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GiveLife.ca

    

PRINT EDITION
BIRTH AND DEATH NOTICES
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Saturday, January 12, 2019 – Page B16

MARY HARWOOD SHERWOOD (née Clarke)

1921 - 2018

A memorial service will be held at The Church of St.

Bartholomew, 125 MacKay Street, Ottawa, at 11.00 a.m.

on Friday, January 18. Light refreshments will be served in the Church Hall following the service. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the charity of your choice.

Condolences/Tributes/ Donations Hulse, Playfair & McGarry http://www.hpmcgarry.ca 613-233- 1143

ALLAN MILTON PAUL SMART

August 22, 1933 January 13, 2018 Deeply loved Sorely missed Forgetting you never Always in our hearts Life ends, love endures -Love Ruth, Kellie, Kara and their families

CHERRY ROBERTA ALLEN

As the sun came out in the afternoon on Friday, January 4, 2019, Cherry died peacefully, surrounded by her beloved family at Foot Flats Farm on Amherst Island, Ontario. Cherry was born in London, England on May 24, 1943, the eldest daughter of Dr. Albert Allen (former Principal/Dean of Arts and Science at University of Toronto) and Alexandra Hogg.

The family will hold a celebration of Cherry's life at the farm on Amherst Island on Saturday, May 25, 2019. All are welcome.

Donations in Cherry's memory can be made to the Amherst Island Public School, ISLE Committee (Island School Liaison Enthusiasts). Cheques can be mailed to AIPS, 5955 Front Road, Stella, Ontario K0H 2S0. Tel: (613) 389-4582. Online condolences at http://www.paynefuneralhome.com

MARY INEZ AZIZ (nee Kirk)

Inez slipped away peacefully on December 17, 2018 at the age of 97. Predeceased by her husband, Fred Aziz. Proud and loving mother and mother-in-law of Susan and Michael Innes and Tony and Jill Aziz. Much loved and cherished Nana to Lindsay Langille (Morgan) and Carolyn Bryce (Doug); and her greatgrandchildren Maya, Evan, Hayley, Noah, and Taylor.

Inez was a longtime member of the Ladies Golf Club of Toronto, an avid bridge player, and congregant of St.

Clement's Anglican Church.

She will be sadly missed by her many friends and loving family.

A private family burial and celebration of Inez's life will be held later this month. If desired, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, through their website.

DR. KEITH G. BALMAIN

August 7, 1933 January 2, 2019 Keith, aged 85 years, passed away peacefully at West Park Long Term Care Centre in Toronto. He was predeceased by his beloved wife, Shirley (2011). Keith is survived by cousins, Tanis (Whaley) Glass, Lorie (Whaley) Lyons, Ross Whaley, and Douglas Whaley and their families.

Keith was born in London, Ontario and spent his teenage years on the Whaley family farm after his father, William, passed away and his mother, Laeta, returned to her family birthplace. Keith was an outstanding student, and his cousin, George Whaley, interested him in a short-wave radio hobby.

Keith often reminisced fondly how George, a farmer/entrepreneur, told him that he would never be a 'farmer' and helped him to pursue his education in engineering at the University of Toronto. He also encouraged Keith to travel and supported him in various experiences. Keith was extremely grateful to the Whaley family for their love and support during those years.

Keith's life focused on his two loves: his career with its related research and his wife, Shirley.

He was a devoted and loving husband to Shirley, his wife of 53 years. They shared a fascination with swans and were frequent visitors to Stratford, Ontario and the Manor in north Toronto.

Together they enjoyed the ballet, classical music, art, and travel. As a professor and teacher, Keith was very fond of his students and kept in touch even when they re-located to different parts of the world.

Keith maintained a very positive outlook on life and this continued into his final days at West Park where he was very well-liked and very fondly called "The Professor."

Keith received his B.A.Sc. degree in Engineering Physics from the University of Toronto in 1957, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in 1959 and 1963 in Electrical Engineering from the University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, where he was associated with the Antenna Laboratory.

In 1966, he joined what is now The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Toronto, where he was a Professor Emeritus.

Special thanks to Dr. Peter Derkach and the staff of 3rd Floor, Raymore Wing at West Park Long Term Care Centre for their kind and compassionate care of Keith when family members were not able to be present. Keith often expressed to the family how well the staff treated him and that helped him to feel at peace.

A private family service will be held at the Whaley family farm. Online condolences may be shared at the http://www.cremationcare.ca.

Donations to a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

MARGUERITE ELLEN BECHERT (Margo)

October 27, 1922 January 4, 2019 Margo passed away at Amica after a short illness. She was born in Czechoslovakia and moved with her parents to Toronto in 1940 and lived a full life.

Margo was a Life Member of the Toronto Ski Club and enjoyed skiing until a few years ago.

In 1948, she joined the Toronto Cricket Skating and Curling Club where she also became a Life Member. Margo was an avid swimmer, lawn bowler and an original member of the croquet section. She served on many committees through the years and was supportive of figure skating competitors and also played bridge. Margo will be missed.

At Margo's request, there will be no service or celebration of her life.

SAMUEL FREDERICK BECK

It is with deep sadness that we announce the sudden passing of our beloved father, Samuel Beck on Sunday, December 30, 2018 at Credit Valley Hospital just shy of his 85th birthday. Predeceased by his wife Eleanor of 53 years.

Born in Dromore, Ireland, this strong, kind and loving Irish man was a devoted father to David, Kerry (Mark) and Brian (Anne). Proud loving grandfather to William, Madison, Joshua, Kinsey and Kaiden. Cherished brother to Margaret, Maurice, Geraldine and Neville.

He complimented a 38 year career at Ontario Hydro with several contracting businesses and endless projects. His proudest achievement was the design and construction of a beautiful cottage that became home in Muskoka; where he proudly displayed his carpentry work and robust gardens. The forever handyman was always working on his next projects or swimming with his grandchildren on Muldrew Lake.

Over the last couple of years, he enjoyed travelling extensively through North America and Europe with family and his dear friend Monika.

A Celebration of Life will be held at the R.C. Legion (#582), 456 Hensal Circle, Miss. on Saturday, January 19th from 2-4 p.m.

MARTINA BLAINE (Inge) (nee Schmidt)

Passed away peacefully on January 8, 2019. Born in Jagerndorf, Czechoslovakia on July 10, 1923, her 95 years took her from wartorn Europe to New York, Montreal, Toronto and finally, Stratford, ON.

Her passions included the cottage in Haliburton, concerts at Roy Thompson Hall, ballroom dancing and a love of Canadian fine art. Now united with husband Gene and son Chris, and lovingly remembered by sons, Tim (Wendy) and Sean (Kirsten); grandkids, Dustin, Kyle, Shannon, Nicole, Erin and Leigha; and great-granddaughters, Natalie and Keira, her unconditional love lives on within all of us.

Visitation at W.G. Young Funeral Home, 430 Huron St. Stratford, Thursday, January 17, 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. Funeral Friday, January 18, 2 p.m. (visitation 1-2 p.m.). Reception to follow at Stratford Festival Theatre Marquee, 55 Queen St., 3-5 p.m.

Memorial donations to Stratford Perth Rotary Hospice Foundation or charity of one's choice are welcome (http://www.wyoungfuneralhome.com)

GEORGE CLAYTON BRITTON JR.

Born June 27, 1924, George died peacefully at K Wing, Sunnybrook Veterans Centre on January 9, 2019. Son of the late George Clayton Britton Sr. and Kate Rebecca Broddy, brother of Barbara Thomas (the late Malcolm) and predeceased by Robert Britton (Gwen) and Kate Tillson. Beloved husband and best friend for 46 years of the late Barbara Jane Wilson. Greatly loved father of Susan, the late George 'Brit', Martha (Joel) and Nancy and loving and much beloved grandfather of Samantha, Jonathon, Benjamin and Georgia.

George enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force when he was 18 and served overseas before returning to earn his Professional Engineer designation and his MBA. George had a long and rewarding career as an executive at TransCanada Pipelines, travelling the world on many projects. But his heart was at home with his family and he devoted his life to them and their well-being, creating a lifetime of wonderful memories. George's other great passion was golf which he took up when he was seven, only putting down his clubs at the age of 93. The longest standing member of York Downs Golf & C.C., George served as President, Men's Captain and on many committees and in 1992 was made an honorary lifetime member.

George and Barb were blessed to have a wonderful group of friends, both at York Downs and in their neighbourhood with whom they shared many fun times over the years. George was one of the great gentlemen whose strength of character, intelligence and wisdom were inspiring to many.

We will always remember him by his credo, do the right thing. Our only regret will be that Dad never achieved that long sought after hole-in-one.

We would like to thank the many caregivers who provided Dad with exceptional care over the last year of his life, in particular the team at K Wing. Cremation and burial have taken place. A Celebration of Life will be held in the Spring.

In lieu of flowers, donations to Princess Margaret Cancer Fund directed to Leukemia Research Fund, North York General Hospital Foundation or to the Sunnybrook Health Science Centre directed to the K Wing Veterans Centre would be greatly appreciated.

WILLIAM DOUGLAS CHAMBERS "Bill"

Bill passed away January 2, 2019. Despite the ravages of polio in 1953, Bill excelled academically, gold medalist at Queen's, a graduate of Osgoode Hall and practised with Fraser/Beatty - Dentons.

A fellow lawyer from Chicago described him as a "lawyer's lawyer, someone who had the ability to combine the scholarly with the practical and who recognized that a lawyer's responsibility is to solve problems rather than create them."

Bill loved good food, good wine and vigorous discussion with family and friends. He will be missed by colleagues, brothers and extended family because he was caring, generous, honest and a lot of fun to be with.

A celebration of life will be planned for close family and friends in the spring.

PATRICIA ANN CIPRICK

On Wednesday, January 9, 2019, Patricia Ann Ciprick of Toronto passed away of heart failure at the age of 80 years. She will be sadly missed by her family and many friends. Pat was predeceased by her husband of 43 years, Bill; and is survived by her two daughters, Karen (Greg) Watson of Toronto and Lynn (Derek) Schreurs of Kamloops; two sons, Mike (Carolyn) of Edmonton and Bill (Christy) of Montreal; and nine grandchildren, Matt, David, Jennifer, Ashley, Charlie, Jack, Anna, Thomas, and Grace.

Pat was born in Cornwall, Ontario on May 26, 1938. She was a registered nurse at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal where she met Bill. They spent sixteen years in Oakville, Ontario and then moved their family to Kamloops, BC in 1979 before Pat returned to Ontario in 2007. Pat enjoyed golfing, travelling and spending time with her good friends. She loved, and was very proud of her family.

A Celebration of Pat's life will be held at Kilgour Estates, 20 Burkebrook Place, Toronto on Saturday, January 12th, from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. with everyone welcome to share stories starting at 3:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations in memory of Patricia Ciprick be directed to the 'Schulich Heart Centre' in care of the Sunnybrook Foundation, KGW01-2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, ON, M4N 3M5, 416-480-4483.

An additional Celebration of Life will be held in Kamloops, BC on Saturday March 2nd, from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the home of Lynn and Derek Schreurs.

Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

BEATRICE MARGARET BLACKSTOCK CORBETT

August 25, 1922 November 15, 2018 Commemoration and Celebration of Life to be held at St. George's Cathedral, Kingston, Ontario, at 1 p.m.

on Saturday, January 26th.

Reception to follow at HMCS Cataraqui.

JOHN ALPINE SCOTT COUSE

With great sorrow, the family of John Couse announces his passing on January 6, 2019 at 98 years of age after a brief struggle with a respiratory infection.

Just 12 days before, his children, grandchildren, their partners, and his caregivers had celebrated with him over a Christmas dinner at which his strength and equanimity were still much in evidence. John was the last of his generation to leave us and was predeceased by his four brothers and sister, as well as his wife, Phyllis, in 2009.

Born at home in Cookstown, Ontario on August 28, 1920 to John R. Couse and Clara Monkman, he grew up with his four brothers and sister in circumstances he described optimistically as idyllic, but never got over the death of his mother in 1928 and younger brother, Paul, in 1934. He left home in 1937 without completing high school and took various jobs in northern Ontario as a mechanic, logger, and welder before enrolling in the Machine School in Galt, graduating at the top of his class to become a draftsman and millwright at a munitions manufacturer in Toronto. Enlisting on New Years Day 1942, to ensure the medical examiner's hangover would prevent him from noticing John's partial blindness, he went to sea for two years on the convoy escort frigate HMCS Montreal (K319) as an Ordnance Artificer, rising to the rank of Chief Petty Officer and serving until the end of the war. Returning to Canada, John opened and operated a machine repair shop in Cookstown with his brother, Keith, during summer months while obtaining his senior matriculation at Ryerson Collegiate in Toronto, before enrolling in Engineering at the U. of T. in 1946. During his last 'skule' year in 1950, John contracted tuberculosis, entering the sanatorium at Sunnybrook Hospital before his final exams.

Expected not to live, U. of T.

awarded him his degree on compassionate grounds, seriously underestimating his durability by 70 years. After convalescing, John embarked on his career in 1953, working with Cochrane, Cancorp (Baldrive), and Bundy of Canada over the years. He met the love of his life (and unstoppable force of nature) Phyllis Johnson, while skiing at Mont Tremblant in 1954 and they married in 1955.

Family followed soon after with Chris (Carol Elder), Joel (Ariane Roumier), and Carolyn (Kim Jepson) being born in 1957, 1960, and 1962. After a busy and active career, John retired in 1985 to cultivate his many interests and enjoy his growing family, all of whom he loved unreservedly and in whose accomplishments he took enormous pride. He was seldom without a list of 25 projects launching or underway when he was not travelling or skiing, which he did until age 90.

John was a great friend, mentor, partner, brother, father, grandfather, uncle, and neighbour. His occupations included paperboy, grocer's assistant, welder, draftsman, serviceman (RCN), blacksmith, machinist, mechanical engineer, manager, board member, and educator. Among his many pursuits he was a sailor, skier, duck hunter, fisher, music lover and musician, carpenter, amateur astronomer, beekeeper, apple farmer, builder, sundial maker, lip-reader, Francophile and French-speaker. John was passionately engaged with life and the people around him. He will be remembered by many as a consummate charmer, conversationalist, wit, raconteur, mischief maker, and avid fan of woman-kind. Deafness that neared totality from mid-life on and bouts with TB, prostate cancer, hernias, partial blindness, and cataracts did little to hold him back.

John's life was long and his fortunes were great; as he would have said, he had 'a good run.' A reception to celebrate his life will be held on January 18th, following a service at the Mount Pleasant Cemetery Cremation Centre (formerly Mount Pleasant Mausoleum), Carfrae Chapel at noon. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Hearing Society would be appreciated.

NEIL F. CRORY

March 29, 1 950 - January 10, 2019 In February 1977, Neil was a quiet, resolute young man from rural Alberta attending university in Edmonton where one of his professors, the distinguished Canadian composer, Violet Archer, wrote, "Neil Crory promises to be a first rate professional musician." And that's exactly what Neil became for this entire country through his stellar career as a Senior Music Producer in CBC Radio Music during those days when the Corporation recorded and broadcast Canada's classical musicians and singers.

Among Neil's most treasured accomplishments are a score of CDs that garnered eight JUNO awards, an American Grammy nomination, and an East Coast Music Award. Then there were the 1997 CBC Schubertiade, and the famous New Year's Eve Gala at Roy Thomson Hall welcoming the 21st century with twelve of Canada's greatest opera singers. Other highlights include several Glenn Gould celebrations honouring, among others, YoYo Ma, Oscar Peterson, André Previn and Pierre Boulez; gala concerts from Rideau Hall; national broadcasts of Tafelmusik, Toronto Symphony, Canadian Opera Company, and Opera Atelier. His proudest achievement was the inspiring Maureen Forrester Memorial Tribute (2010) at Stratford Summer Music. In addition, Neil made innumerable contributions to the pages of Opera Canada and other publications.

In the tender company of his loving partner, Bruce Galbraith, and his cherished sister, Maxine Delaney, Neil left this sphere listening to the songs he loved most, Richard Strauss' Four Last Songs.

At a future date, yet to be identified, Neil's friends, colleagues and admirers are invited to a musical gathering fittingly to recognize his life and his accomplishments.

As he wished, an endowment fund has been created for the Stratford Summer Music Vocal Academy to support two of Neil's passions, the training and the presentation of young Canadian classical singers and the popularization of the Lieder of Richard Strauss. Donations in his honour would be appreciated to Neil Crory Fund, administered by the Ontario Arts Foundation for the music festival. Contributions accepted at http://www.oafdn.ca/make-a-donation. Other enquiries: Stratford Summer Music (1-866-288-4313, ext. 1).

To share memories and make memorial donations, please visit his memorial webpage at http://www.ecofuneral.ca.

Convey me to some peaceful shore where no tumultuous billows roar where life, though joyless, still is calm and sweet content is sorrow's balm.

There, free from pomp and care to wait, forgetting and forgot, the will of fate.

Handel's oratorio, Alexander Balus

ETHEL COVENT

January 10, 2019 at Sunnybrook Palliative Care surrounded by family and friends. Beloved wife of the late Harold Covent. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Warren and Rodell, Murray and Ellen, and Patricia. Dear sister of the late Fran and the late Minnie.

Dear Bubbie of many grandchildren and many greatgrandchildren. A woman of great love who will be missed by many.

At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Sunday, January 13, 2019 at 2:30 p.m. Interment at Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. Shiva at 65 Skymark Drive #2705, Toronto. Memorial donations may be made to Baycrest Foundation, (416) 785-2875 or Toronto Public Library Foundation, (416) 393-7123.

HON. PIERRE DE BANÉ P.C., Q.C.

It is with great sadness that the family of Pierre De Bané announces his passing at the Ottawa Heart Institute on January 9, 2019. He will be deeply missed by his wife, Elisabeth Nadeau (m. 1980); his son Jean-Manuel, his brother Joseph (Suzanne Tritschler); his sister Thérèse, his son's mother Andréanne Bournival; his five grandchildren Pénélope, Jean-Gabriel, Delphine, Laurent, Lambert and his cousins and many nieces and nephews.

Born in Haïfa, Palestine, in 1938, he immigrated to Canada at the age of 11. He studied law at Laval University and was admitted to the Bar of Québec in 1964. He became a Professor at Laval University Law School in the same year.

After joining a law firm in Québec City, he pleaded cases before courts in many jurisdictions, including the Supreme Court of Canada. In 1967, he began working for the then Minister of Justice, the Honourable Pierre Elliott Trudeau. In 1968, he was elected Member of Parliament for the riding of Matane and then Matapédia-Matane, making him the first Canadian Parliamentarian of Arab descent. He won five successive mandates and proudly represented the citizens of his riding for over 16 years. During that time he served as Minister of the Crown in several portfolios.

In 1984, he was appointed to the Senate, a position he held for 29 years. At the time of his retirement in 2013 after more than 45 years of parliamentary service, his combined career in the two Houses made him the Dean of Parliament. He was especially proud of his contribution to l'Assemblée parlementaire de la Francophonie (APF), having served as the chair of the Parliamentary Affairs Committee for 19 years.

The Hon. Pierre De Bané will be remembered for his devotion to his family and friends, his love for his country, his attachment to his middle-eastern roots, his passion for language rights, and his lifetime commitment to public service.

The family would like to express their heartfelt thanks to the staff of the University of Ottawa Heart Institute. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the University of Ottawa Heart Institute Foundation.

Details regarding the memorial service will be provided at a later date. Tributes may be sent to http://www.racinerobertgauthier.com; 613-241-3680

DR. GRANT ANGUS FARROW

We are extraordinarily grateful for the generous and exceptional life of Dr.

Grant Angus Farrow, which ended peacefully at home on January 5, 2019 in his 85th year, following his recent decline with Alzheimer's Disease. As was consistent with his kind spirit and gentle manner, this true gentleman was graceful until the end.

Seven years ago, Grant was blessed with a wonderful new chapter in his life with his marriage to Ruth (nee Peterson). Ruth brought joy and vibrancy to his life, and loving care through his death. We are so thankful for Ruth, and the happiness she brought back into Grant's world.

Grant was predeceased by Jill (nee Weatherstone), his loving wife of 47 years, who he met at age 12. They leave their children, Susan (Blake Hutcheson) and Trevor (Mary Birdsell); and four beautiful grandchildren, Camille, Trevor, Morley and Joseph. He also leaves behind his two brothers and dear friends, his twin George (Diane Adams) and older brother Milt (Mary Bodrug).

Grant was a world-renowned urological surgeon, who pioneered numerous surgical procedures, including performing the first human kidney transplant at the Toronto General Hospital. He will be remembered by thousands of patients and families whose lives he touched across North America, Europe and Asia through his 50-year career.

Among his many medical contributions, Grant was a McLaughlin Travelling Fellow in Surgery from Paris and London, a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the American College of Surgeons, Past President of The Academy of Medicine, the American Urological Association, and the Medico-Legal Society of Toronto. He is a Past Canadian Chair of the American College of Surgeons, a Past Chair of the International Society of Urology, and a valued member of multiple medical and surgical societies.

He also humbly served numerous medical, education, corporate and community boards.

Grant was loved and honoured by the church communities he served, and was Clerk of Session Emeritus at St. Andrew's Church, and Past Warden at St.

Peters-on-the-Rock. We are so grateful for his long-time colleagues, friends and family in Toronto, Oakville, Stony Lake, and around the world, who have loved and supported him his whole life.

A celebration of Grant's beautiful life will be held at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Toronto (King and Simcoe), at 3 p.m. on Friday, January 18, 2019, with a reception to follow at the Church. In lieu of flowers, we respectfully ask you to consider a donation to the Toronto General & Western Hospital Foundation, or St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Toronto, which provides extensive inner-city programs.

MARGARET B. DOOLAN 1924 - 2019 Passed away in Ottawa on January 5, 2019, one month shy of her 95th birthday. She was predeceased by her three siblings, Helen Daly, Betty Anderson and Shirley Lahey.

She leaves behind many nieces and nephews and grand nieces and nephews that admired her independent spirit, her tenacity, her keen intellect and zest for life.

She was especially close to her nieces, Sheila Whyte (Ron), Eileen Daly, Patricia Santos (Carlos); and nephews, Paul Daly (Sue), Michael Daly and all their children.

Margaret was born and raised in Halifax to John and Katherine Doolan. She was a graduate of Mount St. Vincent College and did her Post Graduate degree at Dalhousie University in Halifax and her Masters of Social Work at Boston College. Marg eventually went on to teach Social Work at the University of Toronto from 1960 - 1987.

A family memorial and interment will be held at Pinecrest Cemetery in Ottawa at a later date. In memoriam donations can be made to Inter Pares, Ottawa.

Online condolences may be made at http://www.colefuneralservices.com

THE REVEREND DOCTOR MARGARET EVELYN FLECK

After 86 fulfilling years, Margaret died peacefully with her husband, Jim, holding her hand on Sunday evening, January 6, 2019, Epiphany, and the 34th anniversary of her ordination as a minister.

She spent her primary school years in the care of her cousins in Winnipeg. Later she attended Central Collegiate in London, Ontario where she developed choreographic and dancing skills.

At the University of Western Ontario, her extracurricular activities included cheerleading and tap dancing in the Purple Patches annual revue.

Her love of music and dancing proved to be formative. It was on a Montréal football weekend in 1951 that the cheerleader Margaret met the cymbal-playing band member, Jim. Although he was her third date of the evening, that date started a partnership that included over 65 years of marriage, and gave us Robert (1954), Ellen (1958), David (1959), and Christopher (1969).

She presided over the family as they moved to Asia, Europe and the U.S.; that included six houses in eight years in Japan, France, and Boston, followed by 52 years in one house in Toronto.

Grandchildren followed; Jamie, Erin, Seymore, parented by Robert and Elaine and co-raised by Gary; Quinn and Devon from David and Yvonne, followed by two adorable great-grands, Marion and Corrina by Jamie and Bruno.

When the family returned from Boston to Toronto in 1966, Margaret was solicited by the priest of the St. Augustine of Canterbury Anglican Church to take over a youth group of four young people which she named "DJ's" (Disciples of Jesus) expanding over the next few years to 53. Her group thought calling her Mrs. Fleck was too formal and Margaret was too informal, so they settled on "Flash" to recognize the speed of her movement.

That experience started her on a path that lead from the Centre for Christian Studies and the Episcopal Divinity School, to a Master of Divinity and an Honorary Doctor of Divinity at Trinity College, University of Toronto.

Ordained in 1984, Margaret served in four parishes and was a volunteer hospital chaplain.

She was also deeply involved in Loft Community Services and the Sisterhood of St John the Divine.

After her retirement, she carried on as Honourary Associate Priest and as part of the Pastoral Care team at St. Augustine.

Margaret lightened up a room with her smile and interacted easily and intuitively with others.

Always curious and observant, her travel included 19 years of biking in Europe and many Mediterranean music cruises.

Toward the end of her life she faced many difficult medical challenges and felt ready to move on. We will all miss her ebullience, warmth and remarkable generosity of spirit.

The funeral will take place at 2 p.m. on Monday, January 21 at Trinity College Chapel, University of Toronto, 6 Hoskin Ave. with overflow, if required, in the Fleck Atrium, Rotman School, 105 St.

George Street just around the corner. A live streaming link will be provided in next Friday's obituaries. Reception following in Seeley Hall to meet the family and reminisce.

In lieu of flowers, Margaret would love you to donate to LOFT Community Services at http://www.loftcs.org.

HAZEL DOREEN GLAVIN-SHADLOCK (Dee)

February 16, 1927 Toronto, Ontario December 31, 2018 Calgary, Alberta It is with profound sadness that we announce the passing of Doreen (Dee) Glavin-Shadlock in Calgary, Alberta on Monday, December 31, 2018 at the age of 91.

Dee is survived by her daughter, Karen (Paula); son, Jeff (Roxanne); brother, Steve (Lyn); sister-in-law, Pat; her grandchildren, Meagan, Ian, Lyndsay, Jennifer; her six great-grandchildren, Vincent, Noah, Gabriel, Scarlett, Augustus, Eliana; and several nieces, nephews, and cousins. She was predeceased by her husband, Earl and dear brother, Terry.

To view and share photos, condolences, and stories of Dee please visit http://www.choicememorial.com.

DR. JEAN-YVES GOSSELIN

Psychiatrist (Retired) - Faculty of Medecine, University of Ottawa On Tuesday, January 8, 2019, at the age of 89. Widower of the late Ghyslaine (née Gauvin). Beloved father of Benoit (Christine), François (the late Geneviève Dionne) and Anne-Marie (David Strong). Proud grandfather of Stéphanie, Sophie, Alexandre, Julien, Philippe, Emmanuelle, Erik, Lucca and Patrick. Cherished uncle to numerous nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his parents Auxilia (née Létourneau) and Mathias Gosselin, his 2 brothers and 6 sisters.

The family wishes to sincerely thank the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre team, the Central Palliative Care Group and Cité Parkway Retirement Residence for the quality of care provided.

Friends are invited to pay respects at the Beechwood National Memorial Centre, 280 Beechwood Ave. Ottawa, on Friday, January 18th, from 2 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held Saturday, January 19th, at NotreDame Cathedral Basilica, 385 Sussex Drive, Ottawa at 11 a.m.

In memoriam donations can be made to the Francois-deLaval College Foundation (http://www.collegefdl.ca/fondation) or to the Honens International Piano Competition Foundation (Honens.com).

DR. HERBERT FREDRICK HABERMAN

Loving husband father and grandfather died at home on January 1, 2019.

FREDERICK JAMES SCOTT HALL Scott Hall was born in Toronto on September 26, 1946 and died in Victoria, BC on December 10, 2018.

During the intervening years, he raised a little hell and fought life to a draw, claiming at the end "life is overrated." Predeceased by his parents, Muriel Hall and Fergus Glencross Hall of Toronto; Scott leaves his children, Joel and Marissa Legate; his grandchildren, Rylan, Sasha and Nathan O'Connor; and former wife, Darlene Young.

Educated at Upper Canada College ('54 -'64), Trinity College, University of Toronto, and the University of Toronto Law School ('64-'71), Scott hoped to change the world or at least the part Canada played in it. He found that helping others attain elected office was more to his liking than putting his own name forward.

"I can't lie; I can't help it," Scott once said. He worked on 35 political campaigns. He worked hard for then Prime Minister Kim Campbell, whom he described after she lost the 1993 election as "Almost the best Prime Minister we never had, except that she was Prime Minister...Go figure."

After writing for the CBC for a number of years in the 1970s, and later for Canadian comedic icon Don Harron, on television, Scott passed up an opportunity to work on the first year of Saturday Night Live in New York and chose instead to write in Los Angeles for Freddie Prinze, a comedian who killed himself soon after Scott began to write for Prinze's television show.

Scott retreated to law as a career. "I had no other skills," he said.

After so many years out of the legal milieu, what few skills he had were soon closely scrutinized by the Law Society of British Columbia, which took issue with some of Scott's unorthodox behaviour. Often called on the carpet by his peers, Scott soon learned that "I was only kidding..." is not an excuse that holds much water in law and after getting his knuckles rapped over a series of unfortunate incidents, he finally got his mind right. He helped hundreds of people deal with childhood sexual abuse. He wrote a best selling book titled "Unforgivable Sins," and spent years working with First Nations who had suffered sexual abuse in Canada's residential school system. He had few regrets.

In lieu of flowers or donations, Scott encourages everyone to perform random acts of kindness, if they are moved to do so. He'll be seeing you all soon. Or not.

HELEN HUBER (nee Wolkowicz)

October 21, 1 934 January 6, 2019 Helen lived a long, full life. She was raised on a small farm in Beeton, Ontario and moved to Toronto at the age of 18 to begin her career as a public school teacher. She earned a BA and eventually became a principal.

At her last posting, Sheppard Public School, she founded a steel band for all interested children and, in her typical playon-words style, enlisted the active support of Moe Koffman (Swingin' Shepherd Blues) to inspire them.

After retirement she mentored gifted students.

Helen had a restless energy, a rapier wit and no tolerance for boredom, fuss and nonsense.

She loved to cook and entertain.

She was generous with her friends. She travelled the world with a light suitcase and many companions, and volunteered for several years at the Toronto Jazz Festival. Other passions included cats, needlework, cryptic crosswords and butterflies. And interesting parties.

When various afflictions forced a move to Long Term Care four years ago, Helen accepted the radical change in her life with unexpected grace and pragmatism, yet never relinquished her right to shape her life. Unable to read much, she devoured American political TV news and was often primed for a spirited discussion.

The Jazz Lady (a.k.a. 'H') will be acutely missed by her brother Michael and his wife Patricia (Victoria BC), and by her devoted and loving friends, Sonny and Nadia Fertile (Etobicoke). She is predeceased by her bosom buddy and co-conspirator of longest standing, Marilyn O'Hagan, who left in advance last summer to light tiki torches for Helen's final journey.

Private arrangements have been made through York Funeral Centre. Memorial donations to a charity of your choice or to Helen's chosen charities (MusiCounts, The Canadian Children's Book Centre and the Humane Society) are deeply appreciated.

GORHAM WOOD HUSSEY

July 14, 1931 December 19, 2018 With sadness Gorham's family announces his passing at Sarcee Hospice in Calgary, Alberta after a short illness. He is survived by his beloved wife, Mary Jane (nee Kilpatrick); and his three sons, Brian (Elizabeth), Peter (Winky) and Andrew (Kathleen). He also leaves four grandchildren, Lucas, Duncan, Clarkie and Clementine.

Gorham was born in Bangor, Maine and is the son of Serena and Frank Hussey. Growing up in the potato farming area of Maine provided him with a direction for a life plan. He graduated from Phillips Academy in Massachusetts, University of Maine, Harvard Business School and Purdue University PhD.

in Agricultural Economics. His professional career was in the food business sphere. He worked for several food companies in the United States and Canada. In 1985 his work brought him to Calgary, Alberta along with his wife and youngest son Andrew.

Following retirement he had time and passion to work for a sustainable environment and social justice for all people. His delights and joy throughout life came from time with family and friends, being in the world of nature, and from acts of service to others.

A service of Celebration and Gratitude for Gorham's life will be held on February 9 at 2:00 p.m. in the Unitarian Church of Calgary at 1703 1st Street NW, Calgary, AB T2M 4P4, reception to follow. Donations in Gorham's memory can be directed to either: Calgary Unitarian Church/ Endowment Trust Fund: 1703 1st Street N.W. Calgary AB T2P 4P4 or Alberta Wilderness Association: w w w. A l b e r t a W i l d e r n e s s . c a / donate Calgary Health Trust: http://www.calgaryhealthtrust.org/ donate. Condolences may be forwarded through www.

mcinnisandholloway.com.

In living memory of Gorham Hussey, a tree will be planted at Fish Creek Provincial Park by McInnis & Holooway Funeral Homes, Crowfoot, 82 Crowfoot Circle N.W. Calgary, AB, T3G 2T3, Telephone: 403-241-0044.

ANDREW DAVID JAMIESON

On Monday, January 7, 2019 at the Hospice House Kansas City Andrew David Jamieson (Andy) passed away peacefully after a long, courageous journey. Andy was born in Vancouver, Canada to Betty and the late Mac Jamieson on May 14, 1964. He was the much loved brother of Doug (Shelly) of Toronto, Canada and Sara of Prairie Village, KS, and was predeceased by his other siblings, Reg Jamieson and Nancy Tompkins. He was an adored uncle of Heather and Michael Jamieson of Toronto, Canada, and was supported for many years by his loyal service dog and friend, Bentley.

The family wants to thank the many friends and caregivers who stood by him over the years. Cremation has taken place, and in lieu of flowers, the family would like to encourage donations in Andy's memory to http://www.servicedogsforamerica.org.

Condolences may be left online at http://www.mcgilleystatelinechapel.com.

MARGARET K. LOVE "Peggy"

September 1, 1923 January 6, 2019 Peggy Love, beloved wife of the late Len Love, passed away peacefully on Sunday, January 6, 2019, at the age of 95 years.

Peggy was the devoted mother of Judy Rice and Tom Love and the dedicated mother-in-law of Bill Rice and Dianne Love. She was an extremely proud grandmother to Tiffany (Kevin Shaw) and Todd (April) Rice and to Michael (Mallory) and Jaimie Love, as well as great-grandmother to Calia and Jaiden Rice in Singapore and to Tova Love in Calgary.

Having lived most of their lives in Montreal, Peggy and Len moved to Calgary in 1990, to join their family.

The family wishes to thank the entire staff at Garrison Greens Seniors Community for their much appreciated care over the last four years.

A memorial service will be held at a later date. If friends so desire, memorial tributes may be made directly to the Canadian Red Cross Society, Southern Alberta Region, 2nd Floor, 1305 - 11 Avenue S.W., Calgary, AB T3C 3P6, Telephone: (403) 541-6100, http://www.redcross.ca.

In living memory of Margaret Love a tree will be planted at Fish Creek Provincial Park by McInnis & Holloway Funeral Homes, Park Memorial, 5008 Elbow Drive S.W., Calgary, AB, T2S 2L5, Telephone: 403-243-8200.

DOUGLAS WILLIAM MAHAFFY

March 15, 1945 January 6, 2019 We are devastated to announce that Douglas William Mahaffy lost his short but valiant fight against metastatic melanoma. His adoring family was with him to provide support and comfort to him in his final days.

Shakespeare could not have been more wrong when his Soothsayer warned "Beware the Ides of March", as an incredibly loving man was born on March 15, 1945 to Howard and Kirby Mahaffy.

He is survived by the love of his life and his wife of 50 years, Adrienne (née Faust).

He will be forever loved and never forgotten by his children, Kirsten, Scott (Kathleen), Roy, Nicole and Michelle and his kind and thoughtful grandchildren, Nicholas, Lauren, Logan, Beatrice and Neveah.

Doug had a profound influence on countless people throughout the years. His legacy will be one of kindness, respect, generosity and philanthropy. These traits are well known to his family and friends who would all agree that Doug made the world a better place.

He was an avid traveler and, from Baffin Island to Mozambique, it would be difficult to find a place on the map on which Doug had not stepped foot with his constant travel companion Adrienne at his side. His love for playing hockey and baseball as a youth evolved into a passion for skiing, golf and racquet sports. He read voraciously to the point where it was difficult to recommend a book that he had not already read. Every friend was the beneficiary of his love of fine wine as he delighted in finding just the right bottle to share.

Doug would not want his many accomplishments highlighted but they are worth noting as evidence that a good, kindhearted person can achieve great success. He attended East York Collegiate and would go on to earn both a B.A. and an M.B.A. from York University. In between degrees, he achieved the Chartered Accountant designation.

He went on to have a successful career in business including senior executive positions at Hudson's Bay Company and Merrill Lynch and a long and impactful tenure as President and Chief Executive Officer of McLean Budden Limited. He proudly served on the Investment Committee of the Sunnybrook Hospital Foundation as well as the Board of Directors of Stelco Inc., Methanex Corporation and the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board.

The business world is not known as a place of great compassion but Doug proved that a strong leader need not be a tyrant. He established a warm atmosphere in which kindness was seen as an asset and in which the birth of a colleague's child was as important as winning a new account. As a result, it has been no surprise to hear such incredibly warm words of kindness and support from those with whom he has worked over the years. Many of those messages were shared with him and gave him encouragement during treatment.

His family would like to pass along their most sincere thanks to his friends, as the support provided has been immeasurable. Many thanks also to the doctors, nurses and staff at the Odette Cancer Centre for their efforts. The family would also like to thank the doctors, nurses and technicians with the Local Health Integration Network for enabling him to find peace in the comfort of his own home. The compassion and advice of Dr. Peter Goldfarb will also not be forgotten. The family is deeply grateful for the incredible dedication and warmth shown by the staff of The Florian who made sure that his every need was met with a smile.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Melanoma Research at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre.

Friends and family can make their donation via Sunnybrook Foundation by phone (416-4804483), web https://donate.

sunnybrook.ca/tribute or mail c/o Sunnybrook Foundation 2075 Bayview Avenue, KGW-01 Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 There will be a celebration of Doug's life in the Spring.

We are heartbroken because the world has lost not only a great man, but it has lost a profoundly good man.

JANICE LYN MCCORMICK

August 2, 1951 December, 29, 2018 With sadness, we announce the passing of Janice McCormick on December 29, 2018, due to complications related to her brain injury. She was predeceased by her father, Clare. She is missed by her mother, Aileen; sister, Gwenn (David) England; her husband, Gary Hirose; nieces and nephews: Corey (David), Laura (Clayton), Stephanie (Tom), Kristi (Scott), Kari (Matt), Nikki, Lucas and Jordan; and close friends: Janine Rousseau, Dean Brown, Miriam and Victor Dattel.

Janice was born in Brandon, Manitoba and traveled extensively as a proverbial "army brat", as her father, Clare's military career kept the young family on the move to CFB Gagetown in New Brunswick, then to one of the Canadian Infantry Brigade Groups (CIBG) stationed in Hemer, Germany, and finally, returning to CFB Shilo, 35 km east of Brandon, Manitoba.

Janice studied Nursing at the University of Manitoba and soon met another aspiring nurse, Janine Rousseau, and they formed a tour de force to be reckoned with, besides a lifelong friendship that spanned 50 years.

Janice's adventurous and outgoing spirit led her to New Orleans and a fulfilling job at Tulane Medical Centre in the Dialysis Department. Janice's love of music, dancing and laid-back style was a perfect fit with the Crescent City.

Miriam Dattel, another longtime friend, created a nursing position customized to fit Janice's unique skills at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, and not surprisingly, was the best candidate, and was hired, and they resumed their great friendship for life.

During a dinner party at the home of Miriam and her husband, Victor, Janice met an unexpected late guest, Gary Hirose, who was visiting from Ottawa. It was love at first sight...at least for Janice.

But Gary soon realized that this could be the special someone he'd been waiting for all his life...

and she was. They shared a loving marriage and a great friendship for 30 years.

Janice was a confirmed feminist, and strong supporter of women's rights and issues.

Her Ph.D. dissertation is titled: "The Discourses of Control: Power in Nursing". She taught at UVic in the School of Nursing, Langara Campus.

After Janice's tragic biking accident in 2004, Janice's abilities gradually declined. Janice and Gary moved to North Vancouver in 2014 where they enjoyed life as much as possible for the last few years of her life.

We greatly appreciate the amazing care that Janice received from Dr. Michelle Brousson and Dr. Sue Lejay. Also, we greatly appreciate the wonderful care that Janice received from the staff at the Lionsgate Hospital and the Vancouver Coastal Health, Home and Community Care, North Shore Health Unit.

A Celebration of Life will be held in Janice's honour on Saturday, February 2, 2019, 2:30-7:30 p.m.

in the Capilano Room, Memorial Community Centre, 125 East 23rd Street, North Vancouver, B.C. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the charity of your choice.

DOUGLAS ANTHONY McGREAL MD FRCPC,

Pediatric Neurologist 1923-2018 It is with profound sadness that we share the sudden passing of Douglas McGreal, on December 9, 2018.

Predeceased by his wife, June; Douglas is survived by his children: Suzanne, Allysone (Patrick), Andrew (Inci); and his grandchildren: Spencer, Bella, Eleanor and Evren.

A renowned researcher, educator, and neurologist, Douglas served Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children his entire career. He was also a passionate historian and a much-revered grandpa and babysitter.

A Celebration of Life will be held on January 27 from 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. at 38 Avoca Avenue, Toronto. All are welcome.

ELIZABETH A. BONNIE McPHIE (née Jack)

Born in Toronto to J. Gordon and Mary (MacDougall) Jack.

Loving and beloved wife of the late Donald Stewart McPhie (1992). Loving mother of Robert J. McKelvey (Edna) of Sydney, Australia, and stepchildren Lynn McConkey (Jim) of Mississauga and Peter McPhie (Nancy) of Minden.

Much loved grandma to Sean (Janet), Louise (Nigel), Susan (Frank), Amanda (Damian), Kate (Kevin), and Iain. Great grandmother of 8 great grandchildren. Predeceased by brother Gordon H. Jack (Carol) and sister Margaret M.

Knechtel (Russell).

Friends may call at the Turner & Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., at Windermere, east of Jane subway on Monday, January 14, 2019 from 10 a.m. until the time of the Service in the Chapel at 11 a.m. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. For those who wish, donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society. Online condolences may be made through http://www.turnerporter.ca

ANDRZEJ PAWLOWSKI

January 11, 2019 Please join us in celebrating the life of physician, sculptor and author, Andrzej Pawlowski, born in Warsaw, Poland in 1933. Andrzej completed his medical training at Warsaw Medical School where he also received his PhD. In 1973, he was invited to join the faculty at the University of Toronto Canada where his research of melanoma cast the foundations for today's medical advancements in the detection and treatment of skin cancer. Andrzej was also a successful private practitioner as a dermatologist and positively affected hundreds of lives. Beyond medicine, Andrzej's passions extended to art, literature and history. He was a prolific sculptor and writer. His legacy will continue to inspire his loving family and friends for generations to come.

Friends may call at the Gathering Room, 18 Lower Village Gate, Toronto, on Saturday, January 12, 2019 at 3 p.m.

NORMAN SIM REID (1938-2019)

Passed away surrounded by family at the age of 80 on January 5, 2019.

He is survived by his wife, Winifred; and his three daughters, Fiona, Alison (Karl Braunstein), and Catriona (Mark Dryza); and his seven granddaughters, Lauren, Breanne, Catherine, Caroline, Hayley, Liv, and Eloise.

A. GEORGE RIGG His family, friends, and students acknowledge with deep sadness the death in Toronto of Professor A.G. Rigg on Monday, January 7, 2019. George, as he was known universally to those who knew him personally, died peacefully at home, in the presence of his beloved wife Jennifer, after a period of declining health.

George was born on February 17, 1937 at Wigan, Lancashire, where he received his secondary education at Wigan Grammar School, which was known for its strong reputation in Classics. As an undergraduate he attended Pembroke College, Oxford from 1955 to 1959. Concurrently with his doctoral work at Oxford, he taught at Merton College, when he first met Jennifer, and later at Balliol College, before two years as Visiting Assistant Professor at Stanford University from 1966 to 1968. In 1968 he took the position of Assistant Professor in the newly formed Centre for Medieval Studies and the Department of English at the University of Toronto, where he taught until his reluctant retirement (then still mandated by law at 65) in 2002.

As an emeritus, his generous and energetic mentorship of graduate students continued for many years thereafter.

His exacting philological standards secured his international reputation as a scholar of medieval Latin as well as of Middle English. His magisterial survey, Anglo-Latin Literature, 1066-1422, published in 1992, will remain the definitive reference work for decades to come. He was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1998.

Throughout his career, his students experienced his rare combination of extraordinary erudition, good humour, genuine humility, and quiet empathy.

George's brilliant academic achievements distinguished but hardly defined him. A lover of cats, of gardening, of good beer, of hand-rolled cigarettes, and of long walks in the country, he was as happy digging potatoes, combing the beaches of Nova Scotia, or potting up bulbs for winter forcing as he was sitting in the Bodleian Library with a fourteenth-century manuscript of Latin poetry.

We are all of us the poorer for the loss of this kind, good, and brilliant man. He is survived by his wife, Jennifer Rigg; sistersin-law, Joanne Hope and Ann Nicholson; and by his nephew, Rupert Hope. Warmest thanks to the Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care for their unfailing kindness and support.

The family will receive friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home A.W. Miles - Newbigging Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue) for the funeral service on Saturday, January 19th at 11:00 a.m. with a reception to follow in the Rosedale Room.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to an animal rescue shelter or a charity of your choice. Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through www.

humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

MALCOLM SABISTON

Malcolm "Mac" Renaldo Sabiston passed peacefully at North York General Hospital in his 95th year on January 6, 2019. Mac was predeceased by the love of his life, June (née Marsden). Mac and June had 3 children: Judy Morgan, Mardy Hollingsworth, and John Sabiston (Vida Stripinis).

Mac's 8 grandchildren were the centre of his life: Julia Morgan, David Morgan (Sally), and Jenna Giga (Farouk); Amy Hollingsworth (Justin Grant) and Kerry Caleb (Eric); and Jeffrey Sabiston, Trevor Sabiston (Cailin Munroe), and Milda Sabiston (Matthew Osborne). Mac was also thrilled about the arrival of his 1st great-grandchild, Pip Morgan, and was looking forward to others. Born in Toronto, Mac was the eldest child of Ken and Von (née McConnell). He was predeceased by siblings Colin Sabiston and Lois Howard.

His studies at University of Toronto Engineering were interrupted by 2 years in the Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Air Force where he flew in England until WWII ended. He had an accomplished career at Sangamo Electric/ Schlumberger improving on the Watt Hour Meter and a weather research Radiosonde, and later led their production as plant General Manager, then Vice-President of Operations. He later embarked on a second career with EEMAC (Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers Association of Canada) where he helped modernize many standards. He enjoyed a joyful retirement with family, friends and his many hobbies, which included sailing, woodworking and genealogy.

Mac's life will be celebrated in the upcoming summer at the family cottage on Washago Bay, Lake Scugog. Please contact 905-815-9332 or sabiston.mac@gmail.com if you wish to attend.

Visit trullfuneralsdanforth.com for further details. A donation in lieu of flowers may be made to the charity of your choosing.

RICHARD VILLIERS SANKEY

Richard Sankey 86, on January 8, 2019. Dear husband of Jane Webb; father of John (Susan Wright), Edward, and Robin; grandfather of Benjamin and Clara Sankey; brother of John, deceased, Patricia, deceased (Edward Stuebing), and Jennifer (Marc Faguy). A private family interment will be held in the spring.

KENNETH GRUNDY SCOTT

Ken passed away gently, close to his home on January 6, 2019 in his 80th year. Ken led a happy, productive, loving and satisfying life largely in Switzerland since 1972 with his wife, Viviane (Rappard), a native of Geneva who he treasured and enjoyed a very full life with during 50 years of marriage.

