stats
globeinteractive.com: Making the Business of Life Easier

   Finance globeinvestor   Careers globecareers.workopolis Subscribe to The Globe
The Globe and Mail /globeandmail.com
Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space


Search

space
  This site         Tips

  
space
  The Web Google
space
   space



space

  Where to Find It


Breaking News
  Home Page

  Report on Business

  Sports

  Technology

space
Subscribe to The Globe

Shop at our Globe Store


Print Edition
  Front Page

  Report on Business

  National

  International

  Sports

  Arts & Entertainment

  Editorials

  Columnists

   Headline Index

 Other Sections
  Appointments

  Births & Deaths

  Books

  Classifieds

  Comment

  Education

  Environment

  Facts & Arguments

  Focus

  Health

  Obituaries

  Real Estate

  Review

  Science

  Style

  Technology

  Travel

  Wheels

 Leisure
  Cartoon

  Crosswords

  Food & Dining

  Golf

  Horoscopes

  Movies

  Online Personals

  TV Listings/News

 Specials & Series
  All Reports...

space

Services
   Where to Find It
 A quick guide to what's available on the site

 Newspaper
  Advertise

  Corrections

  Customer Service

  Help & Contact Us

  Reprints

  Subscriptions

 Web Site
  Advertise

  E-Mail Newsletters

  Free Headlines

  Globe Store New

  Help & Contact Us

  Make Us Home

  Mobile New

  Press Room

  Privacy Policy

  Terms & Conditions


GiveLife.ca

    

PRINT EDITION
FLAMES DEVASTATE NOTRE-DAME
space
Firefighters save stone structure and bell towers after hours-long battle; Crown of Thorns and other religious artifacts rescued from blaze
space
By SYBILLE DE LA HAMAIDE, JULIE CARRIAT
REUTERS
  
  

Email this article Print this article
Tuesday, April 16, 2019 – Page A1

PARIS -- A massive fire consumed much of NotreDame Cathedral on Monday, gutting the roof of the Paris landmark and stunning France and the world.

But firefighters managed to save the shell of the stone structure and its two main bell towers from collapse.

Flames that began in the early evening burst rapidly through the roof of the eight-centuriesold cathedral and engulfed the spire, which toppled, quickly followed by the entire roof.

As it burned into the evening, firefighters battled to prevent one of the main bell towers from collapsing and tried to rescue religious relics and priceless artwork.

One firefighter was seriously injured - the only reported casualty.

"The worst has been avoided, even if the battle has not been totally won yet," French President Emmanuel Macron told reporters at the scene shortly before midnight, as firefighters worked to further cool some of the interior structures still at risk of collapse.

Mr. Macron said France would launch a campaign to rebuild the cathedral, including through fundraising efforts and by appealing to "talents" from overseas to contribute.

"We will rebuild it together. It will undoubtedly be part of French destiny and our project for the years to come," a visibly moved Mr. Macron said.

Paris fire chief Jean-Claude Gallet said the cathedral's main structure had now been saved from complete destruction.

Distraught Parisians and stunned tourists gazed in disbelief as the inferno raged at the cathedral, which sits on the Île de la Cité, an island in the River Seine and marks the very centre of Paris.

Thousands of onlookers lined bridges over the Seine and along its embankments, held at a distance by a police cordon. Some sang Ave Maria, with others in the crowd also kneeling and praying.

World leaders expressed shock and sent condolences to the French people.

A huge plume of smoke wafted across the city and ash fell over a large area. People watching gasped as the spire folded over onto itself and fell into the inferno.

Firefighters battled smoke and falling drops of molten lead as they tried to rescue some of Notre-Dame's treasures.

The Crown of Thorns, a Catholic relic, and the tunic worn by Saint Louis, a 13th century king of France, were saved, said Notre-Dame's top administrative cleric, Monsignor Patrick Chauvet. But firefighters had struggled to take down some of the large paintings in time, he said.

The Paris prosecutor's office said it had launched an inquiry into the fire. Several police sources said that they were working on the assumption for now that it was accidental.

Mr. Macron cancelled an address to the country that he had been due to give on Monday evening in a bid to answer a wave of street protests that has rocked his presidency. Instead, he went to the scene of the blaze with his wife, Brigitte, and some of his ministers.

He thanked and congratulated emergency services and firefighters.

The French Civil Security service, possibly responding to U.S.

President Donald Trump's suggestion that firefighters "act quickly" and employ flying water tankers, said that was not an option as it might destroy the entire building.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel called the cathedral a "symbol of France and our European culture." British Prime Minister Theresa May said her thoughts were with the French people and emergency services fighting the "terrible blaze."

The Vatican said the fire at the "symbol of Christianity in France and in the world" had caused shock and sadness and said it was praying for the firefighters.

