlines

  Globe Store New

  Help & Contact Us

  Make Us Home

  Mobile New

  Press Room

  Privacy Policy

  Terms & Conditions


GiveLife.ca

    

PRINT EDITION
Spieth faces tall task in defending British Open title
space
In past 50 years, only four players have pulled off repeat wins
space
By DOUG FERGUSON
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
  
  

Email this article Print this article
Tuesday, July 17, 2018 – Page B12

CARNOUSTIE, SCOTLAND -- Jordan Spieth figured someone from the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews would be waiting for him when he pulled into the parking lot at Carnoustie to take back the silver claret jug. Instead, he was part of a ceremony with enough pomp to drive home the point.

His reign as British Open champion was over.

"The traditions of the Open are very special," Spieth said, "even if you're on the wrong end of that one."

This "tradition" is only a few years old, although typical of the august manner of this major, nothing was left to chance. Spieth was to arrive in a car provided by one of the R&A's sponsors, and as it drove slowly down a dirt path behind the grandstands on the first hole, cameras moved into position. The door opened and a woman slowly emerged from the back seat. That's where Spieth would be sitting. This was just a rehearsal to make sure the cameras had the right angle.

Moments later, an R&A employee asked people sitting in the right portion of the grandstands to move to the other side so it would appear fuller.

"It's the coolest trophy that our sport has to offer," Spieth said. "So having to return that was certainly difficult" It's far more enjoyable to pose with golf's oldest trophy - it was first awarded in 1873 - at the 18th hole on Sunday, not the first hole on Monday. That's the task that awaits Spieth, and it figures to be a monumental one.

Only four players in the past 50 years have repeated as British Open champions, the most recent being Padraig Harrington in 2008.

More than history, it's the nature of Carnoustie that figures to be the stiffest challenge - or at least on Monday, the most mysterious one. A dry summer has turned the links into a combination of brown (fairways), yellow (wispy rough) and green on the tee boxes and putting surfaces.

That translates into the fastest conditions at an Open since Tiger Woods won at Hoylake in 2006.

That was the year Woods hit only one driver - yes, he missed the fairway - and relied mainly on long irons off the tee because the golf ball was running forever.

Early samples indicate this may be just the opposite.

Because the rough isn't up, and because it's difficult to judge how far shots will roll out on the fairways, the answer may be to just smash driver over the trouble. Jon Rahm said he planned to hit driver every day on the 396-yard opening hole.

Tommy Fleetwood, who shot 63 at a much different Carnoustie last year during the Dunhill Links Championship, was most perplexed when he reached the 350yard third hole. It usually is a midiron off the tee and a wedge to the green. Now, it's more like a 6-iron off the tee. Or maybe a 7-iron. And even that's not safe, because the undulations in the fairway could send the ball rolling until a pot bunker gets in the way.

The other challenge facing Spieth is this minislump he's in.

He would not have imagined when he left Royal Birkdale last year with that wild finish and his name on the jug that he wouldn't hoist another trophy. His only close call this year came in the Masters, where he started the final round nine shots behind Patrick Reed and nearly caught him until a bogey on the last hole for a 64.

He finished third.

Since then, Spieth has not been closer than 12 shots off the lead in four of the seven tournaments in which he made it to the weekend.

He missed the cut at Shinnecock Hills in the U.S. Open, opened with a 63 at the Travelers Championship and still tied only for 42nd, and then took a break.

He went to Seattle to watch his little sister be a cheerleader at the U.S. Special Olympics, and then headed to the Mexico beaches for relaxation and fun golf.

"I needed a break," he said. "I was kind of dragging along, cutline golf for a whole and playing a pretty heavy schedule. ... And coming to an Open Championship requires a lot of feel and imagination, and I think that's what I needed a bit of in my game."

And that's what he most likely needs this week to figure out Carnoustie, along with everyone else.

Associated Graphic

Jordan Spieth tracks his shot during a British Open practice round in Carnoustie, Scotland, on Monday. This year's tournament is likely to have the fastest course conditions at an Open since 2006.

PETER MORRISON/AP


Huh? How did I get here?
Return to Main Johanna_Schneller Page
Subscribe to
The Globe and Mail
 

Email this article Print this article

space  Advertisement
space

Need CPR for your RSP? Check your portfolio’s pulse and lower yours by improving the overall health of your investments. Click here.

Advertisement

7-Day Site Search
    

Breaking News



Today's Weather


Inside

Rick Salutin
Merrily marching
off to war
Roy MacGregor
Duct tape might hold
when panic strikes


Editorial
Where Manley is going with his first budget




space

Columnists



For a columnist's most recent stories, click on their name below.

 National


Roy MacGregor arrow
This Country
space
Jeffrey Simpson arrow
The Nation
space
Margaret Wente arrow
Counterpoint
space
Hugh Winsor  arrow
The Power Game
space
 Business


Rob Carrick arrow
Personal Finance
space
Drew Fagan arrow
The Big Picture
space
Mathew Ingram arrow
space
Brent Jang arrow
Business West
space
Brian Milner arrow
Taking Stock
space
Eric Reguly arrow
To The Point
space
Andrew Willis arrow
Streetwise
space
 Sports


Stephen Brunt arrow
The Game
space
Eric Duhatschek arrow
space
Allan Maki arrow
space
William Houston arrow
Truth & Rumours
space
Lorne Rubenstein arrow
Golf
space
 The Arts


John Doyle arrow
Television
space
John MacLachlan Gray arrow
Gray's Anatomy
space
David Macfarlane arrow
Cheap Seats
space
Johanna Schneller arrow
Moviegoer
space
 Comment


Murray Campbell arrow
Ontario Politics
space
Lysiane Gagnon arrow
Inside Quebec
space
Marcus Gee arrow
The World
space
William Johnson arrow
Pit Bill
space
Paul Knox arrow
Worldbeat
space
Heather Mallick arrow
As If
space
Leah McLaren arrow
Generation Why
space
Rex Murphy arrow
Japes of Wrath
space
Rick Salutin arrow
On The Other Hand
space
Paul Sullivan arrow
The West
space
William Thorsell arrow
space





Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space

© 2003 Bell Globemedia Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Help & Contact Us | Back to the top of this page