Ken attended Whitney Public School in Toronto, Trinity College School in Port Hope, Trinity College at the University of Toronto and Osgoode Hall where he earned his law degree. Ken then decided to explore a career in Geneva, Switzerland where he found both a successful career in the Investment Banking business as well as his wife, Viviane.

Ken and Viviane had three children, Natacha Weiss married to Anthony, Scarlett Morier-Genoud married to Guy, and Anthony Scott married to Evelyne; and eight wonderful grandchildren, whom Ken and Viviane enjoy and love very much. Ken will be greatly missed by all of them as well as his brother, Chuck and his wife, Rosemary and their family, who have had the pleasure of enjoying the delightful cottage life we have all shared together on an island in Georgian Bay at Pointe au Baril every summer for the past 25 years.

Au revoir, Ken. Many fond memories of you will remain with your family and many friends in Europe and Canada.

THOMAS ALLEN SLOANE JEAN MARIE SLOANE (nee Glen)

Both passed away peacefully in Toronto during the first week of 2019, Tommy on January 2nd at age 94 and Jean on January 6th at age 92.

Tommy and Jean were married in Toronto on June 19, 1948 at St. John's Presbyterian Church and spent a long and happy life together. They shared their combined love with their four children, Carol Anne MacInnes (Brian), Gail Gaikis (Gunars), David (Evelyn), and Lorna Kingsland (Grant). They will be lovingly remembered by ten grandchildren - Scott MacInnes (Corynne), Bentley Gaikis (Sarah Jones), Andrew MacInnes (Charlene Love), Erik Sloane (Candice de Saldanha), Lija Obermaier (Eddie), Kelly Sloane, Inta Gaikis (Thanasi Lampropoulos), Graeme MacInnes, Caroline Gaikis, and Jennifer Kingsland; and three great-grandchildren Lincoln and Welland Gaikis, and Remington Obermaier.

Tommy was born in Toronto on March 1, 1924 to Mary Jane (nee Mathers) and Thomas Sloane.

He was predeceased by all his siblings, William T., Margaret, Isabell, William G., Samuel J., and Norman H. Following wartime service, he returned to Toronto to work with his father, Thomas, Sr., from their residence on Withrow Ave. to deliver to customers their family brand of tea and coffee.

Throughout most of his life he was known as Tommy The Tea Man. He was a lifelong member and Elder of St. John's Church.

Jean was born in Halifax, NS, on September 29, 1926, to Mary Frances (nee Lehman) and Lorne Glen. She was predeceased by her brother, Don. Jean was a loving and caring homemaker to her children and husband. She appreciated music very much and loved to sing. Her trained contralto voice was shared for many years in the choir of St. John's.

Cremations have taken place.

A celebration of life will be held at St. John's Church, 415 Broadview Ave., Toronto on Saturday, February 16, 2019.

Visitation will begin at 10:00 a.m.

with a memorial service at 11:30.

A reception will follow.

If desired, donations may be made in their memory to the Alzheimer Society of Ontario, Parkinson Canada or St. John's Presbyterian Church.

DONALD HOWARD TAIT 1927 - 2019

A teacher, educator and public servant, Don passed away gently, at home in Ottawa early on January 5, 2019 with family around him and his beloved Shirley (Flemington) at his side. Don and Shirl had been side by side since meeting as students at Mount Allison University and marrying in 1952. To have Shirl as his wife was Don's deepest joy and proudest accomplishment.

Don was the devoted father of Karen, David (Darlene Gunther) and Richard (Suzanne Bullock), and loving granddad of Sean and Ally Crighton (Karen, Iain Crighton parents). Don's little sister, Patricia (Bob MacDonald, deceased) of Dartmouth, N.S., survives him, along with brother-in-law Peter Flemington (Jean) of Toronto and many wonderful nieces, nephews, and cousins, whose lives Don followed with great interest and love.

Don entered Mt. A to study theology, but graduated in 1951 with a BA in history and a B.Ed., beginning as a school teacher in Nova Scotia. He soon joined the Royal Canadian Navy as an instructor officer, and was promoted to lieutenantcommander in 1961. Don and Shirl began their family at Annapolis Royal, N.S., and moved to postings in Victoria, B.C., Dartmouth, N.S., Ottawa, Plymouth, U.K., Toronto, and back to Ottawa, where Don retired from the navy in 1974. He then worked for nine years as a training specialist with Revenue Canada Taxation in Ottawa.

Through all his moves, Don never really left Dartmouth, N.S., which remained at the core of who he became. He was the son of Arthur Howard Tait, who had served in the First World War with the 85th Battalion Nova Scotia Highlanders, and Helen Masters Morash, who grew up on a farm in nearby Cole Harbour.

Don felt blessed to have grown up on the shores of Lake Banook. He was committed to paddling and coaching (and dances) at the Banook Canoe Club, and was continually organizing basketball and hockey teams with friends. He was immensely proud of the women's war canoe teams he coached at Banook during summers home from Mt. A.

Don was also grateful to those teachers in Dartmouth who helped him through early doubts at school, and felt much accomplishment when he earned an MA in history from Dalhousie University in 1962, despite a full-time naval career and three small children.

Those struggles and accomplishments shaped him to be a fine teacher, a fine father, and a caring and loving husband most of all.

The family is deeply grateful to the Champlain LIHN and to the skilled and kind helpers it provided. No service at Don's request. Interment will be at Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa in the spring. In lieu of flowers, Don's family encourages donations to wherever they may help others.

FLORENCE HEATHER TUCKER (née McCuaig)

September 26, 1943 January 1, 2019 After a long illness, Heather passed away on New Year's Day 2019. She is survived by her husband Whitman; children Ken (Sharon), Kelly (Gary), Diane (Paul), and Wendy; grandchildren Ben, Shannon, Samantha, Hayley, Payton, Ireland, Tucker, Cameron, and Madeleine as well as her sisters Mavis, Phyllis, and Judy; and her brothers Ken and Dave. She was predeceased by her sister Shirley and her parents Oliver and Ida.

She grew up in Windsor, Ontario where she was the President of the Elvis Presley fan club (Windsor chapter). She had a life-long devotion to "The King" and his music.

She was a devoted daughter, thoughtful sister, loving wife, wonderful mother, and reveled in doting on her grandchildren.

She and Whit enjoyed a 61 year love affair starting when she was 14 walking down the Forster H.S. halllway in her Sailor Suit blouse. They raised a family together, supported each other's careers, and traveled the world.

She was a dedicated shopper, who never met a sale she didn't like. A consummate hostess and wonderful cook, she was always ready to pull up some extra chairs to the kitchen table for any "mystery guests" Whitman might bring home with him.

Of all the places they traveled, Heather loved Hawaii most of all. She celebrated over 30 Christmases there and fulfilled a lifelong dream by living in Hawaii for 5 years.

Twenty one years ago Whit and Heather purchased a summer home, "the Half-Way House", in the Thousand Islands. This was the scene of many wonderful times with friends and family in the ensuing years.

Heather's favourite time of the year was Christmas. In the late 80's she combined this love with her entrepreneurial sprit and opened a series of Christmasthemed gift shops that are well remembered by many to this day.

Heather loved nothing more than to stay up into the wee hours with her friends and family and have an ongoing series of "last last's", splitting two beers with her nearest companion. We will be having many "last last's" in her honour.

Heather's life was a triumph.

She lived passionately and loved deeply. We will all miss her dearly.

Special thanks to sister Judy and Maureen and Noel Kenny for their devotion and friendship during Heather's illness.

There will be a "Tucker-style" celebration of life in the spring.

In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the charity of your choice.

DAVID VONSOLKEMA

Born March 19, 1948 in the town of Schettens, Friesland, The Netherlands to Peter and Anna Vonsolkema. Passed away suddenly yet peacefully in Toronto, January 10, 2019. Handyman extraordinaire, hockey and baseball player, golfer, fisherman, wine aficionado, and all around the greatest guy there ever was.

Adored and beloved father to Olivier and Claudine, and cherished Pake to granddaughter Kalista and a grandson to follow.

Loving partner and companion to Sue Swaine. Predeceased by his sister, Shirley; he leaves behind sisters, Anne, Rita, Helen and Evelyn; as well as nieces, nephews, extended family and a legion of friends.

Cremation to follow. A celebration of life will be held at a later date.

We Love You.

GOTTFRIEDE WAGNER

Friedl passed peacefully at home, on Wednesday, January 9, 2019, at the age of 93. Loving wife of Gerhard (Gerry) for over 60 years, Friedl is now happily by his side once again. She will be greatly missed by her son, Wilfrid, his wife, Tracey; the Weir family; as well as many friends.

Auf Wiedersehen, Mom.

Friends may call at the Turner & Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., at Windermere, east of the Jane Subway, on Friday, January 18, 2019 from 3 p.m.

followed by a Celebration of Life Service in the Chapel at 4 p.m.

The family also acknowledges and thanks the Thornbrook team for their devoted care. Online condolences may be made through http://www.turnerporter.ca.

PETER WEBB 1928 - 2019

Died in Toronto on Thursday, January 10, 2019. Married to Eugenia in 1954 who died in 1997. Survived by his children Elizabeth and Stewart, their respective spouses Sean Speakman and Kristina Webb and their children William and Andrew Webb and Justin Speakman. Predeceased by his brother Tom, and survived by his niece Vanessa (Webb) Barr.

Survived by Joan York, whom he married in 1998, by her children Marion, David and Edward, their spouses Robert Speer, Judy Ruyzlo and Fiona Whalley and by their children Fred Speer, Declan, Nora, Eleanor and Wallis York.

Following cremation, the family will arrange a reception on a date to be decided.

Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through http://www.humphreymilesnewbig ging.com.

DR. GERRIT JOHAN STEVEN WILDE "Gerry"

Passed away peacefully after a short illness in a hospital in Oaxaca, Mexico on New Year's Day, 2019.

Born in Groningen, the Netherlands in 1932, he immigrated to Canada with his wife Antoinette and their two children Annette and Niels in 1964. He was an internationally renowned researcher and professor emeritus of Psychology at Queen's University Kingston.

His sometimes controversial theory of Risk Homeostasis has been studied the world over. He left an indelible impact on many young minds and contemporaries. For Gerry, there were no sacred cows-all so-called conventional wisdom was fair game and could, indeed should, be challenged.

In later life, his love for the Canadian countryside as well as international travel continued with his loving wife Dawn Elizabeth Clarke.

A true loss to his grandchildren and great-grandchildren Aidan, Sebastian, Shawna and Ashley who enjoyed his cheerful, friendly and intellectual curiosity.

His thirst for new experiences, knowledge, and understanding never left him throughout his successful life and career. His final adventure being to spend eternity in the Sierra Madre mountains of Oaxaca.

Everyone is most welcome to attend his memorial on January 20, 2019 at 3 p.m. in Sydenham St.

United Church in Kingston.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Amnesty International.

Further references: http://riskhomeostasis.org https://www.cbc.ca/radio/spark/ driver-safety-and-the-psychologyof-risk-1.3445993?autoplay=true "Making things safer can be a risky business...Professor Wilde responds that because his theory focuses on motivation it emphasizes the positive. Instead of viewing human beings as passive subjects of technical designs or enforcement, we should treat them as active subjects and look for ways to make them want to be safer."

Dan Keegan, The Globe and Mail,

Toronto ART WRIGHT

1939 - 2019

Died January 1, 2019 of Alzheimer's disease in Victoria, B.C. Survived by his beloved artist wife of 48 years, Sylvia Bews-Wright; sister, Marie Smith (Earl); and many nieces, nephews, surrogate daughters and honorary granddaughters.

Educated in Political Science, Public Administration and Economic and Social Development, Art excelled in a 35 year span of Canadian public service as a Foreign Service Officer in Nigeria, Malaysia, Thailand, Tanzania and India, followed by serving as Ambassador/High Commissioner in Bangladesh, Barbados and Zimbabwe. His interdisciplinary skills in encouraging citizen participation and leadership in sustainable development were broadly admired in these diverse and challenging settings.

Art reflected: "I had this incredible privilege to work for over three decades at the delivery end of foreign policy and development in highly diverse urban and rural environments on three continents - incredibly, I was paid to learn from and work with amazingly industrious people in fascinatingly different and rich cultures." Art's broader interests in regional development issues coincided with those of the Canadian International Agency (CIDA) where he was appointed as Vice-President of CIDA's Asia Branch. Following his posting to Barbados/Eastern Caribbean he returned to CIDA as Vice President of Multilateral Branch followed by his final posting to Zimbabwe.

By 1997, Foreign Service/ CIDA retirement beckoned and Art served as a director of the Foundation for International Training (Toronto), as Senior Associate of UBC's Sustainable Development Research Institute and as a member of the Advisory Board for the School of Peace and Conflict Management at Royal Roads University. When Art and Sylvia moved to Victoria, UVic's Centre for Asia-Pacific Initiatives (CAPI) was avidly awaiting to recruit Art as an associate. He successfully chaired a number of "hot topic" items, using his legendary deep commitment to inclusive and participatory approaches, the importance of listening, an unflagging respect for the value of human life and a deep appreciation for the diversity and interconnectedness of the human species. Art's fondest retirement endeavor centred on his creation of a course in Sustainable Development for the Canadian Field Studies in Africa Program.

The hands-on course attracted Canadian university students to travel in old army vehicles across Kenya and Uganda under Art's tutelage for a semester of living and learning in tents, often surrounded by curious wildlife.

For seven years (2000-2007), this annual interdisciplinary 'safari' was the highlight of Art's restless retirement years. Before he passed away, Art willed his body to UBC for its continuing research into Alzheimer's disease. Donations toward the eradication of the terrible affliction may be made in Art's name to http://www.alz.soc.ca.

A celebration of Art's life will be held at the at Uplands Golf Course, 3300 Cadboro Bay Road at 1 p.m. on February 2. Sylvia is deeply grateful to the Carr West staff at the Heights of Mountain View for the gentle, loving care given to Art during his time there.


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Educating Grayson: Are inclusive classrooms failing students?
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For decades, educators have tried to welcome students with special needs in regular classrooms - but faced with behavioural problems and violence, Caroline Alphonso writes, some school boards resort to sending those pupils home. What will it take to make inclusive education work?
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By CAROLINE ALPHONSO
  
  

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Saturday, January 5, 2019 – Page A10

Lisa Kahn developed a daily routine this fall. She'd eat breakfast, feed her family and get her two children ready for school - Grayson, a seven-year-old boy with strawberry-blond hair and blue eyes, and his older sister, Avery. After she dropped them off, she'd practise deep breathing with help from an app on her watch.

And then she would brace herself for the phone call.

At some point during the day, she knew that Grayson's school was likely to call and ask her to pick him up because he was causing trouble. If she made it through the day without the phone ringing, she'd steel herself at pickup for a staff member to approach and tell her about something awful her son had done.

Ms. Kahn had hoped the school could accommodate Grayson's developmental disorder - he was diagnosed with autism in the summer of 2017, and while he's verbal and can impressively add figures in his head, he becomes aggressive if rules change or the work becomes too difficult.

But in September, he was suspended for part of the day after attempting to push an educational assistant down the stairs.

A couple of weeks later, he picked up a chair and tossed it at another child. On other occasions, he has punched, shoved, kicked and threatened staff and other students, school administrators say.

And then in late October, everything boiled over. After an incident when Grayson struck an educational assistant, leaving her with bruises, scrapes and a concussion, the seven-year-old was expelled from school.

Now Ms. Kahn and her husband Dave are scrambling to piece together a new plan for educating Grayson, who they firmly believe belongs in the public school system.

"Not only has he been stripped of all his peer connections," Ms. Kahn says, "but he's been stripped of his right to an education."

The Kahns have filed a complaint with the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario, and they've appealed the expulsion. For now, at least, they're keeping Grayson at home, and up until recently, the school district was providing him with home instruction. Ms.Kahn now works with him daily, doing lessons in reading, writing and math.

It's an imperfect solution for their son, they say, and makes it difficult for both of them to work during the daytime.

The family's experience highlights the growing challenges that parents - and educators - face when it comes to accommodating special-needs children in the public-school system. Over the past few decades, schools across Canada have moved toward a model of inclusive education, but many are struggling to find the best ways to include children with complex needs in regular classrooms.

The issue of inclusive classrooms has become a matter of fierce debate, and some educators wonder if inclusion has gone too far for students with very complex needs. Inclusiveness can't work, they say, without a thoughtful rethinking of how we teach children with diverse needs and how we structure the school day.

Teachers report an uptick in violent incidents disrupting classrooms, tensions arise among families who feel the safety and learning of their own children are at risk, and school districts struggle with embracing inclusion while providing a safe environment for staff and students. Meanwhile, families with children who have intellectual and developmental disabilities are increasingly being asked to pick up kids early, start the school day later or simply keep them home for the entire day.

Complicating matters is the fact that apart from a few advocacy or parent group surveys, most school districts don't formally track these exclusions or shortened days.

Jacqueline Specht, director of the Canadian Research Centre on Inclusive Education and a professor at the University of Western Ontario's faculty of education, says the system is clearly broken when a seven-year-old is expelled and can't be properly accommodated.

"What are we doing that we expel seven-year-olds instead of really looking at what's causing this behaviour, and how do we stop that behaviour?" Research shows young people in inclusive classrooms tend to have more friends, are better off academically and feel better about themselves than they do when they're educated in separate, segregated classrooms, Dr.

Specht says. But administrators at Grayson's school, John McCrae Public School in Guelph, Ont., say that they can't safely accommodate Grayson.

So, as children across Canada head back to school this week, Ms. Kahn's son will be staying at home. As she and her family have discovered, the road to inclusion is paved with good intentions, but riddled with cracks.

Before the 1970s, it was not uncommon for children with special needs to be excluded from schooling. Too often, these children barely got an education; many were early dropouts.

The 1960s civil-rights movement in the United States, while it focused on race, also spurred awareness about the challenges facing students with complex needs, according to researcher Sheila Bennett, a professor at Brock University and co-author of Special Education in Ontario Schools. Riding that wave, organizations such as the Association for Community Living successfully pushed for changes that called for more inclusive education in several provinces, Dr.

Bennett says.

In Ontario, Bill 82 in 1980 was a game-changer, requiring every school board to provide specialeducation programs and services for students with complex needs.

Over time - and as a result of advances in thinking combined with lobbying from parents and advocacy groups - schools began including more of these children in regular classrooms full-time, rather than segregating them in separate classrooms.

To support special-needs students, school boards often employ educational assistants to work collaboratively with teachers, although teachers' unions argue that most classrooms don't have enough of them.

Philosophically, the Kahns embrace the idea of inclusive education. They believe Grayson should learn alongside his neighbourhood peers, and they try to expose him to a range of activities including swimming and hip-hop dance lessons.

They were proactive when Grayson started having trouble in senior kindergarten. For the most part, students aren't assessed for disabilities until Grade 3, but when they heard reports of behavioural issues, including pushing classmates, the Kahns did not want to wait. They wanted their son to thrive socially and academically, so they spent $2,800 to have him privately

assessed and discovered he had autism.

With the help of an educational assistant, Grayson had a successful school year in Grade 1, with no suspensions or calls for early pickups.

When he began Grade 2, Ms.

Kahn met with school administrators. Grayson had shown more aggressive behaviour over the summer - he'd struck his mother for the first time, after becoming frustrated about not being able to express himself - and she wanted to ensure there was a plan in place at school to deal with the challenges.

Because the school team believed it would be too stressful for one person to work with him for the whole day, they assigned two educational assistants - one for the morning and another for the afternoon. The approach raised red flags with Ms. Kahn, who says her child does better with one person.

The plan fell apart almost instantly. Students and staff reported physical and verbal assaults, and Grayson was spending large chunks of the school day in the office.

At first, administrators asked Ms. Kahn to pick up Grayson early or keep him home for several days. Later, they hatched a return-to-school plan: They would let Grayson come back, but only for 15 minutes a day, Ms.

Kahn says. His return would be graduated over a period of time.

Ms. Kahn was exasperated: "Who's going to pay my bills?" she recalls saying. "Who's taking care of my child? We work. What about his education?" A few years ago, Annie Kidder's organization, People for Education, an education advocacy group, began receiving calls from parents with similar questions: Are principals allowed to ask that I keep my child home for all or part of the day? Can my child be asked to come in later than his classmates?

The answer to these questions is yes. But nobody had documented the scope of the problem. So four years ago, in its annual survey, the group asked principals if they had ever requested that children stay home.

Ms. Kidder says she was "astounded" by the response: 48 per cent of elementary-school principals and 40 per cent of highschool principals reported asking that a student with special needs not attend school for the full day, citing insufficient classroom support.

"We didn't expect that. We thought it was a rare occurrence," she says.

In its latest report, released last year, the numbers have risen to 58 per cent and 48 per cent, respectively.

Similarly, a survey of parents of children with special needs released in November, 2017 by the BC Confederation of Parent Advisory Councils found that children with special needs were missing anywhere from half an hour to three hours of school daily, or being told to stay home because of staff shortages. A number of children, the survey found, were sent home because of behavioural incidents at school, and these exclusions, which were undocumented, would continue for days or weeks. Another survey, conducted by an advocacy group called BCEdAccess, found that a number of parents are being forced out of the public education system as a result.

Expulsions such as Grayson's are rare, but it's difficult to know how common other measures are. Most school districts or provinces don't formally track when a child's school day is shortened - a so-called undocumented suspension. Ms. Kidder says her survey results suggest it's a problem that should be tracked. (Ms.

Kahn was asked to keep Grayson home for a number of days with no formal paperwork from the district.)

Luke Reid, a lawyer at ARCH Disability Law Centre, who practises primarily in the areas of education law and human rights for people with disabilities requiring accommodation, says school administrators see it as a "request" that a parent voluntarily withdraw their children for part of the school day.

"However, as you might guess, these often don't feel like requests to parents and they happen with surprising regularity in many cases, all of which can have a big impact on the family," Mr. Reid says. "There needs to be some sort of accountability mechanism in place to ensure that school boards are properly exercising these powers."

The issue has become so topof-mind that two school districts - North Vancouver and Greater Victoria - passed motions this fall to record how many children with special needs are being asked to stay home, sent home early or dropped off late and being excluded from field trips.

Jordan Watters, chair of the Greater Victoria School Board, says school staff need to understand the challenges so supports can address them and children with special needs can be meaningfully included. "Our move to track incidents of exclusion is intended to help us do that," he says.

The head of Canada's largest school district, the Toronto District School Board, says it, too, has started tracking how many children are being excluded, and is asking principals to work with superintendents before requesting a child stay home.

John Malloy, the director of education, says many children are successfully included in schools, and there will always be a small number who need a special program, but the board is committed to including, "wherever possible," students in the neighbourhood school.

"We are really looking at how we can serve more of our students in their community school where it's appropriate," Dr.

Malloy says. Still, he cautions, "there are only so many resources. There are only so many staff."

"What remains our challenge is that even though we want to serve each and every student in the most inclusive way possible, some students may have needs that exceed our level of experience and that is something we are sometimes challenged by," he says, adding that school districts often partner with community agencies and hospitals.

Part of the problem, some academics say, is that more students are being diagnosed with intellectual and developmental disabilities that were for a long time overlooked.

People for Education found that the proportion of elementary kids receiving special-education support - anything from a little extra help in a regular class to the provision of one, or even two, dedicated staff - has doubled over the past two decades.

At the TDSB, about 40,000 students, roughly 16 per cent of kids, are supported through Individual Education Plans.

Integration, though, still makes some parents uneasy. In Grayson's classroom, parents were concerned for the safety of their children.

"I know that the Kahns are likely arguing his right to an education, but what about the rights of the rest of the kids?" one parent wrote in a letter that was included in the principal's expulsion investigation report. "In addition to the threat to safety, his actions are a near constant disruption to classroom activities.

This is not acceptable."

Another parent said her daughter hasn't been physically harmed by Grayson, but she was "uncomfortable in class and worried for those around her" when Grayson was present.

There were reports that some of Grayson's classmates felt anxious and reported stomach aches. Some of the staff said they had trouble sleeping and felt worried and anxious being around the young boy.

Ms. Kahn is sympathetic, but wonders why her son should be punished for his condition. She says Grayson is the victim of a system that cannot properly handle children who have special needs that come with behavioural issues.

The Upper Grand District School Board, for its part, wouldn't comment on Grayson's case, but also said it is strongly committed to supporting students with special needs while balancing the safety of students and staff. In the principal's expulsion report, obtained by The Globe and Mail, the school said that Ms. Kahn's "extreme hostility" and "repeated verbal assaults" to staff had been stressful and caused emotional harm. She counters that she was only serving as an advocate for her son.

School staff suggested alternative programs, including a therapeutic school, as well as switching him to the English stream (Grayson was in French immersion), which has an intervention program that teaches self-regulation skills and frustration management.

But Ms. Kahn says the therapeutic school, an hour's drive away, was too far from home, and the board hasn't spelled out to her what supports he would have at the English school.

Grayson wants to rejoin his classmates, she says. "There's a lot of little things the school could have been doing to help facilitate that but they didn't. So they just kind of let the behaviours get to the point where they're out of control, and they say, 'Sorry, this child is a threat to safety. He can't be here.' " The principal, on the other hand, argues the school made "significant efforts" to accommodate Grayson's needs while keeping both him and his classmates safe, including drawing up support plans, providing him with full-time educational-assistant support and having the board's mental-health clinician observe him.

Leslie Newman writes in her report that she is satisfied staff made all "reasonable efforts" to accommodate Grayson and "that some of them have suffered significant physical and emotional harm in the course of these accommodation efforts."

In Ontario, and across much of the country, school districts are responsible for determining how best to accommodate special-needs students and aims to include them in regular classrooms, wherever possible.

New Brunswick takes the policy of inclusive education the farthest - it calls for a "common learning environment" for all students. Segregated classrooms aren't an option, and instruction must be primarily provided by the classroom teacher.

The provincial government doesn't track how many students are attending for only part of the day, and the New Brunswick Teachers' Association president, George Daley, says while the model is important, it has been "difficult."

He says teachers need more supports and there needs to be flexibility so students with behavioural issues can spend time outside the regular classroom learning different life skills.

Teachers' unions say that violent behaviour in classrooms is disrupting teaching and student learning. The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario, for example, reports that 83 per cent of its members say violence in school is making teaching more difficult.

Paul Bennett, an education consultant based in Halifax, says a movement to make the classroom the be-all and end-all of inclusion is short-sighted.

"The system is not built to accommodate the range of diversity we now have in our school system," he says.

In the case of children such as Grayson who have the most complex and acute needs, Mr.

Bennett says the public education system should provide oneon-one intensive supports and only provide alternative school settings if integration doesn't work.

"I do not believe in segregation," Mr. Bennett says. "I believe in integration of everyone as far as they possibly can be integrated. But when they fall two, three, four grades behind everyone else, when they're not able to follow, when they're acting out, when they're extremely frustrated, parents are looking for alternatives."

Prof. Specht, of Western University, has seen students who have struggled with aggressive behaviour moved to another school and do much better.

Others, she says, may need time away for intense therapy or to spend 15 minutes in the regular classroom and work on being there longer.

"There are still too many students who are in segregated classes who could be included.

Cases like this one [Grayson's case] are used to say inclusion does not work rather than perhaps thinking it is a rare occurrence," she says.

"There are many positive stories of inclusion that will say, inclusion is what we ought to move toward."

But some parents say the positive stories stem from efforts made by individual teachers and not necessarily the public school system.

Tina McGee's nine-year-old daughter, Kherrigan, has severe autism, medical issues and a severe intellectual disability. In Grade 1 at a school in Abbotsford, B.C., Kherrigan had what Ms.

McGee describes as a "phenomenal teacher," who was supported by a full-time educational assistant.

Before Valentine's Day, knowing that Kherrigan would not be able to chew the treats being brought to school, the teacher sent a note home asking kids to think of what they could give their classmate instead. Some brought cupcakes, others came in with stuffed animals and hair accessories, mostly red as they knew it was Kherrigan's favourite colour.

"She would make plans around Kherrigan and include her in everything," Ms. McGee says.

But when the family moved to Chilliwack, B.C., and changed schools, she was asked almost weekly to keep Kherrigan home in her Grade 3 year because ofstaffing shortages - educational assistants were juggling as many as five children each. Ms. McGee responded by enrolling Kherrigan in a private school that could accommodate her daughter's needs.

Still, she says she believes that inclusion can work. "It can if the teachers and staff aren't so overworked."

Bruce Uditsky of Inclusion Alberta, a nonprofit organization that advocates for children and adults with developmental disabilities, says inclusion is dependent on the leadership and mindset of those in charge. Two school districts could have equal funding, but one will successfully include children and the other won't, he says.

"Teachers or principals or districts should not be guardians to the classroom door as to which kid is valued and which isn't," he says.

"Both government and the system are being allowed to escape [their] responsibility for ensuring that kids with disabilities have access to the same education as would be true for kids without disabilities."

Some parents, he says, are tired of fighting.

Laurie Pett turned to home schooling as a last resort when her 10-year-old son, Connor, was deemed too burdensome for the regular school system. The family moved to Quesnel, B.C. in the middle of the past school year, and Ms. Pett met with the school principal to discuss how best to accommodate Connor, who has been diagnosed with autism, oppositional defiant disorder and apraxia. He has behavioural issues, including aggression and a tendency to run.

She was told that Connor could attend the school's breakfast club every morning for the first few months. When she said that wasn't acceptable, the principal increased the plan to one hour at school a day. There wasn't funding in the school's budget, he said, to support Connor more.

The family has four other children with behavioural issues, all of whom have been accommodated by the school.

But Connor is "definitely not welcome," she says. "And I don't get the feeling that he's welcome in our district."

When Ms. Pett speaks about inclusion, she laughs. "It's not about cracks in the system," she says. "They're big gaping holes."

Ms. Kahn agrees, and has now pulled her daughter Avery, who is nine and has also been diagnosed with autism, out of their local school because she doesn't believe she'll get the support she needs.

"It's not just that I'm fighting for my kid," Ms. Kahn says.

"I'm fighting for all those other kids who have left the system, all the ones who are coming behind us who are not going to have the financial means to hire a lawyer, or financial means to stay home with their children."

Associated Graphic

Lisa Kahn, left, embraces her son Grayson, 7, who was expelled from school for striking an educational assistant. Grayson, who has autism, now stays at the family home in Guelph, Ont., and receives private instruction from the school district while his parents appeal the expulsion. Above, Grayson is seen playing with his father, Dave.

PHOTOS BY MICHELLE SIU/ THE GLOBE AND MAIL


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Global real estate hit hard by market shift
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Housing prices are cooling around the world. It doesn't bode well for Canada, where homeowners have taken on an unprecedented amount of debt to buy into a national real estate boom
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By IAN MCGUGAN, JANET MCFARLAND, PAUL WALDIE, DAVID EBNER
  
  

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Saturday, January 12, 2019 – Page B6

TORONTO TORONTO LONDON VANCOUVER -- In key cities around the world, the red-hot market for real estate has abruptly turned cold.

In London, home prices in some of the British capital's toniest neighbourhoods have slid over the past year. In Sydney, residential property values have tumbled 8.9 per cent, and one economist has warned that Australian real estate is headed for its "deepest downturn" in modern history.

In New York, median prices fell 5.8 per cent in 2018, dropping below the US$1-million threshold for the first time in three years.

Even in the high-tech nirvana of San Francisco, where prices are still inching upward, the number of home sales sank to a four-year low in November.

The cooling trend encompasses a host of specific, local factors such as Brexit, U.S. tax changes and new barriers to foreign investment. Primarily, though, it rests on two broad factors: increasingly unaffordable prices and rising interest rates. Both are likely to be a drag on real estate markets for the foreseeable future and spell the end of a decade of glorious returns for investors and homeowners.

"Home-price growth has slowed everywhere, quite dramatically," said Liam Bailey, global head of research at Knight Frank LLP, an international real estate consultancy in London. His company's index of prices across 57 countries was advancing at a clip of about 6 per cent a couple of years ago; today, the pace has slid to a mere 3 per cent.

The trend does not bode well for a country such as Canada, where homeowners have piled on unprecedented amounts of debt to buy into the national real estate boom.

After years of rapid growth, Canada's two most expensive markets are decelerating in line with many of their global counterparts. In the Greater Toronto Area, total home sales fell 16 per cent in 2018 as average home prices slid 4.3 per cent. In the Vancouver region, sales were down 31.6 per cent and the benchmark home price slipped 2.7 per cent.

"You reach a point where people simply cannot pay more," said Benjamin Tal, deputy chief economist at CIBC World Markets. "We are in a price-searching mode. We haven't found the price yet in Vancouver and Toronto, but clearly we know what the upper limit is."

The risk, both nationally and globally, is that falling home prices can spill over into the rest of the economy. In a housing downturn, banks tend to curtail their lending to prevent defaults, while highly indebted consumers rein in their spending to offset the impact of lost housing wealth. All of that slows growth and can lead to further cycles of decline.

To be sure, nobody is predicting a new financial crisis. Home prices are still climbing in many cities in Canada and around the world. The global financial system has more safeguards in place than a decade ago, and outstanding mortgage volumes are growing at about half the pace they did before the financial crisis, according to Swiss investment bank UBS.

Canada, however, is particularly vulnerable to a real estate downturn precisely because Toronto and Vancouver have enjoyed such spectacular gains in recent years. The two Canadian cities are among six worldwide that qualify as "bubble risks," according to UBS. In a recent report, the bank warned that in both Toronto and Vancouver, "rising rates, stricter market regulations or an economic downturn could turn the lights out on the party given the high valuations and strained affordability."

The darker outlook doesn't necessarily mean a crash. It may not even mean a serious decline in home prices as long as the rest of the economy continues to grow robustly. But Canadian homeowners and investors should brace themselves for a future in which real estate is a riskier, less rewarding investment than it has been over the past decade. It's a scenario that is already unfolding in other locations around the world.

In London, buying agent Henry Pryor spends most of his days bidding on houses for wealthy clients and he hasn't seen a market slump like this in years. "This is a great time if you want to buy something. This is a much harder time if you are 60 or 70 years old and trying to downsize or cash in," he said. "And I don't think things are going to get easier any time soon."

The city's housing market has been slowing in recent years owing to increased land-transfer taxes, moves to tax overseas buyers and stretched affordability. Now, concerns about Brexit have rattled the market further.

Average prices in prime London boroughs such as Westminster and the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea dropped more than 20 per cent from 2017 to 2018, and the number of unsold homes under construction in central London has reached a record high. "Over all, the London market is not looking as brilliant as it was," said Fionnuala Earley, an economist at Hamptons International, a London-based real estate company.

The average house price across Greater London fell about 0.5 per cent last year, compared with an increase of 1.5 per cent in 2017, according to Hamptons. Ms. Earley said the firm is forecasting prices to fall 2 per cent in 2019 before picking up again in 2020. But even then price growth in the prime market "is likely to be less than we've seen in the past."

The signs of a slowing market can be seen almost everywhere.

Last fall, a new 33-storey luxurycondominium project called Centre Point stopped selling units because offers were just too low. The company concluded that the lowballing reflected growing uncertainty and said it saw "no point in chasing a market that is increasingly detached from reality," said Mike Hussey, chief executive of the developer, Almacantar S.A. It had sold just half of the 82 units, which ranged in price from £1.8-million ($3-million) to £55-million.

At the Shard, a 95-storey landmark completed six years ago, the owners have yet to sell 10 luxury apartments at the £50-million asking price, and some developers have taken to offering free cars to entice high-end buyers.

And it's not just the luxury market that's taking a hit. A recent report from UBS found that sellers across the city are slashing prices, with houses taking much longer to sell. The share of "reduced" property listings has increased to 39 per cent, said the report, which tracked 100,000 listings across London; two years ago, it was less than 20 per cent.

Meanwhile, the number of days houses stay on the market has jumped to 128, up from a low of 77 in 2016. "The London housing market remains weak, and our update shows few signs of improvement," UBS analyst Osmaan Malik wrote.

If there is one simple, overarching explanation for the growing fatigue in the global real estate market, it is that homes have become too expensive for mere mortals.

Since 2014, house prices have surged in after-inflation terms worldwide and in late 2017 surpassed the peak they reached in the run up to the financial crisis, according to a global housing index compiled by the International Monetary Fund.

In many cities, home prices are out of touch with local paycheques. In Hong Kong, for instance, a skilled service worker would require more than 20 years of his or her total income to buy a 650-square-foot apartment near the city centre, according to UBS.

"House prices have also decoupled from local incomes in London, Paris, Singapore, New York and Tokyo, where price-toincome ratios exceed 10," the UBS researchers wrote.

Prices are soaring in relation to rents, too. The growing gap between the two suggests a fundamental disconnect between the price of residences and the underlying ability of those residences to generate cash.

In half the cities covered by the UBS study, the cost of a modest dwelling has climbed to more than 30 times the annual rent on similar properties. To put that another way, a prospective landlord in these cities would have to continuously rent out a typical property for three decades simply to recoup the initial purchase price.

Factor in taxes, maintenance costs and other expenses, and the math becomes even uglier. It makes sense only in a low-interest-rate environment, where other investments also offer negligible yields. "House prices in all these cities are vulnerable to a sharp correction should interest rates rise," UBS warns.

The problem for property owners, of course, is just that: Interest rates are rising. They are going up in almost every country - slowly, to be sure, but unmistakably, as central banks begin the long process of restoring borrowing costs to more normal levels. "There have been very big shifts in monetary policy over the past year," Mr.

Bailey at Knight Frank said. "It's the beginning of the end of very low mortgage rates."

Just as low interest rates allowed home buyers to take on larger mortgages and bid up home prices, higher rates are likely to have the opposite effect.

"We're moving from a low-interest-rate environment to a higherrate environment," Mr. Bailey said. "Therefore, we have to expect to see lower capital-gains growth over the next few years."

How much lower will returns fall? In the United States, home prices still look quite reasonable in relation to underlying rents, according to Goldman Sachs. It expects nationwide price growth to slow but still average 2.9 per cent over the next three years.

Other countries appear far more vulnerable. In Sweden, New Zealand and Canada, home-priceto-rent ratios have surged over the past two decades; these countries would experience significant corrections if their home-priceto-rent ratios were to fade back to more historically typical levels.

Things may not be quite that simple, though. A complicating factor is the presence of foreign buyers. In many of these apparently pricey markets, internation-

al capital has been blamed for driving prices beyond the reach of local buyers. Both British Columbia and Ontario have recently enacted measures to discourage foreigners. So have Australia and New Zealand. But if home prices were to fall significantly in any of these markets, foreign buyers might find the bargains too tempting to pass up.

Predicting the behaviour of foreign buyers is difficult, warns Jonathan Miller, president of Miller Samuel Inc., a real estate research firm in Manhattan. At the moment, for instance, high prices and rising interest rates are encouraging those buyers to look beyond pricey New York. So are recent changes to the U.S. tax code that limit how much in the way of state and local taxes a homeowner can write off against federal taxes.

The decreased ability to write off local levies has hit real estate owners hard in highly taxed jurisdictions such as New York, New Jersey and California. It has, however, encouraged new buying interest in smaller centres in more lightly taxed states. "Foreign buyers are looking for upside like everyone else," Mr. Miller said.

"They're not buying condos in Manhattan these days. They're buying strip malls in Houston."

Most analysts believe housingmarket downturns in Vancouver and Toronto are largely due to domestic policy changes. But there are also factors that both cities have in common with other global centres facing downturns.

Most notably, affordability in Canada's two most expensive cities became an overriding issue as prices soared beyond the reach of many buyers. That factor has been compounded by a series of interest-rate increases that began in the summer of 2017, as well as the new federal stress-test rule introduced on Jan. 1 last year, which requires buyers to prove they can still afford their mortgages even if interest rates were to climb significantly higher than the rate they negotiated with their banks.

Brad Henderson, CEO of Sotheby's International Realty Canada, says many buyers and sellers are uncertain about how to proceed.

"Sticker shock and buyer fatigue" have combined with a broader unease about global political and economic uncertainty to keep buyers on the sidelines, he said.

"If you're afraid of recent gyrations in the stock market, if your portfolio is down, you feel less wealthy, you're not inclined to make major purchases."

Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz has acknowledged the unexpectedly large role that policy changes have played in sparking the downturn, saying this week that housing activity has been weaker than expected in recent months and "is taking longer to stabilize than we expected."

"This may be because of the various municipal or provincial measures that have been taken.

Or it may be that the economy is more sensitive to the combined effects of the new mortgage underwriting guidelines and higher interest rates," he said at a news conference on Wednesday.

The adjustments are still playing out, he added, "and it is always difficult to judge where the market will stabilize once froth has been removed."

Real estate agent Shawn Zigelstein, who is based in Richmond Hill, north of Toronto, says the negative news about the mortgage stress test and higher interest rates is having a psychological as well as practical impact.

Some buyers are sitting on the sidelines because they believe they won't qualify for enough mortgage to move up to a better home, he said, so they haven't even tried asking for a loan.

"It's the perception of the potential costs, that's what I believe.

They don't know the exact numbers ... People are ruling it out before they search."

As in other global cities, reduced foreign-capital flows are also playing a role in Toronto and Vancouver. While foreign investment does not drive housing markets in Canada the way it does in bigger markets such as London, it adds another tailwind, especially in certain pockets of Vancouver and Toronto.

Declining foreign investment in Canada is largely due to tighter enforcement of Chinese capital controls, said Mr. Tal of CIBC, making it harder for wealthy Chinese investors to get their money out of the country to buy real estate abroad.

"The foreign investment aspect is not huge, but it's important," Mr. Tal said. "I speak to many people in the industry who tell me Chinese money is not coming because it's simply more difficult to get it out."

According to Statistics Canada, non-residents bought 7 per cent of new detached homes and 11 per cent of new condos built in the Vancouver region from 2011 through 2017. In the hot market years of 2016 and 2017 in particular, non-residents bought 14 per cent of new condos.

Toronto mortgage broker Ron Butler, who runs Butler Mortgage Inc., believes the reduction in foreign capital flows is having a more significant impact on the Vancouver and GTA markets than many people realize. Foreign capital doesn't just come from nonresidents, who are subject to the provincial foreign buyers' taxes, but also from Canadian citizens or landed immigrants who have ties to other countries, particularly China, and have historically used money from abroad for home purchases. Mr. Butler argues that foreign money may have represented as much as 20 per cent of new home financing in recent years, based on the mortgage applications he sees.

"We feel that money will disappear in Canada this year," he said.

"There will be a big reduction."

So far, the market downturns in both Vancouver and Toronto have largely been driven by the detached-house markets, which are typically the highest-priced homes in both cities. If the pain spreads to the condo sector, however, the market declines will be even sharper.

The total volume of detached home sales fell almost 17 per cent in the Greater Toronto Area in 2018 over 2017, and the average price for all detached homes sold last year was down 4.4 per cent.

Overall sales in Toronto were their weakest since 2008.

Vancouver's detached house market has seen an even more dramatic decline. The benchmark price of detached homes in the Vancouver region fell 7.8 per cent in 2018 over 2017 - 7.3 per cent between June and December alone.

The decline has wiped out price increases going back to the spring of 2016.

The Vancouver market is undeniably still expensive - the benchmark price of a detached home is $1.5-million, and that of a condo is $810,000 - but it is teetering, especially in certain market segments.

The region's most expensive homes have seen the biggest percentage declines. Since the summer of 2017, house prices on the west side of Vancouver are down 14 per cent, about $500,000, to a benchmark price of $3.14-million.

And the double-digit slides are not restricted to the wealthiest areas: Houses in New Westminster have fallen 11 per cent, about $130,000, to $1.06-million since last June, and condos in Port Moody are down 10 per cent, about $70,000, to about $630,000.

Vancouver's decline is due not just to tougher mortgage rules but also to a list of specific decisions made in British Columbia to slow the market. Both the city of Vancouver and the province have imposed taxes on vacant homes, aimed at speculators who live elsewhere. And in 2016, the province introduced a foreign-buyers tax, which was increased last year, alongside new taxes on homes worth more than $3-million.

To Andrew Ramlo, a market analyst at real estate broker Rennie Group, a key factor in Vancouver's weakness has been the "staggering" elevation to which prices had climbed, which led to "fatigue" among buyers.

"The sheer high level of where prices had gotten - it put a crimp on affordability for a lot of folks," Mr. Ramlo said.

While condos have propped up the real estate markets in both Vancouver and Toronto in recent years, their fate is uncertain for 2019. In Vancouver, benchmark sale prices for condos fell 6.4 per cent between June and December, returning to the levels of late 2017.

The weakness has left some potential buyers nervous, unwilling to make a move. And condo owners don't want to sell for less, hoping the decline of recent months is only temporary, according to Steve Saretsky, a Vancouver agent who made his name with careful economic analyses in a popular monthly report he publishes.

Mr. Saretsky sees a difficult 2019 ahead. The number of sales in December plummeted to the lowest point in almost two decades. And prices are starting to fall faster. For him, the crunch could get tougher, with developers behind proposed condo towers possibly shelving their plans.

"This feels like the start of something more substantial," he said.

Mr. Tal fears Toronto's condo market could face similar weakness. He points to the high volume of new condo construction in the pipeline in the GTA, which will add to supply. He also cites waning demand from investors who buy condo units for rental; as interest rates rise, it becomes increasingly difficult for investors to earn enough rent to cover the mortgage and monthly condo fees of their units.

The market downturn has a broad economic impact, he adds.

With real estate activity accounting for 7.5 per cent of Canada's economy, he forecasts the current market weakness will shave 0.1 per cent from GDP growth in 2019 and 2020.

"It think the sense is that it's not over - we haven't reached the end," Mr. Tal said. "There's a sense that we are in the middle of it."

Toronto real estate agent Scott Ingram is also worried about the frothy Toronto condo market, which has been propped up by investors and has had three years of significant price gains. Over all for the city, the "headwinds outnumber the tailwinds" for 2019, he said.

But he hopes condos will have a softer fall. The inventory remains low, and the lowest end of the market has so far been the strongest, he said. While sales volumes for homes priced over $1.5million fell 40 per cent last year, there was just a 3-per-cent drop in sales for homes - mostly condos - priced between $500,000 and $800,000, he noted.

It is difficult to predict whether Toronto and Vancouver are in short-term dips or are facing the sort of longer-term corrections that many have warned about for a decade or more. Toronto's market has been supported for almost 20 years by steady population growth and relative housing shortages, and Vancouver hasn't seen its market seriously stall in decades. After an early 1980s peak, however, Vancouver took eight years to recoup losses and surpass the previous high.

Mr. Henderson at Sotheby's predicts 2019 sales volumes will be weaker in both cities, but believes they will remain highly appealing destinations for many buyers. The Toronto region in particular typically goes down the least in a broad real estate downturn, he says, and typically goes back up the fastest.

"I wouldn't be betting longterm against Vancouver or Toronto," he said.

Associated Graphic

After years of rapid growth, Canada's top two real estate markets are decelerating in line with many of their global counterparts: The Greater Toronto Area, seen at top, saw total home sales fall 16 per cent in 2018, while in Vancouver, above, sales were down 31.6 per cent. TOP: MARTA IWANEK/THE GLOBE AND MAIL; ABOVE: DARRYL DYCK/THE CANADIAN PRESS

In London, top, the housing market has been slowing in recent years owing to increased land-transfer taxes, stretched affordability and actions to tax overseas buyers, as well as Brexit concerns. Sydney, above, has seen residential property values tumble 8.9 per cent. TOP: SIMON DAWSON/REUTERS; ABOVE: DAVID GRAY/REUTERS


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Friday, January 11, 2019 – Page B16

WILLIAM DOUGLAS CHAMBERS "Bill"

Bill passed away January 2, 2019. Despite the ravages of polio in 1953, Bill excelled academically, gold medalist at Queen's, a graduate of Osgoode Hall and practised with Fraser/Beatty - Dentons.