The mayor of Paris, Anne Hidalgo, said at the scene that some of many artworks that were in the cathedral had been taken out and were being put in safe storage.

The cathedral, which dates back to the 12th century, is a UNESCO World Heritage site that attracts millions of tourists every year.

It is a focal point for French Roman Catholics who like Christians around the world are celebrating Holy Week, marking the death and resurrection of Jesus.

The archbishop of Paris called on all priests in Paris to ring church bells as a gesture of solidarity for Notre-Dame.

"I have a lot of friends who live abroad and every time they come I tell them to go to NotreDame," said witness Samantha Silva, with tears in her eyes.

"I've visited it so many times, but it will never be the same. It's a real symbol of Paris."

The cathedral was in the midst of renovations, with some sections under scaffolding, and bronze statues were removed last week for works.

Built over a century starting in 1160, Notre-Dame is considered to be among the finest examples of French Gothic cathedral architecture.

It is renowned for its rib vaulting, flying buttresses and stunning stained glass windows, as well as its many carved stone gargoyles.

Its 100-metre-long roof, of which a large section was consumed in the first hour of the blaze, was one of the oldest such structures in Paris, according to

the cathedral's website.

A centre of Roman Catholic faith, over the centuries NotreDame has also been a target of political upheaval.

It was ransacked by rioting Protestant Huguenots in the 16th century, pillaged again during the French Revolution of the 1790s and left in a state of semineglect. Hugo's 1831 work led to revived interest in the cathedral and a major - partly botched - restoration that began in 1844.

The wood-and-lead spire was built during that restoration, according to the cathedral's website.

"I asked our Lord - but why?" Father Chauvet said at the scene.

"It's terrible to see our cathedral damaged like this."

Associated Graphic

The steeple of Notre-Dame collapses on Monday as smoke and flames engulf the historic cathedral in Paris.

GEOFFROY VAN DER HASSELT/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Top: Firefighters hosed down flames and smoke billowing from the Notre-Dame Cathedral's roof. They were able to save the shell of the stone structure and its two main bell towers from collapse. Left: People pray and look on in disbelief as the inferno rages at the cathedral, which sits on the Île de la Cité. Right: Smoke rises around the altar in front of the cross inside the Notre-Dame.

TOP: GEOFFROY VAN DER HASSELT/AFP/GETTY IMAGES; LEFT: CHRISTOPHE ENA/ASSOCIATED PRESS; RIGHT: PHILIPPE WOJAZE/REUTERS

Flames engulf the roof of the Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris on Monday. The cathedral is considered one of the grandest works of European architecture.

FRANCOIS GUILLOT/AFP/ GETTY IMAGES


Huh? How did I get here?
Return to Main Roy_MacGregor Page
Subscribe to
The Globe and Mail
 

Email this article Print this article

space  Advertisement
space

Need CPR for your RSP? Check your portfolio’s pulse and lower yours by improving the overall health of your investments. Click here.

Advertisement

7-Day Site Search
    

Breaking News



Today's Weather


Inside

Rick Salutin
Merrily marching
off to war
Roy MacGregor
Duct tape might hold
when panic strikes


Editorial
Where Manley is going with his first budget




space

Columnists



For a columnist's most recent stories, click on their name below.

 National


Roy MacGregor arrow
This Country
space
Jeffrey Simpson arrow
The Nation
space
Margaret Wente arrow
Counterpoint
space
Hugh Winsor  arrow
The Power Game
space
 Business


Rob Carrick arrow
Personal Finance
space
Drew Fagan arrow
The Big Picture
space
Mathew Ingram arrow
space
Brent Jang arrow
Business West
space
Brian Milner arrow
Taking Stock
space
Eric Reguly arrow
To The Point
space
Andrew Willis arrow
Streetwise
space
 Sports


Stephen Brunt arrow
The Game
space
Eric Duhatschek arrow
space
Allan Maki arrow
space
William Houston arrow
Truth & Rumours
space
Lorne Rubenstein arrow
Golf
space
 The Arts


John Doyle arrow
Television
space
John MacLachlan Gray arrow
Gray's Anatomy
space
David Macfarlane arrow
Cheap Seats
space
Johanna Schneller arrow
Moviegoer
space
 Comment


Murray Campbell arrow
Ontario Politics
space
Lysiane Gagnon arrow
Inside Quebec
space
Marcus Gee arrow
The World
space
William Johnson arrow
Pit Bill
space
Paul Knox arrow
Worldbeat
space
Heather Mallick arrow
As If
space
Leah McLaren arrow
Generation Why
space
Rex Murphy arrow
Japes of Wrath
space
Rick Salutin arrow
On The Other Hand
space
Paul Sullivan arrow
The West
space
William Thorsell arrow
space





Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space

© 2003 Bell Globemedia Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Help & Contact Us | Back to the top of this page