stats
globeinteractive.com: Making the Business of Life Easier

   Finance globeinvestor   Careers globecareers.workopolis Subscribe to The Globe
The Globe and Mail /globeandmail.com
Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space


Search

space
  This site         Tips

  
space
  The Web Google
space
   space



space

  Where to Find It


Breaking News
  Home Page

  Report on Business

  Sports

  Technology

space
Subscribe to The Globe

Shop at our Globe Store


Print Edition
  Front Page

  Report on Business

  National

  International

  Sports

  Arts & Entertainment

  Editorials

  Columnists

   Headline Index

 Other Sections
  Appointments

  Births & Deaths

  Books

  Classifieds

  Comment

  Education

  Environment

  Facts & Arguments

  Focus

  Health

  Obituaries

  Real Estate

  Review

  Science

  Style

  Technology

  Travel

  Wheels

 Leisure
  Cartoon

  Crosswords

  Food & Dining

  Golf

  Horoscopes

  Movies

  Online Personals

  TV Listings/News

 Specials & Series
  All Reports...

space

Services
   Where to Find It
 A quick guide to what's available on the site

 Newspaper
  Advertise

  Corrections

  Customer Service

  Help & Contact Us

  Reprints

  Subscriptions

 Web Site
  Advertise

  E-Mail Newsletters

  Free Headlines

  Globe Store New

  Help & Contact Us

  Make Us Home

  Mobile New

  Press Room

  Privacy Policy

  Terms & Conditions


GiveLife.ca

    

PRINT EDITION
A long and unlikely Olympic road
space
Klinkhammer never thought he would play in the Games. Now, he's a driving force on Canada's blue-collar line
space
By NEIL DAVIDSON
THE CANADIAN PRESS
  
  

Email this article Print this article
Saturday, February 17, 2018 – Page S8

GANGNEUNG, SOUTH KOREA -- Rob Klinkhammer hasn't forgotten his summer job back in junior hockey. Digging ditches will stick with you.

His stepmother got him the job at ATCO Gas in Alberta.

"I was making big bucks at the time for a junior hockey player. I think I was making 18, 19 bucks an hour," the Team Canada winger recalled Friday at the Winter Games. "I thought I was a millionaire.

"But it was long, hard days - 10-hour days. I was doing a lot of manual labour. I was digging down to gas lines so the welder could get in there and change out gas lines. So it was a lot of hard work and it motivated me to work harder in hockey because I didn't want to do that kind of job for a living if I didn't have to."

A long way from that to the Olympics, a reporter remarked.

"It's kind of funny where you come from," Klinkhammer said with a laugh. "But I truly believe that kind of made me into the player and the man I am today - just good hard-working effort, a pretty honest guy. I owe a lot to that."

The 31-year-old from Lethbridge, Alta., continues his blue collar-role with Team Canada, playing on a line with Eric O'Dell and Maxim Lapierre. Just ask Swiss captain Raphael Diaz, thumped by Klinkhammer in the first period of Canada's 5-1 win on Thursday.

"I'd like to get a hit like that every shift if I could," said Klinkhammer, who packs a punch at 6 foot 2 and 216 pounds.

"That's our job to be physical. That's our line," he added. "We're not going to lead the team in scoring but we are going to lead the team in hits. That's what we're there to do."

He did come close to scoring, ringing a hard shot off the post.

"That line plays hard. They're a big line. I think they give us some energy," head coach Willie Desjardins said.

The Canadian men take on the Czech Republic on Saturday at the Gangneung Hockey Centre. The Czechs edged South Korea 2-1 in their tournament opener.

With the NHL stars back home, Klinkhammer and his largely unheralded teammates are carrying the Maple Leaf here. They are cherishing every minute.

"People ask me if this was ever a dream. Like no, it was never a dream," he said. "I never thought this would be a possibility, playing in the Olympics for Canada. I'm not going to go take Sidney Crosby's spot.

"So it's just an unbelievable experience. I'm taking every minute in and I'm so thankful to be here."

Perhaps not surprisingly, Klinkhammer called his Olympic debut "pretty nerve-wracking."

"I think my resting heart rate was about 175 there before the game," he said. "It was tough to calm down. I think about halfway through the game everyone started to settle in, kind of get the jitters out and just play ... It was good to get the first one out of the way and obviously get the win."

Undrafted after a junior career that took him from Lethbridge to Seattle, Portland and Brandon, Klinkhammer went on to score 22 goals and add 21 assists in 193 NHL games with Chicago, Ottawa, Phoenix/Arizona, Pittsburgh and Edmonton.

He also spent time with Norfolk, Rockford, Binghamton, Portland and Bakersfield in the AHL. Now in his third season in the KHL, he plays for Ak Bars Kazan.

Life is good there, he says. The team is wellrun with plenty of support and the city of Kazan is beautiful. The players and their families live together in a gated complex.

Some 8,200 kilometres away, Lethbridge has not forgotten him. His hometown paper, the Herald, has followed his progress closely.

And he has an army of local support here.

"I've got my wife and two boys, my father, stepmother, mother- and father-in-law and my mom," he said. "I've got a whole crew over here."

Associated Graphic

Switzerland goaltender Jonas Hillermakes a save against Canadian forward Rob Klinkhammer during men's hockey action in Gangneung, South Korea, on Thursday.

NATHAN DENETTE/THE CANADIAN PRESS


Huh? How did I get here?
Return to Main Rob_Carrick Page
Subscribe to
The Globe and Mail
 

Email this article Print this article

space  Advertisement
space

Need CPR for your RSP? Check your portfolio’s pulse and lower yours by improving the overall health of your investments. Click here.

Advertisement

7-Day Site Search
    

Breaking News



Today's Weather


Inside

Rick Salutin
Merrily marching
off to war
Roy MacGregor
Duct tape might hold
when panic strikes


Editorial
Where Manley is going with his first budget




space

Columnists



For a columnist's most recent stories, click on their name below.

 National


Roy MacGregor arrow
This Country
space
Jeffrey Simpson arrow
The Nation
space
Margaret Wente arrow
Counterpoint
space
Hugh Winsor  arrow
The Power Game
space
 Business


Rob Carrick arrow
Personal Finance
space
Drew Fagan arrow
The Big Picture
space
Mathew Ingram arrow
space
Brent Jang arrow
Business West
space
Brian Milner arrow
Taking Stock
space
Eric Reguly arrow
To The Point
space
Andrew Willis arrow
Streetwise
space
 Sports


Stephen Brunt arrow
The Game
space
Eric Duhatschek arrow
space
Allan Maki arrow
space
William Houston arrow
Truth & Rumours
space
Lorne Rubenstein arrow
Golf
space
 The Arts


John Doyle arrow
Television
space
John MacLachlan Gray arrow
Gray's Anatomy
space
David Macfarlane arrow
Cheap Seats
space
Johanna Schneller arrow
Moviegoer
space
 Comment


Murray Campbell arrow
Ontario Politics
space
Lysiane Gagnon arrow
Inside Quebec
space
Marcus Gee arrow
The World
space
William Johnson arrow
Pit Bill
space
Paul Knox arrow
Worldbeat
space
Heather Mallick arrow
As If
space
Leah McLaren arrow
Generation Why
space
Rex Murphy arrow
Japes of Wrath
space
Rick Salutin arrow
On The Other Hand
space
Paul Sullivan arrow
The West
space
William Thorsell arrow
space





Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space

© 2003 Bell Globemedia Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Help & Contact Us | Back to the top of this page