A fellow lawyer from Chicago described him as a "lawyer's lawyer, someone who had the ability to combine the scholarly with the practical and who recognized that a lawyer's responsibility is to solve problems rather than create them."

Bill loved good food, good wine and vigorous discussion with family and friends. He will be missed by colleagues, brothers and extended family because he was caring, generous, honest and a lot of fun to be with.

A celebration of life will be planned for close family and friends in the spring.

PATRICIA ANN CIPRICK

On Wednesday, January 9, 2019, Patricia Ann Ciprick of Toronto passed away of heart failure at the age of 80 years. She will be sadly missed by her family and many friends. Pat was predeceased by her husband of 43 years, Bill; and is survived by her two daughters, Karen (Greg) Watson of Toronto and Lynn (Derek) Schreurs of Kamloops; two sons, Mike (Carolyn) of Edmonton and Bill (Christy) of Montreal; and nine grandchildren, Matt, David, Jennifer, Ashley, Charlie, Jack, Anna, Thomas, and Grace.

Pat was born in Cornwall, Ontario on May 26, 1938. She was a registered nurse at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal where she met Bill. They spent sixteen years in Oakville, Ontario and then moved their family to Kamloops, BC in 1979 before Pat returned to Ontario in 2007. Pat enjoyed golfing, travelling and spending time with her good friends. She loved, and was very proud of her family.

A Celebration of Pat's life will be held at Kilgour Estates, 20 Burkebrook Place, Toronto on Saturday, January 12th, from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. with everyone welcome to share stories starting at 3:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations in memory of Patricia Ciprick be directed to the 'Schulich Heart Centre' in care of the Sunnybrook Foundation, KGW01-2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, ON, M4N 3M5, 416-480-4483.

An additional Celebration of Life will be held in Kamloops, BC on Saturday March 2nd, from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the home of Lynn and Derek Schreurs.

Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

LORRAINE MARY CROUSE (née Bennett)

Passed away with her family by her side at the Village of Tansley Woods on Tuesday, January 8, 2019.

Will be deeply missed by her husband, Robert. Will also be missed by her children, Barbara (Greg), Diane (Oliver), Bruce (Elizabeth), and Alison (Andrew); sister Nancy (Paul); grandchildren Kathryn (Sean), Caroline (Tyler), Hannah and Venus; great-grandchildren, Addison and Sawyer.

Predeceased by her brother Dave and granddaughter Christine.

If wished, donations in Lorraine's memory may be made to Doctors Without Borders or World Vision.

THERESE HOLZMAN

On Tuesday, January 8, 2019.

Beloved wife of the late Marvin Holzman. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Rebecca Holzman and Nigel Sharfe. Proud grandmother of Eva and Joshua.

Service at Steeles Memorial Chapel, 350 Steeles Ave. W.

on Friday, January 11th at 10:30 a.m. Interment in Sons of Jacob Cemetery, Belleville, 1:15 p.m. A gathering will be held following at Sons of Jacob Synagogue in Belleville.

Shiva begins Sunday at 37 McMurray Ave. from 4:00-8:00 p.m. daily, evening services daily, 7:30 p.m.

Memorial donations may be made to Hadassah-WIZO, 416-630-8373.

HELEN HUBER (nee Wolkowicz)

October 21, 1934 January 6, 2019 Helen lived a long, full life. She was raised on a small farm in Beeton, Ontario and moved to Toronto at the age of 18 to begin her career as a public school teacher. She earned a BA and eventually became a principal.

At her last posting, Sheppard Public School, she founded a steel band for all interested children and, in her typical playon-words style, enlisted the active support of Moe Koffman (Swingin' Shepherd Blues) to inspire them.

After retirement she mentored gifted students.

Helen had a restless energy, a rapier wit and no tolerance for boredom, fuss and nonsense.

She loved to cook and entertain.

She was generous with her friends. She travelled the world with a light suitcase and many companions, and volunteered for several years at the Toronto Jazz Festival. Other passions included cats, needlework, cryptic crosswords and butterflies. And interesting parties.

When various afflictions forced a move to Long Term Care four years ago, Helen accepted the radical change in her life with unexpected grace and pragmatism, yet never relinquished her right to shape her life. Unable to read much, she devoured American political TV news and was often primed for a spirited discussion.

The Jazz Lady (a.k.a. 'H') will be acutely missed by her brother Michael and his wife Patricia (Victoria BC), and by her devoted and loving friends, Sonny and Nadia Fertile (Etobicoke). She is predeceased by her bosom buddy and co-conspirator of longest standing, Marilyn O'Hagan, who left in advance last summer to light tiki torches for Helen's final journey.

Private arrangements have been made through York Funeral Centre. Memorial donations to a charity of your choice or to Helen's chosen charities (MusiCounts, The Canadian Children's Book Centre and the Humane Society) are deeply appreciated.

ZUHAIR KASH KASHMERI

Our brother, our best friend, kindest human being, passed away suddenly on December 21, 2018.

Though nothing can bring back the hour of splendor in the grass of glory in the flower, let me grieve not but rather find strength in what remains behind.

You will be missed very much by your cousin's sister, Ishrat and husband, Glenn; cousin Vic's wife, Naugul; your nephew, Farhan; niece, Zeba and husband, Will; your grandnephew, Viquar; grandniece, Veronica; couisn, Najma and husband, Aziz; cousin, Laila and husband, Haroon; oldest couisn, Zaki; and family.

THOMAS GERALD LAKE

Gerald passed peacefully at Humber River Hospital December 26, 2018 at the age of 97. Predeceased by his dear wife, Isabelle (Hunter); by his parents, Thomas and Beatrice Lake; by his siblings, Patricia (George Codner), Betty (Arne Ottersen), Helen (Victor Westall) and Kenneth Lake; and by nephews, Paul and Wayne. This proud veteran, skilled mechanic, high school teacher, Port Severn cottager, singer, dancer, world traveler will be fondly remembered by many nieces and nephews over two generations and greatly missed by surviving sisters-inlaw, Elaine Lake and Marlene Amonsen.

A service of celebration to be held at The Village of Humber Heights, 2245 Lawrence Ave.

W., Etobicoke, Saturday, January 19th, at 11:00 a.m.

In lieu of flowers, a donation to the Humber River Hospital Foundation in honour of Thomas Gerald Lake would be appreciated. Family and friends may make donations online at http://www.hrhfoundation.ca or by calling 416-242-1000 ext.

81500.

ELIZABETH A. BONNIE McPHIE (née Jack)

Born in Toronto to J. Gordon and Mary (MacDougall) Jack.

Loving and beloved wife of the late Donald Stewart McPhie (1992). Loving mother of Robert J. McKelvey (Edna) of Sydney, Australia, and stepchildren Lynn McConkey (Jim) of Mississauga and Peter McPhie (Nancy) of Minden.

Much loved grandma to Sean (Janet), Louise (Nigel), Susan (Frank), Amanda (Damian), Kate (Kevin), and Iain. Great grandmother of 8 great grandchildren. Predeceased by brother Gordon H. Jack (Carol) and sister Margaret M.

Knechtel (Russell).

Friends may call at the Turner & Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., at Windermere, east of Jane subway on Monday, January 14, 2019 from 10 a.m. until the time of the Service in the Chapel at 11 a.m. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. For those who wish, donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society. Online condolences may be made through http://www.turnerporter.ca DOUGLAS WILLIAM MAHAFFY March 15, 1945 January 6, 2019 We are devastated to announce that Douglas William Mahaffy lost his short but valiant fight against metastatic melanoma. His adoring family was with him to provide support and comfort to him in his final days.

Shakespeare could not have been more wrong when his Soothsayer warned "Beware the Ides of March", as an incredibly loving man was born on March 15, 1945 to Howard and Kirby Mahaffy.

He is survived by the love of his life and his wife of 50 years, Adrienne (née Faust).

He will be forever loved and never forgotten by his children, Kirsten, Scott (Kathleen), Roy, Nicole and Michelle and his kind and thoughtful grandchildren, Nicholas, Lauren, Logan, Beatrice and Neveah.

Doug had a profound influence on countless people throughout the years. His legacy will be one of kindness, respect, generosity and philanthropy. These traits are well known to his family and friends who would all agree that Doug made the world a better place.

He was an avid traveler and, from Baffin Island to Mozambique, it would be difficult to find a place on the map on which Doug had not stepped foot with his constant travel companion Adrienne at his side. His love for playing hockey and baseball as a youth evolved into a passion for skiing, golf and racquet sports. He read voraciously to the point where it was difficult to recommend a book that he had not already read. Every friend was the beneficiary of his love of fine wine as he delighted in finding just the right bottle to share.

Doug would not want his many accomplishments highlighted but they are worth noting as evidence that a good, kindhearted person can achieve great success. He attended East York Collegiate and would go on to earn both a B.A. and an M.B.A. from York University. In between degrees, he achieved the Chartered Accountant designation.

He went on to have a successful career in business including senior executive positions at Hudson's Bay Company and Merrill Lynch and a long and impactful tenure as President and Chief Executive Officer of McLean Budden Limited. He proudly served on the Investment Committee of the Sunnybrook Hospital Foundation as well as the Board of Directors of Stelco Inc., Methanex Corporation and the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board.

The business world is not known as a place of great compassion but Doug proved that a strong leader need not be a tyrant. He established a warm atmosphere in which kindness was seen as an asset and in which the birth of a colleague's child was as important as winning a new account. As a result, it has been no surprise to hear such incredibly warm words of kindness and support from those with whom he has worked over the years. Many of those messages were shared with him and gave him encouragement during treatment.

His family would like to pass along their most sincere thanks to his friends, as the support provided has been immeasurable. Many thanks also to the doctors, nurses and staff at the Odette Cancer Centre for their efforts. The family would also like to thank the doctors, nurses and technicians with the Local Health Integration Network for enabling him to find peace in the comfort of his own home. The compassion and advice of Dr. Peter Goldfarb will also not be forgotten. The family is deeply grateful for the incredible dedication and warmth shown by the staff of The Florian who made sure that his every need was met with a smile.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Melanoma Research at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre.

Friends and family can make their donation via Sunnybrook Foundation by phone (416-4804483), web https://donate.

sunnybrook.ca/tribute or mail c/o Sunnybrook Foundation 2075 Bayview Avenue, KGW-01 Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 There will be a celebration of Doug's life in the Spring.

We are heartbroken because the world has lost not only a great man, but it has lost a profoundly good man.

NORMAN SIM REID (1938-2019)

Passed away surrounded by family at the age of 80 on January 5, 2019.

He is survived by his wife, Winifred; and his three daughters, Fiona, Alison (Karl Braunstein), and Catriona (Mark Dryza); and his seven granddaughters, Lauren, Breanne, Catherine, Caroline, Hayley, Liv, and Eloise.

A. GEORGE RIGG

His family, friends, and students acknowledge with deep sadness the death in Toronto of Professor A.G. Rigg on Monday, January 7, 2019. George, as he was known universally to those who knew him personally, died peacefully at home, in the presence of his beloved wife Jennifer, after a period of declining health.

George was born on February 17, 1937 at Wigan, Lancashire, where he received his secondary education at Wigan Grammar School, which was known for its strong reputation in Classics. As an undergraduate he attended Pembroke College, Oxford from 1955 to 1959. Concurrently with his doctoral work at Oxford, he taught at Merton College, when he first met Jennifer, and later at Balliol College, before two years as Visiting Assistant Professor at Stanford University from 1966 to 1968. In 1968 he took the position of Assistant Professor in the newly formed Centre for Medieval Studies and the Department of English at the University of Toronto, where he taught until his reluctant retirement (then still mandated by law at 65) in 2002.

As an emeritus, his generous and energetic mentorship of graduate students continued for many years thereafter.

His exacting philological standards secured his international reputation as a scholar of medieval Latin as well as of Middle English. His magisterial survey, Anglo-Latin Literature, 1066-1422, published in 1992, will remain the definitive reference work for decades to come. He was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1998.

Throughout his career, his students experienced his rare combination of extraordinary erudition, good humour, genuine humility, and quiet empathy.

George's brilliant academic achievements distinguished but hardly defined him. A lover of cats, of gardening, of good beer, of hand-rolled cigarettes, and of long walks in the country, he was as happy digging potatoes, combing the beaches of Nova Scotia, or potting up bulbs for winter forcing as he was sitting in the Bodleian Library with a fourteenth-century manuscript of Latin poetry.

We are all of us the poorer for the loss of this kind, good, and brilliant man. He is survived by his wife, Jennifer Rigg; sistersin-law, Joanne Hope and Ann Nicholson; and by his nephew, Rupert Hope. Warmest thanks to the Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care for their unfailing kindness and support.

The family will receive friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home A.W. Miles - Newbigging Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue) for the funeral service on Saturday, January 19th at 11:00 a.m. with a reception to follow in the Rosedale Room.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to an animal rescue shelter or a charity of your choice. Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through www.

humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

RICHARD BURKE VAN VALKENBURG

Passed away peacefully on January 3, 2018 in Cobourg, Ontario, age 85. He is survived by his son, Burke Jr. (Stefanie); daughter, Tanya (Penny); grandchildren, Taylor, Emily, Owen and Luca; great-grandchild, Anastasia; and sister, Greta.

Burke was a broadcasting pioneer who worked at CFTO and CHFI before starting communications companies Trans Media Services and Van Valkenburg Communications. He was warm, generous, charismatic, and well known for lightning-fast quips and puns. His loyalty to his friends resulted in countless lifelong friendships.

Memorial to be held in the spring.

Donations to the Alzheimer Society of Canada would be appreciated.

Condolences can be sent to tanyavanv@klondiker.com.

MIRIAM VELLA

September 15, 1970 January 8, 2019 Passed away unexpectedly at the age of 48 at home. Loving wife of David. Proud mother of Cody, Lila and Conner.

Beloved daughter of Roslyn and Allen Katz and Lydia Robertson. Cherished sister of Michael Katz , Michael and Vanessa Robertson. Miriam will be greatly missed by many relatives and friends.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Canadian Liver Foundation. Visitation to be held at York Cemetery & Funeral Centre, 160 Beecroft Rd. North York on Sunday, January 13, 2019 from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Funeral Service at York Funeral Centre, Chapel Monday, January 14, 2019 at 2:00 p.m.

Interment to follow at York Cemetery. Online condolences can be made at http://www.etouch.ca

AUREA WILLIAMS

It is with great sadness that we announce the sudden but peaceful death of Aurea Williams (née Maxwell Scott) at the age of 92 on December 31, 2018. Beloved mother of Mike (Janet), Anne (Jan Rzyzora), Andy (Mary Jo), and Sheila (Andries Van Der Merwe). Dearest Grannie of Deborah (Kevin), Andrea, Matthew, Simon, Christopher (Amanda), Trevor (Anna), Pamela (Shaun), Jake (Erin), Kathleen (Mike), Stephanie (Rory), and Megan (Braeden).

Dearest sister to David Maxwell Scott (Isabel) and sister-in-law Moyna Maxwell Scott. Beloved Aunt and Great Cousin to many relatives from around the world.

Predeceased by her husband, Peter; her children, Deborah, Pamela, Ian and Joanna; sisters, Mamo and Susan; and brother, Simon. Aurea lived a life full of grace, generosity, love, faith and courage and was an inspiration to all who knew her, especially her family.

Visitation will be held at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge St.,Toronto) on Thursday, January 24th from 6-9 p.m. The Memorial Mass will be held at Blessed Trinity Parish (3220 Bayview Ave., North York) on Saturday, January 26th at 11 a.m.

Interment at Holy Cross Cemetery. Condolences may be left at http://www.rskane.ca.

R.S. Kane 416-221-1159

ART WRIGHT 1939 - 2019

Died January 1, 2019 of Alzheimer's disease in Victoria, B.C. Survived by his beloved artist wife of 48 years, Sylvia Bews-Wright; sister, Marie Smith (Earl); and many nieces, nephews, surrogate daughters and honorary granddaughters.

Educated in Political Science, Public Administration and Economic and Social Development, Art excelled in a 35 year span of Canadian public service as a Foreign Service Officer in Nigeria, Malaysia, Thailand, Tanzania and India, followed by serving as Ambassador/High Commissioner in Bangladesh, Barbados and Zimbabwe. His interdisciplinary skills in encouraging citizen participation and leadership in sustainable development were broadly admired in these diverse and challenging settings.

Art reflected: "I had this incredible privilege to work for over three decades at the delivery end of foreign policy and development in highly diverse urban and rural environments on three continents - incredibly, I was paid to learn from and work with amazingly industrious people in fascinatingly different and rich cultures." Art's broader interests in regional development issues coincided with those of the Canadian International Agency (CIDA) where he was appointed as Vice-President of CIDA's Asia Branch. Following his posting to Barbados/Eastern Caribbean he returned to CIDA as Vice President of Multilateral Branch followed by his final posting to Zimbabwe.

By 1997, Foreign Service/ CIDA retirement beckoned and Art served as a director of the Foundation for International Training (Toronto), as Senior Associate of UBC's Sustainable Development Research Institute and as a member of the Advisory Board for the School of Peace and Conflict Management at Royal Roads University. When Art and Sylvia moved to Victoria, UVic's Centre for Asia-Pacific Initiatives (CAPI) was avidly awaiting to recruit Art as an associate. He successfully chaired a number of "hot topic" items, using his legendary deep commitment to inclusive and participatory approaches, the importance of listening, an unflagging respect for the value of human life and a deep appreciation for the diversity and interconnectedness of the human species. Art's fondest retirement endeavor centred on his creation of a course in Sustainable Development for the Canadian Field Studies in Africa Program.

The hands-on course attracted Canadian university students to travel in old army vehicles across Kenya and Uganda under Art's tutelage for a semester of living and learning in tents, often surrounded by curious wildlife.

For seven years (2000-2007), this annual interdisciplinary 'safari' was the highlight of Art's restless retirement years. Before he passed away, Art willed his body to UBC for its continuing research into Alzheimer's disease. Donations toward the eradication of the terrible affliction may be made in Art's name to http://www.alz.soc.ca.

A celebration of Art's life will be held at the at Uplands Golf Course, 3300 Cadboro Bay Road at 1 p.m. on February 2. Sylvia is deeply grateful to the Carr West staff at the Heights of Mountain View for the gentle, loving care given to Art during his time there.


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MAGIC WORDS
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Reading aloud is something we associate with children and bedtime stories. But for grownups, and especially the elderly, it can also tie us together, improve our minds and ease our loneliness
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By MEGHAN COX GURDON
  
  

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Saturday, January 12, 2019 – Page O1

Author of The Enchanted Hour:

The Miraculous Power of Reading Aloud in the Age of Distraction, from which this essay is adapted

Not long ago, a woman named Linda Khan sat by a hospital bed feeling ill at ease. Her elderly father lay beside her. His heart was faltering and he needed surgery. That wasn't what was bothering Ms. Khan, though. What troubled her was that all day, the two of them had engaged in nothing but depressing small talk. They had always enjoyed good conversations, but now her father seemed sunk in querulous contemplation of his predicament. He talked about the hospital food, the tests, the doctors, the diagnosis. The scope of his once wide-ranging interests seemed to have shrunk to the size of the room. The world outside seemed remote, disconnected, irrelevant.

"It is really hard to sit with a person in a hospital," Ms. Khan said later. "The patient is going through so much, and it feels like there's nothing to talk about except the medical situation."

Casting around for a way to divert her father's thoughts, Ms. Khan noticed a stack of books that people had brought to the hospital for him. He'd always been a big reader, but of late didn't have the energy or focus. Epiphany struck. She picked up a copy of Young Titan, Michael Sheldon's biography of Winston Churchill, and started to read it out loud.

"Right away, it changed the mood and atmosphere," she said. "It got him out of a rut of thinking about illness. It wasn't mindless TV, and it wasn't tiring for his brain or eyes because I was doing the reading."

The two of them ended up reading for an hour that day. It was a relief and a pleasure for both of them. The book gave the daughter a way to connect with her father and to improve a situation that was otherwise out of her control. Listening allowed the father to travel on the sound of his daughter's voice, up and out of the solipsism of illness and back into the realm of mature intellectual engagement, where he felt himself again.

"He's in and out of the hospital a lot and now, I always read to him," Ms. Khan told me, "It's usually military history or biography, not my usual stuff, but he has good taste. I'm happy."

Reading aloud is something most of us associate with young children. There's no quicker way for a filmmaker to show that an adult and a child have a loving relationship than to depict the elder reading to the younger. It's cinematic shorthand for good reason. Reading aloud with kids is a magical experience that brims with love and language and imaginative discovery. It's excellent for children, too: We're learning more all the time about the cognitive and social-emotional boost they get, especially in the early years when their brains are growing fast (in the first year, a baby's brain doubles in size; by his or her third birthday, the brain has completed 85 per cent of all the growth it will have). So reading in the early years can have profound, lifeshaping consequences.

What many people don't realize is that the magic still operates when everyone involved has long since grown up. Linda Khan discovered it by accident. For Neil Bush, the late-life hospitalizations of his famous parents George H. W. and Barbara Bush were an opportunity to repay a debt of gratitude.

"When I was a kid, [my mother] would read to me and my siblings," Mr. Bush told a reporter last year. With his parents in and out of care, he said, "we've been reading books about Dad's foreign policy and more recently, Mom's memoir. And to read the story of their amazing life together has been a remarkable blessing to me, personally, as their son."

His mother died the day after he gave the interview; his father died in November.

Before the ubiquity of screens, reading to the sick and convalescent was reasonably common.

Albert Einstein, for instance, used to read the Greeks - Empedocles, Sophocles, Aeschylus, Thucydides - to his sister Maja in the evenings after she suffered a stroke and was bedridden.

Einstein was a man who appreciated higher planes of thought, as we know, and was sensitive to the plight of an active mind trapped in an earthbound body.

Years earlier, at a birthday celebration for the theoretical physicist Max Planck, Einstein had talked of the human yearning for transcendence over coarse, quotidian things: "I believe that one of the strongest motives that leads men to art and science is escape from everyday life with its painful crudity and hopeless dreariness, from the fetters of one's own evershifting desires. A finely tempered nature longs to escape from personal life into the world of objective perception and thought; this desire may be compared with the townsman's irresistible longing to escape from his noisy, cramped surroundings into the silence of high mountains, where the eye ranges freely through the still, pure air and fondly traces out the restful contours apparently built for eternity."

A person constrained by illness or old age may need a collaborator in order to escape the fetters. There's a wonderful literary example of this in Michael Ondaatje's 1992 novel, The English Patient. The main character has horrible burns over most of his body. He's active only in his mind and, unfortunately, the young Canadian nurse who reads to him keeps mangling the Kipling.

"Read him slowly, dear girl, you must read Kipling slowly," the English patient entreats her.

"Watch carefully where the commas fall so you can discover the natural pauses. He is a writer who used pen and ink. He looked up from the page a lot, I believe, stared through his window and listened to birds, as most writers who are alone do. Some do not know the names of birds, though he did. Your eye is too quick and North American. Think about the speed of his pen. What an appalling, barnacled old first paragraph it is otherwise."

The English patient's request is a good reminder that reading aloud needs to be considerate as well as companionable. No one wants to hear a voice droning on without regard to the words or the listener. At its best, the experience becomes a piece of art that the reader pulls from thin air and gives as a gift to the hearer. The beauty of the language, the reader's phrasing and intonation, the pauses between words and sentences, the timbre of the voice and its warmth or chill: All these things communicate themselves in a complex aesthetic experience that's as transient as breath and as comforting as physical touch.

In Britain, thousands of people attend reading groups run by a charity called The Reader, which was founded in 2002 by a professor at the University of Liverpool who wanted to bring great literature out of the ivory tower and into places where ordinary people live, and in particular to places where they suffer. The organization sponsors groups for foster children, teenagers, prisoners, psych-ward patients, recovering drug addicts, as well as for nurses and stressed-out caregivers.

There are groups for Alzheimer's patients. And there are groups for the elderly, such as the one I visited at a facility for the frail and aged in north London.

It was a June afternoon and half a dozen people had assembled at two round tables. Outside, clouds hung heavy in the sky. Inside, the meeting place was pleasant and hotel-like, with soft carpeting and standalone bookcases. There was no medicinal smell, no sign of the violent catastrophe that had shaped these people's lives.

A younger woman, Kate Fulton, had just served hot cups of tea, and now she handed out sheaves of stapled photocopies.

"Right," Ms. Fulton said as she slid into her chair, "we've got a story by Doris Lessing. Just to remind, there are no rules other than -" "Listening."

"No, not that one. No reading ahead!"

Amusement ran around the tables. This was being explained for my benefit.

"The whole point of this group is to be in the moment with the literature," Ms. Fulton said to me, "so that when we stop, we see where we are. And we assess.

We're only at a moment in time."

She turned back to the group.

"Everybody ready? Right, I'm going to start. Flight, by Doris Lessing."

She began to read, her words loud and crisp. She watched carefully where the commas fell: "Above the old man's head was the dovecote, a tall wire-netted shelf on stilts, full of strutting, preening birds. The sunlight broke on their grey breasts into small rainbows. His ears were lulled by their crooning, his hands stretched up towards his favourite, a homing pigeon, a young plump-bodied bird which stood still when it saw him and cocked a shrewd bright eye.

"'Pretty, pretty, pretty,' he said."

Most of the listeners sat unmoving, their faces angled down as they read the words they were hearing. One woman, blind behind dark glasses, had her face turned toward the reader. The room was filled with a kind of quiet, concentrated intelligence.

There was an open and interested knowingness in this group of people whose accents - Gallic, Teutonic, English expatriate - hinted at the postwar diaspora that had brought them all to the predominantly Jewish neighbourhood of Golders Green. All of them were Holocaust survivors.

At the time of my visit, Ms. Fulton had been reading to the group for five years, having given up a career in law to "nourish the soul rather than the bank balance," as she put it.

"I have to make sure the imaginative places that I take them are varied," she told me. "We went to a magic shop with H. G. Wells the other week. We're walking down some Russian street with Chekhov, we're somewhere with Maupassant or we're just having a door fixed with Rose Tremaine.

"They enjoy it very much. I had one lady who never spoke. Remember, these people have had quite a difficult past. This lady had been evacuated, but I didn't know because she never spoke.

We read a poem, Longfellow's The Arrow and the Song, and she suddenly said: 'That's a song, you know, Kate.' She'd never spoken before! I said, 'Would you like to sing it to us?' And she did! She started crying. The tears were pouring down her face, and she said, 'I was evacuated in the war and we were at a fire station and I haven't heard that song since then and you've just given me back my childhood.' "When you're in these kind of groups, talking about stories, anything can come up. You just don't know what's coming."

The blind member of Ms. Fulton's group told me afterward: "It makes me think. ... You use your brain and you find things that interest you that you normally don't talk about. You get an insight into different stories. It's surprising what you can learn about other people, too. It's not as though you're in school and being taught. It's a friendly relationship."

"It's interaction with other people," a man put in.

"It brings literature to life," said another woman. "You hear something and you discuss it.

You can put yourself in the protagonist's shoes. It's stimulating.

Otherwise, you look at the four walls or watch television or something like that."

In a 2010 survey in Britain, elderly adults who joined once-aweek reading groups reported having better concentration, less agitation and an improved ability to socialize. The survey authors attributed these improvements in large part to the "rich, varied, non-prescriptive diet of serious literature" that group members consume, with fiction encouraging feelings of relaxation and calm, poetry fostering focused concentration, and narratives of all sorts giving rise to thoughts, feelings and memories.

Serious literature may offer yet another perk. Researchers at Yale University have found that people who read for pleasure live an average of two years longer than non-readers, and that, further, those who enjoy books seem to enjoy a greater protective effect than those who read newspapers or magazines. "This effect is likely because books engage the reader's mind more," explained Yale's Avni Bavishi. "Cognitive engagement may explain why vocabulary, reasoning, concentration and critical-thinking skills are improved by exposure to books."

Literature, she said, "can promote empathy, social perception and emotional intelligence, which are cognitive processes that can lead to greater survival."

More exciting still, perhaps, are the effects of reading aloud on people with Alzheimer's disease. A 2017 paper from clinicians at the University of Liverpool hints at huge potential promise for sufferers and their families: "Reading a literary text together not only harnesses the power of reading as a cognitive process: It acts as a powerful socially coalescing presence, allowing readers a sense of subjective and shared experience at the same time."

That's positive in itself, of course, but there's more: "Research suggests that the inner neural processing of language when a mind reads a complex line of poetry has the potential to galvanize existing brain pathways and to influence emotion networks and memory function."

That seems to be what happened to the silent member of Ms. Fulton's group when she heard the Longfellow poem.

For many adults, being part of a read-aloud session offers the physiological relief of being in the company of others. Elderly people who live alone or in nursing homes may have only rare contact with others, and even then the exchanges may be more practical and transactional than sincere or prolonged. The same is true for men and women living behind bars, or in hospitals. They may not have much opportunity to engage with other people as equals, let alone to escape into the world of objective perception and thought that Einstein described.

"On the emotional level, it's just wonderfully nourishing," said Paul Higgins, an early volunteer with The Reader. "Not all of us have had that wonderful, almost primordial experience of being read to as children, and soothed. Interestingly, given the opportunity, people, particularly older people, often say, 'It's so relaxing.' Loving kindness is what people experience, through the literature, through the network that builds up, the lifeline that builds up week to week. Kindness, love and beauty. That's what hits people."

In the digital era, life can be an isolated affair. By one recent assessment, rates of loneliness have doubled since the 1980s. Today in the United States, upward of 40 per cent of adults suffer from some degree of isolation.

We are social animals, as Aristotle said. Feeling disconnected can take a grievous toll. Lonely people are three times as likely to report symptoms of anxiety and depression, according to a Danish study, and face double the mortality risk from diseases of the heart.

"The world is suffering from an epidemic of loneliness," former U.S. surgeon-general Vivek Murthy wrote recently. "Loneliness causes stress, and long-term or chronic stress leads to more frequent elevations of a key stress hormone, cortisol. It is also linked to higher levels of inflammation in the body. This in turn damages blood vessels and other tissues, increasing the risk of heart disease, diabetes, joint disease, depression, obesity and premature death. Chronic stress can also hijack your brain's prefrontal cortex, which governs decision-making, planning, emotional regulation, analysis and abstract thinking." It's an awful catalogue of suffering, given how simple and inexpensive the means of relief.

We humans are not even the only species to benefit! Dogs do, too, which is why volunteers at the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals now read aloud to animals recovering from trauma. Victoria Wells, who runs ASPCA's behaviour and training program at its headquarters in New York, came up with the scheme after seeing how traumatized dogs responded when she sat outside their kennels playing the guitar.

"I noticed that the dogs who were very fearful, in the back of their kennels shivering and cowering, would slowly creep forward to the front," she said. "They would appear to be listening and they would become very relaxed."

Shifting from music to reading made it possible for a larger number of volunteers to pitch in. To minimize stress, readers learn to use a reassuring tone of voice, and sit so that they're not facing the dogs. When I stopped in, a retired opera singer was reading the 1967 sci-fi thriller Logan's Run to half a dozen dogs. There was lots of noisy barking when she began, but soon her voice settled on them like an audio blanket, and the animals subsided.

"The dogs really enjoy the reading," Ms. Wells told me. "I think the fact that it's non-threatening but it's attention, all the same. The dogs are much more receptive to us, they seem more comfortable in their kennels, but it really prepares them for people having to walk by, and adopters looking at them and potentially taking them home. I think it's that soothing, even tone of voice, and the presence of somebody to keep them company that really benefits them."

If even dogs flourish when we read to them, it's hardly surprising that people do, too, whether it happens by design in a weekly get-together or in a moment of serendipity in a hospital room.

Literature shared by the voice is an opportunity for encounter, companionship and self-discovery. It's a balm for the lonely heart and an escape route from quotidian dreariness. It offers connectedness both in the moment and, in a deep way, with the full richness of human experience.

"You read something which you thought only happened to you, and you discover that it happened 100 years ago to Dostoyevsky," the great James Baldwin once reflected. "This is a very great liberation for the suffering, struggling person, who always thinks that he is alone. This is why art is important. Art would not be important if life were not important, and life is important."

Adapted excerpt from The Enchanted Hour by Meghan Cox Gurdon (c) 2019. Published by Harper. All rights reserved.

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ILLUSTRATION BY YANN KEBBI

ILLUSTRATION BY YANN KEBBI


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BIRTH AND DEATH NOTICES
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Thursday, January 17, 2019 – Page B16

WILLIAM BLAIR ASHMORE

On January 14, 2019, in the winter of his 93rd year Blair Ashmore died peacefully in the home he loved surrounded by his family.

Blair's life began in Palmerston, ON, a railway town during the golden age of rail travel. In his youth, he was passionate about trains and aspired to become a train engineer. This did not transpire. He went on to graduate from Western University followed by the University of Toronto and became a teacher/vice principal. However, the love of trains never left him. On one occasion during a road trip out west he jumped aboard the Trans Canada in Banff, and with wife and daughter following by car went through to Golden, BC. If he could, he would have gone straight through to the coast.

He introduced his bride Kay to the transcontinental train from Washago to Vancouver. This passion for rail continued right up to his 90's with numerous family train trips on the Rocky Mountaineer.

Blair's father (Frederick Thomas) was a merchant, his mother (Annie Evelyn) a teacher. Predeceased by his only sibling, sister, Shirley Anne in 1945. From them he inherited the talents of entrepreneurship and lifelong learning.

His affinity for business began with operating an ice cream shop in Wasaga Beach for a few summers as a young teacher and continued when he purchased and operated Woodington House on Lake Rosseau during the 60's. He would finish teaching school in June, operate the "Lodge" until Labour Day weekend then, be back in class for the first day of school. He also enjoyed a long relationship with Santa's Village in Bracebridge as a director.

Dad's life was also one of community service and volunteering. He was a member of the Y's men, likely due to "Skid" Watson's mentorship when he first arrived in Orillia and boarded at the "Y".

He was a life long Mason/Shriner, also served as a school trustee, volunteered in minor hockey, was a church warden and president of Chi Rho.

In addition to all his other interests, he was a good athlete excelling in track & field, tennis, hockey and curling. In 1979 he received a Life Membership in the Orillia Minor Hockey Association.

He had a talent for raising money. Co-chairing with Dr. Tom Brandl he helped raise funds in support of the building of Brian Orser Arena in Orillia.

This achievement led both men to receive the Orillia Citizen of the Year in 1974.

In his late 80's, he was asked to chair a successful fundraising campaign to refurbish the steeple for St. James Anglican Church Orillia. He had a knack of getting the grandchildren to drive him by the project to monitor progress.

So much so the cheeky young people started to call him a steeple chaser! All this would not have been possible without the love and support of two women. Our mother Muriel Margaret Ashmore deceased 2010 and our stepmother, Kathleen Page Ashmore.

Life was "interesting" with this man's drive and as a neighbour commented during one of his birthdays - how did he find two such incredible women?

Blair leaves a family who derived strength and enjoyed full lives due to his work ethic: Left with great memories are daughters, Susanne Ashmore (Fred Achenbach-deceased), Nancy Pigden (Marty), Peter Ashmore (Marla); and loving grandchildren, Kristen, Brandon, Stacy, Jessica (John Robert) and Thomas.

Our family and our father have been blessed by the care of many. Dr.

Catford, Dr. Okafo, Grace, Ninette, Myrtle, Brian, Rexy, Aileen, Jonah, Elyza, Perlyn, Aleli, and Dana.

We thank all of the many friends who visited and supported Kay and Dad at home.

In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to the Mariposa House Hospice. http://www.mariposahousehospice.com.

Visitation at Mundell Funeral Home, 79 West Street North, Orillia Thursday, January 17th, from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Members of the Equity Masonic Lodge #659 A.F. & A.M.; G.R.C. and sister lodges are asked to gather in the Chapel for service Thursday evening at 6:45. A funeral service will be held at St. James' Anglican Church, 58 Peter St. N., Orillia on Friday, January 18th 11:00 a.m. with a luncheon to follow.

W. GRAHAM DUTTON Q.C.

January 10, 2019 It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of our dear friend and one of our founding partners, Graham Dutton.

Mr. Dutton was called to the Bar in 1960 and was a founding partner of the firm Dutton Brock LLP, formed in March of 1982. He was appointed Queen's Counsel in 1976 and certified as a Specialist in Civil Litigation by the Law Society of Upper Canada at the inception of that designation.

He was a well-respected member of the bar who was actively involved, and held key positions, in many associations including the Medical Legal Society of Toronto, Canadian Bar Association, Advocates' Society, County of York Law Association, Defense Research Institute and the American College of Trial Lawyers. He was recognized by the Ontario Trial Lawyers Association and was a recipient of the Canadian Defence Lawyers Lee Samis Award of Excellence.

Graham Dutton was instrumental in building Dutton Brock LLP into one of Canada's premier insurance defence firms. The Partners and employees of the firm, many of whom worked closely with him and considered him a dear friend and colleague, remember a man with tremendous advocacy skills, a good sense of humour and strong family values.

His legacy will live on with family, friends and colleagues along with the legal community that he devoted much of his life to.

Thank you Graham, for all that you gave us. From your friends and colleagues at Dutton Brock LLP.

BERT GARFIELD

Peacefully and with family and friends by his side, at age 101, Bert passed away in his home at the Sunnybrook Veterans Centre, Toronto on Monday January 14, 2019. Eldest son of Anna and Jacob , born in Toronto, he spent the majority of his life there, with an interlude in Montreal while working for Van Kirk Chocolate.

Predeceased by his wife Lottie Garfield, sisters Lil Gordon, Ruth Joseph, brother Howard Garfield, sisters-in-law Shirley Banks, Eileen Appleby, brothers-in-law Bill Gordon, Ben Joseph, Murray Appleby, Syd Banks and nephews Mark Joseph and Bruce Gordon.

He will be sadly missed and lovingly remembered by a large extended family including his daughters Ellen and Louise Garfield, son-in-law Patrick Lee, brother Goody Garfield, sisters-in law Shirley Garfield, Margot Garfield and his many beloved nieces and nephews and devoted friends.

A Canadian Veteran, Bert served in WWII in the Canadian Army, Royal Canadian Corps of Signals on the west coast of Canada. For most of his professional life, Bert was the General Sales Manager of Van Kirk Chocolate (Chipits) and travelled extensively through Canada and the U.S. Bert was an avid sports aficionado and fine athlete, playing golf regularly at his beloved Westview Golf Club well into his 99th year.

The family would like to thank all the staff at Sunnybrook Veterans Centre for their compassionate, skilled care and loving support while he made it his final home.

In keeping with Dad's wishes there will be a graveside service on Monday January 21, 2019, at 11a.m. at Pardes Chaim Cemetery, (Community Section), 11818 Bathurst Street, Vaughan (north of Gamble Rd). Shiva following the burial at 77 St. Clair Ave East, 3rd floor-code 9554. (Yonge and St.

Clair area) In lieu of flowers, please send donations to Sunnybrook Foundation (Veterans Comfort Fund) 2075 Bayview Ave, Suite KGW-01, Toronto, ON, M4N 3M5 or the charity of your choice.

FRANK PHILIP GISHMAN

On Tuesday, January 15, 2019, Frank passed away at Sunnybrook Veterans Centre in Toronto, at the age of 98. Frank came with his parents, Mendel and Civy to Peterborough from Poland when he was six months old.

Peterborough would be his home for the next 94 years. He was joined by his bride, Ruth, after serving in World War II with the 404 Royal Canadian Air Force Squadron. After working at Westclox, he established and was the proud owner of Peterborough Jewellers on George Street. He was a certified gemologist. He was a past president of Beth Israel Synagogue and a leader of the Peterborough business community. As a longstanding member of Rotary, he was recognized for never missing a meeting in over 33 years. He also received the Paul Harris Fellow Award from Rotary International for "furtherance of better understanding and friendly relations among the peoples of the world."

Frank was a quiet, loyal person committed to personal responsibility and always doing the right thing. Beloved husband of Ruth Cait Gishman for the past 73 years. Loving father and father-in-law of Anita and Val Rachlis, and Dana Colson and Brian Sackett. Dear brother of the late Francis Zakem. Devoted grandfather of Shari (Bill Horvath), Alisa (Yaron Blanc), Jeffrey, and Caitlin. Loving great-grandfather of Lexie, Michael, Matthew, Lily, Lyla and Benjamin.

At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West, Toronto (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Thursday, January 17, 2019 at 10:00 a.m.

Interment in the Beth Israel section of Little Lake Cemetery in Peterborough. Much gratitude to his caregivers Mary, Virginia, Maryann, Margina, Michelle, Lyn and Hazel for all their excellent care over the years and to the compassionate and highly professional team at Sunnybrook Veterans Centre. Memorial donations may be made to Sunnybrook Veterans Foundation 416-480-4483.

AILEEN SHIRLEY HAGGART

It is with sadness that the family of Aileen Shirley Haggart announce that Shirley passed away peacefully on January 13, 2019, at the Aberdeen Hospital, New Glasgow NS after a short illness.

Shirley was the cherished sister of Joan Haggart (Winston Hetherington); Sandy Haggart (Alma); Susan Robinson (Stanley); Charles Haggart (Petty); and Ross Haggart (Diana). She was a loving aunt to her many nieces and nephews, grandnieces and grand-nephews.

Shirley was predeceased by her parents, Margaret Aileen (Dahr) and James Garfield Haggart; her sister, Margaret Dyane Haggart Ronin (Sebastian); her brother-inlaw, Bill Forsythe; and her grand-nephew, Thomas Guerette.

Shirley was born January 7, 1947, in New Glasgow, NS and moved with her family to Aylmer Quebec in 1955. She graduated with a BA in Political Science from Dalhousie University and had a satisfying career in the Ontario Ministry of Economic Planning. Upon retirement, Shirley returned to Pictou County to live in Black Point and care for our mother.

Throughout her life, Shirley was active in her local community and applied her time and skills as a volunteer to many worthy causes.

Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m., Saturday, January 19th, at St Andrew's Presbyterian Church, New Glasgow, NS. Family flowers only. Donations in memory of Shirley may be made to St.

Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 37 Mountain Rd., New Glasgow, NS, B2H 3W4 or to a charity of your choice.

Condolences may be sent by visiting: http://www.rhporter.ca

CHARLES KELLY

Charles Kelly passed away peacefully in his 87th year on Tuesday, January 15, 2019 in K Wing Palliative Care at Sunnybrook Hospital with family by his side.

Charles leaves behind his wife of 58 years, Shirley (nee Denomy) and his four children, Charlene Richmond (Grant), Barb Ferlatte (John), Paul (Caroline) and Gerry (Leasa) and his 7 grandchildren Kelly, Carter, Meredith, Brooke, Mark, Heather and Brendan.

Educated at Assumption University, Windsor, Ontario.

Devoted family man, lover of life and all those he met, forever curious and a lifelong learner, taking up a paintbrush in his last years. A devoted volunteer at Blessed Sacrament Parish who helped initiate the Out of the Cold Program in 1996 with many other dedicated volunteers who shared his passion for helping those in need.

The family extend sincere thanks to the staff at Sunnybrook Hospital especially the Palliative Care Unit. Profound appreciation and gratitude to Ritche, Ed and Chona for their incredible devotion to Charles. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to St. Vincent du Paul.

The family will receive friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home A.W. Miles - Newbigging Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue) from 2:00 4:00 p.m. and 6:00 - 8:00 p.m. on Friday, January 18th. Funeral Mass well be held at Blessed Sacrament Church, 24 Cheritan Avenue on Saturday, January 19th at 11:00 a.m.

Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

KENNETH EDWARD PAGE

May 8, 1931 - January 12, 2019

After a life well lived, Ken passed away peacefully in one of his favourite places - Unionville, Ontario. Ken, beloved husband of Jeanne (Moir), the love of his life for over 64 years. Adoring father to Leanne, loving and proud father-in-law of George (Lewis), and adoring grandfather to Elliott and Julia (Christopher). Beloved son of the late Alice and Neville Page.

Loving oldest brother of the four Page boys, Gord (Kathy), Gary (Rotraud), and Ross (Colleen). Proud Uncle Kenny to his nieces and nephews.

A friend to many, Ken's legacy will live on in the many lives he touched throughout his active life.

Born during the Great Depression, Ken always exceeded expectations.

As a young child, he was struck down by polio, but went on to thrive.

He left high school early to join his father's plastering business, N. Page and Sons. As times changed and drywall increasingly replaced plaster, Ken entered the teaching profession in the late '60s. He juggled teaching full time while taking university courses, earning his B.A. at York University in just four years. Ken taught trowel trades, first at Sir Winston Churchill Collegiate Institute, then at Sir Wilfred Laurier Collegiate Institute. Inspired by his students Ken was ahead of his time, introducing integrated learning techniques into his classroom. As a trades teacher, many of his students were practical rather than academic students. To keep his students engaged in school and to broaden their learning, Ken designed complex construction projects that his students built in his large, two-story classroom shop.

His final and largest project had a "walk through history" theme.

Within his shop, students reconstructed a WWI trench, built a Tudor-style English pub, created a night-time forest with a waterfall traversed by a railroad trestle (for which Pierre Burton drove the last spike), built a¾ scale model of the first log school house in Scarborough (which local grade 3 classes took turns studying in over six weeks), and recreated a section of Pompeii.

The project took two years to complete. Many of his at-risk students stayed in school to see the project through to completion and they learned a variety of construction techniques while also learning something about history, art, math, and other subjects. His students enjoyed the project work so much they would regularly phone "Mr. Page" on Saturday mornings and over holidays asking if he would open the shop so they could come in and work on the project. Of course, he always did with enthusiasm. His projects and innovative teaching methods led to Ken's growing reputation at the Scarborough Board of Education. Eventually, Ken was asked to develop one of the first high school cooperative education programs in Canada.

He undertook the challenge with his usual creative gusto, first in a volunteer capacity over a summer, then in a full time role. Ken acquired the nickname "Captain Co-op" as the Scarborough co-op program grew exponentially and he received invitations from across the country and around the world to advise other boards as they developed now ubiquitous co-op programs.

In addition to teaching, Ken was an active community volunteer.

He served as President of the Unionville Skating Club where he also built carnival props for the annual ice show, enjoying the camaraderie of his fellow volunteers and developing deep friendships. Ken also helped lead the fund-raising committee that raised the money needed to replace the old Crosby Memorial Community Centre Arena. Ken was also active over the years in many other charities, including the Unionville Progress Club, the Unionville Home Society Board, and more recently, Pickering Rotary.

All in all, a life well lived.

Jeanne, Leanne, and George extend heartfelt thanks to friends, family, and neighbours for your visits, support, and prayers as Ken's health declined.

Your thoughtfulness has meant more than you know. We also thank Osmond for his compassionate, professional, and dedicated caregiving.

Funeral arrangements entrusted to McEachnie Funeral Home, Ajax, Ontario. Visitation - Saturday, January 19, 2019 from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at McEachnie Funeral Home, 28 Old Kingston Road, Ajax, ON.

Funeral Service - Sunday, January 20, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. at St. George's Anglican Church, 77 Randall Drive, Ajax, Ontario. Preceding the funeral there will be visitation at the church from 1:00 p.m. to 1:45 p.m. Private burial.

In lieu of flowers, you might consider a donation in Ken's memory to: Rotary International's Polio Eradication Initiative via the Rotary Club of Pickering electronically on their web page (http://www.pickeringrotary.ca and look for the payment tab, click on and then select the memorial Donation for Ken Page tab), or by cheque (P.O. Box 7, Pickering, Ontario L1V 2R2). HOPE - Helping Other Parents Everywhere via e-transfer to etransfer@hope4parents.ca, by cheque (1740 Kingston Rd. P.O. Box 64, Pickering, Ontario L1V 2R2), or via the HOPE website - http://www.hope4parents.ca - to access the "Donate" tab.

Online condolences may be placed at http://www.mceachniefuneral.ca.

JOHN BRUCE SUTHERLAND

John Bruce Sutherland died peacefully in Newmarket on Sunday, January 13, 2019, in his 85th year. Beloved father of David (Karen) and Kate (Rob Doyle) and brother of Janet Stowell (Dexter d.) (Bethel, Maine). Uncle to Betsy Stowell (Tim MacLean), Judy Stalford (Rob), Nancy White (Bill).

Generous and always interested grandfather to Ben (Ashley) Sutherland, Terri Sutherland (Justin Majnarich), Meghan Koiter (David), Michael Lewkoski, Danika Sutherland and Sam Doyle. Dear friend to former wives Ildi Conner and Wendy Duncan.

Donations may be made to the Visual Performing Arts (Vpan.

ca) remembering his passion for music. A visitation/celebration of life will be held at Taylor Funeral Home, 524 Davis Drive E., Newmarket, on Saturday, January 19, 2019 from 1 p.m.

until 4 p.m. Further information and condolences may be left at http://www.taylorfh.ca.

CAROL MCMANUS SODEN STEWART

June 26, 1926 January 17, 2016 We miss you and keep your memory strong.


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Birthand death notice
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Monday, January 14, 2019 – Page B14

GEORGE BRADY

February 9, 1928 - January 11, 2019 Our beloved patriarch, George, died quickly and painlessly at home on January 11, 2019.

To say that George squeezed out every drop of life is a grand understatement - from surviving the horrors of the Holocaust and losing his entire family, to restarting a new life in Canada. Blessed with 4 children (or as he would say, 3 kids and a girl) he pursued life with great vigour.

World renowned for his tenacity and generosity, for George there were no problems, only challenges for which he could always find solutions.

He helped hundreds of new Canadians find jobs, homes, and pursue their dreams. He had no time for naysayers or laziness. Our father lived larger than life - from using dynamite to blast rocks at the cottage, to igniting Czech democratic protests in 2016.

George's early years are well known through the story of Hana's Suitcase, which follows George and his sister Hana's journey from their Czech home to Terezin and finally to Auschwitz. In George's case - he believed that he survived due to his perseverance and a little bit of luck. He was liberated from the Death March in January of 1945 and returned home to find out that he was the sole survivor of his family.

George felt that he should not dwell on the past and chose to make a new life in Canada honouring the legacy of his parents. Three years later, he met a fellow survivor, Joe Seidner, and together they founded Brady & Seidner.

As he established the business, George began a busy family life with his first wife Carol and their 3 boys, Douglas, Paul and David. He impressed upon his boys the values he had grown up with, including a spirited appreciation for cottage life and family time. Guests were frequently lulled into a false sense of relaxation with weekend invites to a "Rock Festival" or "Woodstock", neither of which had anything to do with music, but rather the literal translation. When he was no longer able to swing a chainsaw, his favourite pastime was to direct others including his kids and grandkids as they cut trees, used the leaf blower, and moved rocks.

At 54, George expanded the family by marrying a second time and together with Teresa had a daughter, Lara Hana. The family continued to grow with badly trained but much loved dogs.

The arrival of Fumiko Ishioka into George's life in 2000 heralded the next chapter, sharing the story of his sister, and that of his own as a member of the underground magazine at Terezin called Vedem. George believed that these stories transcended faith and belief; encouraging kids and adults alike to explore history and learn more about the consequences of hatred and intolerance. Having, impacted many lives, his story continues to touch people in every corner of the world.

George's proudest achievement was his family and their success. He often commented that his parents would have been so proud to see how the Brady clan had expanded after suffering such hardship during the war. Not one to hold a grudge, this was his vindication; that he won out in the end.

George was a member of the Order of Ontario, and received the Queen's Diamond Jubilee medal, keys to Prague and Nove Mesto (his home town), the highest German civilian Order of Merit: the "Verdienstkreuz am Bande", the Masaryk Society award, the Czech House of Commons award, Post Bellum award, honour from Palace University, and various other honours.

He was also very proud of achieving 1st, 2nd and 3rd place (in the same race) for the over 80 category at the Devil's Glen Ski Club Championships.

George's legacy is carried on by his wife Teresa; children Douglas (Carol), Paul (Joyce), David (Robin), Lara (Mark) and his grandchildren; Adam, Daniel, Cameron, Everest, Sierra, Nirvana, Khoi, Grace, Isaiah, Elijah, Aaron and Theodore. Special thanks to Teresa for her miracles in keeping George healthy, despite his best efforts to do otherwise and to Marty for those weekly lunches. Forever with a twinkle in his eye, George will be deeply missed. George was the world's biggest optimist - always seeing the glass more than half full.

At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (three lights west of Dufferin) for service on Wednesday January 16, 2019, at 3:00 p.m. Shiva to be observed privately. In George's honour, and to continue the important cause he believed in - please consider a donation to the Tokyo Holocaust Education Centre in lieu of flowers.

https:// http://www.canadahelps.org/en/ dn/31868

LILA TROTT CHAMBERS

April 1, 1915 - January 8, 2019

Loving mother, step-mother, grandmother, great grandmother.

Born in Fort William (Thunder Bay) Ontario, Lila trained as a teacher in Ottawa in 1936 and worked in Temiskaming and Graham Ontario until her marriage to J.R. (Jack) Trott (CPR Investigation Department). They moved to Winnipeg in 1939, Vancouver in 1950 and Montreal in 1966.

They retired to Gibson's Landing, B.C. in 1973. After Jack's death in 1976, she met and married William (AB) Chambers (Air Canada). They moved to Richmond, B.C. in 1989. AB died in 1990 and she moved to Toronto to be near her children.

She is predeceased by her beloved son David Trott and step- daughter, Carol (Gary Troll). She is survived by her step- daughters: Margaret called Peggy (Henry Daubaras) and Pam (Moe Hays) and her daughter Jocelyn (Leonard Schwartz).

She was a lifetime member of the P.E.O. belonging to chapters in Vancouver, Montreal and Toronto. She was a member of the South Arm United Church in Richmond for many years.

She was an accomplished pianist and her interest in tap dancing led to her performance with a group of ladies from The Minaru Centre, Richmond, well into her eighties. She was a member of golf clubs in Gibson's and Richmond until lifting her golf cart in and out of the trunk of her car became an issue. This was also well into her eighties. She was an avid traveller and was afforded ample opportunity with husbands both in the CPR and Air Canada.

She engaged, actively, in every experience that life presented which led to her ski- dooing on Lake Simcoe and flying in a twin engine, float plane over Muskoka in her nineties. She loved life and lived it well. She will be missed but never forgotten as she left an indelible mark on all the hearts she touched.

A celebration of her life will be held on Sunday, January 27, 2019 at Amica at Bayview, her home for the last ten years, 15 Barberry Place, 2 p.m. Donations may be made to the charity of your choice, in lieu of flowers.

DAVID ROBERT FEINMAN

Passed away Sunday, January 13, 2019 at the age of 90.

Survived by his loving wife Trudy, daughter Ellen and grandchildren Jesse, and Becca Moss. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Dr. S. Victor Feinman and the late Felicia Feinman.

Cherished by nieces and nephews Joyce and Zion Sasson, Rena and David Siegel and their devoted families. A Holocaust survivor, David was a successful yet always honourable and modest businessman; multilingual, but a man of few words.

A graveside service will be held on Monday, January 14, 2019, at 3:00 p.m. in the Shaarei Shomayim Congregation Section at Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery, 6033 Bathurst Street. Shiva at 18 Lower Village Gate, #412. Memorial donations may be made to Beit Halochem Canada, 905-695-0611, or Association For Soldiers Of Israel Canada, 416-783-3053.

ROBERT GRAHAM

Unexpectedly passed away, peacefully, on Wednesday, January 9, 2019, at the age of 81. Beloved father to Jackie (Henrik), Doug (Mary), and Ted. Loving and devoted grandfather to Andrew, Ben, Katie, Robin, and Samantha.

He was a wonderful father and grandfather, who will be dearly missed.

My heart's in the Highlands, my heart is not here, My heart's in the Highlands, a-chasing the deer; A-chasing the wild deer, and following the roe, My heart's in the Highlands, wherever I go.

~Robert Burns A memorial will be held in the Humphrey Funeral Home A.W. Miles Newbigging Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Davisville Avenue) on Friday, January 18th, at 1:00 p.m.

As an expression of sympathy, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be greatly appreciated. Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through humphreymilesnewbigging.com.

MARGARET K. LOVE "Peggy"

September 1, 1923 January 6, 2019 Peggy Love, beloved wife of the late Len Love, passed away peacefully on Sunday, January 6, 2019, at the age of 95 years.

Peggy was the devoted mother of Judy Rice and Tom Love and the dedicated mother-in-law of Bill Rice and Dianne Love. She was an extremely proud grandmother to Tiffany (Kevin Shaw) and Todd (April) Rice and to Michael (Mallory) and Jaimie Love, as well as great-grandmother to Calia and Jaiden Rice in Singapore and to Tova Love in Calgary.

Having lived most of their lives in Montreal, Peggy and Len moved to Calgary in 1990, to join their family.

The family wishes to thank the entire staff at Garrison Greens Seniors Community for their much appreciated care over the last four years.

A memorial service will be held at a later date. If friends so desire, memorial tributes may be made directly to the Canadian Red Cross Society, Southern Alberta Region, 2nd Floor, 1305 - 11 Avenue S.W., Calgary, AB T3C 3P6, Telephone: (403) 541-6100, http://www.redcross.ca.

In living memory of Margaret Love a tree will be planted at Fish Creek Provincial Park by McInnis & Holloway Funeral Homes, Park Memorial, 5008 Elbow Drive S.W., Calgary, AB, T2S 2L5, Telephone: 403-243-8200.

GORDON MCCASLIN

It is with great sadness that we announce Gordon's passing after his courageous battle with cancer, peacefully at his home surrounded by his family and best friend on Skeleton Lake, Huntsville, Ontario on January 10, 2019.

Husband of the late Barbara; father of Paul (Suzanne) and David (Michele); grandfather of Stacey, Jason, Krista, Laura and Christopher; great-grandfather of Ryane, Gavin, Max, Ayla, Lowen, Peyton, Evan, Connor. Loving companion Sheila Patterson. Best friend of Paul Sinclair for 25 years.

Loved by all who knew him.

Gordon was a successful stock broker rising through the ranks of Bunting and Company to Director and Chairman of the Board for both Bunting and UBS Canada, as a reflection of the 40 plus years in the financial services industry.

Family and friends are welcome at a visitation on Saturday January 19th, from 2:00 - 4:00 and 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. and Sunday, January 20th, from 12:00 - 1:00 p.m. at the Highland Funeral Home, Scarborough Chapel, 3280 Sheppard Avenue East, at Warden, 416-773-0933.

Funeral Service Sunday, January 20th, 1:00 p.m. in the Chapel.

Reception to follow.

Memorial donations to: Huntsville Hospice, Huntsville Hospital Foundation or Sunnybrook Hospital Odette Cancer Center would be appreciated by the family.

Special thanks to all the care givers; Theresa, Kathy, Jill, Dr. Deb Harold and Dr. Stacey Erven.

For online condolences please visit http://www.highlandfuneralhome.ca

THELMA ROSEN-BERRIS

Passed away peacefully at home in her 95th year on Saturday, January 12, 2019.

Predeceased by husbands Barnett Berris and Sydney Rosen. Loving mother and mother- in-law of David and Marg Rosen, Paul and Evy Rosen. Dear sister and sisterin-law of Gerry and Stella Freedman, and Joyce Zweig.

Devoted grandmother of Michael, Laura, Jesse, and Ashley. She will also be missed by many nieces and nephews.

At Holy Blossom Temple, 1950 Bathurst Street for service on Tuesday, January 15, 2019 at 1:00 p.m.

Interment Holy Blossom Memorial Park. Shiva following the service on Tuesday and Wednesday from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at The Dunfield Retirement Residence, 77 Dunfield Avenue, Toronto. Memorial donations may be made to the Sydney I. Rosen Memorial Fund at The Hospital for Sick Children, 416-813-6166.

GEOFFREY REGINALD SHARRON

On January 6, 2019, at the age of 30, as a result of a skiing accident in British Columbia. Geoff will be dearly missed by his parents, Teresa Cooney and Bruce Sharron, and by his brothers Thomas and James (Laurenne). He is survived by his grandmothers, Audrey Sharron and June Cooney, as well as his many aunts, uncles and cousins.

Geoff was born in Toronto on November 23, 1988. He was raised in Newmarket, Ontario.

In 2009, he began spending his time between Alberta and B.C., where he enjoyed his passion for the outdoors. Known to all of his friends for his kind and gentle approach to life, and a wonderful sense of humour, Geoff was most recently living in Golden, where he worked as a builder of log homes. In lieu of flowers, please donate to a charity of your choice or, to reflect Geoff's love of animals, to your local Animal Shelter.

A celebration of Geoff's life will be held on Thursday January 17th, at 2:00 p.m. Taylor Funeral Home, 524 Davis Drive, Newmarket.

Online condolences may be left at http://www.taylorfh.ca

THOMAS ALLEN SLOANE JEAN MARIE SLOANE (nee Glen)

Both passed away peacefully in Toronto during the first week of 2019, Tommy on January 2nd at age 94 and Jean on January 6th at age 92.

Tommy and Jean were married in Toronto on June 19, 1948 at St. John's Presbyterian Church and spent a long and happy life together. They shared their combined love with their four children, Carol Anne MacInnes (Brian), Gail Gaikis (Gunars), David (Evelyn), and Lorna Kingsland (Grant). They will be lovingly remembered by ten grandchildren - Scott MacInnes (Corynne), Bentley Gaikis (Sarah Jones), Andrew MacInnes (Charlene Love), Erik Sloane (Candice de Saldanha), Lija Obermaier (Eddie), Kelly Sloane, Inta Gaikis (Thanasi Lampropoulos), Graeme MacInnes, Caroline Gaikis, and Jennifer Kingsland; and three great-grandchildren Lincoln and Welland Gaikis, and Remington Obermaier.

Tommy was born in Toronto on March 1, 1924 to Mary Jane (nee Mathers) and Thomas Sloane.

He was predeceased by all his siblings, William T., Margaret, Isabell, William G., Samuel J., and Norman H. Following wartime service, he returned to Toronto to work with his father, Thomas, Sr., from their residence on Withrow Ave. to deliver to customers their family brand of tea and coffee.

Throughout most of his life he was known as Tommy The Tea Man. He was a lifelong member and Elder of St. John's Church.

Jean was born in Halifax, NS, on September 29, 1926, to Mary Frances (nee Lehman) and Lorne Glen. She was predeceased by her brother, Don. Jean was a loving and caring homemaker to her children and husband. She appreciated music very much and loved to sing. Her trained contralto voice was shared for many years in the choir of St. John's.

Cremations have taken place.

A celebration of life will be held at St. John's Church, 415 Broadview Ave., Toronto on Saturday, February 16, 2019.

Visitation will begin at 10:00 a.m.

with a memorial service at 11:30.

A reception will follow.

If desired, donations may be made in their memory to the Alzheimer Society of Ontario, Parkinson Canada or St. John's Presbyterian Church.

DAVID VONSOLKEMA

Born March 19, 1948 in the town of Schettens, Friesland, The Netherlands to Peter and Anna Vonsolkema. Passed away suddenly yet peacefully in Toronto, January 10, 2019. Handyman extraordinaire, hockey and baseball player, golfer, fisherman, wine aficionado, and all around the greatest guy there ever was.

Adored and beloved father to Olivier and Claudine, and cherished Pake to granddaughter Kalista and a grandson to follow.

Loving partner and companion to Sue Swaine. Predeceased by his sister, Shirley; he leaves behind sisters, Anne, Rita, Helen and Evelyn; as well as nieces, nephews, extended family and a legion of friends.

Cremation to follow. A celebration of life will be held at a later date.

We Love You.

PETER WEBB 1928 - 2019

Died in Toronto on Thursday, January 10, 2019. Married to Eugenia in 1954 who died in 1997. Survived by his children Elizabeth and Stewart, their respective spouses Sean Speakman and Kristina Webb and their children William and Andrew Webb and Justin Speakman. Predeceased by his brother Tom, and survived by his niece Vanessa (Webb) Barr.

Survived by Joan York, whom he married in 1998, by her children Marion, David and Edward, their spouses Robert Speer, Judy Ruyzlo and Fiona Whalley and by their children Fred Speer, Declan, Nora, Eleanor and Wallis York.

Following cremation, the family will arrange a reception on a date to be decided.

Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through http://www.humphreymilesnewbig ging.com.


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THE LIFE-CHANGING MAGIC OF GETTING RID OF MY COMICS
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In love, as in war, dividing your territory is key. So what happens when boxes of your belongings get in the way?
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By COREY MINTZ
  
  

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Saturday, January 12, 2019 – Page O4

Author of How to Host a Dinner Party and host of the Taste Buds podcast

Every superhero has an origin story, and so does every comic-book collection. Mine grew out of a conversation at recess one May afternoon in 1984, when my friend Anooj asked what I was getting for my ninth birthday, which I would celebrate later that week. Every Saturday, I watched the cartoon Spider-Man and his Amazing Friends, waiting for a repeat of my favourite episode, featuring a team of heroes called the X-Men. Anooj informed me that there was a comic that was just about the X-Men and that they also starred in another comic called Secret Wars, which featured the most brilliant idea a nine-year-old could imagine: A magical being makes every superhero fight every villain for no particular reason.

I was hooked.

From that point on, I went to the comic-book store every week, my collection growing inside a drawer in the bedroom I shared with my brother, later migrating to a closet shelf, then a box designed for comics, which multiplied over the years into 17 boxes holding about 2,500 comics.

Three decades later, I got married.

Whether you divide our opposing tribes along lines of aesthetics (tidy versus sloppy), values (spartan versus packrat) or class (snobs versus slobs), there is no denying the world is divided into neat people and messy people.

We don't change teams. But we do intermarry. And we have to learn to live in peace.

And whether you are Napoleon and Louis XVIII signing the Treaty of Paris (1814), Lucy and Ricky drawing a line down the centre of the apartment (I Love Lucy, Season 1, Episode 8, 1951) or Darkseid and Highfather placing their children in each other's care to prevent war (New Gods #7, 1972), all of history's greatest armistices are about division of territory.

So it was with my comic books.

Victoria and I live in a loft apartment, with one large open space for our kitchen, living room, dining area and gym.

Our bookcase is nothing special. It's the same collection of IKEA Kallax interlocking units that everyone has - except that thanks to our high ceilings, we've got 72 of the cubby-hole cubes.

Until recently, my comic books took up 17 of them.

In addition to comics, there are spaces for cookbooks, wine, my rubber-band ball, her ballet slippers, spare light bulbs, a canister of compressed air, board games, photos of our grandparents, a box of candy bars my wife doesn't know about and camera gear, among other things. While she has shelves for purses and gym equipment, my possessions clearly dominate. She's never minded, since about the same amount of wall space is taken up by her open walk-in closet, three clothing racks all in a row.

Over time, though, I started to notice strange activity on the shelves. When Victoria finished a book, she would bring up another half-dozen from a bookcase in the lobby of our building, where people dump their old novels.

She'd choose one to read, then wedge the rest into open spaces on our shelves. Gradually, each square became double-parked, with random unread books - other people's junk - filling up our space.

Meanwhile, the drawer under the bathroom sink filled with bottles of creams and lotions - some highly valued and used every day, others almost empty and abandoned. The shelf underneath the coffee table, meant for remote controls, swarmed with nail polish bottles.

Every time Victoria proposed a new item for our home - a second-hand treadmill and steamer I would come to use regularly - I opposed. I knew I would eventually give in, but I needed to stem the tide of detritus flooding our home. She countered by proposing we put our dining room chairs in storage, or perhaps get rid of them altogether, along with the dining table.

One day, she came home with a fourth clothing rack in a box - a "day rack" to be used exclusively for assembling the week's outfits.

I suggested that if she wanted to highlight clothing, subtraction might work better than addition; that getting rid of overstock would have a more positive effect than enlarging the showroom.

She did not want to hear that.

But at the time we were fostering three kittens, so it wasn't a good moment for her to argue in favour of bringing more things into the home. And I didn't argue with her because my mission is always to stay married, which means not fighting every conflict as it arises, trusting that some things aren't worth it, that sometimes they take care of themselves.

Last year, we took a trip to Italy. In a twist as shocking as discovering Magneto is the father of Quicksilver and Scarlet Witch, a few days after we returned home, Victoria removed a third of her clothes from the racks and donated them to Goodwill. To this day, the fourth rack remains in its box, on the floor where she first placed it.

With fewer items on the racks and floor space cleared by the elimination of shoes that the kittens had peed on, she remarked on how she could clearly see the clothes she truly loved, how much more it all resembled the curated display of a well-lit store.

I chose this moment to tell her that I was planning to get rid of some comic books. This would free up space on our bookcase, but I cautioned that it was not simply to be refilled with random junk.

Later, when my friend Max came to town, we made a night of going through the collection, pulling out the comics from each box and subjecting each to the core question of home-organizing guru Marie Kondo, "Does it spark joy?" before adding them to a discard pile. We tacked on a few qualifiers of our own. Would I ever read it again? Would I recommend it to someone else? Would I be embarrassed if someone saw it on my shelf? Does it have genuine sentimental value? Does it have monetary value?

The problem was that they all had sentimental value. I had been collecting these things since I was 9. But whether it's the rice pasta in the pantry or a near-complete run of Kamandi, The Last Boy On Earth, you know when you have no use for something.

Many of the rulings were obvious. Runs of Fantastic Four and Spider-Man from the 1960s, stuff I continued to reread over the years, were going to stay. Much of the rest was on the chopping block. We deliberated over the small details.

"This is a great comic," Max said, holding up the first issue of Jack Kirby's Black Panther. I countered that since I gave up my back-issue crate digging years ago, I was never going to buy the other 12 issues; besides, it was now easy to read complete stories through collected editions or online subscriptions. I felt protective of some Art Adams comics - until Max pointed out that perhaps my 13-year-old self only ever liked the women drawn with impossibly tiny waists and large breasts. Embarrassed, they went immediately to the discard pile.

When in doubt, I invoked two precedents established by author/podcast judge John Hodgman: It's reasonable to save objects purely for sentiment, but apartment dwellers must limit this to no more than the volume of a shoebox; and the difference between a collection and a hoard is that a collection is used or displayed.

In the end, I cut about 900 comics, 35 per cent of my collection. Every time I excitedly told someone about my culling of the herd and the shelf space it would create, they were enthralled at the jackpot I was sure to reap.

Many former comic buyers think they're sitting on a paper gold mine, but our collections aren't worth anything. At least not what we are led to believe.

Growing up in the 1980s, I repeatedly heard an urban legend about a guy whose mom threw away a fortune in comic books when she cleaned out his old room, the basement, attic or garage. There was some basis of truth to this. Because for the first 40 years of the medium, comic books were disposable. Kids rolled them up, stuffed them in their back pockets, read them, traded them and tossed them aside - only the true obsessives saving them to reread. Part of the reason there are so few copies of Superman's first appearance from 1937 is that a lot of "golden age" comics didn't survive the paper drives of the Second World War, when newsprint was recycled in a conservation effort.

As with coins or stamps, there is value in rarity. So there was always someone on the lookout for hard-to-find comics. But organized collecting didn't start until the late 1960s, when Marvel readers, just trying to track down a five-year-old issue of Spider-Man to complete their runs, began to notice used book dealers commanding high prices for even "silver age" comics. Around this time, conventions evolved out of the "rummage sales" held in church basements and libraries.

A far cry from today's glitzy affairs, where movie studios launch their marketing campaigns to fans dressed in costumes, nascent conventions were held in hotel ballrooms and were often the only opportunities for collectors to buy and sell, as well as meet each other.

In 1970, the first edition of the Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide was published, soon to become a collector's bible, with its detailed evaluations for fair-, good-, near-mint- and mint-condition comics.

By the late seventies, the legend of the lost collections grew, as many baby boomers returned from college to find their parents had emptied their bedroom closets, stacks of Avengers and Daredevil comics dispersed for pocket change through yard sales.

That's why, when I was growing up, everyone knew someone who shared a version of the squandered-fortune story, often with a touch of misogyny mixed into the tale of a cousin or uncle who could have bought a house if his foolish mother hadn't thrown away his buried treasure (somehow, despite the odds, I've never heard a version in which it's the dad who cleaned out the basement or garage).

These legends, and a fundamental misunderstanding of how market scarcity works, spurred collectors to "bag and board" every 75-cent issue of Teen Titans, sheathing them in protective plastic sleeves and strips of cardboard. Comic-book stores overordered, believing they would continue to sell back issues to collectors for years to come. In the 1990s, the floundering comic publishing industry seized on this misconception by producing variant covers of new editions so readers would buy multiple copies as investments.

If you're a financial trader or a chef, you know that adding volume to a stock dilutes its value.

But try telling that to a 13-year-old who thinks they're buying a bluechip stock at a dollar a share. Either way, if you're currently sitting on a bunch of Punishers from the nineties, they are destined for the 50-cent bin.

Still, even though I knew the collection wasn't worth much, I'd told the staff at The Beguiling comic-book store that my "go pile" contained a significant amount of 1970s Jack Kirby material, so they offered to take a look.

Usually, the shop just offers sellers a price, in cash or store credit. Providing me a peek behind the curtain, they shared a spreadsheet, with a separate column for grading (an estimate of physical condition, on scale of one to 10), potential retail price for resale, the percentage of that price offered to me based on the likelihood of selling the item (18 per cent for the first Kamandi versus 30 per cent for Black Panther), the price offered to me, then a final column for important notes such as "first appearance of Darkseid" or "death of Gwen Stacy."

I was thrilled to see any money, satisfied simply to have the junk off my hands. Even the lowestvalue stuff, at five cents apiece, was better than having to drag it to Goodwill myself.

"In a city like Toronto," says Peter Birkemoe, owner of The Beguiling, "the limits of space are what end up causing comics to be sold, not the need for money."

Six spaces freed on our bookcase, I made a tactical error. With the overconfidence of Lex Luthor, I boasted to my wife of how I'd vanquished the shelf space. Rather than immediately reorganizing and finding a use for each slot, I revelled in their emptiness before leaving on a work trip.

When I returned, Victoria was also away on her own work travel.

Three of the shelves had been filled with random items - a travel neck pillow, scrunched up plastic bags, loose batteries and unread books that had previously cluttered her bedside table.

Victoria works for UNICEF and was at that moment in Uganda, at a refugee settlement near the border with South Sudan. It was not the right moment to message her about my need to keep the bookcase organized.

Instead, I got to work on the shelves. I bundled all the cords for computers, phones, cameras, storage drives, microphones, etc.

into a box. I moved the pasta roller to where it should be, in the kitchen, to make space for a toolbox. Wrapping paper, bows and tape got folded into a lunchbox and placed next to the one with office supplies.

As I went over the shelves again, I noticed how throwing out something I thought was precious made it easier to throw out everything.

It became easy to earmark more items - books, comics, DVDs - for the donation pile. But I couldn't touch Victoria's belongings. You can't throw out someone else's property. What you can do, however, is show them how much you are getting rid of, then open up a box that contains cords and charging pods for cameras that she hasn't seen since her undergraduate years. And if you have a partner who has devoted the past decade of her life to visual storytelling, you can trust the science of "show, don't tell": The visual impact of so much forgotten and obsolete junk will convince her that she can make more cuts, too. And eventually, you will both delete enough items that you are more comfortable in the home you share.

Our shelves look nice again.

The dining room and kitchen tables are clear, no longer repositories for whatever came into the home that week. They'll be messy again. Because we are human.

And at the end of the work day, we are too tired to dogmatically adhere to Marie Kondo's cleanliness doctrine. New piles of junk will grow. It's my job to prune those piles to keep them from becoming mountains.

Tidiness is an everyday affair.

One does not have a neat home, one keeps a neat home.

And if you are like me, the Felix to your partner's Oscar, there is only one way to have a clean home: Clean it. Sweep, mop, dust, wipe, scrub, tidy, organize, reorganize. Do that and your home will be neat. It helps if you like cleaning and/or podcasts.

Here's what you don't do to achieve a clean home: nag, guilt, pressure or in any way ask your partner to change or feel bad about who they are. That's who you decided to be with. And love cannot be conditional on our demands that people change.

We both knew who we were marrying. And while both of us have changed dramatically into more thoughtful and patient versions of ourselves, learning to compromise on big-ticket life items, she's never going to start squeezing the toothpaste from the bottom of the tube and I'm never going to stop caring. So every time I find a five-day-old, lipstick-marked can of strawberry daiquiri in the fridge, with two sips left, I think of how she kisses me goodnight. Every time my toes touch crumbs in the bed, I remember how she says "I love you" as she leaves for work in the morning. And every time a new book, energy drink or pair of shoes arrives in our home, I remember how she arrived in my life and made it infinitely better.

Associated Graphic

ILLUSTRATIONS BY SANDI FALCONER


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BIRTH AND DEATH NOTICES
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Monday, November 26, 2018 – Page B20

JANINE BORENSZTAJN

On Friday November 23, 2018 at her home. Beloved wife of the late Dr. David Borensztajn. Janine will be missed by many family and friends. A graveside service took place on Sunday, November 25, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. in the Community Section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Rest in peace Janine.

BARBARA JULIA BUNKER (nee Neill)

Barbara passed on Thursday, November 22, 2018, just shy of her 99th birthday. Barbara was a remarkable woman adored by many. Her positive energy brought smiles and laughter everywhere she went.

Barbara grew up on her family's dairy farm, Devon Holsteins, in Fredericton, NB before moving to Toronto, ON with her husband where they made wonderful memories with their family at their home on Lytton Blvd., hobby farm in Kendall, ON, and cottage on Grand Lake, NB in the summers.

Predeceased by parents Helen (Lint) and Douglas Neill. Loving wife to Dr. Manzer Bunker (predeceased). Dear sister of Ronald (predeceased) (Lorraine) and Albert (Pete). Mother to Jane (predeceased), Douglas (Colleen, predeceased), and John (Terry).

Grammie to Kirby (Mandi), Julie (Dave), Kendall, and Kristine (Tim); Great-Grammie to Paisley Jane. Aunt (and great-aunt) to many nieces and nephews, cousin to many more. Missed by daughter-in-law Joanne (Guido).

Cremation has taken place.

A celebration of life is scheduled for Friday, November 30, 2018, from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. in the event room at 18 Concorde Place, Toronto, ON. Memorial donations can be made to the Sunnybrook Hospital Foundation. Please visit https://humphreymiles.com/ tribute/details/5491/BarbaraBunker/obituary.html#contentstart for more details.

ROBERT ARNOLD BURNSIDE

March 18, 1 933 November 24, 2018 After a long struggle with Parkinson's disease, Heart Disease and Dementia, Bob passed away peacefully at his home in Kingston.

Beloved by his late wife of 54 years, Doris Emma Burnside (nee Peters), devoted father of Janet (Colin Kelly), Jillian (Don Bradley) and Jay Joyce (Michelle Marshall). Proud grandfather of Jeffrey Prozeller (Brianna Dwornik), Jennifer Watts (nee Prozeller, David Watts) and Nichola Burnside-Marshall. Bob was predeceased by his sister Denise Blakely. Much loved uncle of many nieces and nephews.

Bob graduated from Queen's University, Science '56, Chemical Engineering and had a 32 year career with Esso Chemical and Imperial Oil, attaining the rank of Vice President. Upon retirement in 1988, Bob returned to Kingston and his alma mater to assume the role of Associate to the Principal of Queen's University, a position he held for seven years. During his time at Queen's, Bob was instrumental in the establishment and reorganization of the planning, giving and advancement department at Queen's. Bob was the recipient of the Queen's Distinguished Service Award, Queen's Padre Laverty Award, Queen's Herb Hamilton Award and Rotary Paul Harris Award.

Bob had a long history of active volunteerism, serving as President of Queen's Alumni Association, Princess Street United Church in leadership positions, a dedicated Rotarian, chaired the Engineering Advisory Council at Queen's, served on the Board at KGH, was involved with Kingston Economic Development and the Chamber of Commerce. Bob was a dedicated philanthropist, giving $1,000,000 donation to the Queen's University Innovation program in 2011 along with other significant gifts to the causes dear to his heart at Queen's and within the Kingston community. Bob was nominated, in 2014, for the Philanthropist of the Year. Bob was known, loved and respected within his community of friends and family.

Bob was above all else loyal and a man of his word. Bob had a great sense of humour and had knack for making even the toughest challenges seem doable.

Donations in lieu of flowers to the Science '56 Entrance Bursary Fund at Queen's University or Princess Street United Church. The family will be forever grateful for the care provided to Bob by our care team, Don, Amanda, Justin, Aimee, Lisa, Chris and Michele.

The team was instrumental in ensuring Bob's quality of life and enabled him to remain in his own home - there are no words to express our thanks. Friends will be received at the Robert J. Reid & Sons "The Chapel on the Corner", 309 Johnson Street, Kingston from 7:00 pm - 9:00 p.m. on Tuesday, November 27th. The Funeral Service will be held at Princess Street Untied Church, 484 Albert Street, Kingston on Wednesday, November 28, 2018 at 11:00 a.m.

Arrangements entrusted to Robert J. Reid & Sons Funeral Home "The Chapel on the Corner", 309 Johnson Street, Kingston 613-548-7973.

Online condolences http://www.reidfuneralhome.com

ANNE GOLDMAN

It is with deep sadness to announce the passing of our dear mother, Anne Goldman on Friday, November 23, 2018 at Valleyview Residence.

Born in Toronto on January 26, 1924, to Louis and Toby Weidman. Beloved wife of the late Harold Avrom Goldman, darling mother and mother-in-law of Heather and the late Robert Kaplan, Louise and Ken Hill, and Cheryl Goldman and Barbara Goldman. Beloved and cherished grandmother of Shelby and Allison, Harley, Jacki and Naz, Darlene and Dino, Benjamin, Olivia, Dani and Amy, Michael, and Jonathan, and the late Christopher. Great-grandmother of 14, and great-greatgrandmother of 3. Dear sister and sister-in-law of the late Ruth and Mort Norris, the late Sol and Molly Weidman, and the late Feigie and Schmiel Pancer. Mom will be deeply missed by many nieces, nephews, family, and friends.

At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave. West, Toronto (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Monday, November 26, 2018 at 2:30 p.m. Interment following at Mt. Sinai Memorial Park, Veterans Section. Shiva at35 Bales Avenue in the party room on the main floor. Underground parking available through the concierge. Shiva on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, from 2 - 4 p.m. and 7 - 9 p.m. Memorial donations may be made to a Na'Amat Pioneer Woman T o r o n t o , 416-636-5425.

DEONE JEAN GRIFFITH JACKMAN

November 7, 1934 November 17, 2018 Born in Toronto, Ontario Resided in Chicago, Illinois Deone Jean Griffith Jackman left this earth on November 17, 2018.

She passed away peacefully at home with her son and family by her side. She celebrated her 84th birthday on November 7th. Deone was born in Toronto, Ontario, the only surviving child of parents Thomas and Jean (Hargrave) Griffith.

She grew up in the High Park area of Toronto and on Manitoulin Island where she helped her parents run "Griffith's Fishing Camp" during the summers.

Deone was a graduate of Trinity College (5T7) at the University of Toronto where she enjoyed acting at the Hart House Theatre, as she had at Humberside Collegiate. At Trinity she met her first husband and the father of her two children, Frederic (Eric) Jackman. After they moved to Chicago she earned a graduate degree in Child Development at the Erikson Institute. Retiring from a career as a psychotherapist, she became an avid collector and supporter of the arts. Along with her husband Eugene Goldwasser, she founded the Jackman Goldwasser Residency at the Hyde Park Art Center, a community art center on the South Side of Chicago.

Professor Goldwasser, University of Chicago biochemist, noted for isolating the hormone erythropoietin, preceded her in death in 2010.

Deone was concerned for and dedicated to advancing human rights. She traveled to countries in need and gave generously to human rights organizations.

She is survived by her daughter, Tara Jackman Nolan; son and daughter-in-law, Tom and Lisa (Hendrickson) Jackman; and beloved grandsons, Alexander and Jonathan Nolan.

The family thanks caregivers Gina Balzano, Alicia Means and Jasmine Sheppard for their compassionate support.

Memorial gathering: December 2nd, 6:00 PM; Hyde Park Art Center, 5020 S Cornell Ave, Chicago, IL 60615 In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Hyde Park Art Centre, Jackman Goldwasser Residency Program.

Online condolences may be left at: www .cremation-society.com

STEPHEN ROBERT LONG

Surrounded by his family, Stephen died peacefully at the age of 81 on Wednesday, November 21, 2018. Predeceased by his dear wife, Jean, he is survived by his children, Mary Eleanor, Stephanie (Greg) and Alex (Neel); and grandchildren, Hannah and Thomas. Son of the late Drs. John and Eleanor Long, he is also survived by his brother, John and was predeceased by his sister, Nancy and brother, Robin.

A graduate of Forest Hill Collegiate and the University of Toronto (engineering), Stephen had a long and rewarding career with Imperial Oil. He was the consummate "family man," an engaged father who took great pride in his children's and grandchildren's accomplishments, no matter how big or small. With a wide smile and genuine laugh, he was always welcoming to old and new friends alike. He had an adventurous and gregarious spirit, he saw the potential of turning an old schoolhouse into a treasured family retreat, spearheaded family road trips to the east and west coasts, travelled extensively with Jean and friends, and visited his children in far off places. Stephen's close circle of lifelong friends and their families were always in evidence at annual cottage weekends, camping and ski trips and frequent social gatherings. He was always active, a gifted racquet player who transitioned to aquafit later in life.

In retirement, Stephen was eager to keep his mind active as well; he and Jean joined the Academy for Lifelong Learning at the University of Toronto, played bridge and he particularly enjoyed reading about and discussing finance and politics.

Stephen was also community oriented and volunteered with local organizations and in many capacities at Calvin Presbyterian Church. Jean's death earlier this year was a devastating blow to Stephen. He still forged ahead, his lymphoma in remission, only to be beset by a second form of cancer, melanoma, which spread too quickly for effective treatment.

He was, however, able to enjoy a cross-Canada train adventure a month before his death.

A funeral service, followed by a reception, will be held in Calvin Presbyterian Church, 26 Delisle Avenue on Saturday, December 1st, at 2:00 p.m., followed by a reception. Contributions in Stephen's memory may be made to the Ride to Conquer Cancer through http://www.conquercancer.ca/ goto/stephenlong.

Condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through humphreymilesnewbigging.com

DONALD GEORGE MORPHY

Peacefully at St. Joseph's Hospice, London on Saturday, November 24, 2018 at the age of 83.

Son of the late Dr. George and Lila (Mackie) Morphy. Beloved husband of Cathy Morphy. Loving father of Brad (Kimberly), Cheryl Payne (Todd) and Rod (Deb). Dear brother of Nelson Morphy (Janice) of London and John Morphy (Fran) of Oakville. Loving grandfather of Addison, Victoria and Michael.

Uncle of Richard, Lianne, Lauren and Scott; and stepfather of Justin Pilgrim.

After attending The University of Western Ontario, Don spent his life in the corrugated paper box business, starting in 1956 at Canadian International Paper Co.

in London. In 1965, he moved to Quigley Containers in Waterloo as plant manager. In 1970, he started his own company, Morphy Containers Ltd. in London with three people. The company employed approximately 130 people when it was sold in 2009.

Don was a member of the London West Rotary Club in the early 60's. Later he was on the board of directors of the London Chamber of Commerce, London Junior Achievement and Museum London. He was quite involved with his industry trade association, The Association of Independent Corrugated Converters, (A.I.C.C) and served terms as president of the Canadian region and also the international group of 13 regions in 1984-85. He was inducted into the A.I.C.C. Canada Hall of Fame in 2010.

Don loved cars and was a member of the Porsche Club of America (Upper Canada Region).

He participated in many Driver Education events at road tracks such as Mosport, Watkins Glen and Shannonville.

Special thanks to the staff at St. Joseph's Hospice.

The funeral service will be conducted at Harris Funeral Home, 220 St. James St. at Richmond, London on Wednesday, November 28, at 12 noon, with visitation preceding from 11 a.m. -12 noon.

Reception to follow. Interment Woodland Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations could be made to the Canadian Cancer Society or St. Joseph's Hospice.

JOHN DONALD PATERSON

Peacefully passed Friday, November 23, 2018 surrounded by his family, with a strong sense of love in the air. His family is grateful to have had such a strong, adventurous and humorous man in their lives for so long.

Don leaves behind his wife, Carol, who lovingly cared for him to his last day. He was the kind and supportive father of Scott (Jackie), Linda (Peter) and the fun loving Grandpa to Declan, Magnus, MacKenzie, Kennedy and Charlize.

Survived by his lifelong friend and brother, Bill (Joy), and spoke fondly of reuniting with his parents, William and Edith.

Don was born and raised in Toronto and spent his summers with his family on Lake Muskoka. He replicated this on Shadow Lake where he warmly welcomed all family and friends, encouraging a fun time. He raised his family in Toronto while he worked as an entrepreneur in the insurance industry. In retirement, Don and Carol traveled throughout North America, often visiting Scott and family in time to attend their neighborhood street party.

Don was known for his passion of building resulting in numerous boats, a car, a cottage, and an airplane. Don was always quick to help others with every project under the sun. He donated time to The Salvation Army and was proud of his work with Dr. Morton of the Odette Centre in their efforts to eradicate cancer. It was important to Don to feel that he had given during his lifetime.

A Celebration of Life will take place this Saturday, December 1st, between 3:00 and 5:00 at Leaside Gate (955 Millwood Road) followed by a private family service. Our heartfelt thanks to Sunnybrook Palliative Care for their kindness and support, we are forever grateful! In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to The Odette Cancer Centre in honor of Don.

JOAN WYKES (nee Nightingale) Peacefully at Christie Gardens in Toronto on November 24, 2018 at the age of 91. Beloved wife of the late E. Harold; mother of Julie Cays (Ian) and the late Christopher John. Proud Nana of Graeme Wykes and Matthew, Andrew and Erin Cays. Lovingly remembered by Graeme's mother, Gillian Johnston.

Joan was born in Annfield Plain, County Durham, U.K.

She graduated from the University of Liverpool as an architect and practiced in Durham until she married Harold in 1955 and soon moved to Toronto. After a hiatus to care for Julie and Christopher, she took a course at University of Toronto on "Second Careers for Women" in the 1970s and returned to work at an engineering firm as a draftswoman. Joan was a lifelong volunteer with many organizations, including the Dorothy Ley Hospice and St. George's Church on-the-Hill.

She was a strong, independent and optimistic woman who never failed to look elegant. Despite much sadness in her life, she continued to say how grateful and lucky she was. Her beautiful blue eyes and bright humour will be remembered by all who encountered her. Heartfelt thanks to the caring team at Christie Gardens as well as her dear friends Tess and Roselyn.

Cremation to be arranged by Morley Bedford Funeral Services with a celebration of life to be held at a later date. If desired, in lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to The Dorothy Ley Hospice or the Christie Gardens Foundation.


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Your 2019 winter reading list
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From close-to-home Canadiana to big-name debuts, from a swath of new translations to books with stories behind them, from deeper dives into news headlines to exciting reads for the kids, Becky Toyne recommends some titles to keep you busy until spring
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Saturday, January 12, 2019 – Page R6

MADE IN CANADA This season's lead Canadian titles stay close to home with stories set in locations across Canada. In Days by Moonlight (Coach House Books, Feb. 19), the fourth instalment in André Alexis's "quincunx" of novels that includes the Scotiabank Giller Prize-winning Fifteen Dogs, a botanist and a professor embark on a Dantesque journey through Southwestern Ontario.

Daniel Goodwin's second novel, The Art of Being Lewis (Cormorant Books, March 23), tells the story of a Jewish boy from Montreal whose world falls apart in a series of unfortunate events after he moves to Moncton. And Ian Williams - familiar to many as the author of poetry and short stories - heads to Brampton, Ont., for his debut novel, Reproduction (McClelland & Stewart, Jan. 22), a Zadie Smithian love story.

Megan Gail Coles can arguably already claim the prize for this year's best title with Small Game Hunting at the Local Coward Gun Club (House of Anansi Press, Feb. 12).

Highly regarded as an author of stories and drama, Coles is making her debut as a novelist. Billed as "Newfoundland gothic for the 21st Century," this perfect winter read takes place in February in St. John's.

Turning to Canadian history, Kevin Major reimagines the sinking of a passenger ferry in the Gulf of St. Lawrence in 1942 in his Second World War-set novel, Land Beyond the Sea (Breakwater Books, Jan.

25). While in historical Canadian non-fiction, author and forensic anthropologist Debra Komar tells the true story of a 1921 trial in which two Inuit men were falsely convicted and executed in The Court of Better Fiction: Three Trials, Two Executions, and Arctic Sovereignty (Dundurn, March 16).

David Bezmozgis's and Ayelet Tsabari's new books both deal with identity and immigration. With stories set in locations from Riga to Montreal, Bezmozgis's Immigrant City and Other Stories (HarperCollins, March 12), is the Natasha and Other Stories author's first collection in close to 15 years. Israeli-Canadian Tsabari won awards and international acclaim for her debut story collection, The Best Place on Earth - pretty impressive for someone who didn't write her first story in English until 2006. Her non-fiction debut is the memoir-in-essays The Art of Leaving (HarperCollins, Feb. 19), from which excerpts have already scooped magazine awards.

While much poetry is held back for National Poetry Month in April, a few collections are out this winter. McClelland & Stewart's inaugural list under the editorial eye of Dionne Brand showcases new work by poets including Souvankham Thammavongsa (Cluster, March 26) and Cassidy McFadzean (Drolleries, March 26).

New collections by Dina Del Bucchia (It's a Big Deal! Talonbooks, March 25), and Natalee Caple (Love in the Chthulucene (Cthulhucene), James Street North Books, March 19) will also hit shelves in March.

Oh, and while you wait for Margaret Atwood's sequel to The Handmaid's Tale (coming September, 2019), there's The Handmaid's Tale: The Graphic Novel (McClelland & Stewart, March 26), with art and adaptation by Renée Nault.

INTRODUCING ... THREE BIG CANADIAN DEBUTS TO WATCH Praise from a who's who of the most important and celebrated Canadian authors of the past two years graces the cover of Alicia Elliot's debut, A Mind Spread Out on the Ground (Doubleday Canada, March 26). In these essays, Elliot asks essential questions about the treatment of Indigenous people in North America while drawing on intimate details of her own life and experience with intergenerational trauma. "Incisive," Katherena Vermette says. "A stunning, vital triumph of writing," David Chariandy says.

Philip Huynh dives into the Vietnamese diaspora in his debut story collection The Forbidden Purple City (Goose Lane, March 12), which takes its title from the walled palace of Vietnam's Nguyen dynasty. And with Shut Up, You're Pretty (VS Books, March 31) there are two debuts in one: This punchy short story collection from Téa Mutonji is the launch title for VS Books, a new imprint of Arsenal Pulp Press curated and edited by writer-artistmusician Vivek Shraya.

NEW ARRIVALS FROM OVERSEAS Fairy tales, folklore and myth inform a group of highly anticipated new novels from international household names.

Billed as an African Game of Thrones, Black Leopard, Red Wolf (Bond Street Books, Feb, 5), the new tome from A Brief History of Seven Killings author Marlon James, begins James's Dark Star trilogy. Narrated by a chi or guardian spirit, An Orchestra of Minorities (Little, Brown & Co., Jan. 8) by Chigozie Obioma (The Fishermen) is the story of a Nigerian poultry farmer who loses everything trying to win the woman he loves. And there's magic in spades in Tomi Adeyemi's Children of Virtue and Vengeance (Henry Holt & Co, March 5). This sequel to Adeyemi's young adult fantasy Children of Blood and Bone has an initial print run of one million and is aimed at readers 14 and older.

In Karen Thompson Walker's sophomore novel, The Dreamers (Doubleday, Jan. 15), a mysterious sleeping sickness takes over the lives of people in an isolated college town. As with Walker's debut, The Age of Miracles, this one will have crossover appeal to young-adult readers. As might Helen Oyeyemi's (Boy, Snow, Bird, The Icarus Girl) Gingerbread (Hamish Hamilton, March 5), a delightful family yarn in which a family's legacy is a recipe for that fairytale staple: gingerbread.

Two recent word-of-mouth smash hits (that couldn't be more different) have companion books coming this winter: Fans of Leila Slimani's The Perfect Nanny can look forward to Adèle (Penguin, Jan.

15), Slimani's novel about a sex-addicted woman in Paris, while lovers of John Williams's Stoner will rejoice at the North American reissue of the author's brooding first novel, Nothing but the Night (New York Review Books, Feb. 12) - originally published in 1948 but out of print since 1990.

Two non-fiction books receiving a big push in the "if you liked this, you'll love that" category also introduce two new authors: Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay and a Mother's Will to Survive (Hachette Books, Jan. 22) by Stephanie Land is a look at poverty in the United States that will appeal to readers of Nickel and Dimed (whose author, Barbara Ehrenreich, supplied the introduction). And for an Eat, Pray, Love kind of vibe but with dogsledding in Yukon and Alaska, look no further than Kristin Knight Pace's memoir This Much Country (Grand Central Publishing, March 5).

THE BUZZ - FIVE BIG BOOKS WITH A BACKSTORY When novelist Jojo Moyes offered to let an aspiring writer spend a week at her cottage, Candice Carty-Williams was selected from more than 600 applicants based on a 500-word sample. Carty-Williams is a mar-

keting executive at Penguin Random House UK by day, and is the founder of Britain's Guardian and Fourth Estate BAME (black, Asian, and minority ethnic) Short Story Prize. Her debut novel, Queenie (Scout Press, March 19), netted a hefty advance in multiple countries. Billed as Bridget Jones's Diary meets Americanah, this London-set story of a 25-year-old Jamaican British woman straddling two cultures is being presented as a lead title on both sides of the Pond.

Into That Fire (Knopf, Feb 19) is a novel by M.J. Cates. Which is to say that it is a novel by a person who for the purposes of this novel shall be called "M.J. Cates," but whose name isn't, in fact, M.J. Cates. "M.J.

Cates," we are told, was born in Canada, has lived here and in Britain, and is an award-winning author of many novels under another name. A First World War-set love story, this novel will appeal to fans of Anthony Doerr, Paula McLain and whowrote-it, secret-author mysteries.

Translations from Nordic countries have long been big business in the Englishlanguage market, but it's unlikely you have many books from Greenland on your shelf. Hailed as "Greenland's unlikely literary star" by the New Yorker in January, 2017, Niviaq Korneliussen's debut novel is only now coming to North American readers (translated by Anna Halager from Korneliussen's own translation into Danish, and not the original Greenlandic). Last Night in Nuuk (Grove/Atlantic, Jan. 25) is the story of five people on the cusp of adulthood in Greenland's capital.

"Going viral" isn't something one usually expects of serious literature, but that's what happened when Kristin Roupenian's Cat Person was published in the New Yorker in December, 2017. Chances are pretty good that you read it and have an opinion about it, or at the very least read a think piece about it and have an opinion about that. Cue You Know You Want This: Cat Person and Other Stories (Scout Press, Jan. 15), Roupenian's debut collection (in the Cat Person vein), which netted the author a reported seven-figure advance.

In the spring of 2018, Shannon WebbCampbell's Who Took My Sister?, a collection of letters and poems about missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, was pulled from publication after it came to light that the author had not sought permission from the women's families to use their loved ones' stories. In I Am a Body of Land (Book*hug, Jan. 8), Webb-Campbell revisits that earlier text to present a new work that is an examination of accountability, learning and undoing harm. The book was reworked with guidance from celebrated author Lee Maracle, who also edited the new poems and supplied the introduction.

RIPPED FROM THE HEADLINES Headlines new, old and seemingly eternal take book-length form across genres this season. In Blamed and Broken: The Mounties and the Death of Robert Dziekanski (Dundurn, Jan 12), CBC investigative reporter Curt Petrovich digs into the decade-long legal saga that followed the taser tragedy watched around the world. New York Times Canada-bureau chief Catherine Porter shares a personal story in A Girl Named Lovely: One Child's Miraculous Survival and My Journey into the Heart of Haiti (Simon & Schuster, Feb.

26), memoirs about the profound effect a young girl in postearthquake Haiti had on the journalist's life. And after more than four decades spent in solitary confinement for a crime he didn't commit, Albert Woodfox shares his story in Solitary: Unbroken By Four Decades in Solitary Confinement. My Story of Transformation and Hope (HarperCollins, March 3).

For readers 14 and up, Malala Yousafzai will release We Are Displaced: My Journey and Stories from Refugee Girls Around the World (Little, Brown, Jan. 8). And perhaps as an antidote for readers weary of European political squabbles, celebrated scientist Tim Flannery's Europe: A Natural History (Grove/Atlantic, Feb. 15) puts things into evolutionary perspective with a 100-million-year natural history of the continent.

Nilofar Shidmehr depicts the rich lives of postrevolution Iranian women in Divided Loyalties (Astoria, Feb. 5), a collection of short stories published on the 40th anniversary of the Iranian Revolution. While in Spies of No Country: Behind Enemy Lines at the Birth of the Israeli Secret Service (Signal, March 5), Matti Friedman, whose Pumpkinflowers was beloved by reviewers and prize juries in 2016, shares the never-before-told story of the Jewish "Arab" spies who helped the new state of Israel win the War of Independence.

Gentrification, the condoization of cities and community in a capitalist society are the subject of Leaving Richard's Valley (Drawn & Quarterly, March 19) an outlandish graphic novel by Michael DeForge: "One of the comic-book industry's most exciting, unpredictable talents" (NPR).

And in High Time: The Legalization and Regulation of Cannabis in Canada (McGill Queens University Press, March 30), editors Andrew Potter and Daniel Weinstock provide an overview of Canada's cannabis legislation for policy wonks.

YOUNG ADULT Three books for readers 12 and up deal with young love, rebellion and feeling out of your comfort zone. Tanaz Bhathena's (A Girl Like That) new young-adult romance, The Beauty of the Moment (Penguin Teen, Feb. 26), features two teens who meet at a fundraiser for Syrian refugees.

Samira Ahmed's second novel (after Love, Hate, & Other Filters) is Internment (Little, Brown, March 19), a story of rebellion set in an internment camp for Muslim Americans in a near-future United States. And in Ben Philippe's debut, The Field Guide to the North American Teenager (Balzer & Bray, Jan. 8), a black French-Canadian boy finds himself out of his comfort zone when his family moves to Austin, Tex.

Aimed at readers 14 and up, Sabina Khan's The Love and Lies of Rukshana Ali (Scholastic, Jan. 29) is the story of a 17year-old girl straddling cultures and struggling to live up to her Muslim parents' expectations, especially when she's caught kissing her girlfriend.

PICTURE BOOKS Written by Guy and Patricia Storms and illustrated by Milan Pavlovic, bedtime story Moon Wishes (Groundwood, March 1) is a gorgeous and colourful alternative to perennial favourite Goodnight Moon. Author Mark Lee and illustrator Nathalie Dion introduce young readers to the water cycle in The Biggest Puddle in the World (Groundwood, March 1), a sweet story about two siblings who go exploring with their grandfather after a storm. And acclaimed novelist and poet Katherena Vermette adds to her children's picturebook catalogue with The Girl and the Wolf (Theytus Books, Feb. 5), an empowering Indigenous twist on a classic wolf narrative illustrated by Julie Flett.

Becky Toyne is the "Should I Read It?" columnist for Day 6 on CBC Radio and a regular contributor to Globe Books.


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Forest ire: Battle lines being drawn over Alberta's plan for new provincial park
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Tuesday, January 8, 2019 – Page A1

With this story, Jeff Lewis begins his coverage of environmental issues in Canada. Mr. Lewis previously covered Canada's energy industry.

Trapper Neil Godlonton turns a small jar of dark paste in his hand as he contemplates the future of a contentious slice of wilderness on the edge of Canada's Rocky Mountains.

It's a Monday morning at Tackle and Trails outfitters, and Mr. Godlonton is stocking up on wolf bait. He has worked a trap line close to nearby Nordegg, Alta., for more than 30 years. It's a marginal trade - a single pelt fetches $300, on a good day - but one he fears is nonetheless in jeopardy of being stamped out, should a proposed provincial park in the surrounding boreal forest comes to fruition.

Nobody wants "another Banff and Jasper," he says, referring to the national parks to the south and north, respectively. "Tourism is great," he adds, "but Albertans need a place to go."

Battle lines are being drawn in Alberta's back country over the NDP government's plan to set aside an area roughly the size of Rhode Island as provincial parkland.

The clash over conservation comes amid a widening revolt against environmental regulation in the oil-rich province, and provides an early glimpse at contours that will shape this spring's Alberta general election, widely expected to be fought on economic and climate issues.

Premier Rachel Notley's government, facing an angry electorate and a deficit projected at $8.8-billion, has pitched the proposed Bighorn Wildland Provincial Park as a means of diversifying the battered provincial economy through tourism.

Conservation groups say it's a chance to create a needed haven for vulnerable and threatened species in an otherwise loosely regulated backcountry laced with logging roads, forestry clear-cuts and trails carved by all-terrain vehicles (ATVs).

They also see such wilderness parks as a bulwark against climate change.

Bighorn, wedged between Banff and Jasper national parks, would help stitch together key habitat in a vast corridor that extends as far south as Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, and to Yukon in Canada's Far North. It is the largest of four current proposals for new or expanded Alberta provincial parks.

The region is home to numerous sensitive species, including grizzly bear, wolverine and bull trout, as well as the headwaters of the North Saskatchewan River, which supplies drinking water to Edmonton, Alberta's capital city hundreds of kilometres to the east.

"What can be more precious?" said John Weaver, who has spent years studying the region as a senior conservation scientist with Wildlife Conservation Society Canada (WCS). "It's really a good place to invest in terms of resiliency," he said.

Few see it that way in Rocky Mountain House, a Conservative stronghold where talk of climate science can elicit eye rolls and the Bighorn proposal has met with stiff resistance, some of it egged on by local United Conservative Party MLA Jason Nixon.

Growing tensions led the provincial government on Saturday to scrap four impending information sessions out of concern for public safety. Environment Minister Shannon Phillips cited "inflamed rhetoric" and misinformation surrounding the proposal, as well as unspecified allegations of bullying and abuse aimed at the park's supporters. In a statement, the province said it would facilitate call-in information sessions instead. It also extended consultations until Feb.

15.

Mr. Nixon has asserted, without evidence, that the plan is a foreign-funded plot to wall off the backcountry to Albertans who call the region home. At a recent open house in the community, Mr. Nixon complained that his constituents had not been adequately consulted and questioned why the Bighorn was hived off from a broader regional planning process that has been under way for years. He would not say whether a future UCP government would support the new park.

"If we get to the end of this, and we think that it's been jammed through without proper consultation, then we will look at whether or not we need to go back and do the regional access plan right or fix it," he said in a brief interview.

What many in this town of 7,000 people fear most is heightened restrictions on ATVs, hunting, trapping and fishing. All are major pastimes and tourist draws in a wider region with few economic prospects beyond lumber and oil. In interviews, residents said the proposal has spawned more questions than answers. Several scoffed at provincial assurances that land-use changes would be negligible, pointing to restrictions that curbed motorized recreation following the creation of another provincial park farther south, in 2017. The province has said final regulations and management plans for the Bighorn are still being crafted.

"There's nothing getting shut off," said Tackle and Trails owner Jordan Scott. "It's just getting regulated, putting rules on stuff that didn't have rules before, right?

And nobody likes change."

Scientists say a large swath of Alberta's backcountry is already in flux - partly owing to the rise in planet-warming greenhouse gases that result from burning fossil fuels.

Global temperatures are forecast to climb anywhere from two to four degrees over the next 50 to 100 years. Data compiled by University of Calgary researchers show the Rockies have experienced some of the sharpest warming trends in Alberta over the past half-century.

In a paper published last year, Dr. Quazi Hassan and Dr. Khan Rubayet Rahaman analyzed detailed temperature data collected between 1961 and 2010. They found that more than two-thirds of Alberta experienced local warming trends, ranging from one-quarter of a degree to more than one degree.

In the mountains, warming trends were significantly higher, from three-quarters of a degree to more than one degree - a trend they attributed in part to rapid urbanization in tourist towns such as Banff.

Biologists and researchers who study the region say rising temperatures stand to trigger a host of changes affecting land and water in the province.

Between Jasper and Banff, the Athabasca Glacier is already in retreat. Summers are growing hotter and drier. Warmer winters are likely to reduce snowpack as more precipitation falls as rain.

That has major implications for everything from agriculture to aquatic habitat for native fish.

"There's good evidence now, particularly within the past 30 years, these changes have intensified," WCS Canada's Mr. Weaver said. "And they're coming faster than what scientists projected."

Much of what comprises the Rockies' eastern slopes, a sprawling area that cuts along the province's western flank and includes the proposed new parkland, is under acute pressure.

Consider the bull trout - Alberta's provincial fish, and just one of the native species scientists say is in trouble. Lorne Fitch, a retired provincial fisheries biologist who has studied native trout for five decades, calls it a "sentinel" species whose abundance and distribution serve as an indicator of how well we have managed the landscape.

His prognosis is dire: "Every native trout species in the eastern slopes is either endangered or threatened," he says.

Bull trout have been pushed to the brink of extirpation in some watersheds through a well-documented combination of overfishing, habitat loss and competition from introduced species.

Now, climate change is erecting new barriers to recovery.

The predatory fish have evolved over thousands of years and are adapted to a cold, nearly sub-Arctic alpine ecosystem.

Adults spawn in the fall when glacial melt has eased and rivers are cold and free of silt. The eggs incubate all winter - about 200 days - and hatch in the spring, when rivers are still clear and bugs are plentiful.

Rising temperatures threaten to throw this delicate sequence out of whack, says Michael Sullivan, a fisheries scientist with Alberta Parks and Environment.

Warmer water increases competition from introduced species and generally makes it harder for the fish to breed. Yet as spring arrives sooner, bull trout are spawning earlier in the fall, in warmer water with more silt.

That increases the risk that fungus will grow on eggs.

"The fish have adapted to a certain season," he says. "And climate change is changing that probably faster than they can evolve."

The Bighorn is seen partly as a coping strategy, offering topographic diversity as the distribution of plants and animals shifts in response to warmer and sometimes drier conditions.

It was singled out by the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS) as one of several regions that can help Canada meet conservation targets under the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity. The international pact commits Canada to protect at least 17 per cent of land and inland waters by 2020, up from 10.6 per cent currently - a level that puts Canada last among Group of Seven countries, according to CPAWS.

Alberta's New Democrats are keen to spur fresh spending in a region and province starved for investment. Ms. Phillips, the Environment Minister, pointed to another provincial park to the south as a model that could be repeated.

In an interview, she said tourism and recreation in Kananaskis, created in 1978 by then-Progressive Conservative premier Peter Lougheed, now accounts for $141-million of Alberta's GDP annually. Still, the minister was vague on how and when the $40million earmarked for the Bighorn proposal would be spent, saying only that some of it would help beef up enforcement of controls on ATV use and unregulated camping in the region.

"That is a universally held opinion that it is a bit of a wild west out there," she said. Access would still be governed through public land-use zones, and existing trails would stay intact, she said. "This is a step up," she added.

Locals in Rocky Mountain House acknowledge that enforcement is needed, but they insist the region is otherwise well managed under existing land-use policies by a network of volunteer organizations.

Margriet Berkhout is among the skeptics. An avid skier, hiker and climber, she is also a longstanding member of a volunteer search-and-rescue team. The group has a good relationship with the local RCMP detachment and the fire department. The proposed park isn't all bad, she says.

But she worries it will require establishing a more professional operation, should visitor numbers increase much from current levels. "You'd basically kick a volunteer group out," she said.

"If eventually the visitor numbers really go up, our volunteer group will be challenged for sure.

But right now it's manageable."

Clearwater County Reeve Jim Duncan doubts Bighorn will attract visitors in droves. It's too isolated. "This is never going to be like Kananaskis," he said at the local town office. "It's not the same. You've got a million people in Calgary living next door to Kananaskis." With public and industry consultations nearing an end, there is speculation that the province will make a speedy decision on the park's fate before the election; Ms. Phillips would not say either way.

Still, pressure is mounting for the government to act. Last week, a group of 37 retired government biologists and wildlife officers urged the province to enshrine protections in law. "It can't be a free-for-all any more," they wrote in an open letter. "We have tested the limits, and many indicators, especially fish and wildlife populations, have signalled to us we've exceeded ecological thresholds."

At Tackle and Trails, owner Mr.Scott knows such pressures intimately. He's an avid trapper and angler. Above the cash register in his store, snapshots of customers grinning widely with their catch hint at a long history of manmade interventions in the natural world. There are brown trout introduced from Scotland and Germany, as well as brook trout, the mountain fish of the Appalachians and Eastern Canada.

Both species now compete with dwindling bull trout, which are subject to a strict zero-catch limit in the few watersheds in which they're still found in large numbers, including the nearby Ram River.

"There's not very many of them in Alberta - good bull trout fishing," Mr. Scott says. "And that's why it gets hit very hard."

Associated Graphic

A sign bars recreational vehicles in a section of the proposed park near Rocky Mountain House, Alta. What many in the town fear most is heightened restrictions on ATVs, hunting, trapping and fishing. TODD KOROL/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Dire warnings that the region's ecological thresholds have already been exceeded are mounting pressure on the Alberta government to make a decision on the Bighorn park. Enthusiasts such as Tackle and Trails owner Jordan Scott, right, know that pressure all too well, and are already seeing changes in local waters.

PHOTOS BY TODD KOROL/ THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Many of the residents in Rocky Mountain House, Alta., say they are most concerned by the prospect of increased regulation on ATVs, hunting, trapping and fishing. All are major pastimes and the driving force behind much-needed tourism for a local economy with few prospects beyond lumber and oil.


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BIRTH AND DEATH NOTICES
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Wednesday, January 9, 2019 – Page B17

J. EDNA BEANGE (nee Longman)

May 12, 1920 January 7, 2019

After a rich and full life, Edna passed away on January 7, 2019, at the age of 98. Predeceased by her husband, George Beange (1973) and son-in-law, Marc Paradis (2004). Survived by her children, Donald Beange (Carolynn), Jean Paradis; and grandson, Graham Beange. She will be sadly missed.

Edna Beange was a woman of distinction with a commitment to service and a history of leadership.

For over 50 years, she served on over 20 agencies, committees and boards working tirelessly so that seniors could remain independent with first-rate community health care. Meals on Wheels, Sharing, East York Community Care, CallA-Service, Hospital Special Needs and SAHIL are all organizations that Edna founded, chaired or supported as well as Leaside Garden Society.

She served three terms as East York Alderman (1975-88) and was the first woman on the Toronto East General Hospital Board of Governors. In 1999, she was appointed Honorary Director for outstanding service to the Hospital Board of Directors.

In 1994, she received the Agnes Macphail award in its inaugural year for furthering women's rights, senior's fairness, and access to housing, health care and education. And in 2001, Edna received the Governor Generals' Caring Canadian award from the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario.

Declining health in June 2018 required the support of a Palliative Care team, caring friends, neighbours and United Church parishioners. We are grateful for their support. A special thank you goes to the staff at Sunnybrook Palliative Care for their wonderful care and compassion.

A service will be held on Friday, January 11th at 2:00 p.m. at Leaside United Church at 822 Millwood Road, followed by a reception in the church hall. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre Foundation or Toronto East Health Network Foundation (aka, Michael Garron and Hospital Foundation).

Condolences and photographs may be forwarded through http://www.heritagefuneralcentre.ca.

GLADYS CHIN (née Kong)

January 24, 1926 December 24, 2018 Gladys Chin (née Kong) passed away peacefully at the age of 92 on December 24, 2018, at Markham Stouffville Hospital surrounded by Cyril her husband of 78 years, six children - Christine, Winston (Brenda), Cecelia (Leslie deceased), Nelson (GraceMarie), Noel (Sharon), Jeannine (Mark); thirteen grandchildren and nine greatgrandchildren. She was predeceased by her five younger siblings.

Gladys will forever be remembered as a loving mother and grandmother who loved to cook for her family.

A private funeral was held on December 31, 2018.

Donations can be made to Markham Stouffville Hospital Palliative Care Unit.

DR. GRANT ANGUS FARROW

We are extraordinarily grateful for the generous and exceptional life of Dr.

Grant Angus Farrow, which ended peacefully at home on January 5, 2019 in his 85th year, following his recent decline with Alzheimer's Disease. As was consistent with his kind spirit and gentle manner, this true gentleman was graceful until the end.

Seven years ago, Grant was blessed with a wonderful new chapter in his life with his marriage to Ruth (nee Peterson). Ruth brought joy and vibrancy to his life, and loving care through his death. We are so thankful for Ruth, and the happiness she brought back into Grant's world.

Grant was predeceased by Jill (nee Weatherstone), his loving wife of 47 years, who he met at age 12. They leave their children, Susan (Blake Hutcheson) and Trevor (Mary Birdsell); and four beautiful grandchildren, Camille, Trevor, Morley and Joseph. He also leaves behind his two brothers and dear friends, his twin George (Diane Adams) and older brother Milt (Mary Bodrug).

Grant was a world-renowned urological surgeon, who pioneered numerous surgical procedures, including performing the first human kidney transplant at the Toronto General Hospital. He will be remembered by thousands of patients and families whose lives he touched across North America, Europe and Asia through his 50-year career.

Among his many medical contributions, Grant was a McLaughlin Travelling Fellow in Surgery from Paris and London, a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the American College of Surgeons, Past President of The Academy of Medicine, the American Urological Association, and the Medico-Legal Society of Toronto. He is a Past Canadian Chair of the American College of Surgeons, a Past Chair of the International Society of Urology, and a valued member of multiple medical and surgical societies.

He also humbly served numerous medical, education, corporate and community boards.

Grant was loved and honoured by the church communities he served, and was Clerk of Session Emeritus at St. Andrew's Church, and Past Warden at St.

Peters-on-the-Rock. We are so grateful for his long-time colleagues, friends and family in Toronto, Oakville, Stony Lake, and around the world, who have loved and supported him his whole life.

A celebration of Grant's beautiful life will be held at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Toronto (King and Simcoe), at 3 p.m. on Friday, January 18, 2019, with a reception to follow at the Church. In lieu of flowers, we respectfully ask you to consider a donation to the Toronto General & Western Hospital Foundation, or St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Toronto, which provides extensive inner-city programs.

DR. HARRY GRAUER

October 16, 1928 December 21, 2018 He passed away following a long disability, at Kensington Gardens Long Term Care Facility in Toronto.

Loving husband of Ishbel (Burnett), and father of Leslie (Gerry Brock), David (Gisele Simpson), Karen (George Blasby), Philip (Sarah Braman), and Eric (Tricia Clarke); and grandfather of nine grandchildren.

Harry was the son of Dorothea and Max Grauer and his early years were spent in Czechoslovakia. The family immigrated to Canada in June of 1939 and settled on a farm north of London.

Following graduation from Western University in 1954 Harry had a long, distinguished career at the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal, practising psychiatry with a focus on geriatrics. His work in the community to help holocaust survivors was extensive and meaningful.

He graduated from the Montreal Psychoanalytic Institute. His psychoanalytic knowledge and commitment influenced his understanding of his psychiatric work.

His summertime love was his cottage at Charleston Lake in eastern Ontario, where he swam and kayaked and shared time and meals with many friends. In Montreal, he biked the Lachine Canal frequently and always had an eye on bikes in his latter days in Toronto.

He will be missed by many.

He supported Doctors Without Borders; friends may wish to donate to it in his memory or to the Kensington team that cared for him so well.

Private funeral arrangements.

CAROL SUZANNE LONG (PENDRITH)

Septe mber 14, 1931 January 5, 2019 Carol passed away peacefully, on January 5, 2019 in Toronto at the age of 87. She will be sadly missed by her family and many friends. Carol is survived by Jack, her loving husband of 65 years; her children, Steven (Helen), Catherine (Ken), Jeffrey (Octavia), Julianne, Jennifer; her 17 grandchildren (and spouses); and three great-grandchildren.

She was predeceased by her son, Jonathan.

Carol graduated from The University of Toronto with a Bachelor of Music degree. She was well known in the Toronto music community as a gifted piano player, and worked as a professional musician in Montreal, Toronto and the US. Family and music were always the most important things in Carol's life.

She loved spending time making or listening to music and being at her Haliburton cottage with her family. A funeral service will be held on Friday, January 11 at 2 p.m.

at Grace Church on-the-Hill, 300 Lonsdale Road, followed by a reception in the church hall.

PALOMBA PAVES-YASHINSKY

On Monday, January 7, 2019, in her 89th year.

A former professor of French at York University, a muchloved docent at the AGO, the leader and instigator of the groupe de conversation Café et Bavardage, a stalwart for years of book and cinema clubs, Palomba remained active (and actively herself) until the very end. A woman of grace and spirit, of courage and integrity, she had a tender heart as well as a sharp tongue.

Beloved wife of the late Jack Yashinsky. Loving mother to Dan Yashinsky. Devoted grandmother to Natty and the late Jacob Yashinsky-Zavitz.

Friend to many, she'll be greatly missed.

There will be a graveside service on Thursday, January 10th, at Holy Blossom Cemetery, 66 Brimley Rd. 3 p.m.

F o r t i m e a n d shiva details check http://www.benjaminsparkmemori alchapel.ca. Shiva will take place at 6 Bernard Ave.

PENELOPE RAI

March 12, 2014 - January 6, 2019

With profound sadness we announce the passing of our beautiful Penelope Rai after a long, courageous battle with cancer on January 6, 2019. Penelope passed away peacefully in her loving parents' arms, Roger and Shawna Rai. Adored by her big sister, Madison; and cherished by her grandparents, John and Janice Kosnik and Kuldip and Darshan Rai.

Penelope will be sadly missed by her loving aunts, uncles, cousins and friends. Penelope will always be remembered as the happiest, bravest and most determined and positive warrior, filled with so much humour and light.

Heartfelt gratitude to her Sick Kids family, especially Dr. Daniel Morgenstern and purple pod team, Dr. Ted Gerstle, Dr. Gail Annich, nurse Lee-Anne Williams, Dr. Kevin Weingarten and the PACT team, Penelope's 8A family of nurses and her Camp Ooch friends. Also, to Dr. Modak, Dr. Kim Kramer and the team at Memorial Sloan Kettering in New York.

Visitation will be held at Bernardo Funeral Home (2960 Dufferin St., south of Lawrence Ave. W.)

on Thursday, January 10th, 2019 from 4:00 - 8:00 p.m. Funeral Mass will be celebrated in Blessed Sacrament Church (24 Cheritan Ave - Yonge St - South of Lawrence Ave.) on Friday, January 11, 2019 at 11:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the neuroblastoma research fund at: my.sickkidsdonations.com/

PENELOPERAI NORMAN SNIDER

Storyteller, writer, author, screenwriter, journalist, professor Born in Toronto, November 14, 1945; Died January 4, 2019.

Norman was a leading Canadian journalist and cultural commentator who wrote on literature, politics, crime, sports and jazz, appearing regularly in Toronto Life, Saturday Night, Maclean's, and The Globe and Mail where he was a weekly columnist in the 1980's.

He was the author of The Changing of the Guard, a work of political journalism as well as co-authoring Smokescreen, a best selling true crime book.

But his greatest passion as a writer was his extensive work for movies and television, winning a Genie award for co-writing, with David Cronenberg, the movie Dead Ringers.

Norman was a man of dark humour, with a disabused, ironic, and deeply insightful view of the world, and all its woeful events and lamentable personalities. He believed that if the writer couldn't change the nature of his time, he could yet choose the part he would play in it. Norman chose to preserve clear sight.

He leaves his wife of 48 years, Frances-Mary (FM) Morrison; son James (Jessica); adored grandchildren Keira and Lily Claire; and brothers Leslie and Alvin (Jacqueline).

Life won't be the same for Norman's friends without hearing his talk about books, jazz, and the Leafs. A celebration of life will be held later this year to coincide with the posthumous publication of some of Norman's last writing.

KATIE SOEGTROP

On Saturday, January 5, 2018, Katharina "Katie" Maria Christina Soegtrop died after living a full life at the age of 96. She was born in Duisburg, Germany and together with her beloved husband, Guenter (d. 2015), they moved to Canada and raised 6 children. She will be sadly missed by her children Rainer (Yola), Brigitta (Joerg, d. 1994), Barbara (Orhan), Michael (Jane), Dieter (Dale) and Caroline. She is also survived by 9 grandchildren: Kirsten (Ken), Bjorn, Leyla, Natalie, Sergen, Robert, Matthew, Madison and Maja and her 2 greatgrandchildren, Quinn and Zachary.

Extended family Niggemann and Jacobs in Germany also mourn her passing. She dedicated her life to the care of people with mental health and addiction issues and she will be fondly remembered by her friends and patients at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) where she worked first as a nurse for 35 years and then as a volunteer for 25 years in her retirement.

A Celebration of Katie's Life will be held on Sunday January 13th, at the Mount Pleasant Funeral Centre (375 Mount Pleasant Road, east gate entrance), visitation will begin at 10 a.m with speeches to follow at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations in Katie's Memory can be made to The CAMH Client Learning Fund.


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Indigenous groups are endangered environmental guardians
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At a time when climate change has emerged as a mortal threat, these dwindling communities are locked in battles that affect us all
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Saturday, January 12, 2019 – Page O1

Geostrategist and author of nine books, including the award-winning Water, Peace, and War

Brazil's new President, Jair Bolsonaro - known for his misogynistic, racist, homophobic and anti-environmental comments - has raised questions about the future of the world's fourth-largest democracy with his support for torture and his unapologetic nostalgia for the country's 1964-85 military dictatorship. But no part of Brazil's diverse society has more to dread from Mr. Bolsonaro's coming to power than the country's already beleaguered Indigenous groups.

Over the past five centuries, the number of Indigenous people in Brazil has shrunk from as much as five million to about 895,000, less than 0.5 per cent of the country's population. Since 2006, their territory - the Brazilian part of the Amazon Basin - has lost forest cover over an area greater in size than the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the world's 11th-largest country, according to satellite data.

Mr. Bolsonaro, perhaps the most right-wing leader of any democracy in the world, has vowed to open up the Amazon rain forest to developers by repealing constitutional safeguards for Indigenous lands, claiming the protected reserves amount to keeping Indigenous people in "zoos."

As if to signal his intent to permit greater destruction of the world's biggest rain forest, he has appointed a Foreign Minister who believes climate change is an anti-Christian plot by "cultural Marxists" seeking to criminalize red meat, oil and heterosexual sex. And he has appointed an anti-abortion evangelist to head a new ministry overseeing Indigenous groups, women and human rights.

To be sure, Brazil is not the only country where Indigenous tribes must confront mounting threats to their ways of life - and their lives. From Canada and the Philippines to Japan and Indonesia, Indigenous people face growing threats of discrimination, marginalization and forced assimilation. As a result, the world's Indigenous communities are rapidly dwindling in numbers owing to encroachment and the exploitation of their natural resources.

With their combined share of the global population shrinking to 4.5 per cent, Indigenous communities are locked in modernday David-versus-Goliath battles against mining companies, dam builders, oil-palm plantations, loggers, ranchers, hunters, evangelists and military forces. Their rights continue to be violated with impunity despite an international convention obligating governments to protect their lands, identities, penal customs and ways of life.

More fundamentally, at a time when environmental degradation and climate change have emerged as mortal threats to humankind, Indigenous peoples' ways of life, with their premium on maintaining a balance between human needs and the preservation of ecosystems, serve as examples to the wider world.

Living close to nature, with their survival tied to ecosystem health, Indigenous communities respect nature as their teacher and protector. Consequently, they tend to understand nature better than modern societies, as was illustrated in late 2004, when a devastating tsunami struck in the Indian Ocean, killing more than a quarter million people across 14 Asian countries. On India's remote Andaman archipelago, however, close to the epicentre of the earthquake that caused the tsunami, two of the world's most isolated Indigenous tribes escaped harm by relying on traditional warning systems and moving to higher ground in time.

In fact, one of these two groups - the world's last known pre-Neolithic tribal community, living on coral-fringed North Sentinel Island - made international headlines recently because of a Chinese-American missionary's covert but fatal expedition to convert its 100 or so members to Christianity. John Allen Chau made repeated forays onto the island over three days, ignoring warnings from the Sentinelese tribe members to leave their community alone.

After the decimation of Indigenous tribes under European colonial rule, countries such as Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, India and Peru have pursued "no contact" policies toward isolated tribes. These policies are anchored in laws that protect the rights of Indigenous people to live in seclusion on their ancestral lands. Tribal reserves in India's Andaman archipelago, for example, are off-limits to all outsiders. Intrusions are punishable with a prison sentence.

Yet, with the support of a Kansas City-based missionary agency that trained him for the arduous undertaking, Mr. Chau dodged Indian laws and coastal security to make repeated incursions into North Sentinel to convert a highly endangered tribe to his religion, according to his own diary accounts. He undertook his mission just before American Thanksgiving, an annual whitewash of the genocide perpetrated against Native Americans.

Contrast the Sentinelese handling of the alien with punishments for unlawful activity or entry in the so-called civilized world: On Mr. Chau's first intrusion into their peaceful world, the hunter-gatherer Sentinelese did not subject him to Abu Ghraibstyle torture or to U.S. President Donald Trump's "catch and detain" policy, applicable to anyone entering the United States illegally. The Sentinelese, as Mr. Chau acknowledged in his notes, let him go - with a warning not to return.

But an undeterred Mr. Chau, using a fishing boat and a kayak, repeatedly stepped ashore, disparaging the island as "Satan's last stronghold." The patience of the Sentinelese wore out, and he was likely shot with a bow and arrow.

His body was reportedly buried on the beach, in the way the tribe disposes of its own dead.

Although local police have filed a case of murder against "unknown persons," the Sentinelese acted in a way permitted by the "stand your ground" laws in states such as Florida. That selfdefence law shields a person from both criminal prosecution and a civil lawsuit "if he or she reasonably believes it is necessary" to use deadly force to prevent harm or death.

Mr. Chau - the son of a refugee father who fled China during the Cultural Revolution and converted to Christianity in the United States - described in his notes how he hid from Indian coastal patrols under cover of darkness to make his criminal forays into an island forbidden even to Indians, including military forces. By demonstrating the ease with which one can breach Indian tribal-protection laws and security, he helped highlight the vulnerability of India's endangered tribes.

More broadly, his mission exemplified the threats to Indigenous people who live in total isolation. Today, most of such tribes live in the Amazon Basin, straddling Brazil's borders with Peru, Ecuador and Bolivia, or in the jungles of New Guinea and India.

The isolated tribes have rejected contact with the external world usually after experiencing ghastly violence and deadly diseases brought by outsiders from the time of European colonization, which wiped out many Indigenous communities from Australia to North America.

To escape genocide, some tribes fled to the deepest and most inaccessible parts of jungles, where they still live.

For example, until 150 years ago, the Andaman archipelago was home to more than two dozen isolated aboriginal communities, whose ancestors left Africa tens of thousands of years ago in a major exodus that provided the earliest inhabitants of Asia and Oceania. Studies have identified a genetic affinity between the Andaman islanders, Malaysia's tiny Orang Asli Indigenous population and Oceania's Melanesians.

After British colonial excesses, only four Andaman tribes survive. Two of these groups were forcibly assimilated by the British and have become rootless and dependent on government aid.

They are likely to vanish much ahead of the other two groups, which are self-sufficient and continue to live in complete isolation.

Likewise in Brazil, three-quarters of the Indigenous communities that were forced to open up to the outside world became extinct, with the rest suffering catastrophic population declines.

Since the late 1980s, however, Brazil's constitutional protections for Indigenous territories have helped many remaining tribes increase their populations - protections Mr. Bolsonaro has now threatened to repeal.

The examples from the Amazon Basin and the Andaman Is-

lands underscore the potent dangers of forced assimilation for isolated aboriginal people. Forced incorporation usually happens in the name of providing access to better technology, education and health care or, as Mr. Bolsonaro wants, to open up Indigenous lands to resource extraction and other development projects.

There are compelling anthropological and epidemiological reasons to prohibit outsiders from establishing contact with remote tribes. For example, the first waves of European colonization caused a calamitous depopulation of Indigenous societies by introducing smallpox, measles and other infectious diseases to which Indigenous people had no immunity.

Modern life is characterized by rampant use of antibiotics, including in meat production, with antibiotic resistance posing a major public-health challenge globally. Secluded people have no antibodies against the outside world's deadly pathogens.

This helps explain why, even in death, Mr. Chau poses a potential threat to the Sentinelese community because of the pathogens he may have brought.

To be sure, contact may be perilous for isolated Indigenous groups, but leave-them-alone policies are no guarantee that remote-living tribes will survive.

Small, highly inbred groups confront the spectre of dying out completely, irrespective of whether they stay in or come out of isolation.

Close rapport with alien culture, however, may be the worst option, speeding up their disappearance. An isolated Indigenous community's embrace of modern culture usually dooms its existence. This is why remote-living groups choose to stay in isolation and - like the Sentinelese - fire warning arrows at those who seek to encroach on their habitats.

Constitutional or legal safeguards for indigenous lands, cultures and lifestyles, as in Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, India and Peru, have allowed some endangered tribes to grow. When authorities look the other way, however, these tribes lose out in battles to defend their lands and cultures from miners, loggers, ranchers, evangelists and others.

The unpalatable fact is that the clearing of more forests and other ecosystems for cropland, mining, pasture and other purposes continues to contribute to the decimation of isolated Indigenous groups living in peace and contentment.

Most such groups are small and very vulnerable. Brazil, in addition to 238 "contacted" Indigenous tribes, has "23 confirmed and 47 potential" Indigenous groups living in complete isolation, according to one study, while Peru has about 15 such "uncontacted" tribes.

For scientists seeking to reconstruct evolutionary and migratory histories, tribes living in complete isolation are an invaluable biological asset. As another study has put it, "Isolated populations living in remote and/or inaccessible parts of the world are regarded as biological treasures from the genetic viewpoint. Many of these isolated human groups have remained relatively unknown until very recent times, so that the information provided by population genetic studies can help the scientists in the partial reconstruction of their demographic and evolutionary histories."

The future of these highly endangered tribes hinges on policies and laws that adequately safeguard their seclusion and privacy from interlopers and encroachers, who bring violence, disease and rapacious exploitation.

Media labels such as "primitive" and "Stone Age" are racist tags that conjure up false images.

Isolated tribe members certainly do not have the luxuries of modern life and use primal tools. But as Indian anthropologist Madhumala Chattopadhyay, who studied the Andaman Indigenous groups, has said, "The tribes might be primitive in their technology but socially they are far ahead of us."

Let's be clear: Religion has little meaning for Indigenous societies that revere nature and serve as the world's environmental sentinels. Where Indigenous communities have been converted to a religion - as on India's now predominantly Christian Great Nicobar Island - the lifestyle changes have been so profound that the traditional Indigenous cultures have been uprooted.

Today, the world's Indigenous groups, despite their small and declining share of the global population, manage 80 per cent of Earth's biodiversity, in part because their ancestral lands make up 22 per cent of the world's land surface. By preserving forests, lakes, rivers and other ecosystems on their territories, they play an indispensable role in climate-change mitigation and adaptation.

A critical part of the world's cultural diversity and ecological harmony, Indigenous peoples have much to teach us about how to combat environmental degradation and climate change. In fact, their role as guardians of biodiversity is critical to the search of modern societies for more sustainable lifestyles.


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BIRTH AND DEATH NOTICES
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Tuesday, January 15, 2019 – Page B17

GEORGE BRADY

February 9, 1928 - January 11, 2019 Our beloved patriarch, George, died quickly and painlessly at home on January 11, 2019.

To say that George squeezed out every drop of life is a grand understatement - from surviving the horrors of the Holocaust and losing his entire family, to restarting a new life in Canada. Blessed with 4 children (or as he would say, 3 kids and a girl) he pursued life with great vigour.

World renowned for his tenacity and generosity, for George there were no problems, only challenges for which he could always find solutions.

He helped hundreds of new Canadians find jobs, homes, and pursue their dreams. He had no time for naysayers or laziness. Our father lived larger than life - from using dynamite to blast rocks at the cottage, to igniting Czech democratic protests in 2016.

George's early years are well known through the story of Hana's Suitcase, which follows George and his sister Hana's journey from their Czech home to Terezin and finally to Auschwitz. In George's case - he believed that he survived due to his perseverance and a little bit of luck. He was liberated from the Death March in January of 1945 and returned home to find out that he was the sole survivor of his family.

George felt that he should not dwell on the past and chose to make a new life in Canada honouring the legacy of his parents. Three years later, he met a fellow survivor, Joe Seidner, and together they founded Brady & Seidner.

As he established the business, George began a busy family life with his first wife Carol and their 3 boys, Douglas, Paul and David. He impressed upon his boys the values he had grown up with, including a spirited appreciation for cottage life and family time. Guests were frequently lulled into a false sense of relaxation with weekend invites to a "Rock Festival" or "Woodstock", neither of which had anything to do with music, but rather the literal translation. When he was no longer able to swing a chainsaw, his favourite pastime was to direct others including his kids and grandkids as they cut trees, used the leaf blower, and moved rocks.

At 54, George expanded the family by marrying a second time and together with Teresa had a daughter, Lara Hana. The family continued to grow with badly trained but much loved dogs.

The arrival of Fumiko Ishioka into George's life in 2000 heralded the next chapter, sharing the story of his sister, and that of his own as a member of the underground magazine at Terezin called Vedem. George believed that these stories transcended faith and belief; encouraging kids and adults alike to explore history and learn more about the consequences of hatred and intolerance. Having, impacted many lives, his story continues to touch people in every corner of the world.

George's proudest achievement was his family and their success. He often commented that his parents would have been so proud to see how the Brady clan had expanded after suffering such hardship during the war. Not one to hold a grudge, this was his vindication; that he won out in the end.

George was a member of the Order of Ontario, and received the Queen's Diamond Jubilee medal, keys to Prague and Nove Mesto (his home town), the highest German civilian Order of Merit: the "Verdienstkreuz am Bande", the Masaryk Society award, the Czech House of Commons award, Post Bellum award, honour from Palace University, and various other honours.

He was also very proud of achieving 1st, 2nd and 3rd place (in the same race) for the over 80 category at the Devil's Glen Ski Club Championships.

George's legacy is carried on by his wife Teresa; children Douglas (Carol), Paul (Joyce), David (Robin), Lara (Mark) and his grandchildren; Adam, Daniel, Cameron, Everest, Sierra, Nirvana, Khoi, Grace, Isaiah, Elijah, Aaron and Theodore. Special thanks to Teresa for her miracles in keeping George healthy, despite his best efforts to do otherwise and to Marty for those weekly lunches. Forever with a twinkle in his eye, George will be deeply missed. George was the world's biggest optimist - always seeing the glass more than half full.

At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (three lights west of Dufferin) for service on Wednesday January 16, 2019, at 3:00 p.m. Shiva to be observed privately. In George's honour, and to continue the important cause he believed in - please consider a donation to the Tokyo Holocaust Education Centre in lieu of flowers.

https:// http://www.canadahelps.org/en/ dn/31868

WILLIAM GRAHAM DUTTON, Q.C.

July 10, 1935 January 10, 2019 It is with deep sadness that the family announces the passing of William Graham Dutton.

Beloved husband to Sheila (Westman) and loving father of Chris (Karen), Lynn (John Clarke) and Tim. Proud grandfather to Katie, Oliver, Emily, Owen and Jenny. Beloved brother to Liz (Milton) and late brother John. He will be missed by his many nieces and nephews.

Graham was born in Chatham, Ontario to W.L Dutton and Aileen (Turner). He grew up in Chatham where many of his lifelong friendships began. He later attended St. Andrews College, which became an important part of his life.

While attending a St. Andrews dance he first met Sheila, who he would later marry on December 28, 1959. This was followed by 59 years of joyful marriage.

Graham attended the University of Toronto, became president of Delta Upsilon and graduated from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1960.

He was called to the Ontario Bar in 1962.

As a litigator, he soon became a well-respected member of the bar with a long and rewarding career.

He was appointed Queen's Counsel in 1976, and certified as a Specialist in Civil Litigation by L.S.U.C at the inception of that designation. Graham's career legacy is distinguished with many landmark and high profile legal decisions.

He was a founding partner of Dutton Brock, which soon became one of Canada's premier insurance litigation firms.

Graham's high commitment to the legal community saw him actively engaged through many associations: Past President of the County of York Law Association Director of the Advocate Society Former council member of the Medico-Legal Society of Toronto Former member of the management board of the Canadian Bar Insurance Associate Fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers He also proudly served on school boards: Montcrest School and St.

Andrews College Graham's compassion in helping others went beyond his legal career. He would not just offer advice but would take the time necessary to support and help others through their times of need.

Graham and Sheila were avid travellers. Their many adventures would take them across the world's continents. A large collection of photo albums attest to these wonderful trips for his children and grandchildren. The numerous photos of a Graham and Sheila smiling with their friends showed how much they enjoyed their times together.

Graham was competitive both in the courts of law and in his in free time. He enjoyed many sports: golf, tennis and squash as well as skiing and sailing. He was an active member of the Badminton and Racquet Club, Rosedale Golf Club and the Erieau Yacht Club (Commodore 1979).

Erieau, nestled between Lake Erie and Rondeau Bay, held a special place in Graham's heart.

It is where Graham spent his summers from the time he was a toddler. It was where we saw the fun loving side of Graham. Many fond friend and family memories were formed there.

Later in life Graham and Sheila spent their winters in Naples, Florida. Amoung friends and family they enjoyed watching many sunsets over the Gulf.

Graham's legal legacy is well documented but it is Graham, the true friend, the devoted and loving husband, father and grandfather that he will be remembered by.

A celebration of life will be held on Saturday, January 26th at Rosedale Golf Club from 1:00 p.m.

- 3:00 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the charity of your choice. Donations, condolences, photographs and memories may be forwarded through http://www.etouch.ca

MARGARET K. LOVE "Peggy"

September 1, 1923 January 6, 2019 Peggy Love, beloved wife of the late Len Love, passed away peacefully on Sunday, January 6, 2019, at the age of 95 years.

Peggy was the devoted mother of Judy Rice and Tom Love and the dedicated mother-in-law of Bill Rice and Dianne Love. She was an extremely proud grandmother to Tiffany (Kevin Shaw) and Todd (April) Rice and to Michael (Mallory) and Jaimie Love, as well as great-grandmother to Calia and Jaiden Rice in Singapore and to Tova Love in Calgary.

Having lived most of their lives in Montreal, Peggy and Len moved to Calgary in 1990, to join their family.

The family wishes to thank the entire staff at Garrison Greens Seniors Community for their much appreciated care over the last four years.

A memorial service will be held at a later date. If friends so desire, memorial tributes may be made directly to the Canadian Red Cross Society, Southern Alberta Region, 2nd Floor, 1305 - 11 Avenue S.W., Calgary, AB T3C 3P6, Telephone: (403) 541-6100, http://www.redcross.ca.

In living memory of Margaret Love a tree will be planted at Fish Creek Provincial Park by McInnis & Holloway Funeral Homes, Park Memorial, 5008 Elbow Drive S.W., Calgary, AB, T2S 2L5, Telephone: 403-243-8200.

DAVID WILLIAM ROULSTON

It is with immense sadness that we announce the unexpected passing of our hero, David William Roulston, on Friday, January 11, 2019, at his favourite place, Trillium Ridge (the cottage), at the age of 62.

Predeceased by his parents, Lila and William Roulston.

Beloved husband of Sara Fay Sulley. Devoted father and best friend to Nelson Jacob (Jake) Roulston. He also leaves to mourn his sisters-inlaw Terry Sulley and Melody Sulley. He will be sorely missed by his nieces and nephews, Russell Sulley, Adrienne, Joel and Kayla Altman and his great-nieces and nephew Victoria, Noah, Zoey and Amelia. Always larger than life, his friends and family will remember his passion and enthusiasm in his teaching, coaching, gaming, golfing, comic book collecting and all his other endeavours.

Visitation will be held at R.S.

Kane Funeral Home, 6150 Yonge St., Toronto, on Wednesday, January 16th, from 6 - 8 p.m. The Funeral Service will be held in the R.S.

Kane chapel on Thursday, January 17th, at 11 a.m.

A private interment will take place. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Grandravine Special Hockey, Alzheimer's Society of Ontario or a charity of your choice. Condolences may be left at http://www.rskane.ca

IN MEMORIAM JOE MIOTTO

Still think of you every day with lots of love from your family and friends

GEOFFREY REGINALD SHARRON

On January 6, 2019, at the age of 30, as a result of a skiing accident in British Columbia. Geoff will be dearly missed by his parents, Teresa Cooney and Bruce Sharron, and by his brothers Thomas and James (Laurenne). He is survived by his grandmothers, Audrey Sharron and June Cooney, as well as his many aunts, uncles and cousins.

Geoff was born in Toronto on November 23, 1988. He was raised in Newmarket, Ontario.

In 2009, he began spending his time between Alberta and B.C., where he enjoyed his passion for the outdoors. Known to all of his friends for his kind and gentle approach to life, and a wonderful sense of humour, Geoff was most recently living in Golden, where he worked as a builder of log homes. In lieu of flowers, please donate to a charity of your choice or, to reflect Geoff's love of animals, to your local Animal Shelter.

A celebration of Geoff's life will be held on Thursday January 17th, at 2:00 p.m. Taylor Funeral Home, 524 Davis Drive, Newmarket.

Online condolences may be left at http://www.taylorfh.ca


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A delicate question
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How much, John Miller asks, should we or can we give those people in return for using pieces of their story? How far will writers go for our craft, and at what cost?
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Saturday, January 5, 2019 – Page P16

In December, 2007, I received an e-mail. "I relapsed and have found myself in a state of ugliness again." My friend and former colleague Kim had been sleeping in crack houses for two months but had found a place to move into, and needed to come up with $400 to add to the $800 she'd already put down for rent.

"I am emailing everyone I know for help. I feel so embarrassed but am desperate right now. So sorry for letting you down, John."

She asked if I'd call her.

A state of ugliness, to quote Kim, took hold of me as I wrestled with what I was about to do.

The next evening, I called Kim with a proposal: I wouldn't gift or lend her the money, but I would contract with her instead, and my payment would be $400, the amount she needed. The job - to grant me two final interviews - would complete a process we'd started two years before, when Kim had been off of drugs for many years. Those interviews, the first of them given for free, were to be background information for Wild and Beautiful is the Night, my third novel, which, 11 years later, has made its way onto bookshelves.

Kim accepted my proposal and after we hung up, I considered how my chosen course of action touched on questions that writers ask each time we interview a research subject. How much should we or can we give those people in return for using pieces of their story? How far will we go for our craft and at what cost? Do the benefits to us and, later, our readers, justify the emotional toll such exploitation might take? Sometimes, there's no exploitation, no harm and, therefore, no dilemma. Other times, as in my situation, it isn't so clear.

Kim and I met in 2003, when for more than a year I filled in as executive director at the Toronto People with AIDS Foundation.

She was the organization's speakers' bureau co-ordinator, a job that required her to dig into her past to speak publicly about her former crack-cocaine use and her experiences as a sex worker, an occupation she'd left years before; about the joys and struggles of motherhood; and about being a woman and a lesbian living with HIV.

Her primarily middle-class audiences related to Kim, in part because of her own middle-class background. She was lauded as an engaging speaker with a certain gift for holding a room in her thrall. I began to wonder if a fictional character similar to Kim might make a useful protagonist, one who might be a window into the complex issues faced by sex workers and people who use drugs.

Once I was no longer her boss, I asked if I could interview her in aid of a new novel I was considering. At first, she hesitated, but only because she'd been thinking of writing her memoirs. I encouraged her to do so and assured her that any novel I wrote would borrow details of her life to lend authenticity to more than one fictional character, but none of those characters would be a thinly veiled Kim. With that reassurance, she enthusiastically agreed. Kim wasn't afraid of identifying information; but she cared who told her story and how it was told. She was no victim. She was proudly resilient and wanted that to be known.

In 2005, she and I met a couple of times and I asked her for specifics and anecdotes, for what it felt like then, as opposed to when she was in recovery. Those first interviews were reflections on a past she thought she'd left behind. At that point, the benefits to Kim seemed clear: She liked being seen as an expert; it made her feel good to help and she seemed pleased when I mentioned she'd be named in the novel's acknowledgments. Since my writing income is paltry, I didn't offer to pay her, then. Nor did I pay any of the other people I interviewed for my novel, including other drug users and sex workers. Most novelists don't.

A few months later, Kim quit her secure job to start a small business. Although she was now too busy to meet for the rest of our interviews, Kim was genuinely excited to have a continuing part in my writing project. I was grateful whenever she brought it up; I was eager to dive into my story, but I still had research to do. I hoped, once things settled down, we'd be able to meet at length again.

Sadly, her business didn't succeed, one thing led to another and, with the stressors piling up, she relapsed. At that point, someone called Children's Aid and her son was removed from her care and sent to live with her ex-partner. Throughout this period, Kim and I sporadically kept in touch by e-mail and sometimes by phone. She raised the scheduling of our two final interviews, again, without my prompting, but understandably with her renewed challenges, as she went from relapse, to detox and treatment, to relapse and again into that all-consuming period of early recovery, those interviews were postponed several times.

Then, in December, 2007, came her e-mail asking for rent money. I wondered, was she taking advantage of our friendship and moreover, would I be establishing myself as an easy mark?

Would my financial support be used for drug money? But I also wanted her to be housed. I was ashamed to be thinking in such a judgmental and self-protective way, and my next thought was how humiliating it must have been to make the request.

I laid out my possible courses of action, the three real choices I had: to say no, to give Kim the money without conditions or to pay her for her time. I weighed the good that might come of each, and the harm. There was no option that would cause no harm. I grappled with the competing sets of principles, laid them out in front of me, disheartened that so many were in conflict with one another. I tried to put myself in Kim's shoes, even though I understand the limits to empathy when two people are in such different places.

I had to believe it was more ethical to help Kim, if I could, without subjecting her to that state of powerlessness, that feeling that erodes at our self-worth, when we can't help ourselves. I didn't want to be her saviour, nor for her to see me as one, as some parental figure who expected his gift to be used in the proper way.

How condescending, how foul that would make me - to her and to myself. I considered that giving her cash without conditions might be taken a different way, that it might be accepted as a show of non-judgmental support, if I framed it right. I was her friend and that's what friends are supposed to do: help one another without judgment. But she'd asked for that help and her need was so, so great. Would paying her for her expertise leave her feeling better and less like a charity case? Probably, although not by much, and there was no denying that this option benefited me the most; I very much wanted those interviews. I braced myself for her judgment.

On an icy December afternoon, I arrived early to a drafty coffee shop with fogged-up windows. Waiting for her, I contemplated my decision again, and the ugliness of its possible repercussions blew through me with each gust coming through the opening and closing door. Kim arrived on time. Weariness weighed her eyelids down. Her skin was grey. I probably didn't look much better myself.

Our table was too close to the other patrons and my coffee was appropriately bitter. I selfconsciously gave her an envelope, which contained all of the cash for both interviews, and said it was hers for merely showing up. I hoped she'd stay, I said. I hoped she'd come back a second time, but if she felt it was too difficult, I'd understand. "Also, if my questions are too much, too intrusive," I added, "you don't have to answer. You can leave."

Then, unable to meet her eye, I said, "I know I'm making you sing for your supper. Am I like one of your old tricks, minus the sex?" I started to cry and so did she. We held each other tightly in an embarrassingly long hug.

When we sat again, she sidestepped my question, but she was exceptionally kind. "This novel's going to be amazing," she said. "I'm so happy to be able to help." She squeezed my arm.

I marvelled at her generosity, at her humanity. At how, despite everything, she cared about soothing my self-reproach. She stayed, and the next week, true to her word, she showed up for the second interview.

Our conversations during those two December meetings were excruciating in their intimacy and in their honesty. Kim described her in-the-moment life without censorship or self-pity.

Instead of reflecting back on a distant past, she described how she felt then and there. What it had been like for her that morning, as pains shot down her arms, and how it felt to sit in front of me, coming down from her high. "I'm beyond exhausted," she said. She described what it had been like two hours earlier, as the drug she'd injected had taken hold. The oscillating optimism and hopelessness. She was breathtakingly self-aware and spoke with a heartbreaking blend of self-deprecating humour and sadness.

We hugged goodbye after that second interview, cried again, promised to keep in touch, and we did, a couple of times. Kim never again asked me for money.

A year and a half later, she died from an overdose. She never got the chance to write her story, in her own words.

It took me 10 years to finish the novel that began with those conversations. I scrapped a first manuscript, a very different story that took five years to write but failed mostly because I'd been too scared to mine the emotional honesty that was Kim's true gift. I suppose I was too ashamed of how I'd come by it.

Ultimately, I started over, told myself that I owed it to her to see it through. The novel that has made its way to publication is deeper and rawer. Kim's fighting spirit, humour, kindness and integrity have found their way into both of its protagonists. Still, I'm haunted by those last encounters. Elizabeth Epstein and Anne Hamrick, nursing professors and ethicists at the University of Virginia, describe what I'm feeling as moral residue, the feelings that linger after we've been involved in a morally ambiguous situation. To me, it's the grimy film left behind when there was no great option, when you had to choose one, and the consequences have coated you and won't wash away. I'm confident I made the best choice, but I could never bring myself to ask Kim if she agreed.

John Miller's novel, Wild and Beautiful is the Night, was published in October by Cormorant Books.

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Saturday, January 12, 2019 – Page B1

Peter Jacobs liked what he heard when he attended Goldcorp Inc.'s investment day in January of last year. So the chief investment strategist with Stifel RMG Group, a Washington-based financial firm, started buying shares.

Goldcorp management's presentation made a strong case that the mining company "was on track to increase production and reserves, lower costs, deleverage the balance sheet and create additional shareholder value," he said.

A year later, the picture isn't so pretty. In late October, Goldcorp lost close to a fifth of its market value in a single day after reporting falling production, rising costs and a decline in reserves. Gold grades at its flagship Cerro Negro mine in Argentina fell by more than 30 per cent in the third quarter compared with the previous quarter. Production at its Musselwhite mine in Ontario and giant Pueblo Viejo operation in Dominican Republic, which it owns alongside Barrick Gold Corp., also fell more than expected. The company reduced its production forecast and bumped up its cost expectations for 2018.

Goldcorp shares have been in a long-term tailspin, trading at $12.86 apiece Friday on the Toronto Stock Exchange, down from more than $54 in 2011.

Sources say the company is exploring options for a possible combination with another gold miner in a bid to revive its fortunes.

"I don't know about how other shareholders feel but I would think and hope they are also disgusted by the lack of execution against goals laid out" last year, Mr. Jacobs said. "The company has failed on all fronts."

In an October conference call after the release of Goldcorp's third quarter results, Mr. Jacobs accused chief executive David Garofalo of shirking responsibility for the poor performance and behaving as if it was "business as usual."

Others also pointed the finger at management.

The steep decline in Goldcorp's share price in part reflected a "loss of confidence in the management team," wrote Scotia Capital Markets Inc. analyst Tanya Jakusconek in a note titled "Has the market thrown in the towel on Goldcorp?"

Just three years ago, Vancouverbased Goldcorp was the most valuable gold company in the world.

Goldcorp was worth more than Barrick Gold Corp., even though it was nowhere near as big in terms of production. Goldcorp was lauded for navigating the great commodities gold boomand-bust cycle better than Barrick by not hedging its gold exposure on the way up, and having a much better balance sheet on the way down.

But hidden from view, problems were brewing at Goldcorp, including flawed acquisitions, a tendency of overpromising and underdelivering, and execution issues on the technical side of mining.

Geoff Phipps, co-founder and portfolio manager with Torontobased hedge fund Arrow Capital Management Inc., says the decline of Goldcorp has been a "really painful slow burn that just exhausts shareholders."

With its stock now trading near a 17-year low, "Goldcorpse" as mining blogger IKN calls it, is now only the seventh-most valuable gold company in the world.

"I don't think anybody's happy with the share-price performance," Mr. Garofalo said in an interview in late November. "Absolutely not."

Mr. Garofalo acknowledged the company could have done a better job of anticipating problems at its Musselwhite mine and that the company needed to give better forecasts to investors. But he said investors overreacted to a "soft quarter," and he pins the company's travails largely on the flat gold price over the past few years as well as the flight of capital out of mining into sectors such as cannabis. He calls the past couple of years "a miserable time for gold investors, generally."

Now, Goldcorp is a possible target in the next big gold-mining deal. Goldcorp was recently in talks with Australian gold producer Newcrest Mining Ltd. about a deal, but those talks have lapsed, said a person familiar with the situation who isn't authorized to speak publicly about the discussions. (A merger between the two would have created a sizable mining company: Newcrest has a market capitalization of more than $17-billion, compared with $11.2-billion for Goldcorp.)

Goldcorp has since engaged in discussions with Newmont Mining Corp., the big U.S. gold miner, the person said, although it is far from clear that the talks will lead to any transaction.

Spokespeople for Newcrest and Newmont declined to comment.

Rick Rule, CEO of Sprott U.S.

Holdings Inc., says even though Goldcorp may be loath to sell at such a depressed stock-market valuation, an acquisition by Newmont Mining would be welcomed by institutional investors. A Newmont-Goldcorp combination could lead to significant savings in general and administrative (G&A) expenses, which include head office costs and salaries for management and directors.

"The resultant company would command a better premium and hence a lower cost of capital," Mr. Rule said.

Facing heavy criticism amid years of underperformance, Mr.

Garofalo defends his tenure at Goldcorp, pointing to improvements he has made since he took the job in early 2016, such as reducing costs and growing reserves over that time period. And others say not all of the company's troubles can be pinned on him.

"This company's been mismanaged under a couple of CEOs, not just Garofalo," said Benoit Gervais, veteran mining portfolio manager with Mackenzie Investments. He says Goldcorp has a long history of missing targets, making ill-advised acquisitions and paying enormous sums to management for subpar performance.

"There's something wrong in this company," he said. "Who's signing off on this?" Goldcorp's acquisitions haven't always worked out as planned.

In 2006, Goldcorp, under CEO Ian Telfer - who is now the chairman - paid US$430-million for the Éléonore development project in Quebec. Goldcorp said Éléonore would eventually produce 600,000 ounces of gold a year. But Éléonore, which went into production in 2015, hasn't measured up. Last year, it produced about 350,000 ounces of gold at a high all-in sustaining cost (AISC) of $900 an ounce.

(AISC is a measure that factors in most of the costs of mining.)

In 2008, then under CEO Kevin McArthur, Goldcorp paid $1.5-billion for an Ontario development property called Cochenour that had not yet even carried out a resource estimate. At one point, Goldcorp touted it as a five-million ounce deposit. More than a decade later, Cochenour sits as a project in its portfolio with a meagre 300,000 ounces in reserves. In 2010, Goldcorp, then run by Chuck Jeannes, bought what is now considered its flagship asset, Cerro Negro in Argentina, for $3.6-billion. In 2015, it wrote down Cerro Negro by $2.3billion.

John Tumazos, owner and CEO of Very Independent Research in New Jersey, says not only has Goldcorp consistently overpaid for assets without doing sufficient due diligence, the company's traditionally strong balance sheet has allowed it to spend far too much building mines, leading to poor investment returns.

"They have enough rope to hang themselves and they do."

In 2017, a little more than a year after Mr. Garofalo took over as CEO, Goldcorp paid around US$700-million for two development assets in Chile. As part of that deal, Goldcorp paid US$520million for a 50-per-cent stake in a project called Cerro Casale. The deposit contains a massive 23 million ounces of gold in the ground, but despite decades of study, no mining company has been able to make the case for building a mine. The grade is too low, its location in the Andes too remote and the capital cost, estimated at US$4.2-billion, too steep.

The economics of Caspiche, another Chilean development asset that Goldcorp bought at the same time for about US$100-million, appear even more tenuous.

All of its 12.5 million ounces are classified as "resources," which means there could be no profitable gold at all in the ground.

"That deal they did in Chile," said Robert Cohen, portfolio manager of the Dynamic Precious Metals Fund, "that's when I kind of mentally checked out on Goldcorp." He says it's hard to believe that Goldcorp would pay steep sums for two projects with such poor economics.

"I'm the first to acknowledge that Casale and Caspiche, the two deposits that make up Norte Abierto, on their own would have been marginal," Mr. Garofalo said.

But he's optimistic that by developing the two projects at the same time, the economics could work, as Cerro Casale and Caspiche could conceivably share common processing facilities and infrastructure.

Another acquisition made under Mr. Garofalo is the $530-million deal in 2016 to buy Kaminak Gold Corp., owner of the Coffee gold project in Yukon. Goldcorp expects Coffee to cost US$400million to build and Mr. Garofalo says the company's return on the mine should be between 13 per cent and 15 per cent. But Goldcorp recently cut Coffee's reserves by 23 per cent to 1.7 million ounces after doing further drilling.

The setback at Coffee, as with Éléonore a decade earlier, illuminates a long-running problem at the gold company, Dynamic's Mr.

Cohen says. Goldcorp has been repeatedly caught out by not having enough technical people - geologists, metallurgists and engineers - in its upper-management tiers, he says.

Mr. Garofalo, an accountant by training, says Goldcorp is working on improving its skills on the technical side of mining and taking more ownership over the process. As with most in the gold industry, Goldcorp relies on external engineering firms to build its mines, but internal staff now manage expansions.

"We have much more robust project execution teams at the mine site than we've had historically," he said.

Some say Goldcorp could take a leaf out of founder Robert McEwen's playbook.

In 2000, Mr. McEwen opened up the company's geological records on its Red Lake mine in northern Ontario to the world and offered a $325,000 award to anyone who could help find new discoveries. The gambit paid off when the winners eventually uncovered six million ounces of new gold.

Goldcorp used to hold on to a portion of its gold in lieu of cash on its balance sheet. Apart from benefiting from the ensuing appreciation in the price of gold in the 2000s, holding all that bullion in a vault also gave the company pause before spending its capital.

"I thought that was pretty smart," Mr. Cohen said.

And in an industry widely criticized for overpaying its executives, Mr. McEwen earned a salary of US$1 in 2017 as CEO of McEwen Mining. Mr. Garofalo was paid a salary of $1.35-million, a cash bonus of $1.9-million and various other compensation for a total of $8.4-million.

Veteran gold analyst John Ing with Maison Placements says regardless of whether Goldcorp gets acquired, it has a ton of work to do.

It must dispose of marginal assets, make deep cuts in general and administrative expenses and move forward with management changes.

"What's needed is more than just a pruning," Mr. Ing said.

It's "drastic surgery."

Associated Graphic

A worker walks inside Goldcorp's Borden gold mine near Chapleau, Ont., in June, 2018. GoldCorp CEO David Garofalo has been facing heavy criticism amid years of underperformance.

CHRIS WATTIE/ REUTERS


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Vancouver developer fights for 'ugly' L.A. building
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Onni's ambitious plan for Times Mirror Square has preservationists battling for the historic Pereira building
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By DAVID EBNER
  
  

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Monday, November 26, 2018 – Page B3

LOS ANGELES -- The Times-Mirror building in downtown Los Angeles is not, to most eyes, an architectural marvel. The six-storey structure, completed in 1973, stands like a cold fortress, its top floor rimmed by dark windows held aloft on a series of granite pillars.

This building has become an unlikely flashpoint in an architectural preservation debate that has thrust a media-shy Vancouver real-estate developer, Onni Group of Companies Ltd., into a spotlight. The fight has put a proposed project worth hundreds of millions in jeopardy.

Onni bought this site two years ago. It's a full block, across from City Hall. The oldest building is from 1935, a widely appreciated Art Deco work, the former home of the Los Angeles Times. A 1948 building in a similar style is on a second corner.

On the other side of the block is the 1973 building and a parking garage; Onni wants to tear them down to put up two luxury apartment towers while keeping the two older buildings.

On a recent sunny afternoon, across the street on the steps of a courthouse, a band of local activists considered the unappreciated building. Reflected light from the glass courthouse rippled on the granite of the 1973 building, designed by William Pereira. The L.A. architect was famous in his day for work such as the Transamerica Pyramid in San Francisco, but even Pereira fans know his Times-Mirror building is hard to love.

"A lot of people think it's just ugly," architectural historian Alan Hess said. But he said styles often fall out of favour and predicted there will soon be a revival of appreciation for a building once voted the second-ugliest in L.A.

A wife-and-husband team, Kim Cooper and Richard Schave, is leading the quest to gain heritage status for the Pereira building. They are passionate Angelenos whose day job is leading offbeat tours of the city. In September, after years of work, they won a victory at the city's Cultural Heritage Commission. This week, the battle moves to an important committee at city hall.

Ms. Cooper, looking at the Pereira building, declared: "You can't just clear cut and put up towers. You have to come up with something more sophisticated. It takes more money, more time, and more heart. I don't think Onni feels the heart of how important this place is."

Onni made its first move in L.A.

in 2011, and has since invested more than US$1-billion in the market. It has built one tower and will soon finish construction on three luxury-apartment blocks.

This project at Times Mirror Square is Onni's biggest proposal yet: 1,100-plus luxury apartments and an overhaul and refurbishment of the two older office buildings.

On Tuesday afternoon, Onni's vision for Times Mirror Square faces an imposing hurdle. L.A. city council's powerful planning and land-use management body will decide on the Times Mirror Square heritage question, a make-or-break ruling for Onni's development plans and a ruling that could have broader implications for development in L.A.

The hearing unfolds as the council is riven by political scandal: Jose Huizar, a pro-development councilman for downtown, has been ousted from his key role as chair of council's planning committee following Federal Bureau of Investigation raids of his offices and home in early November. With Mr. Huizar out of the picture, Onni has lost an important backer at City Hall.

'WE LOVE LOS ANGELES' Onni's roots stretch back to the mid-1960s, when the De Cotiis family, immigrants from Italy, entered the Vancouver construction and real-estate business. Onni got going in the late 1990s, run by the sons of Inno De Cotiis: Rossano, Morris, Giulio, and Paolo.

It was the global financial crisis, which forced the company to slash prices on hundreds of unsold condos in the Vancouver region, and pushed management to turn its eye to other markets to diversify. On an early visit, Onni executives were struck by how downtown L.A. reminded them of Vancouver's downtown peninsula several decades back, with ample land on which to build towers.

"You had this amazing city, globally famous, with a massive economy, and yet their downtown core had so much empty space," said Duncan Wlodarczak, chief of staff to Onni president Rossano De Cotiis, in an interview at a coffee shop near Onni's modest headquarters on Vancouver's Robson Street.

The De Cotiis brothers tend to avoid attention. Rossano De Cotiis's name rarely appears in print.

But out of the spotlight, the family has a sprawling collection of real estate in B.C.'s lower mainland, Toronto, and several U.S. cities. The family keeps careful control of everything it does - managing its own construction projects instead of hiring a contractor to do so, for example.

Onni's arrival in L.A. was welltimed. Downtown for decades was empty of residents. In 1999, a city policy change and the opening of a new arena downtown sparked residential development.

In recent years, as the U.S. economy has recovered from the Great Recession, development has boomed. The vibe in what's branded as DTLA has shifted from vacant to vibrant. In 1999, fewer than 20,000 people lived downtown in a region of nearly 10-million. Today, the downtown population approaches 75,000 and is forecast to double in the next decade.

Onni is in the middle of it. It has invested across downtown from residential towers to office buildings. "They're as big a player as anyone," said Jessica Lall, president of the Central City Association of L.A.

Two years ago, Onni bought Times Mirror Square for US$105million from Chicago-based Tribune Media Co. Onni saw potential and profit in reviving the two older office buildings and building two new high-end apartment towers. It filed redevelopment plans in mid-2017.

But at Times Mirror Square, Onni ran headfirst into Ms. Cooper and Mr. Schave, who had run a number of successful battles to preserve historical buildings.

Among them was a successful bid to win a historic-cultural monument designation - which is what they're seeking for Times Mirror Square - for an East Hollywood apartment building where the writer Charles Bukowski had lived. It was to be torn down but has since been renovated.

"We love Los Angeles," said Mr.

Schave.

In the late 2000s, the couple realized the 1935 L.A. Times building didn't have heritage protection.

Architect Gordan Kaufmann, whose best-known work is the Hoover Dam, designed the building. The city told them they had to seek to protect all of Times Mirror Square.

In June, they filed a 374-page application to the city's Cultural Heritage Commission, a fivemember body appointed by the mayor, to try to get the square protected as historic-cultural monument. The city's Office of Historic Resources endorsed the submission and, in September, the commission met to consider it.

At the hearing, an architectural historian hired by Onni argued the 1973 Pereira building was not a significant work by the architect and also suggested Mr. Pereira had little hand in its creation. The preservationists brought in Mr.

Pereira's daughter, Monica. Ms.

Pereira said her father was close friends with the Chandler family, the long-time owners of the Times, and they would have insisted the architect oversee the work.

"Every time you tear down something, even part of it, you're losing part of our history," said Ms. Pereira.

The commissioners endorsed the bid, ruling that Times Mirror Square is architecturally significant and closely connected with important Angelenos. "It tells a story of the city of Los Angeles," said commission president Richard Barron.

'IT COULDN'T BE A MORE PERFECT SPOT' On a tour of the complex in late October, Onni vice-president Mark Spector pointed to fissures in the thick Indiana limestone cladding of the 1935 building.

Pieces had fallen off. "There's a lot of work to do," he said. The sidewalks around Times Mirror Square are quiet.

Onni wants to enliven the area with retail that could include restaurants and a grocery on Spring Street and a pedestrian paseo.

The firm's proposal is the best way to honour the heritage of Times Mirror Square and build for the future, said Mr. Spector, who joined Onni in L.A. in early 2013, and has overseen all of the company's major projects in the city.

The company's goal is to ensure the 1935 and 1948 buildings are "around for the next 100 years," he said.

Standing on a patio of the Pereira building, Mr. Spector talked of the new residential development in this area of downtown - there is a Frank Gehry project up the street - and a new metro station under construction on the next block. "It couldn't be a more perfect spot," he said.

While a heritage designation does not kill Onni's plans, it would make it much more difficult to proceed. Onni would probably scrap its current proposal if the heritage bid succeeds because the only structure it could legally tear down would be the parking lot. "It doesn't make sense to build only one high-rise," said Mr.

Spector. "We would probably keep the whole thing as is."

The meeting on Tuesday comes with a new set of political circumstances. The planning and land use committee is now led by Marqueece Harris-Dawson, a first-time councilman elected in 2015. The previous chair, Mr. Huizar, helped propel the downtown property boom with pro-development decisions. But his political career appears to be crumbling with the FBI raids on Nov. 7. (The affidavits backing the search warrants are under seal and the FBI has not given a reason for the searches. Mr. Huizar has declined to comment on the investigation.)

Back in the lobby of the 1948 Mirror building, workers at Uber Technologies Inc. come and go; the ride-sharing company is a new tenant Onni signed on after buying Times Mirror Square. The Times this summer moved to a building near the airport bought last year by the newspaper's new billionaire owner.

Above the lobby doors, in steel lettering, is the old journalism notation: -30-. In the past, that number marked the end of a newspaper story. Mr. Spector knows these buildings well. He talked about how Onni plans to restore the lobby of the 1935 Kaufmann building, with its large globe and murals on the rotunda walls. "You have to know the history, what happened here, to properly restore the existing buildings," he said.

To the preservationists, this is about the value of L.A.'s past as it builds its future. At Times Mirror Square, Ms. Cooper said the history is not divisible: "All three buildings are uniquely valuable."

Associated Graphic

Architect and historian Alan Hess, left, along with Kim Cooper and her husband, Richard Schave - seen in Los Angeles on Nov. 14 - are advocating to preserve the Times Mirror Square's Pereira building, a hard-to-love building the Los Angeles Times once called home.

PHOTOS BY PHILIP CHEUNG/THE GLOBE AND MAIL


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Vancouver-bound: Canadians exit Hong Kong as Beijing edges in
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Many ex-pats headed home fled city once before when it came under Chinese rule
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By NATHAN VANDERKLIPPE
  
  

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Monday, January 14, 2019 – Page A1

The sheen of opportunity and adventure that made Hong Kong into one of the world's great gateways - the City of Life, as it calls itself - has dulled for some as the cost of living rises and the grip of China tightens.

According to a recent survey, nearly a third of the Hong Kong population is thinking about leaving the city of 7.4 million. Canada, as it has in the past, is playing an outsize role in their search for an alternative; Hong Kong has boasted an estimated 300,000 Canadian passport holders, enough to rank the Asian financial centre as the equivalent of one of Canada's 20 most populous cities.

Many Hong Kong residents fled the island for Canada before it came under Chinese rule in 1997 - fearing Beijing's power. They later returned for jobs. Now, the current of human movement has once again shifted, moving back toward Canada. It is for some a third cross-Pacific move. They call themselves the "re-returnees." "People are thinking twice about staying in Hong Kong," said Eugene Ho, an entrepreneur who is president of the local University of British Columbia alumni chapter. It is holding a session on Tuesday to guide people through the process of moving back to Canada, from sorting through taxes to securing a mortgage and finding the right school for their kids.

A third of Hong Kong's population wants to leave, says a survey released by the Chinese University of Hong Kong earlier this month. Their top reasons were "too much political dispute" and social rifts, overcrowding and dissatisfaction with local political institutions. Fifty-one per cent of those between the ages of 18 and 30 want out. They cited Canada as their most desired destination. Canadian immigration data show that the number of people from Hong Kong applying for permanent residency in Canada increased by 50 per cent in 2016, to 1,360, and has remained at that elevated level.

What those figures do not count, however, are the people who already hold Canadian passports, and who are slipping back across the Pacific.

They are people such as Harjeet Grewal, 39, a Cantonese speaker who was born in Hong Kong but is disturbed by its changing political environment and influence from Beijing. "You have to be careful what you are saying and I don't want to live in that kind of climate for the long term," Ms. Grewal says.

John Luciw has his own reasons. Mr.Luciw, 51, a long-time Hong Kong resident who plays in a Tragically Hip cover band, runs a news site for expats and is now so done with the city's brutal cost pressures that, "I don't even know if I'm going to come back for a visit."

And 45-year-old Andrew Loo, a banker, decamped for Vancouver to escape a high-pressure education system in a city where he was once told his six-year-old daughter was "average at best" when she interviewed for a primary-school spot.

Mr. Loo embodies the shifting currents that have carried people to and from Hong Kong. Born in the city to a father in the shipping industry, his family moved to Vancouver when he was 10. They were, like many families, worried about what would happen to Hong Kong when it was returned to Chinese rule in 1997, an anxiety that prompted an extraordinary tide of emigration, particularly to Canada, which offered relative proximity and a welcoming environment. In 1994 alone, 48,000 people arrived from Hong Kong.

But when the worst fears about Beijing rule failed to materialize, the tide very quickly reversed course. Mr. Loo was among the droves who returned - a flock of 65,000 between 1996 and 2011, according to a South China Morning Post analysis.

In the summer of 2001, he and the woman who became his wife travelled to Hong Kong for the Dragon Boat Carnival.

Canadian-educated and a Cantonese speaker, he found himself in demand. "I had two job offers in a very short span of time," he said. Hong Kong, the land of opportunity, had hooked another young Canadian.

It's "a very easy place to get used to," he said. Taxes are low, jobs are relatively plenty, salaries can be high and domestic help inexpensive.

He married and had three children, building a comfortable career as a banker, with three nannies and a driver. But he began to think about Canada as his three children began to move through a fiercely competitive school system that, famously, interviews toddlers. "It's just ridiculous," Mr. Loo said, not to mention stressful - both for students and their parents living in the city.

He adds, "there's no such thing as work-life balance." He wasn't the only one raising questions. "Our friends are around the same age and their kids are the same.

And they're all thinking the same thing" - go to Canada. In 2017, Mr. Loo and his family moved back. His daughter was 10, the same age as Mr. Loo when he first moved to Canada.

There is "a bit of symmetry there," he says.

Others are coming behind them. Take Mr. Luciw, who arrived in Hong Kong in 1999 and dove into the thrills of being young and "wild and crazy" in the city. He became the general manager of AsiaXPAT.com, a news and discussion site for expatriates. But he himself is now keen to exit expat life. "As I've gotten older, this place has lost its lustre for me," he says.

He has two children, and "when you have kids here, it sucks. It's expensive. There's a lack of things to do. You may think it's a paradise, but it's not."

He's already sold his apartment, booked his tickets to Canada - after one last show with Phantom Power, his Hip cover band - and picked the minivan he intends to buy. He wants his kids to live in a house with a backyard, not a cramped apartment an elevator ride from the outdoors.

"I was watching them not have a childhood I think they deserved, that I can give them by being a Canadian citizen," he said.

Ms. Grewal, meanwhile, cites the changes in a city that is increasingly being brought under the thumb of political masters in Beijing. Chinese security services have seized people from the city, while new bridge and rail links have more deeply enmeshed Hong Kong with mainland China. Activists for democracy and independence have been banned from political participation, and a proposed new rule outlaws insults to the Chinese national anthem.

"I just felt constricted," Ms. Grewal says.

When Keelan Chapman moved back to Hong Kong three years ago, he didn't expect to find himself with a front-row seat to a Canadian exodus.

Mr. Chapman runs the Canadian Real Estate Investment Centre Hong Kong, a company he created three years ago to help people in Asia buy property in Canada. He figured his clients - who meet him in Hong Kong's skyscraper forests of buzzy coffee shops and swish boardrooms - would be investors moving cash into Vancouver's exuberant housing market.

What he has found instead is people looking to buy homes for themselves.

"My main clients in Hong Kong tend to be Canadians looking to return to Canada," he says.

Hong Kong's participation in China's economic rise has helped make the city wealthy. But it has also made Mandarin an increasingly important language for those in business and banking, tilting advantage toward job seekers from mainland China. Indeed, that may be exactly how Beijing wants it, suggests David Zweig, a Canadian who is a scholar at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, where he has researched the movements of Chinese students.

China "may be very glad to have a new cohort of young college graduates come down here, graduate and then work here - and replace the Hong Kongers," he said.

At the same time, at least some of those loading children and possessions on planes bound for Canada are being replaced by younger people winging their way into Hong Kong. Some of what drew Mr. Loo to Hong Kong two decades ago remains true today. Jobs are available, taxes are low and salaries can be high.

Kale Law, 26, was born in Hong Kong but moved to Canada with his mother in 1997. They came back to Hong Kong, where he attended high school, before he returned to Canada for university. Now, he's back in Hong Kong again, working at a small content company with an office in a warehouse converted into a co-working space.

"Hong Kong seems to be the crown jewel for a lot of young professionals wanting to hustle," he says. Even Ms. Grewal may come back. She has yet to find a job in Canada, while she has a half-dozen offers in Hong Kong. She also finds herself chafing at Vancouver's slower pace. "It just doesn't fulfill me the same way Hong Kong does," she says.

Still, Mr. Law isn't sure how long he can last. He figures he will stay until he is 30, at which point he, too, may join the march out of the city - alongside his mother and father.

"A lot of the older generation, which is my parents' generation, they can't wait to get out of Hong Kong," he said.

Associated Graphic

Andrew Loo, who had a career in Hong Kong as a banker, began to think about Canada as his three children moved through a famously competitive school system that interviews toddlers. He and his wife Jobina moved their family back to Canada in 2017.

BEN NELMS/THE GLOBE & MAIL

Andrew Loo, right, a banker who decamped for Vancouver partly to escape Hong Kong's high-pressure education system, walks on Ambleside beach in Vancouver on Saturday with his wife, Jobina, their three children and dog.

BEN NELMS/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Alex, son of long-time Hong Kong resident John Luciw, looks out the window of the family's apartment on Sunday. Mr. Luciw and his family are leaving the urban centre, and he says he doesn't 'even know if I'm going to come back for a visit.'

BEN MARANS/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

John Luciw sits with his wife, Connie, and their two children, Claire and Alex, in their Hong Kong apartment on Sunday. Mr. Luciw arrived in Hong Kong in 1999 and became the general manager of a news and discussion site for expatriates. 'When you have kids here, it sucks. It's expensive. There's a lack of things to do. You may think it's a paradise, but it's not,' Mr. Luciw says of Hong Kong.

BEN MARANS/THE GLOBE AND MAIL


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A famous international murder trial, now forgotten
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A recent obituary spoke kindly of Cyril Belshaw, but in 1979, the case of his wife's death gripped observers everywhere
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By MARCUS GEE
  
  

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Saturday, January 12, 2019 – Page A16

At the start of December, 2018, a notice appeared in the obituary columns of Canadian newspapers for Cyril Belshaw, a noted professor who taught at the University of British Columbia. Prof. Belshaw had died on Nov. 20, just short of his 97th birthday.

The notice listed his many accomplishments as an "international academic, observer and writer." It described him as a kind and generous man who "delighted in good food, travel, politics, gardening, music and his great passion, tennis." It listed those he left: his daughter, his son, his grandchildren. What it failed to mention was that four decades earlier he had been arrested, jailed and put on trial in Switzerland, charged with murdering his wife. The case caused a sensation in Vancouver. Reporters came from all over to cover the trial in the picturesque Swiss town of Aigle. I was one of them.

Prof. Belshaw and his wife Betty were well-known figures in the UBC community. He was an anthropologist and she taught English. The Swiss court described her as "expansive, warm and sensitive in all her personal relations, very attached to principles, rather dependent, and particularly faithful to her husband."

He was "intelligent, ambitious, proud, calm."

In January, 1979, while the couple was spending time in Europe on sabbatical, Prof. Belshaw called home with some distressing news: Betty had gone missing.

She was doing research at the Bibliothèque nationale in Paris about the short-story writer Katherine Mansfield, who, like the Belshaws, was from New Zealand. By his account, the couple parted ways at a Metro station one morning. She set off for the library. They planned to meet later for an aperitif at the Galeries Lafayette, the famous department store. She never appeared.

He reported her disappearance to the police, told his adult son and daughter back in Vancouver and returned to Switzerland, where the couple had rented a place at a fashionable ski resort. All of UBC wondered: What on earth could have happened to Betty?

Then, on March 28, the Swiss police made a gruesome discovery: a woman's naked, badly decomposed body, wrapped in three plastic bags, abandoned on a forested slope a short drive from the Belshaw rental. Police asked Prof. Belshaw for the address of his wife's dentist so they could get her dental records, in case the body was hers. He told them not to worry - he would get hold of the records himself. He wrote to the dentist in Vancouver, saying that the authorities had been searching for Mrs. Belshaw and might need her charts.

At this point, the professor made the mistake that would see him stand trial for her murder.

When the charts arrived, he carefully altered them, covering some of Mrs. Belshaw's dental work with white ink and drawing in other, imaginary work. Then he gave photocopies to the police.

Suspicious investigators obtained the original, undoctored records and identified the body as Mrs.

Belshaw's. Prof. Belshaw then admitted to doctoring the records "on impulse," saying he could not face the "psychological trauma" of identifying his wife's remains without his family by his side.

The authorities were not buying it. A pair of Swiss cops came to interrogate him after he had returned to Vancouver. When he unwisely decided to travel to a conference in Paris, police met the plane and placed him under arrest.

A year later, as his trial approached, I was travelling in Italy with my future wife. We had both studied at UBC. Her father had been an English professor there and her parents knew the Belshaws. She had once been hired to serve at a dinner party at their house.

I sent a telegram to The Province, the Vancouver paper where I had worked as a part-time and summer reporter through university. Did they want me to cover the trial? We called the courthouse. Officials told us that the trial would take place over three days in December, concluding on a Friday. With Swiss precision, the court would pronounce a verdict the following Monday, Dec. 8, 1980, at 5 p.m.

The snow-draped FrenchSwiss town of Aigle was all abuzz when we arrived by train from nearby Geneva. Quiet, conservative, upright, it had never seen anything quite like this: a distinguished Canadian professor accused of killing his wife and dumping her body in the forest.

French, German, Canadian and Swiss reporters lined up for seats in the wood-panelled courtroom in the Hôtel de Ville on the town square. Joining us was an author of mystery novels, Ellen Godfrey, whose 1981 non-fiction book on the Belshaw affair, By Reason of Doubt, I have drawn on here to bolster my notes and memories.

The trial got underway just as scheduled at 9:15 a.m. on Dec. 3.

The tribunal assembled to hear the case was made up of stolid Swiss burghers straight out of central casting - three judges and six jurors, all of them, of course, men. Presiding over the proceedings from a high bench was the president of the tribunal, JeanPierre Guignard, a striking figure with a sweeping mane of hair.

One of things about the trial that surprised us was how he jumped in to question and challenge the defendant, making no attempt at the impartiality expected of Canadian judges. At one point, he demanded in a voice filled with anger how Prof. Belshaw explained the fact that he reported his wife missing in Paris and yet she turned up in Switzerland, "wrapped in garbage bags and thrown away like a piece of garbage."

Hour by hour, Justice Guignard and prosecutor Willy Heim hammered away at Prof. Belshaw and his tale of his wife's disappearance. Middle-aged tourists don't usually vanish into thin air on the streets of Paris. If the Belshaws had really made a trip to Paris, why had no one seen her either there or on stops that Prof.

Belshaw made on the way from Switzerland to Paris? Why would an innocent man doctor his missing wife's dental records?

Wouldn't he want to know whether the body found by the road was hers? How, demanded Mr. Heim, could he bear the idea that it might have been Mrs. Belshaw's corpse lying there "like a piece of putrefying meat."

The prosecution had another arrow in its quiver: a possible motive. The trial was told that in July, 1979, Vancouver police found a couple parked on the university campus in a red sports car. When a policeman approached, he observed the pair in what the court demurely called "an equivocal position." It transpired that Prof.

Belshaw was having an affair with a married woman. In fact, she visited him in Switzerland and lived with him there quite openly before Mrs. Belshaw arrived. Prof.

Belshaw admitted the affair, but said the idea he would have sex in a car was simply "disgusting." He told the court to keep in mind that his wife was not an intolerant woman and "didn't attach too much importance to the physical act."

But as suspicious as Prof.

Belshaw's actions seemed, the prosecution was holding a weak hand. They had no witnesses, no murder weapon and, in the time before the rise of DNA testing, no physical evidence to link the professor to his wife's death. They certainly had no confession. "I had nothing to do with the loss of my wife," Prof. Belshaw proclaimed, thumping his hand on the table where he sat facing the jury. He said he was in anguish after her disappearance, seeing "all the beauty of the countryside without Betty."

His family and friends backed him up. Colleagues testified to his good character and the strength of his bond with his wife. His daughter Diana, an actress, gave emotional testimony that had the normally stone-faced jurors wiping away tears. She called her father a reserved, affectionate man who loved his wife. When asked if he could have committed murder, she replied: "Absolutely not."

Prof. Belshaw had a top-notch defence team made up of JeanFélix Paschoud, who was the lawyer for British author Graham Greene, and Eric Stoudmann, an elegant, often flamboyant figure in flowing lawyer's robes. Mr.

Stoudmann mercilessly mocked the prosecution's case, calling it a "total fabrication." In the absence of material evidence, he said, "we don't know if she was killed, nor how she was killed, nor when she was killed, nor where she was killed." In any event, he said, how could a five-foot, six-inch man carry his dead wife from their home to his car, scaling a wall of snow like an alpinist. "Messieurs," he said to the judges and jury, "look at those little hands."

The court was as hushed as a chapel when Justice Guignard began reading the verdict on Dec 8.

As he totted up the damning evidence - the affair, the falsification of the dental records, the lack of any proof that Mrs. Belshaw had even been in Paris - it was looking bad for the 59-year-old professor.

But in the end, the court decided it could not convict him, despite his "deceptive and morally shocking actions." By reason of "very light doubt" - and Justice Guignard stressed the "very" - it ordered the immediate release of the defendant.

Even if the verdict struck in the judge's craw, it was not hard to understand. The Swiss court system is different than ours, but defendants still enjoy (as Justice Guignard put it) "the presumption of innocence from which every accused benefits." A defendant cannot be convicted simply because his version of events seems suspect; it's up to the prosecution, not the accused, to make its case. An accused cannot be convicted of murder for deceiving the police. An accused must be proved guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, as in Canadian courts.

If that means that some defendants walk free despite our suspicions, it is the price we pay.

Prof. Belshaw returned to Vancouver and continued teaching at UBC. Although his death notice overlooked the dramatic events in Switzerland all those years ago, it did make brief reference to Mrs. Belshaw, his partner of 37 years. When he did his early field work in places like Fiji, New Guinea and northern British Columbia, it said, "he was supported, as in life, by his wife, Betty."

Associated Graphic

Above: UBC professor Cyril Belshaw, left, and his wife, Betty Belshaw, as published in The Globe and Mail in December, 1980. Left: Mr. Belshaw, centre, shakes hands with his police guard during his murder trial in Switzerland. The professor was eventually acquitted because of a lack of evidence.

ERIC STOUDMANN /ASSOCIATED PRESS/VATERLAUS


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New tax, delayed impact
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B.C.'s revamped provincial school tax is drawing criticism
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By KERRY GOLD
  
  

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Friday, January 11, 2019 – Page H3

VANCOUVER -- Residents of B.C. whose homes are affected by the new provincial school tax won't feel the pain until they receive their property-tax notices in the summer, says a local tax agent who has long been protesting the tax.

Paul Sullivan predicts a host of appeals and greater outrage once the new measure finally takes effect.

"It's not until the July tax bill that we will feel it," says Mr. Sullivan, senior partner and head of the tax division at consulting firm Burgess, Cawley, Sullivan and Associates. "It's only after the Jan. 31 deadline to appeal that people will realize how egregious this tax is."

The new tax targets homes valued at more than $3-million. It is one of a host of tax measures announced by British Columbia's NDP government last year that have turned Vancouver's crazy ride of a real estate market into a far quieter, more balanced one - a change most residents, and realtors, are embracing. It is the slowdown that many people wanted to see, particularly those shut out of the housing market.

However, while most agree that the issue of speculative buying was driving prices and needed to be addressed, they feel that the school tax unfairly ensnares local residents who have made their lives here.

English teacher Mary Lavin believes Vancouverites are shouldering too much of the burden for an unaffordability crisis that was caused by decades of government policy aimed at courting foreign-investment dollars.

Government should fix the problem it created, says Ms. Lavin, who's owned her townhouse on Point Grey Road for years. She says her home will not be hit by the new tax this year, but she knows it's a matter of time.

"We had nothing to do with the policies; we had nothing to do with prices going up or down, and nothing to do with the foreign investment that government courted going back 30 years," she says. "Now, we are the ones being targeted, in a discriminatory fashion. We're the perceived rich. And we've done nothing except live our lives and contribute productively to the economy. It's not only wrong, but it's insulting and hurtful. That's where you get the divisiveness between the haves and havenots."

A Ministry of Finance media representative said in an e-mail that the new tax is a progressive version of a pre-existing school tax, and that only 2 per cent of property owners in B.C. are affected. But Mr. Sullivan says more than 10 per cent of Vancouver residents will have to pay the tax.

Last year, Mr. Sullivan found that more than 21,000 properties qualified for the tax, with an average 33-per-cent increase in property taxes. The NDP projected about $250-million in revenue from the school tax over three years, and despite its name, the money generated will go into general revenues.

Mr. Sullivan is also irked by the vague wording on recent assessments he's seen, which say the school tax "may be payable," without giving a specific amount.

"They didn't have the guts to state specifically that it does apply to you, and how much it is.

What are they doing?" Mr. Sullivan represents individuals, developers and businesses who want to appeal their property assessments. He has also consulted for the city. He argues that the new school tax unfairly targets a group of homeowners who can't necessarily pay hefty new taxes on properties they purchased decades ago.

In Vancouver, the school tax is probably the most contentious of all the new tax measures introduced in the provincial government's 2018 budget. It has created a divide between those who are property rich and those who view those lucky homeowners as greedy. The new speculation tax on homes that are left empty for six months of the year, and the increased foreign-buyer tax of 20 per cent, aren't inspiring anything close to the wrath of the school tax.

Not surprisingly, the loudest opposition is coming from the city's tony west side and the city of West Vancouver, as well as expensive areas such as South Surrey. For the many people who can't afford a down payment on a home, the plight of the high-end homeowner hasn't garnered much sympathy. A poll by Research Co. last year showed that 61 per cent of respondents were for the tax, but 51 per cent were against it if applied to homes valued at less than $2-million.

But taxes need to be fair and affordable, Ms. Lavin argues. People will argue that if she can't afford the tax, she should sell her house and move. And Mr. Sullivan counters that pushing a longtime member of the community out of their home isn't the answer, because the person who buys that home will be a person with greater wealth.

Those in favour of the tax have argued that homeowners can defer their taxes if they are older than 55, and although their debt will go up each year, so, too, will the value of their home.

But that plan isn't as workable if the homeowner needs a reverse mortgage or refinancing down the road, says developer and west-side homeowner Michael Geller, who defers his own property taxes.

"Should you decide to take out a home-equity loan, you cannot do that as easily if you have a lien against your house from the government, and that's effectively what you have when you defer your taxes," he says. "The second thing is, you cannot defer your taxes if you are living on leased land. I'm hearing all sorts of negatives."

West-side realtor Bryan Yan says other government measures have already achieved the goal of slowing the market.

"The speculative buyer is gone," he says. "The foreignbuyer tax and the mortgage stress test hurt a lot, those two together.

Now, the local investors are not seeing the foreigners coming to buy. They are saying, 'It's difficult for me to borrow money now.' "So I think it's not necessary, and I think the school tax is a Pandora's Box, because the government is going to keep adding different types of taxes. Government shouldn't have the power to tax unrealized gains of an asset."

Mr. Yan also thinks the tax is inaccurate because it's going to be based on assessments done in July, 2018, and those are already out of date with the market slowdown, which changes month to month.

Realtor Patricia Houlihan believes prices in Vancouver have fallen further than the nearly 5 per cent reported recently by the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver.

"If you look at West Van, for example, or [Kitsilano], or even East Van or North Van, they are down way more than that - and we don't even know how far down because so few homes are selling we can't get an accurate number. Homes that were $4-million a year or year and a half ago, are selling now for $1million less - that's a 25-per-cent drop."

Ms. Lavin and others believe that as prices fall and fewer homes qualify, the government could lower the qualifying threshold. This is a commonly heard concern from those in the anti-tax group. In an e-mail, the Ministry of Finance said government would not lower the threshold and that such claims were part of a partisan effort to spread misinformation. Ms. Lavin says she is non-partisan on the issue.

"I think an investigation should be done into government practices in the past," she says.

"It's our government who should be held accountable. It's not fair to dump the problem onto the homeowner."

Raymond Wong is a member of Housing Action for Local Taxpayers, which lobbies government to take action against foreign property-buying in the Lower Mainland. They argue that foreign speculation has driven up prices and created a housing crisis for local income-earners. Mr.

Wong is currently working on a petition against money laundering in the region. He is in favour of the province's tax measures, particularly the foreign-buyer tax and the speculation tax. However, he says the school tax needs adjustment.

"The tax is not perfect. I understand what the government is trying to do, but it needs to be tweaked in a way that they should go after foreign buyers, satellite families and non-residents.

"There are people who say, 'Let's stick it to the homeowner.

They've made all this money because their equity has grown.' But we don't want to see the school tax destroy communities.

"I feel perhaps that maybe the tax should be tweaked so that if you bought at $3-million or more, then you get hit with the school tax. I think the benefit to [the tax measures] is to bring house prices down to make it a less attractive place for foreign investment to come in. But I think the government didn't do enough study on it. People are getting hurt by this tax."

But over all, Mr. Wong is pleased with the effect of the government's effort to soften the market. For the first time in a long time, there is hope that housing might return to affordable levels, he says.

"I've talked to a lot of my colleagues, and they are hoping people will get into the market; firsttime buyers. I believe that in the long term, the condo market will start dropping in price. Retired people could move down or choose to stay, and growing families could move up the property ladder. It would be great.

"Every time I go by [the west side], the place is hollowing out.

You need to do something to bring down those property values so that people can move up."

Associated Graphic

Property assessments have started arriving in mailboxes across B.C. as the government brought in a new school tax targeting homeowners with properties assessed at more than $3-million, a figure that captures much of the real estate on Vancouver's west side.

KERRY GOLD/THE GLOBE AND MAIL


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A contested pipeline tests the landscape of Indigenous law - who controls the land?
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Pipeline owners say they have consent, but Wet'suwet'en leaders are divided
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By JUSTINE HUNTER, BRENT JANG, WENDY STUECK, SHAWN MCCARTHY
  
  

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Saturday, January 12, 2019 – Page A12

With members of the Wet'suwet'en First Nation blockading a pipeline project on their traditional lands, Na'moks was standing by a crackling campfire, next to an RCMP checkpoint, drawing in the snow with his right boot.

The hereditary chief of the Tsayu clan made a small circle to represent the authority of elected band councils within reserves.

Outside that circle, he explained, is where Wet'suwet'en clans wield power over a vast territory.

"We are hereditary chiefs," he said, "and we have control of this land."

The temporary checkpoint was set up earlier this week in a remote area of the B.C. Interior as things got tense, with RCMP officers arresting 14 protesters on Monday at a blockade erected last month along a logging road.

The road leads to the Unist'ot'en camp on the Morice River bridge, where hereditary leaders were preventing construction workers from TransCanada Corp.'s Coastal GasLink pipeline project from passing. By Friday, the barriers were coming down, after the protesters agreed to comply with an interim court injunction to grant workers temporary access to the area. The way forward for the project, however, remains uncertain.

The pipeline is a vital piece of infrastructure for the launch of British Columbia's liquefied-natural-gas sector, supplying the planned $40-billion LNG Canada project - the largest private investment in the province's history. Almost a third of the proposed pipeline route crosses the territory to which the Wet'suwet'en maintain aboriginal rights and title.

Coastal GasLink has signed deals with First Nations all along the 670-kilometre route, including the elected chiefs of the Wet'suwet'en, who say the agreements will deliver economic benefits to their communities.

For both the provincial and federal governments - which have made solemn commitments to respect Indigenous rights and title - the agreements meant the company had secured sufficient consent for the project.

But who speaks for the Wet'suwet'en people?

Under Canadian law, the elected chiefs have authority over the reserves created by the Crown.

But authority over the 22,000 square kilometres of traditional Wet'suwet'en territory involves a matrilineal system of 13 unique houses, five clans and 38 house territories. Under that system, Na'moks, who belongs to the Beaver house under the Tsayu clan, is one of the hereditary leaders obligated to manage how those lands and resources are used.

The project has sown deep divisions and put a spotlight on the conflict between those two systems of leadership - one ancient, passed down through oral tradition, the other established and codified by federal law. It has demonstrated the messy but necessary processes resource companies and governments must confront when pursuing projects in British Columbia.

And it has forced Indigenous groups to face the tensions within their own communities - the painful trade-offs between economic development and ancient obligations of land stewardship.

Chief Jackie Thomas, the elected chief of the Saik'uz First Nation, said she worked hard on behalf of her community to secure a deal and the benefits that will come as a result of construction.

"We went through this long process in our community and we ensured that our concerns and worries were resolved. We had naysayers - they exist in all communities - but we sorted it out. I personally worked hard for this and I was happy to see a final investment decision reached."

But she said the politicians and the company would have been wiser to deal directly with the hereditary chiefs as well.

"It would help if Premier [John] Horgan and Prime Minister [Justin] Trudeau would go to the feast house at Wet'suwet'en, talk to the hereditary chiefs and give some serious attention to this matter," she said. "Let's dedicate some time and resource to see this through."

Mr. Trudeau, responding to heated questions about his government's support for the pipeline at a town-hall meeting this week, said it is up to the Wet'suwet'en people to sort out who represents them.

"It's not for the federal government to decide who speaks for you," he said. "My job is to work with all of you so that you are taking back control of your land, your future, your people, your destiny. ... And it's difficult."

Nowhere in Canada are the lines of authority more blurred than in B.C., where major resource developers have stumbled time and again over how to consult and win support from Indigenous peoples for their projects. The province is home to 203 Indian Act bands and most of the land remains subject to aboriginal claims.

Mr. Horgan met with the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs on Aug. 31 in Smithers, hoping to find a way to resolve the brewing conflict at the Unist'ot'en camp.

He left without a resolution and concluded that the project had enough Indigenous support despite the opposition.

"The challenge for government, federal and provincial, is determining how we bring together these historic band councils modelled with, as I understand it, the emerging hereditary model that's very much manifesting itself in Wet'suwet'en territory," the Premier told reporters at a news conference on Wednesday, after the arrests triggered rallies across the country. (He later clarified that he meant to say "re-emerging.") Val Napoleon, an influential Indigenous scholar who holds the Law Foundation research chair at the University of Victoria's aboriginal justice and governance program, said the Premier has it all backward: Elected band councils are, in the time of the Wet'suwet'en, a new invention. The community has been governed under the hereditary model, she said, "since the land was forming," with a complete set of laws that is up to the task of resolving internal disputes and providing binding decisions.

She said there is a way forward, but the federal and provincial governments need to make a substantial commitment to build a bridge between Indigenous law and Canadian law.

"Indigenous legal orders need support to rebuild and restate legitimate processes so that when a decision is made, people will uphold it even if they don't get their own way. That's the legitimacy that's required," she said.

"And right now, that's not happening."

For Canada's resource industry, doing business in the vast areas of British Columbia where land claims have never been settled, this complexity can be daunting and discouraging.

Susannah Pierce, director of external relations for LNG Canada, welcomed the truce negotiated late last week, but in a socialmedia post, she said: "While this is good news, we remain concerned the agreement only pertains to a temporary injunction and only specific activities - not the full construction of the pipeline. In fact, social media posts by the Unist'ot'en indicate that the fight has only just begun."

This week's protests drew international attention and sparked discussions about the differences between the Wet'suwet'en system of hereditary chiefs and those elected under the Indian Act.

But that distinction shouldn't have come as a surprise. Hereditary Wet'suwet'en leaders have been claiming ownership of their traditional territory for decades, most notably in Delgamuukw v.

British Columbia. In that case, launched in 1984, Gitxsan and Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs claimed ownership of 58,000 square kilometres of territory. In a landmark 1997 ruling, the Supreme Court of Canada confirmed that Indigenous peoples have valid claims to ancestral lands that were never ceded by treaty.

"For over 21 years, the governments of Canada and B.C. and any lawyer who has done any level of aboriginal law would understand that when you're dealing with the Wet'suwet'en people ... on traditional territory, you're talking about a system of hereditary chiefs," said Peter Grant, a veteran lawyer who represented the plaintiffs in Delgamuukw, in a recent interview.

Western Canadian energy companies have a long history of engaging with Indigenous communities and understand that there are differing opinions and potential opposition even after agreements have been signed, said Brian McGuigan, manager of Indigenous relations for the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers.

"This is certainly not the first time a company has struck an agreement with elected officials and another part of the community says, 'Well, hang on a minute, we have something else to say about this,'" he said.

It's an issue that must be resolved within Indigenous communities, but governments are grappling with it, too, especially as both B.C. and Ottawa are preparing to enact the principles of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which stipulates that they must give consent to industrial development on their traditional territories. By endorsing the declaration, the federal government has said it will aim to secure Indigenous consent on projects but does not guarantee it.

There is a parallel process as well in defining Indigenous selfgovernance.

Mr. Trudeau, who made reconciliation with Indigenous communities a major theme of his government, has condemned the Indian Act - under which elected band councils were established - as a relic of the colonial past and has encouraged First Nations to pursue their own self-government models. But that process has a long way to go.

For the Wet'suwet'en who oppose the pipeline, the deals signed between the pipeline's proponents and elected band councils mean little. Molly Wickham, a spokeswoman for the blockade along the logging road and one of the 14 people arrested on Monday, insisted the pipeline will "absolutely not" be built.

"This is far from over," she said. "This isn't just about the pipeline, this isn't just about this one project. This is about how our people, and our governance system, has been ignored, diminished and attacked - and how we are done with that."

Associated Graphic

JOHN SOPINSKI/THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: WETSUWETEN.COM

Protesters are seen at an Unist'ot'en camp near Houston, B.C., on Wednesday. By Friday, the barriers were coming down, after the protesters agreed to comply with an interim court injunction to grant TransCanada workers temporary access to the area. The way forward for the Coastal GasLink pipeline project, however, remains uncertain. JIMMY JEONG/THE GLOBE AND MAIL


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Back in the game
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The Toltecs played it, and so did the Aztecs, the Olmecs and the Mayans. Now the game of ulama is enjoying a resurgence in Mexico as participants connect with their Indigenous past
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By STEPHANIE NOLEN
  
  

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Thursday, January 17, 2019 – Page A1

TEOTIHUACAN, MEXICO -- Brenda Solano lunged and dived for the ball near the end of an ulama game last week. She hit the dirt and shoved her hip forward, the five-kilogram rubber ball catching her at the ribs. She let out an audible oof - but kept the ball out of her end of the court.

"You have to get hit to learn," she said cheerily when she limped off the grass a few minutes later. Ms. Solano, a 22-year-old student of anthropology, summoned a stoic air. "It's about feeling Mexican."

Her trainer, Arturo Sanchez, gave an encouraging nod.

He is always on the lookout for recruits. They were playing this game - on a newly built court for an ancient sport in a town near the Mexican capital - as a demonstration during a community festival, hoping to entice new players. "A lot of people come once and they play and then they say, 'No, thanks,'" said Mr. Sanchez, sounding equal parts contemptuous and puzzled. On the grass, his players rubbed their thighs, their arms, their hips, their heads: Even when you play ulama with skill, it means getting whacked with a ball a bit smaller than a volleyball with the weight and feel of a frozen turkey.

That may not sound tremendously appealing, but ulama has survived for at least 3,000 years. And today it is resurgent in Mexico as part of an interest in all things precolonial - in having, as Ms. Solano put it, a culture that is distinctive from the Spanish, and instead draws on the roots of the dozens of Indigenous cultures that were here before the conquest.

Archeologists have found courts for variations on ulama on sites ranging from Arizona down to Guatemala, and images that show the game being played 1,500 years BC. The Toltecs played it, and so did the Aztecs, the Olmecs and the Mayans. There were different variations, in which the ball - made with natural latex tapped out of trees - is struck with the forearm, the hip or clubs. It is either knocked through rings on the side of a narrow stone court, or driven from one end of a field to the other, over a goal line.

The point-scoring is wildly complex - in some versions, one side loses a point when the other gains, making it arduous for either one to get to a winning seven. In Teotihuacan, Ms. Solano and her compatriots played for three hours without anyone managing to score a point; games can last for days.

Ulama (this version of the name comes from Nahuatl, today the most widely spoken of Mexico's 70 Indigenous languages) was not, in its original conception, a game, but rather a religious ritual. There were typically between three and five players on a side - and in the great court at the pyramid at Chichen Itza, as many as 52 players may have occupied each side, said Mr. Sanchez, who is finishing his studies in archeology, specializing in the pre-Hispanic ball sports. The two sides represented spring and fall, day and night, life and death.

Teams played to settle disputes and decide shifts in power.

"Ulama had a political, economic and social role. It was a ritual, it had huge symbolic value, in that it had the whole cosmovision," said Ana Collado, who runs the Mexican Federation of Indigenous Sports. "And so it was a threat."

Recognizing its power, the Spanish colonizers immediately banned ulama, and made playing punishable by death. "So the game moved to the far south and the far north of the country, where the Spanish didn't see it," Mr. Sanchez said. Unable to build permanent courts with rings to shoot through (this Aztec style of the game that had spread with trade), players adopted a version played with a temporary court drawn in grass.

In the end, he said, just two families kept the game alive, in Sinaloa in the northwest, an area of little interest to the Spanish because of its relative lack of resources. The opening ceremony of the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City included a brief demonstration of ulama, and so did that of the 1986 World Cup. But in Sinaloa, the players were giving up: "The old guys don't want to play any more, and young guys didn't want to learn," Mr. Sanchez said. Rules and styles of the game were lost and just a handful of people were committed to preserving the heritage, he said.

Then, in the late 1990s, a tourist empresario from the Yucatan who was building a theme park wanted Mayan sports, and he hired a few of the last players from Sinaloa, bussed them across the country and dressed them in feathers and leather loincloths to appear appropriately "ancient Mayan." That sparked a small resurgence of interest in the game.

Mr. Sanchez had read about the historical game in his archeology studies, but nearly five years ago he learned that a few people still played. He travelled to the western state of Guerrero to see a game, and jumped at the chance to try. When he got back to the capital, he sought out Ms.

Collado and the Indigenous sports federation to try to learn more. He is committed to trying to revive a version of the game as close to the original as possible, and studies historic texts, such as those in the Vatican library, to analyze court structures and player positions.

Mr. Sanchez had a grandfather who was a member of the Mixtec nation, but does not identify as Indigenous. Neither do any of the 25 people he has recruited into a new ulama league in Mexico City. (The sport was traditionally played by men, but he has six women on his teams.) The pull of the game is not about feeling Indigenous, so much, he said, as a curiosity and passion for things that were Mexican before the Spanish conquest.

"We're very disconnected - as Indigenous people, we have been discriminated against, excluded and it creates a distance from the identity," Ms. Collado said. "But young people are going to build an identity through this game. They are going to build it through knowledge and fun and experience. They don't adopt a pure Indigenous identity, [but this is] theirs and it's Mexican and in that way, we'll make progress."

Some 16 million people in Mexico identified as Indigenous in the past census in 2010 - 14 per cent of the population; the number of people who describe themselves as Indigenous has risen in recent years (even as the number of those who speak an Indigenous language remains the same), suggesting that the level of stigma associated with "being Indio" may be declining.

The new President, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, has pledged a changed relationship with Mexico's first peoples, and in a break with tradition, he included Indigenous rituals from different first nations in his swearing-in in December. Ms. Collado said she was cautiously optimistic about the new administration; she hopes to see Indigenous sports included on school curriculums - "why do we teach football at school and not these?" - and with them a new pride in the identity.

As a teenager, Ms. Collado took up the Purepecha version of ulama - it's played at night, with the ball on fire, passed with racquets a bit like those used in lacrosse. She describes it as "dangerous but super fun."

Today, the game is played by teams at universities in the state of Michoacan and growing in popularity. But the risk, she said, is that the traditional games are "commercialized and deracinated" even as they are revived.

There is another ulama court at an Indigenous cultural centre called Xochicalli in the northern Mexico City neighbourhood of Azcapotzalco, where a group plays a couple of times a week and trains new players. "I play because it's a way to get to my culture, my roots," said Uriel Ordaz, 23.

He doesn't identify with a specific first nation, but as a Mexican, he said, this is his tradition. Tossing the ball back and forth between his palms in a way that belied its heft, he did not try to sugarcoat what it's like to start playing. "You can get elbow fractures, broken knee caps, skull fractures, kidney damage, a ripped anus."

Pardon?

"Yeah, that can happen."

The court in Teotihuacan was built by Ricardo Tonatiuh, 36, who runs a tour company. He has Mixtec grandparents on one side of his family and Toltec on the other, but grew up without the languages.

"I built the court for my children, so that they can do more than just read about their culture in books," he said. He has Mr.

Sanchez and his crew play there regularly, so that young people in his community see the sport.

"People don't think they have Indigenous identity, because their grandparents were abused just for speaking the language," he said. "But it's there in their hearts. And we can write a different story for the future."

Associated Graphic

Arturo Sanchez, right, who is finishing studies in archeology, trains others how to play ulama. PHOTOS BY ALICIA VERA/ THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Above: Local children take in a game of ulama in Teotihuacan last Saturday. The game's ball, right, is slightly smaller than a volleyball and is made with natural latex tapped out of trees - but it has the weight and feel of a frozen turkey.

Above: A figure of the Aztec deity Huehueteotl sits at a cultural centre in Teotihuacan, Mexico. The Aztecs played just one of many variations of the game.

Top, left: Ulama players take part in a game in Teotihuacan last Saturday. Ricardo Tonatiuh, 36, above, says he built the Teotihuacan court for his children, 'so that they can do more than just read about their culture in books.'

Above: Anthropology student Brenda Solano, 22, says part of the enjoyment of playing ulama is 'about feeling Mexican.' Even though it was banned by Spanish colonizers at one point, the sport has managed to survive for at least 3,000 years.


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China sentences Canadian to death on drug charges
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Trudeau expresses 'extreme concern,' says government will do all it can to halt execution
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By NATHAN VANDERKLIPPE
  
  

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Tuesday, January 15, 2019 – Page A1

DALIAN, CHINA -- A Chinese court has sentenced to death a Canadian man, calling him a "core member" of an organized international drug-trafficking conspiracy.

The actions of Robert Schellenberg brought an "extremely large" negative impact for China, the court in Dalian said Monday, issuing its verdict barely an hour after the trial concluded. The stunningly quick decision stands to heighten tensions between China and Canada, where critics say Mr. Schellenberg's case has become political following the December arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver at the request of U.S. authorities.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau strongly deplored China's decision to impose the death penalty, accusing China of acting arbitrarily and said the Canadian government will do all it can to convince Beijing not to execute Mr.

Schellenberg.

"It is of extreme concern to us as a government, as it should be, to all our international friends and allies that China has chosen to begin to arbitrarily apply the death penalty as it is in this case facing a Canadian," he told a news conference after unveiling a mini-cabinet shuffle.

The Prime Minister said his government strengthened a policy that requires Ottawa to "always intercede on behalf of Canadians facing the death penalty anywhere in the world."

Late Monday, the Canadian government updated its travel advisory to China, warning about the risk of arbitrary arrests.

"We encourage Canadians to exercise a high degree of caution in China due to the risk of arbitrary enforcement of local laws," Global Affairs said in announcing the new travel advisory.

Chinese police arrested Mr. Schellenberg while he was on board an airplane in Guangzhou, on Dec. 3, 2014. Nearly four years later, a court sentenced him to 15 years in prison as an accomplice to drug smuggling.

But on Dec. 29, he was ordered to face retrial, after prosecutors cited the emergence of new evidence, saying he was in fact involved in organized international drug trafficking, a crime whose maximum sentence is execution.

On Monday, the court rejected the defence by Mr. Schellenberg, who called the accusations against him "ridiculous," as he sought to rebuff new evidence brought against him during a proceeding in which he and his lawyers were frequently interrupted by a prosecutor and the chief judge.

Mr. Schellenberg, 36, showed little reaction to the decision, standing still and quietly acknowledging the verdict against him.

In the single-day trial, Mr. Schellenberg had described himself as a tourist caught up in a conspiracy to traffic drugs to Australia by a man he thought was his translator.

"I am not a drug smuggler. I am not a drug user. I am a normal person," he said. "I am innocent."

But that translator, Xu Qing, appeared in court as a witness, saying he himself was a pawn - an interpreter inadvertently embroiled in a plan by Mr.Schellenberg and others to pack 222 kilograms of methamphetamine into bags filled with plastic granules and hide them inside tires.

The court adopted the arguments made by prosecutors, who used phone and banking records to paint Mr. Schellenberg as part of a criminal conspiracy to move large sums of drugs.

The court did not provide a two-year reprieve, which can be used to avoid execution through good conduct.

It said instead that Mr. Schellenberg could appeal the verdict within 10 days.

Mr. Schellenberg has been convicted of drug-related offences before.

In April, 2012, he was sentenced by a B.C. Supreme Court judge to 16 months and 12 days in prison after pleading guilty to possessing cocaine and heroin for the purposes of trafficking. He had also pleaded guilty to simple possession of cannabis and methamphetamine.

In his sentencing, Justice Niell Brown acknowledged that Mr. Schellenberg struggled with addiction, but said that his future is in his hands.

"As your counsel has noted, drug trafficking is a very serious matter," Justice Brown told Mr. Schellenberg, then 29. "It is a scourge in our province and our country.

Your country deserves much better from you.

"You are in one of the best places in the whole world to live. You are not caught up in Libya or Syria; I do not have any evidence of any abuse in your childhood, and I accept that you have your own struggles to deal with, but you have to confront those.

"After all, it's not as if you are 18, and having to storm Juno Beach. Your basis is to overcome your addiction and reform your life. I hope this is the last time you appear in court."

Mr. Schellenberg's drug offences date back to 2003, when he was convicted of possession and received a six-month conditional sentence and six months' probation, according to court documents.

On Monday, Mr. Schellenberg's family asked Canadians to pray for his safe return.

"The Schellenberg family cares deeply about our Robert, who is being held under very difficult circumstances in China," the family said in a statement.

At least two Canadian citizens were executed in China for drug crimes during the time Guy Saint-Jacques was ambassador in Beijing. Chinese officials proceeded with the death penalty even after receiving personal pleas to President Xi Jinping from then-prime minister Stephen Harper. Governor-general David Johnston had also sought to intervene. China's response was that "drug trafficking is a very serious crime in China and we have to apply our laws to everyone," Mr. Saint-Jacques recalled.

Even so, "the unusual circumstances of this retrial and death sentence will reinforce suspicions in Ottawa that China is using the lives and liberty of Canadian citizens to strong-arm the Canadian government," said Roland Paris, a former foreignpolicy adviser to the Trudeau government who is now professor of international affairs at the University of Ottawa.

The court said Mr. Schellenberg's conduct in Dalian, where the methamphetamine was stored in a warehouse, was not typical of a tourist. Dalian is not a typical destination for first-time travellers to China.

But Mr. Schellenberg said he spent a week in Dalian visiting shopping malls, restaurants and nightclubs before being taken to a port warehouse and then to hardware stores, where he and Mr. Xu shopped for scissors, tape, flashlights and gloves - items the court said were intended as tools for repackaging drugs into tires.

On Monday, prosecutors revealed some of their new evidence against Mr. Schellenberg in a new indictment, which relied on the digital records to show, prosecutors said, his involvement in organizing and inspecting the drug shipment to Australia.

Among those pieces of evidence were money transfers between people found guilty of drug crimes elsewhere in China.

Prosecutors also introduced phone records that showed a single call between Mr.

Schellenberg's phone and a number they said belonged to Mai Qingxiang, a Chinese man who has been sentenced to death, with a two-year reprieve, on drug charges.

Mr. Schellenberg said he had not heard Mr. Mai's name until he read it in an indictment, while his lawyers disputed Mr. Mai's ownership of the phone in question.

But, prosecutors argued, the records show Mr. Schellenberg was a "principal criminal" in an international trafficking conspiracy. They relied heavily on testimony from Mr. Xu, who said Mr. Schellenberg had ordered him to do a series of tasks related to the methamphetamine smuggling, including buying tools, tires and a container and visiting a warehouse where the drugs were stored.

Mr. Schellenberg's response: Mr. Xu paid for each of those things, brought him to the warehouse to frame him and used the Canadian man's phone to call others to bolster that proof.

The financial and telephone records used as evidence "have nothing to do" with Mr. Schellenberg, his lawyer, Zhang Dongshuo, argued - and in fact, he said, Mr.

Schellenberg had not received a penny of benefit from his supposed participation in a drug-trafficking operation.

Mr. Zhang allowed that there could be suspicion of Mr. Schellenberg's involvement. But a court should convict solely on evidence, he said, asking the judges to consider deportation, particularly in light of the international attention directed at the case.

One report in state media said Mr. Schellenberg had also "requested no Canadian media be allowed in the court, and it seems he does not want people from his home country to hear about the case."

The Globe and Mail was allowed into a separate courtroom three kilometres away, where a live video stream broadcast the court proceedings. Several Japanese reporters were in the same room. Four officials from the Canadian embassy attended the trial.

The quick verdict against Mr. Schellenberg "will reflect badly on the criminal-justice system in China," said Sida Liu, an expert on Chinese law and criminal justice at the University of Toronto. But, he said, while a retrial death sentence verdict is uncommon, other aspects of the trial were not.

Prior to Monday, Canada had not updated its China travel advisory since October, when it warned Canadians to "exercise a high degree of caution" because of "isolated acts of violence, including bombings and protests."

It also cautioned that Chinese authorities may detain foreigners for up to six months without formally arresting them for behaviour and activities that Beijing considers a danger to national security.

Early in January, the United States updated its advisory, cautioning American citizens they could face arbitrary arrest amid heightened diplomatic tensions over the U.S. request that Canada extradite Ms.

Meng on allegations of possible fraud relating to U.S. sanctions against Iran.

With reports from Alexandra Li and Robert Fife in Ottawa and Andrea Woo in Vancouver

Associated Graphic

In Monday's one-day trial, Robert Schellenberg described himself as a tourist, caught up in a conspiracy to traffic drugs to Australia by a man he thought was his translator. Mr. Schellenberg, who has been convicted of drug-related offences in British Columbia, was ordered to face a retrial late last year after originally being sentenced to 15 years in prison.

AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Robert Schellenberg is seen in a family photo provided by his aunt. THE CANADIAN PRESS


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Ottawa's carbon taxes face a reckoning in 2019 - and the world is watching
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For those who believe carbon pricing is urgently needed to fight climate change, Canada will be one of the world's most important battlegrounds in 2019.

It's not just the strategy to reduce Canada's 1.6-per-cent share of global emissions at stake in this year's federal election, as Justin Trudeau's Liberals defend their decision to impose a carbon tax on provinces - as of now Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and New Brunswick - that don't meet new federal carbon-pricing requirements. (A levy on large industrial polluters took effect Jan.

1, and one on fossil fuels will begin in April.)

More than that, the campaign will serve as a case study about carbon taxation's political viability, sure to be noticed by politicians elsewhere considering similar measures.

Even if his shine may be wearing off at home, Mr. Trudeau is still seen by liberals through much of the world as a political star. If Andrew Scheer's Conservatives drive him from office after one term, with carbon-tax opposition playing a major role, he could join the likes of France's Emmanuel Macron as a cautionary tale about even the most skilled politicians not being able to sell this sort of policy.

Conversely, if the Liberals win another majority government, it will allow carbon-pricing advocates elsewhere to push back against arguments that it's politically toxic. And some of them, not least U.S. Democrats who will be participating in primaries shortly after Canada's election, will closely study Mr. Trudeau's implementation and communication, with an eye to what they can borrow.

Heading into the year, it's possible to get a sense of some of the open questions that will yet determine how this story plays out here - many of them up to the competing parties to answer, in the months ahead.

HOW MUCH WILL THE PARTIES ACTUALLY CAMPAIGN ON THIS ISSUE?

At this point, both leading federal parties seem to think the carbonpricing debate is a winner for them.

There is a view in Mr. Trudeau's camp that many Canadians will respect him for taking a principled risk, and disqualify Mr.

Scheer for his comparative unwillingness to take seriously an existential environmental challenge; the Liberals particularly hope it will help mobilize younger voters, key to their 2015 electoral success.

The Conservatives believe they'll be able to cast it as nothing more than a tax grab; they say their research shows their target voters prioritize economic and affordability concerns over the environment.

It's possible both parties will maintain that confidence. It's equally possible one of them will decide it's a political loser, and try to change the channel.

Especially in provinces (Quebec and British Columbia, among others) where Ottawa won't collect the tax owing to systems already in place, it could also easily become just one piece of a broader cost-of-living debate. Carbon pricing may be the biggest policy rift between the parties, but that doesn't necessarily mean it'll be top of mind come October.

CAN THE LIBERALS DRAW ENOUGH ATTENTION TO THEIR REBATES?

Key to the Liberals' hopes for avoiding the same fate as when Stéphane Dion campaigned on a carbon tax back in 2008 is their assurance that it won't take money out of Canadians' pockets. Almost all revenues, they promise, will be returned to families and individuals in the provinces they were collected - and because those revenues also come from businesses, most people will see a net gain.

It's a model that strikes some carbon-pricing advocates as so foolproof, it's already being cited internationally as a way to avoid backlash. But a potential catch is how the money will be returned.

While voters could think about the new tax every time they pay for fuel - especially in Ontario, where Doug Ford's government has mused about serving reminder through stickers on gas pumps - the rebates will be distributed through annual tax returns. So the returned revenue could go all but unnoticed among other calculations.

That's going to place a premium on communication around tax season. Voters in provinces where Ottawa will be collecting and returning money can expect lots of advertising drawing attention to the rebate.

WILL THE CONSERVATIVES' PLAN GIVE THEM COVER?

To date, the Liberals have been able to accuse the Conservatives of having no policy to reduce emissions. It's unlikely the governing party's rhetoric will change much after the Tories release a plan closer to the election.

While Mr. Scheer has said his approach will be "comprehensive," he has made clear it won't include carbon pricing. It may be in the same vein as Mr. Ford's, which includes scaled-back emissions-reductions targets, and fairly modest commitments to industrial regulation and cleantechnology funding.

How it lands will test the way Canadians currently see climatechange policy. If many target voters expect parties to be ambitious with their policies, the Conservatives will likely have a problem. If most people just want to know they're not climate-change deniers, any plan at all could suffice.

CAN THE LIBERALS GET THEIR TONE RIGHT?

Whenever he accuses the Conservative plan of being insufficient, Mr. Trudeau will face a delicate balancing act. His aim will be to present the lack of a serious emissions-reduction strategy as proof of unfitness for office, as the world runs out of time to stop climate change's impacts. But if he goes too far scorning anyone who doesn't view it as a top priority, he risks offending voters struggling to make ends meet and worried about the tax's effect.

CAN THE NDP (OR GREENS) CONVINCE VOTERS THE LIBERALS AREN'T DOING ENOUGH?

The level of taxation the Liberals have chosen may not be enough to meet the Paris Agreement commitment to reduce emissions to 30 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030. And Canada is certainly not on pace to achieve much greater reductions that the United Nations' climate change panel says are needed to avert environmental catastrophe.

The Conservatives will make that point, but it could be made more effectively by parties that want to do more rather than less.

Jagmeet Singh's New Democrats and Elizabeth May's Greens will argue that Mr. Trudeau's continued (if to Conservative eyes tepid) commitment to oil sands development undermines other emissions-fighting efforts. And they will argue those efforts don't go far enough, likely calling for more regulations and greater investment in clean technology.

The Liberals hope that if anything, such messaging will leave them looking like the responsible middle option. But if it gets traction, it could take away the policy's political upside.

WHAT IMPACT WILL THIRD PARTIES HAVE?

There are outside groups on either side of this debate with strong interest in its outcome.

Even under new political financing restrictions, there is opportunity for them to influence its outcome through digital-media advertising Look for some of the most visceral anti-carbon tax messaging to come from the conservative Ontario Proud, which did huge traffic on Facebook in last year's provincial election, and is now going national. Liberal-aligned groups may respond by painting Mr. Scheer as a threat to the planet's future. They could respectively have financial backing from corners of the resource sector and from environmental groups, or those interests could go it alone with their own third-party ads.

Whatever impact such efforts have, it's likely to be strongest in the first half of 2019, before preelection third-party spending limits kick in, and when the window to shape opinion on the new policy may be widest.

HOW WILL THE COURTROOM DRAMAS PLAY OUT?

In February, Saskatchewan's Court of Appeal will start hearing arguments in a constitutional challenge of the carbon tax brought forward by that province's government. In April, a similar case courtesy of Mr. Ford's government will begin in Ontario.

Neither verdict is likely to be the final judicial word on the matter, given the prospect of appeals.

But if the cases move swiftly enough for pre-election rulings, they will bolster or significantly weaken Mr. Trudeau's argument.

And even if they're slower, the proceedings - including interventions on both sides from other provinces' governments - could help frame the debate.

WHERE WILL GAS PRICES BE AT?

If gas prices remain as low as currently, drivers may not be aggrieved by the carbon tax adding a projected 4.42 cents a litre. But if unrelated market fluctuations cause prices to rise more sharply, there could be more outrage at the pumps.

Theoretically, the government should want that kind of reaction: Carbon pricing's purpose is to incentivize decisions, such as taking public transit rather than driving, that lower emissions.

In practice, the Liberals would likely prefer the tax's perceived impact initially be mild, with it gaining acceptance as Canadians realize the rebate balances it out, before the tax rate (and rebates) are increased - as opposed to it immediately receiving outsized blame for the cost-of-living squeeze.

WHAT KIND OF SUMMER WILL IT BE?

No, weather in one part of the world in a single season is not a responsible lens through which to view climate change happening globally over decades.

But it's human nature to feel urgency about things in plain sight. If next summer is like the last, with rampant wildfires and other disasters amid blazing-hot temperatures, the planet's future may be more on voters' minds than if it has been mild.

Rightly or not, that will combine with the many variables over which politicians have more control, to help determine Canadians' mindset about carbon pricing when they send a message to the rest of the world in the fall.

Associated Graphic

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks to news media and students at Humber College about Canada's federally imposed carbon tax in Toronto in October, 2018.

NATHAN DENETTE/THE CANADIAN PRESS


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Cannabis firms fall short on corporate governance
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Annual evaluation of Canada's boards finds nascent industry and other young stars of Toronto Stock Exchange have yet to institute a set of best practices
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By DAVID MILSTEAD
  
  

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Monday, November 26, 2018 – Page B1

After months of focusing on how to grow marijuana, publicly traded pot producers are facing a new problem: how to grow up.

One of the key next steps in the industry's evolution from outlaw business to legal industry is to bolster corporate governance - the set of best practices in how a board manages a corporation, and the disclosures that let investors know it's being done right.

It's a step that the Canadian cannabis companies - and other young stars of the Toronto Stock Exchange that posted returns outpacing most of the S&P/TSX composite index in the past year - have yet to take, according to the Report on Business's annual evaluation of Canada's corporate boards.

Canopy Growth Corp., in its second year in the rankings, has finished second from the bottom once again. It's trailed only by Aurora Cannabis Inc., coming in dead last in its first rating in Board Games. Aphria Inc. ranked 227th out of 237 companies. (For a full detailing of the three cannabis companies' scores, see sidebar.)

It is not just a matter particular to pot, however: Other young, highflying companies such as Canada Goose Inc. and Shopify Inc. dwell in the nether regions of the Board Games rankings. Canada Goose leads the index with a return of just less than 157 per cent through Friday, according to Standard & Poor's Global Market Intelligence, with Canopy second at 134 per cent. Aurora, Aphria and Shopify all rank in the top 25. Those who doubt the benefits of adopting corporate governance best practices will likely find support in seeing so many stellar stocks among the laggards. A longer-term view, however, suggests that you can say corporate governance doesn't matter - until it does.

"You might be able to get away with less than tier-one corporate governance for a while, but it would be unwise to wait for your stock price to drop and the market tell you your corporate governance practices aren't up to snuff, because now you're dealing with it in the vacuum of a crisis," says Rahul Bhardwaj, chief executive of the Institute of Corporate Directors. "That would not be wise."

Jennifer Longhurst of Davies Ward Phillips Vineberg LLP said many young companies need a greater awareness of what they should be doing. "Startups need to understand governance best practices and monitor the evolution in those practices," said the author of the law firm's annual Governance Insights survey of Canadian trends. "Like it or not, a junior company will be judged comparatively by those standards and in times of volatility, or declining performance, those are oftentimes the first areas of attack."

For an example of a company that faced a governance-based attack when its share price was low, look to Crescent Point Energy Corp., which dropped nearly 50 spots in this year's rankings, losing more points than any other company, as it battled an activist investor. Cation Capital Inc.

picked away at Crescent Point's compensation practices, pointing out a disconnect between its hefty executive-pay totals and its woeful stock return. (Board Games measures elements of pay disclosure and governance - for example, giving Crescent Point marks for holding a say-on-pay vote - but makes no judgment on whether shareholders are getting a good bang for their bucks.

They felt they were not, as Crescent Point lost say-on-pay votes in 2016 and 2018.)

Or, for an example of how even long-term share outperformance can offer no blank check on governance matters, look to Alimentation CoucheTard. The convenience-store chain could point to a stock price that had multiplied 650 times in its 30-year history when it asked shareholders in 2015 to extend the super-voting powers of its four founders, even as they gradually began to retire from the company. Facing shareholder pushback, it pulled the proposal.

Governance specialists say investors may be more tolerant of less-developed structures in young companies because management is focused on other matters. "Young company startups - the cannabis industry is an example of that - are grappling with a lot of challenges [compared with] companies that have evolved or matured," Ms.

Longhurst said.

Most young companies are not as cash-rich - good governance comes at a cost - and companies in the cannabis industry in particular had to worry about complying with a host of federal and provincial regulations on marketing, selling and packaging. "Investors of those young companies may not want management to be devoting both people time and money toward some of those processes given some of those other challenges they're focused on," Ms. Longhurst said.

Sleep Country Canada Holdings Inc. is an example of a young company that was preoccupied with those challenges after its 2015 initial public offering.

But it also saw its 2017 Board Games ranking - 234th out of 242 - and felt it had to do better. It added 26 points in 2018 and moved firmly into the middle of the pack.

"When we first went public, we were very focused on growth," chief financial officer Robert Masson said in an interview. "Going public and all the regulatory affairs that go with that is a big extra burden, and we run a pretty lean ship here. We don't even have internal [legal] counsel. So these are all things that add to the workload."

"But our board does care about corporate governance, and that's why we focused our attention on this," Mr. Masson said.

"And now that we have a foundation in place, it becomes less of a burden every year, and it's more just getting it done in the normal course of business."

One example of the changes Sleep Country made: CEO David Friesema owns stock in the company worth more than three times his base salary - but the company didn't have a formal policy requiring it, and Sleep Country didn't do a good job of explicitly disclosing his holdings.

"If we'd asked the board prior to this, 'Do you think it's a good idea the CEO holds stock?' they would have absolutely agreed with that," Mr. Masson said. "It was just a matter of writing it down."

Shengjun (Victor) Li, an executive vice-president at Kingsdale Advisors who specializes in governance issues, says as companies mature, they often attract more institutional investors, who are more attuned to, and more vocal about, governance, compared with retail investors.

"When their shareholder base changes, they have to listen ... eventually, they face the pressure of shareholders."

Still, it remains to be seen when and whether some of the other young companies that currently lag will become more proactive on governance matters.

"The corporate governance policies we implement don't tend to take external rankings into account," Canopy spokesman Jordan Sinclair e-mailed in response to a query about Canopy's low marks.

"We develop corporate governance policies to ensure we're managing risks and protecting shareholder value along with our corporate reputation."

A spokeswoman for Shopify Inc., the tech company that provides e-commerce services for small business, declined to comment for this story, while Aphria, Aurora Cannabis and Canada Goose failed to respond.

The cannabis companies have a number of governance weaknesses that can be corrected easily, by creating and disclosing processes for the board stock ownership and self-evaluation, for example. Or they can evolve in time, such as shifting the board mix away from early investors and founders to more independent directors. Aphria, for example, added four new independent directors at its annual meeting earlier this month.

Other governance issues are intentional, fundamental and long-term. Shopify and Canada Goose have dual-class share structures in which company insiders or private investors have multiple votes for each share they own, versus single votes for investors who buy common shares on the TSX. These structures de-couple economic ownership and voting rights, giving the holders of the supervoting shares more influence than their investment might otherwise warrant.

Dual-share structures have long been a feature in corporate Canada, given the number of family-controlled companies such as the Desmarais' Power Corp., or Bombardier. The newest Canadian dual-class companies, however, may be taking their cue from U.S. tech giants Google parent Alphabet Inc. and Facebook Inc., whose structures are more about founder control than family control.

Canada's institutional investors have largely expressed misgivings about dual-class structures, but have needed to tolerate them in order to invest in as wide a range of domestic stocks as possible.

The Canadian Coalition for Good Governance, in a 2013 policy statement on the issue, noted "there is not unanimity among CCGG members as to the governance principles which should apply to [dual-class share] companies in Canada" - something still true, says the group's executive director, Catherine McCall. "Institutional shareholders continue to buy them, in spite of some of them having objections in principle. There's not just one view on it."

That may give Shopify and Canada Goose some cover, and the cannabis companies more time to change their practices.

There will always be, however, institutional shareholders such as the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board, who treat good governance as a requirement for investment.

If you don't adopt those principles, CEO Mark Machin said, "the chances are you're going to underperform financially and economically. It's not a tradeoff."

Associated Graphic

ILLUSTRATION BY DAVE MURRAY

Cannabis plants grow at a medical marijuana facility near Cremona, Alta., on Nov. 12. JEFF MCINTOSH/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Wednesday, January 09, 2019

Correction

A Nov. 26 Report on Business feature on corporate governance, called Board Games, included incorrect marking information for Finning International Inc., which received a mark of 91 but should have scored 93 out of 100, tying for 18th place in the ranking.


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HEAD OFFICE IS WHERE THE HEART IS
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When multinationals pull up stakes in Canada, it can rock the economy. But losing executive influence in homegrown companies can tear at the national fabric
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By MATTHEW BELLAMY
  
  

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Associate professor of history at Carleton University in Ottawa and author of Profiting the Crown: Canada's Polymer Corporation

When General Motors announced in late November that it would be closing its plant in Oshawa, Ont., the outrage was immediate - and perfectly understandable. Here was a strategic move on the part of a multinational company, tearing out roots and slashing the manufacturing jobs that were the lifeblood of the town. Add in the billions of dollars that Ottawa had spent to keep the company in Canada, and it's easy to see why Canadians would take this so personally.

Meanwhile, the recent news about Barrick Gold - that it would lay off more than half of the staff at its Toronto head office in the wake of a merger with Randgold, an African operator with headquarters in the Channel Islands, and revamp its board of directors to leave just one Canadian-born member who lives in New York - hasn't stirred the emotions in quite the same way. Fair enough, too: Much of Barrick's business, since it transitioned from a money-losing oil and gas firm to a money-spinning mining company, has happened outside of Canada, in places such as the United States, Australia, the Dominican Republic, Peru, Argentina and Chile.

And even though the company's dynamic founder, Peter Munk, lived in Canada for seven decades, he passed away in March. Besides, even if industry veteran Pierre Lassonde says these recent moves effectively mean that Barrick is "not going to be a de facto Canadian company, period," the company's new chief executive, Mark Bristow, insists he plans to keep the headquarters in the city. So does it really matter that Barrick's "heart" isn't wrapped in red and white?

But Canada's diminished presence in Barrick's head office might actually be more lamentable, and a bigger blow to the national fabric. And the reasons go beyond Canadian culture's usual inferiority complex, which gets inflamed when a homegrown kid leaves town.

The debate over what a Canadian company even is re-emerges virtually every time one gets taken over by a foreign firm. During the 1970s, when the "new nationalism" was on the rise in Canada, and roughly two-thirds of Canadians believed that the takeover of domestic firms - particularly by American ones - constituted a serious threat to our political and economic sovereignty, the federal government attempted to identify the elements that make up a "Canadian" corporation. It proved as problematic then as it does now. Was it the level of Canadian ownership, the number of Canadians in management or a mixture of both? And if so, how much of each? Did having two Canadian vice-presidents cancel out the one foreign-born president?

That led to the 1973 Foreign Investment Review Act, which decided that a Canadian business was one "carried on in Canada by a Canadian corporation or an individual who is either a Canadian citizen or ordinarily resident in Canada, or by any combination in which one of such parties is in a position to control the conduct of the business." It may be a bit of jargon-laden bafflegab, but it does at least signal Ottawa's preference for keeping controlling interests - which usually lie with head offices - in the country.

Headquarters matter. They employ well-educated and highly skilled people including senior managers, accountants, financiers and human-resource specialists, and they generate jobs in ancillary services, too, from auditors to information technologists. Headquarters also act as a magnet for other companies, leading to industrial clusters that have had a profound effect on local identities. Just think of the clustering of banks in Toronto in the early 1900s; since that time and to this day, Toronto's identity is defined, in part, by being the financial capital of Canada.

It's why the Canadian government has historically been far more willing to allow takeovers when the conquering company promises to keep the head office in Canada. Take, for example, the Beijing-based China National Offshore Oil Corp.'s 2013 acquisition of the Calgary-headquartered energy producer Nexen Inc. After a long review, the federal government approved the US$15.1-billion deal because CNOOC made a series of undertakings to the Canadian government that included keeping its North American headquarters in Calgary.

But every time a company moves its head office from Canada, we lose revenue from corporate, income and excise taxes. Domestic suppliers go out of business, advertising agencies close and numerous spin-off industries disappear. Sometimes whole clusters go into decline.

The current state of Sarnia, Ont., shows what that scenario can look like. Polymer Corp., born on the shores of Lake Huron and out of the crucible of the Second World War, played a critical role in the Canadian economy for more than 50 years. Blending innovative science and technology with expert business and managerial strategies, the former Crown company kept Canada on the vanguard of international synthetic rubber developments, and Polymer became a symbol of our postwar industrial prowess. During the 1960s and 1970s, when Polymer was producing some of the best synthetic rubber in the world, there were more PhDs per capita in Sarnia than anywhere else in Canada. Scientists from all over the world came to work at Canadian companies on the cutting edge of technology, and so profitable was Polymer that the federal government even proudly placed an image of its Sarnia plant on the back of the $10 bill in 1971.

That prosperity is now in the past. In 1988, Alberta-based Nova Corp. bought Polymer, which had been renamed Polysar, and took it private, flipping it to German chemicals and health-care giant Bayer AG two years later. Bayer promised not to move the head office for three years, a promise it kept - before moving its headquarters to the United States. Sarnia became a blue-collar town, with a population that has declined nearly every year since the company's HQ moved away, with declining population and projections of stalled growth, at best. The buzzing city core is no more.

Look, too, at what has happened to London, Ont., since Interbrew - which in 2008 became AB InBev when the Belgian brewer bought AnheuserBusch for US$52-billion - purchased Labatt in 1995.

Jobs have been lost, suppliers have gone out of business, and executives have moved to other places, taking their money and their talent to foreign destinations.

When head offices are built or relocate, it leads to a rise in the confidence in the new host community. By the early 2000s, Nortel and other tech companies inspired Canada's sleepy capital to rebrand itself as cerebral, energetic and modern, with new headquarters set up almost every year in Ottawa between 1970 and the dot-com crash. These offices were the engines for generating community confidence and high-paying jobs, which spilled over into the local economy and civic culture. Roads were improved, the airport was renovated, new cosmopolitan restaurants opened and the Rideau Centre shopping mall was built; the city even got an NHL team. Its high-flying tech confidence was even awkwardly referenced into the city's memorable, if short-lived, slogan: "Ottawa: Technically Beautiful."

But the nation's capital also shows us what happens when headquarters pack up and leave. During that heyday, more than one-third of the employees of the major fibre-optics maker JDS Fitel Inc. - 10,000 people - were employed in Ottawa. But after a merger with Uniphase Corp., JDS moved its headquarters to San Jose, Calif., in 2003, leaving the city as an outpost; within a year of the move, only around 500 people remained. Its departure, the acquisition of major Ottawa tech firms such as Jetform and Newbridge Networks, and the collapse of Nortel as a major entity led to the mantle of "Silicon Valley North" moving to other cities.

The United States knows these effects well, which is why the country has defined its terms and defended its turf. President Donald Trump has been urging American corporations to "come home," and is calling for an end to the practice of "tax inversion" - whereby a U.S. company is acquired by a smaller foreign business from a low-tax country, adopts it as its domicile and reduces the combined firm's overall U.S. tax burden. And when pollsters asked what characteristic most defines an "American company," 75 per cent of Americans put "manufacturing its products in the United States" at the top of the list.

Barrick wouldn't even rise to this definition in Canada. But that just means we need to raise our standards. For a country whose primary industries already tend to be dominated by foreign-owned companies in terms of employees and value - manufacturing, automotive, and finance and insurance - Canadians cannot be complacent.

This is not the rant of an old-school economic nationalist. These are not the last ravings of oldschool economic nationalism, suffocated at last by neo-liberalism. This is a heartfelt lament. Because when Canadian companies move their headquarters out of the country, we lose not only revenue from taxes - but also a bit more of our Canadian culture.

Associated Graphic

ILLUSTRATION BY MICHAEL HADDAD


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Monday, November 26, 2018 – Page B15

CHARGERS 45, CARDINALS 10 CARSON, CALIF. Philip Rivers tied the NFL record for consecutive completions and set marks for the most to start a game and the highest percentage in a game as the Los Angeles Chargers rolled to a 45-10 victory over the Arizona Cardinals on Sunday. The 15-year veteran completed his first 25 passes and was 28-of-29 for 259 yards and three touchdowns in three quarters. It was also his 11th straight game with multiple TD passes. Rivers completed 25 straight passes in the first 2½ quarters, tying Ryan Tannehill's mark from 2015. The Dolphins QB completed his last seven passes against the Tennessee Titans on Oct. 18, 2015, and then his first 18 the following week against the Houston Texans. Rivers tied the mark with a four-yard touchdown pass to Keenan Allen midway through the third quarter. He had his only incompletion on the next possession when he was rushed and was unable to connect on a short pass to Austin Ekeler. Rivers did break Mark Brunell's record for most completions to start a game. Brunell had 22 straight for Washington against the Houston Texans on Sept. 24, 2006. Rivers's 96.8 per cent accuracy surpassed Kurt Warner's 92.3 per cent, which was set in 2009 when he went 24of-26 for Arizona against Jacksonville.

SEAHAWKS 30, PANTHERS 27 CHARLOTTE, N.C. Russell Wilson threw for 339 yards and two touchdowns and Sebastian Janikowski kicked a 31-yard field goal as time expired to lift Seattle Seahawks to a come-frombehind victory over Carolina. After Graham Gano missed a 52yard field goal with 1 minute 40 seconds left in the game that would have given the Panthers the lead, Wilson moved around in the pocket until finding Tyler Lockett downfield for a 43-yard completion, setting up the winning kick. The victory puts Seattle (6-5) firmly in the hunt for a wildcard spot in the NFC, while the Panthers (6-5) are reeling after losing three straight and having their 10-game home winning streak snapped. Lockett finished with five catches for 107 yards and a touchdown, while David Moore had four receptions for 103 yards and a score. The Panthers spoiled a record-setting performance from Christian McCaffrey, who had a franchise-record 239 yards 462 Passing yards for Pittsburgh QB Ben Roethlisberger who had 41 completions in 56 attempts and one touchdown in the Steelers' loss to the Broncos 133 Rushing yards for New England RB Sony Michel on 21 carries and one touchdown in the Patriots' win over the Jets 189 Receiving yards for Pittsburgh WR JuJu Smith-Schuster on 13 catches and one touchdown in the Steelers' loss to the Broncos from scrimmage. He had 17 carries for 125 yards and 11 catches for 114 yards, becoming the first Carolina player to surpass 100 yards in both receiving and rushing in the same game. Cam Newton finished 25-of-30 for 256 yards with two touchdown passes and one interception in the end zone. He ran for 63 yards on eight carries.

BROWNS 35, BENGALS 20 CINCINNATI Baker Mayfield threw a career-high four touchdown passes in another growing-up-fast performance, and Cleveland ended one of the NFL's longest streaks of road futility with a victory over Cincinnati, which lost quarterback Andy Dalton to a thumb injury. Cleveland (4-6-1) got its first road win since 2015, emphatically snapping a streak of 25 straight road losses that was one shy of the Lions' NFL record.

EAGLES 25, GIANTS 22 PHILADELPHIA Jake Elliott kicked a 43-yard field goal with 22 seconds remaining, and Philadelphia rallied for a victory over New York.

The defending Super Bowl champions trailed 12-0 early and were down 19-14 in the fourth quarter before Carson Wentz made key throws and undrafted rookie Josh Adams delivered big runs. Adams scored on a one-yard touchdown run and ran up the middle for the 2-point conversion to put Philadelphia ahead 22-19. After the Giants tied it on Aldrick Rosas's third field goal, a 29-yarder, the Eagles controlled the ball for 5:27.

Coach Doug Pederson went for a fourth-and-one at the Giants 42 and Wentz completed a 12-yard pass to Nelson Agholor right before the two-minute warning.

Adams ran three times and Elliott made the go-ahead kick. The Giants started at their 34 with 16 seconds left but couldn't do much.

The Eagles (5-6) stayed in the mix in a mediocre NFC East. Dallas and Washington are tied for first place at 6-5. The Giants fell to 3-8.

RAVENS 34, RAIDERS 17 BALTIMORE Rookie quarterback Lamar Jackson ran for a touchdown and threw for a score, Terrell Suggs returned a fumble 43 yards for a TD and Baltimore ran past Oakland. Cyrus Jones took a punt 70 yards for a touchdown to help the Ravens (6-5) win a second straight game for the first time since September. Gus Edwards rushed for 118 yards as part of an effective ground game that enabled Jackson to pass just enough to keep the Raiders (2-9) off guard - and off the field. Baltimore expanded a three-point halftime lead to 27-17 with two run-heavy touchdown drives that consumed a total of nearly 16 minutes.

BILLS 24, JAGUARS 21 ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. Josh Allen scored the go-ahead touchdown on a 14-yard run in the fourth quarter and the Bills beat the Jaguars in a game marred by a fight that led to the ejections of Jacksonville running back Leonard Fournette and Buffalo defensive end Shaq Lawson. Fournette scored twice to tie it at 14 in the second quarter. He finished with 95 yards on 18 carries before he was thrown out with 2:57 left in the third. Allen also threw a 75yard touchdown pass to Robert Foster in the rookie quarterback's first game since missing four with a sprained throwing elbow. Rookie receiver Isaiah McKenzie scored on a six-yard run off a sweep, and Buffalo (4-7) came off its bye week off to win consecutive games for the first time this season. The Jaguars (3-8) dropped their seventh consecutive game in their longest losing streak since a nine-game slide in 2016, which led directly to Gus Bradley being fired and replaced by current coach Doug Marrone.

BUCCANEERS 27, 49ERS 9 TAMPA BAY Jameis Winston threw for 312 yards and two touchdowns to help Tampa Bay snap a fourgame losing streak. Winston, benched last month after turning the ball over 11 times in 14 quarters, completed 29-of-38 passes without an interception. The fourth-year pro, who's shared the starting job with Ryan Fitzpatrick, tossed scoring passes of six yards to Cameron Brate and 28 yards to Adam Humphries on a play he extended by scrambling to his right before throwing back toward the centre of the field. Tampa Bay (4-7), meanwhile, had four sacks and forced a turnover on defence for the first time in eight games, with Ryan Smith and Isaiah Johnson coming up with the team's first interceptions since a loss to Pittsburgh on Sept. 24.

COLT 27, DOLPHINS 24 INDIANAPOLIS Andrew Luck threw three touchdown passes, Adam Vinatieri kicked a 32-yard field goal as time expired and Indianapolis beat Miami for its fifth consecutive victory. Indianapolis (6-5) scored 13 points in the final 8½ minutes to erase a 10-point deficit. It's the longest win streak for the Colts since 2014. Miami (5-6) has lost 10 of its past 11 on the road, perhaps none more frustrating than this one. The Dolphins picked off Luck twice, recovered a fumble and partly blocked a punt on their way to a 24-14 lead. It still wasn't enough to derail the resurgent Luck, who was 30-of-37 for 343 yards. He also had the first catch of his NFL career, a fouryard reception on fourth-and-one late in the first half. Luck capped that drive with a one-yard TD pass to Jack Doyle.

BRONCOS 24, STEELERS 17 DENVER Nose tackle Shelby Harris picked off Ben Roethlisberger's two-yard pass to Antonio Brown in the end zone with 1:03 remaining to seal Denver's win over Pittsburgh that snapped the Steelers' six-game winning streak. The Broncos (5-6) used four takeaways to counter a 97-yard touchdown toss from Roethlisberger to JuJu Smith-Schuster. Roethlisberger was 41-of-56 for

462 yards, but he was intercepted twice and the Steelers (7-3-1) lost two fumbles in losing for the first time since September. Phillip Lindsay rushed for 110 yards and the game-deciding touchdown on just 14 carries for Denver.

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Cleveland Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield flashes a smile after helping to take down the Bengals 35-20 in Cincinnati on Sunday, the same day he threw four TD passes - a career high. FRANK VICTORES/AP


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After a gruesome injury, Ennis tracks a long path back to basketball
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By LORI EWING
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Wednesday, January 9, 2019 – Page B13

MISSISSAUGA -- Brittany was the first member of Canadian basketball's big Ennis family to hear the news. "Hey, prayers for your brother," someone texted the 19year-old.

Why prayers? she worried.

Then someone sent her the video link.

Tyler Ennis was just three regular-season games into his EuroLeague career with storied Turkish club Fenerbahce in October when he suffered a gruesome broken leg. The play seemed innocuous enough. The look on opponent Malcolm Armstead's face said the injury was anything but.

The 24-year-old from Brampton, Ont., was driving to the hoop when he collided with Buyukcekmece's Armstead, and their legs seemed to become entangled. Ennis falls, and when he lifts his left leg, it hangs limply like an empty sock from the middle of his shin down. Armstead looks away in horror. The video is not for the squeamish. It comes with a "graphic" warning. Ennis still hasn't watched it. He says he may never do so.

He called and talked to his panicked sister right after the injury.

"Brittany was crying, she said 'Your leg!' [and] I'm like, 'I'm fine now,' " Ennis said.

Ten weeks after the injury, the 6-foot-3 guard is back home rehabilitating with Canada Basketball's staff.

Ennis walks into the Movement Lab in Mississauga for treatment and a workout with a slight limp. He has a knobbly scar below his knee a couple inches wide where surgeons in Istanbul inserted a rod down the length of his tibia from knee to ankle.

He scrolls through his phone to the X-ray image of his industrial-strength leg. There are five screws for reinforcement that will eventually be removed.

"I've been walking for a while, I still have a little limp ... but, by the time I leave him, I'll be a lot better," he said, with a nod toward Canada Basketball athletic therapist Krisjon Vargas, who kneads the muscles around Ennis's break for the better part of an hour.

Ennis played four seasons in the NBA, for Phoenix, Milwaukee, Houston and the Los Angeles Lakers after he was drafted 18th over all by the Suns out of Syracuse University in 2014. He saw Fenerbahce as a fresh start.

"Me and my agent talked, and it was an opportunity for me to really take control of my career, [after] playing on teams where I didn't get to play as much, or politics or whatever the case may be," Ennis said.

"My agent said going over there was a chance to really show for a full season what I could do, compared to playing 10 or 15 games in a row, and then not playing, just like the inconsistency in minutes ... so, go over there and play well and have the option to stay there, or come back (to the NBA) and kind of take control. I was more interested in that rather than playing the waiting game that free agency is."

There's no timetable for his return to Fenerbahce, which leads the Turkish league at 15-1.

The injury, Ennis said, initially felt like he'd been kicked in the leg.

"But I've seen Paul George and those guys do it, and I've seen the trainer run out and hold the leg when it's broken," Ennis said - George suffered a tibia-fibula fracture in the summer of 2014. "I saw [our trainer], and before he even said, 'Are you okay?' he was holding my leg, and I thought 'Ugh.' "

Maurizio Gherardini, Fenerbahce's general manager, was in the arena that night. He and the entire team went straight to the hospital after the game.

"Tyler had gained everyone's appreciation in a very short period of time with his approach to the game and by showing the person he is," said Gherardini, a former vice-president and assistant general manager with the Toronto Raptors. "The injury was frustrating for different reasons. It happened in an unusual way. It happened to a young player who was getting better game by game.

"The game right before that one, we had won in Kaunas, against Zalgiris, one of the European historical powerhouses, and Tyler had been instrumental in that road win, with a very effective fourth-quarter play. It happened when we all were feeling he was the right fit for our puzzle."

Armstead, an American who played at Wichita State with Raptors point guard Fred VanVleet and Canadian Nick Wiggins, also visited Ennis in the hospital.

"People were saying, 'Oh, let's take a picture,' and he said 'Naw,' he just wanted to check on me, make sure I was okay," Ennis said.

"I have a lot of respect for him for that."

Ennis called his dad, Tony McIntyre, after the injury. His dad, alerted by Brittany, was already at an airport gate waiting to board an overseas flight when Tyler called. When he awoke from surgery, McIntyre - director of basketball operations for the Athlete Institute academy in Orangeville, Ont. - was beside his bed.

Ennis, who made a point of not looking at his leg until after the surgery, is recovering under the guidance of Canada Basketball athletic therapist Sam Gibbs. He does physiotherapy six days a week, lifts three days a week, does work in the pool and is on the court three days a week.

"Now that I'm able to stand, I can do dribbling drills, free throws ..." Ennis said.

At the Movement Lab, Ennis goes through an hour-long workout of squats and kettle bell work with Karamvir Gill, an athletic performance coach with Canada Basketball. The Movement Lab is a training and therapy haven for Canadian players when they're in town. Signed basketballs and shoes line one cinder-block wall, including Sim Bhullar's size 19s.

A chef is cooking in the facility's small kitchen, preparing a couple days worth of meals for Ennis.

He looks at his injury as a chance to build a better version of himself.

"That's the plan," he said. "It's helped me a lot, just taking care of my body, and realizing what I need. I can feel a lot more with the injury. I can feel: 'Okay, my hamstrings are tight.' Or: 'My lower back is tight.' "And right away when I got home, we talked about nutrition for healing and when I get back healthy. So we hired a chef [Evan White], which was something I always wanted to do.

I'm taking this time away from basketball for a bunch of stuff I wanted to focus on with my body, strengthening my legs or core or whatever ... that I had never got around to it, as far as really diving into it."

He sees a proverbial silver lining in his injury. He and girlfriend Ericka Gilbert have a daughter, Jordan, who's a year and a half.

And early Monday morning, Gilbert gave birth to a second daughter they named Tyler.

"My girlfriend likes Istanbul, we had a good time there, but she said the silver lining is the baby gets to be Canadian as opposed to the complications of having the baby over there," Ennis said.

He was able to spend a rare Christmas with family.

"I try to look at things like that, things I'm not able to do during the season ever basically until I stop playing, things like going to my brother's games, my sister's games, everyday stuff. I try to take advantage of that," he said.

Ennis has two older brothers - Dylan, who plays professionally in Andorra, and Brandon, a coach with the Athlete Institute. Brittany played basketball. There's a 13year-old sister and nine-year-old brother who both play, plus another brother who's just 3.

"It's good having family around, real support," Ennis said.

While he has no timeline for a return, he says his recovery is ahead of schedule.

"They told me, 'You'll be walking by this time,' and I was walking before, and whatnot," he said.

"I feel really good. ... And being home and away from the team, it's easier for me to lock in and focus on myself and what I need to do to get back."

Gherardini has no doubt Ennis "will bounce back from this nasty injury."

"He's dedicated to basketball, he's a student of the game and he has a very positive approach to life over all, which helps as well," he said. "As he got injured, he was the one smiling and cheering us up. That tells you how strong his desire can be to make it back at full strength. We are all cheering for him, as we would all love to see him on the court before our season is over: it would be the best reward to his dedication and his passion for the game."


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Three refreshing portraits of bureaucracy
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At a time when Britain is in turmoil and the U.S. government is shut down, these books offer a more hopeful view of modern governance
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By ERIC ANDREW-GEE
  
  

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Thursday, January 10, 2019 – Page A14

These are dark days for technocrats.

From Brexit Britain to Trump's America to Ford's Ontario, the world is in thrall to a style of politics that treats the functionary as an obstacle - an arrogant "expert" interfering with people power or, worse, an emissary of the "deep state" thwarting the executive's whim.

Republicans and Tories have been attacking bloated bureaucracy for generations, but this isn't Ronald Reagan's conservatism: In a growing segment of the modern right, the civil service is treated not only as inefficient, but illegitimate.

Little wonder, then, that so many journalists have responded by lionizing the humble bureaucrat. Who better to stand up for such a maligned figure than a bunch of reporters - maybe the only other class of people more familiar with authoritarian slander? Maybe that's why, without quite meaning to, Michael Lewis in The Fifth Risk (W. W. Norton & Co.; US$26.95; 256 pages), Susan Orlean in The Library Book (Simon & Schuster; US$28; 336 pages) and Deborah Blum in The Poison Squad (Penguin Random House; US$28; 352 pages) have written homages to the genius of modern government and the people who make it tick.

At a time when the U.S. federal government is shut down and otherwise careening out of control, and the British government is aiming an unsteady gun at its own foot, these books contain a refreshing portrait of bureaucracy as a haven of good sense and competent management.

Government doesn't advertise itself well. But if it did - and right now, it should - it would look a lot like these books. Dead-eyed pencil pushers and scheming mandarins are nowhere to be found. Instead we get a gallery of quiet heroes.

There's Harvey Washington Wiley, chief chemist of the U.S.

Department of Agriculture at the turn of the 20th century and maestro of Blum's "poison squad" experiments, which showed America the dangers of using chemicals to preserve food.

There's Charles Lummis, the eccentric head librarian of Los Angeles in the early 1900s who walked from Ohio to California seeking "joy and information," wore a brilliant green corduroy suit, published a book of poems on birchbark pages and waged war on trashy books with a "Literary Pure Food Act."

And there are modern lights such as the biochemist Catherine Woteki, who fought sexism in academia before rising in the civil service to become chief scientist of the Department of Agriculture under Barack Obama and quashing a potentially catastrophic bird flu outbreak.

To varying degrees, these books are all about something other than bureaucracy. Sleek and accessible as all of Lewis's work, The Fifth Risk is billed as a warning about Donald Trump's dangerous ignorance of sensitive government functions (safeguarding nuclear weapons is a big one). In her spirited, off-kilter way, Orlean tells the story of a mysterious fire at L.A.'s beautiful Central Library. Blum, slightly more plodding, recounts the nationwide battle for pure food in the Gilded Age.

But, almost by accident, each story becomes a song of praise to government office workers - the kind now locked out of their jobs in D.C. and beyond. A few common traits emerge from these bureaucratic characters. One is passion for their work. Since careers in government are often thankless and badly paid, they attract people who have a vocation for public service. Another Los Angeles librarian we learn about from Orlean thought people in her profession should "read as a drunkard drinks or as a bird sings or a cat sleeps or a dog responds to an invitation to go walking."

Lewis and Blum describe people who feel the same way about food chemistry or meteorology.

They're unabashed nerds who don't mind the grey buildings and endless staff meetings because they feel lucky to be working on subjects that have fascinated them since childhood.

Much of what government does is highly technical - think weather radar, rather than welfare - so it also attracts clever people who like a challenge. Lewis tells us about John MacWilliams, a very American sort of high achiever who was both a Goldman Sachs investment banker and a literary novelist before joining the Department of Energy as "chief risk officer." At first he was put off by the alphabet soup of acronyms that clotted his departmental memos, but soon came to relish the fascinating stuff he and his colleagues got to do, such as sending teams to measure radiation at the Super Bowl in case of a dirty bomb attack.

Like many of the characters in these books, MacWilliams was drawn to government by a simple-hearted desire to "serve." It turns out that good people gravitate to work in the public interest. People such as Ali Zaidi, who moved to the United States from Pakistan at the age of 5 and gratefully realized after joining the federal government that the U.S.

Department of Agriculture paid for his school lunch as a kid.

A public sector more inclined to self-promotion would spend lots of time talking about the kinds of unideological but important jobs that Zaidi learned his department performs: things such as inspecting the nine billion birds Americans eat every year, running a squadron of firefighting aircraft and managing 193 million acres of national forests and grasslands.

Without that kind of busy work, the modern world falls apart. It's easy to forget, because it all performs so seamlessly most of the time, but someone always has to be doing maintenance on the machinery of civilization: pumping water, keeping the lights on, making sure people have breathable air.

"No one notices when something goes right," one of Lewis's characters says. It's a fair lament.

Maybe nowhere is the government's hand more needed or more invisible than in the food we eat. There was a time, just a few generations ago, when massproduced food killed people regularly and made a far greater number sick. Government intervened. That's the story of The Poison Squad.

In the late 19th century, advances in chemistry and industrial production had actually made food less wholesome in many ways, since manufacturers could and did mask rot with embalming chemicals and kept their wares "fresh" with toxic preservatives. Blum gives a litany of the poison people were spoon-fed by big companies at the time. Early margarine ingredients included sulfate of lime and sugar of lead.

Candy samples tested in New York turned up dyes made from lead chromate and arsenic. U.S.

soldiers were sickened by lead in their canned beef rations; common flour was laced with powdered clay and whitened with sulphuric acid; sour milk was sweetened with formaldehyde, killing hundreds of children.

It's a valuable reminder of what the industrialized world can look like without vigilant bureaucrats. Few have been more vigilant that Wiley. His poison squad experiments involving government clerks led to the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 - popularly known as "Dr. Wiley's law" - that banned the mislabelling and adulteration of food sold across state lines.

These books help show why government has good reason to be neurotic and risk averse. It's not just because the public sector is insulated from market pressure - the usual conservative line - but because government is often society's last line of defence. It's there for people when no one else is. During the Great Depression, Orlean tells us, out-of-work men doubled the patronage of the L.A.

Central Library. It was mostly poor people eating the cheap, preserved food Wiley fought against. It is impoverished families such as Zaidi's who use food stamps.

That kind of responsibility breeds a caution the more freewheeling private sector can't really understand. It's why bureaucrats look doubly good these days: not only in comparison to the thick-necked strongmen of the world, but also beside the amoral whiz kids of finance and tech, those inventors of the credit default swap and targeted digital ads who helped wreck the global economy and America's democracy in the span of a decade. Government is still cleaning up their mess.

That contrast brings to mind Facebook's one-time mantra, which it lived up to all too well: Move Fast and Break Things. The bureaucrat's motto is more likely the opposite: Move Slow and Fix Things. We're lucky they live up to it, too.

Associated Graphic

Harvey Washington Wiley works in a lab at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Bureau of Chemistry in 1902. His work on food preservation led to the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 - known as 'Dr. Wiley's law' - that banned mislabelling and adulteration of food sold across state lines.

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS


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Edmonton apartment puts a spin on rent-to-own
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Alberta developer looks to shake up multifamily rental segment, create template for future ventures. But renters will have to get their heads around the idea first
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By JOEL SCHLESINGER
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Tuesday, January 15, 2019 – Page B6

A new high-rise set to open this year in south Edmonton bears all the necessary characteristics to win over renters in the prairie city.

The 18-storey, 149,000-squarefoot Central Tower will open this summer at Century Park, a fastgrowing and transit-oriented hub with boutiques, cafés and other shopping amenities. With an energy efficient design, the high-rise will feature triple-glazed window walls, solar panels and a co-energy generation system. As well, it will offer concierge service, expansive balconies and community garden plots, all for market rent.

Those traits alone make the new development notable. But what's truly unique is Central Tower will be the first rental offering tenants a risk-free, no-moneydown path to ownership.

"This has never been done before," says George Schluessel, chief executive officer and president of ProCura Real Estate Services, the company behind the project. "We're basically creating multifamily buildings with an option-to-ownership program, transitioning renters into owners."

Mr. Schluessel founded ProCura in 1979. The Alberta-based company has a development pipeline of about 4.4 million square feet, which includes more than 6,900 multifamily units.

ProCura calls its concept "OpTown" (as in option to own) and it will be used for all its coming multifamily and mixed-use developments.

"We call it a win-win because as developers we can lease-up the building faster." And renters have a way to ownership in which they can build equity without paying premium rent like in a traditional rent-to-own model.

Furthermore, Mr. Schluessel argues the market is ripe for OpTown given home ownership is increasingly challenging after two decades of rising property values, along with the more recent obstacle of higher borrowing costs.

What's more, he believes the concept could disrupt how the industry develops multifamily projects, making pure rental and condominium projects obsolete.

Indeed the idea aims to capitalize on changing dynamics in real estate as the latest census data point to home ownership falling from its peak in the late 2000s.

"OpTown is for the people who may have given up on ownership but they still want that opportunity."

He's so confident in the idea that ProCura will soon list a spinoff, publicly-traded company named OpTown Properties Ltd.

on the Toronto Venture Exchange (TSV) under the ticker TLC.

The new corporate entity will serve several purposes, including acting as the developer and manager of future multifamily properties on behalf of ProCura. As well, the offering will raise capital to develop more than $400-million in mixed-used, multifamily projects on ProCura's land base.

But the new company has an even more ambitious aim - marketing its services to other real estate firms seeking to convert rentals to condominiums to raise capital to build their business.

Mr. Schluessel believes the OpTown model will be attractive to developers because it will make properties easier to rent, as renters will be drawn to the opportunity of ownership. In turn, these properties may have less turnover and steadier rents.

Moreover, the company has a robust marketing component to lease buildings before completion - also attractive to developers, says Sherry Schluessel, senior managing partner at ProCura.

Typically "it's only after the doors open you can really start to rent," she says, adding that's months of lost income.

Still one might ask why renters would prelease a unit they cannot to live in for several weeks.

That, according to Mr. Schluessel, is where OpTown's most innovative aspect comes into play. The model offers long-term renters a 25-per-cent stake in the upside of the market value of their unit at the end of a five-year lease, presumably for a down payment.

While the model is unproven, the waiting list for Central Tower is already long enough to lease a third of the building, Ms. Schluessel says.

She adds the firm is only now launching a marketing campaign, aimed at leasing the building fully by mid-February even though it will not open until July.

The faster lease-up will generate rents sooner, Mr. Schluessel says, allowing the developer to access financing more quickly to develop other projects in the area.

"We have zoning for 4,200 more units, and they will all be rentals under OpTown."

The concept may have legs, says the head of a Toronto-based investment firm.

"In a competitive market where you're developing boxes in the sky, and others are building similar boxes in the sky, if you can shorten your sales cycle and sell out before the other guy, sure, that's a benefit," says Dennis Mitchell, CEO of Starlight Capital.

Yet he also sees snags.

"What happens if at the end of five years, renters can't qualify for a mortgage?" Mr. Mitchell says.

Another key question: How will Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) treat tenants' equity share?

Will that be taxed annually as income, or at the end as a capital gain? How those concerns are addressed, he notes, may affect how well OpTown resonates with renters, and whether the concept catches on in the industry.

Mr. Schluessel says the company has hired accountants for an opinion on the tax treatment while it also has an application with Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. (CMHC).

"If we can get CMHC underwriting, the down payment goes further."

Even with these hurdles cleared, Mr. Mitchell sees another problem. "One of the big challenges is explaining the concept because anything different from what people are accustomed to takes time to wrap their heads around."

But Mr. Schluessel is confident the market will come around if only because of the limited risk involved. "As an owner, the downside is you have an apartment building, which you would have anyway, and the worst case for tenants is they end up paying market rent for a first-class apartment." BUILDINGS TO BE DEVELOPED UNDER THE OPTOWN MODEL ProCura Real Estate Services aims to use the option-to-own model for its nearly complete Central Tower high-rise in Edmonton's Century Park. But it has at least two other major multifamily, mixed-use building projects for the area that will be developed under ProCura's new spinoff corporation OpTown Properties Ltd., which will use this model.

CENTRAL TOWER The 18-storey building will have 175 one- and two-bedroom suites along with 233 parking stalls, and feature energy efficient heating and cooling, an amenity lounge, in-suite laundry and VIP concierge service. Floorplans are 500 to 800 square feet, renting between $2.50 and $3 per square foot.

Total cost: $66,492,432.

Completion date: Summer of 2019.

TIMES SQUARE The project includes three residential towers and 13 townhouses, designed by New York architects Pelli Clark Pelli.

With 472 suites, and 421 parking stalls, it also will offer more than 15,000 square feet of retail space.

Total cost: $185,644,000.

Broke ground: December of 2018.

THE LOUVRE The project will have 400 suites and 420 parking stalls along with concierge services, a conference centre and 9,000 square feet of commercial and office space. Project will also feature roof top patio, fitness centre, spa and library.

Total cost: $237,750,717.

Start date: To be determined.

HOW OPTOWN WORKS Unlike traditional rent-to-own, OpTown tenants do not have to pay a large deposit to secure a unit. Nor must they pay rents with built-in premiums to build equity. While they are not obligated to buy, renters must sign a five-year lease, at the end of which they can vote to convert to a condominium. If 75 per cent or more vote in favour, the property management company helps tenants secure financing and manage the conversion. As well, renters receive a 25-percent share of the gain in market value on their unit over the five-year lease, which can be used for a down payment.

Tenants who do not want to buy their unit can still rent with the developer maintaining ownership, although the developer also has the option to sell the apartment at fair market value.

PROPERTY METRICS 10.9% Biggest one-week gainer among REITs: Slate Retail 16.1% Biggest one-week gainer among real estate operating companies: Invesque 1.7% Biggest one-week decliner among REITs: Partners 2.4% Biggest one-week decliner among real estate operating companies: Brookfield Real Estate Services CIBC

Associated Graphic

The 18-storey Central Tower, shown in this rendering, is expected to open this summer at Century Park in Edmonton. One of the project's key distinctions is its offer to renters to one day own their units without a hefty down payment or leasing premiums.


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Stampeders secure eighth Grey Cup win
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Monday, November 26, 2018 – Page B16

EDMONTON -- The Calgary Stampeders overcame two years of frustration and a slippery field on Sunday to beat the Ottawa Redblacks, 27-16 in the 106th Grey Cup at Commonwealth Stadium. It is the eighth time the team has won the championship of Canadian football and the first time in four years, and comes after losses in the title game in each of the last two years.

Calgary quarterback Bo Levi Mitchell - the CFL's most outstanding player this season after tossing a league-best 35 TDs - was 24-for-36 passing for 253 yards with two touchdowns and two interceptions in what could be his final game with the Stampeders.

The talented quarterback from Texas - who was the game MVP - has reportedly received queries from teams in the NFL.

The loss ended the Redblacks' dream of winning another Grey Cup. It was their third appearance in the championship finale since their inaugural season in 2014.

They won in 2016.

A sellout crowd of 55,819 turned out on a chilly but seasonable day for late November in northern Alberta. The temperature was near freezing at kickoff and fell over the next few hours. Players on both teams struggled with their footing on the icy turf. Thousands of fans tailgated in the parking lot beforehand and cheered wildly for three hours after that in between a halftime performance by Alessia Cara, the Grammy Awardwinning singer from Canada.

If not exactly rooting for the Redblacks, many Edmontonians cheered against their provincial rivals, booing as they came out for pregame warmups. Calgary will play host to the Grey Cup next year, perhaps then Calgarians can return the favour if the Eskimos get that far. After a promising start, they went 9-9 this season and missed the playoffs.

Both teams looked nervous at the start. Ottawa's Brad Sinopoli, the league's most outstanding receiver, dropped an easy throw from Trevor Harris on the second play. Mitchell underthrew a receiver in the end zone and was picked off by Jonathan Rose, who was suspended for shoving an official during last week's East Division final but had the decision reversed on appeal. Harris had another throw batted down, then had a poorly thrown toss intercepted at his own 37-yard-line by Ciante Evans.

That turnover led to the game's first score, a 21-yard touchdown on a screen pass from Mitchell to Eric Rogers. The Redblacks blitzed on the play, leaving Rogers wide open in the right flat. He bolted into the end zone untouched.

Ottawa put a drive together at the end of the first quarter but still ended up without points. Lewis Ward, the most outstanding rookie and special-teams player in the CFL, sent a 48-yard field goal try wide to the left. The Redblacks kicker made 51-of-52 previous field-goal attempts this season, including a record 33 in a row.

Ward made amends a few minutes later, however, converting a 29-yard kick with 12 minutes 32 seconds left in the second quarter to cut Calgary's lead to 7-3. The field goal was set up by a 27-yard completion from Trevor Harris to R.J. Harris. It was only Harris's second completion of the game. He had three attempts go awry in the first quarter; he only missed three passes in a 46-27 victory over the Hamilton Tiger-Cats in the East Division final last week.

The Stampeders drove 75 yards to their second score, a drive that featured completions by Mitchell of 20 and 11 yards to Rogers, 26 yards to Julian Lynch, five yards to Chris Matthews and 17 for a touchdown to Lemar Durant with 8:10 left in the second. The teams traded turnovers - another interception by Mitchell and a fumble by Ottawa's William Powell - before Harris found Julian Feoli-Gudino down the sideline for a 55-yard score. A two-point convert pass from Harris to Jean-Christophe Beaulieu trimmed Calgary's lead to 14-11with 2:15 left in the half.

Disaster struck for the Redblacks on the next-to-last play of the half when Calgary's Terry Williams fielded a punt at his own 13 and raced 97 yards, reaching the end zone with one second remaining. It was the fourth punt Williams has returned for a touchdown this season, and the longest in Grey Cup history.

The teams traded field goals in the third quarter, then Rene Paredes of Calgary added another in the fourth to increase the margin to the final.

With the victory, the Stampeders' Dave Dickenson avoided the ignominy of becoming only the second coach to lose three Grey Cups in a row.

The always-confident Mitchell had joked this week about coming out on the losing end in the two previous Grey Cups. He said he planned to eat a bowl of Wheaties for breakfast Sunday morning from a box with Doug Flutie's picture on it for good luck.

Former teammates had sent messages urging him on throughout the week.

"People have been texting and saying, 'Hey man, go finish the thing,' " Mitchell said Saturday after the Stampeders' final pregame practice.

Calgary easily won both regular-season meetings between the teams and was listed as a fourpoint favourite.

The Stampeders scored the second-most points in the league and allowed the fewest while compiling a CFL-best 13-5 regularseason record. They were the first team in the league to clinch a playoff spot in Week 13, but struggled in the West Division final before coming away with a 22-14 victory over the Winnipeg Blue Bombers.

Ottawa went 11-7 before it clinched a berth in the Grey Cup with the triumph over Hamilton in the East final. Harris set a playoff record by completing 90 per cent of his passes and throwing for six touchdowns in the game.

It was the first Grey Cup start for the 32-year-old, who played for a handful of teams in the Arena and United Football Leagues before he landed in the CFL in 2012 with the Toronto Argonauts. He has started most of Ottawa's games since 2016, but sat out its Grey Cup victory over Calgary when Henry Burris returned from injury.

"There have been some dark times," Harris said this week. One UFL team he signed with folded nine days into training camp, him and all of the players on another team were fired en route to their opening game. "It tests your perseverance.

"It is the beauty of football. It is a unique thing that challenges your mental courage, your emotional courage and your physical courage."

Harris threw for 5,116 yards during the regular season with fewer touchdowns (22) and interceptions (11) than Mitchell. The league's MVP threw for 5,124 yards and 35 touchdowns with 14 interceptions.

Durant was named the outstanding Canadian with four catches for 30 yards and a TD and a 22-yard run.

He was 1-2 in two previous Grey Cups, but his 366 passing yards per game were the second-most in CFL history.

"It is the hardest game to get to, but I prepare myself to be in it all the time," Mitchell said. "I pride myself on not shying away."

The Stampeders were 8-1 this season while leading after the first quarter, 10-1 when they led at halftime and were 11-0 when they held a lead at the end of the third.

The Redblacks were 3-5 when they trailed at the half and only 2-6 when behind entering the fourth quarter.

Calgary was 11-0 in games where they had fewer turnovers than their opponent, and 0-5 when they had more. Ottawa was 9-1 when they had fewer turnovers than its opponent, and 1-4 when it had more. That form held true in the most important game of the year: The Redblacks turned the ball over five times; twice on fumbles and three times on interceptions thrown by Harris, the last two late in the fourth quarter.

Associated Graphic

Ottawa Redblacks wide receiver Greg Ellingson watches the ball slip through his fingers after failing to complete a touchdown pass during the second half of the Grey Cup against the Calgary Stampeders in Edmonton on Sunday.

JASON FRANSON/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Governor-General Julie Payette, centre, flips a coin as Calgary's Bo Levi Mitchell and Ottawa's Trevor Harris keep their eyes on it before Sunday's Grey Cup in Edmonton.

NATHAN DENETTE/THE CANADIAN PRESS


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BIRTH AND DEATH NOTICES
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Wednesday, January 16, 2019 – Page B16

JOHN DAVID BEESON

Peacefully on Monday, January 14, 2019, at Northumberland Hills Hospital, Cobourg, in his 88th year. Greatly loved husband of Patricia. Loving father of Richard (Kay), the late James, and Nik.

Dear grandfather of Alex, Katy, Juliana, Bela, Max and Theo.

A celebration of John's life will be held on Saturday, January 19, 2019 at 1 p.m. at St. Mark's Anglican Church, Port Hope.

Donations to the Northumberland Hills Hospital Foundation would be appreciated by the family. Condolences received at http://www.MacCoubrey.com.

EDWARD JOHN HYSTEAD

Born April 28, 1941 at home in Wallaceburg, the youngest of four born to William Victor and Lee Etta Anne (Comer) Hystead, passed away peacefully at home, January 13, 2019. Loving husband to Sandra Gayle (McDonald) Hystead for 54 years. Caring and helpful father to Jeffrey Edward (Cindy), Shelley Leanne (Peter) Seca, and Jayson Ryan Hystead. Proud Grandpa to Hannah, Noah, and Ava Seca and Reed Hystead. Adopted Grandpa to Vittoria, Sophia and Alessandro Seca. Survived by a sister, Carol Anne Smith, and brother-in-law, Homer Lashley. Predeceased by Mary Lou Lashley, Connie and Denis Belle-Isle, and Hugh Smith.

The late Mr. Hystead is resting at Turner and Porter Funeral Home, Neweduk Chapel, 1981 Dundas Street West, Mississauga, Ontario.

Visitation Wednesday, January 16th from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Funeral Thursday morning in the Chapel at 11 a.m. Then he will rest at Cavanagh Funeral Home, 409 Nelson Street, Wallaceburg, ON. Visitation from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

followed by the service. Interment will be at Riverview Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, if so desired, donations to Canine Vision or CNIB would be greatly appreciated.

THE HONORABLE MICHAEL EDWARD MARTIN Q.C.

Michael Edward Martin died on January 13, 2019 one month from his 93rd birthday. Born on February 16, 1926 in Brandon, Manitoba, Mike was a true gentleman who emanated kindness and lived his life with integrity and humility. Mike also had a curious intellect and a wry sense of humor which accounted for his many unique expressions.

Mike's proudest accomplishment was his family. He leaves his wife of 59 years, Elizabeth (Beth Ann Joy) Martin; and his children and their spouses, Elizabeth Monk (Peter), Michael Martin (Margot Stokreef), Julia Martin (Matthias Falkner) and Catherine Martin; as well as eleven terrific grandchildren. He is predeceased by siblings, Jack Martin, Maureen Schroeder and Sheila Lacroix. He leaves many loving nieces and nephews. Mike taught us that there is no greater pleasure on earth than a "Happy Family Time".

A veteran of the Royal Canadian Navy in the second World War, Mike earned a law degree at the University of Manitoba and first worked as a lawyer in that province. He later moved his practice to St. Catharines, and then to London in 1963 where he became the Crown Attorney, and eventually the Regional Crown Attorney for Southwestern Ontario in 1986, Mike was made Director of Crown Attorneys for Ontario at the Ministry of the Attorney General in Toronto.

In 1988, he was appointed as a Judge of the Ontario Court. Mike was a tough but fair adversary and judge, whose skills in the courtroom are renowned. He was also a role model, mentor and comrade to many colleagues in the "law business", as he liked to call it.

Cremation has taken place. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated on Saturday, January 19th at 11:00 a.m. at St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church, 73 Picton Street, Niagara-on-the-Lake. A reception to follow.

Rather than sending flowers, please do something nice with your family and think of Mike.

Arrangements entrusted to Morgan Funeral Home, 415 Regent St., Niagara-on-theLake. Memories, photos and condolences may be shared at http://www.morganfuneral.com

JORGEN ANTHON POSCHMANN

Jorgen Anthon Poschmann, aged 91 of Oakville, Ontario passed away peacefully on December 18, 2018 after months of wishing his heart would work better than it was. Jorgen was born in Copenhagen, Denmark and he met the love of his life, Erla, in Iceland in 1950. Jorgen came to Oakville in 1953 where, five years later, he founded The Pottery Supply House. Jorgen was an accomplished potter, sailor and Scottish country dancer.

Later in life he travelled the world as a volunteer advisor in ceramics engineering for CESO and CIDA.

Jorgen was predeceased by his sister and his granddaughter. He is survived by his wife, his six children, his eight grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

Family and friends gathered for a celebration of life on Sunday, January 13, 2019. For condolences, please visit http://www.koprivataylor.com.

DAVID WILLIAM ROULSTON

It is with immense sadness that we announce the unexpected passing of our hero, David William Roulston, on Friday, January 11, 2019, at his favourite place, Trillium Ridge (the cottage), at the age of 62.

Predeceased by his parents, Lila and William Roulston.

Beloved husband of Sara Fay Sulley. Devoted father and best friend to Nelson Jacob (Jake) Roulston. He also leaves to mourn his sisters-inlaw Terry Sulley and Melody Sulley. He will be sorely missed by his nieces and nephews, Russell Sulley, Adrienne, Joel and Kayla Altman and his great-nieces and nephew Victoria, Noah, Zoey and Amelia. Always larger than life, his friends and family will remember his passion and enthusiasm in his teaching, coaching, gaming, golfing, comic book collecting and all his other endeavours.

Visitation will be held at R.S.

Kane Funeral Home, 6150 Yonge St., Toronto, on Wednesday, January 16th, from 6 - 8 p.m. The Funeral Service will be held in the R.S.

Kane chapel on Thursday, January 17th, at 11 a.m.

A private interment will take place. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Grandravine Special Hockey, Alzheimer's Society of Ontario or a charity of your choice. Condolences may be left at http://www.rskane.ca

DR. JOHN KILLORAN WILSON

March 27, 1925 January 13, 2019

Passed away peacefully on January 13, 2019 after a brief illness and surrounded by his loving family.

He leaves his beloved wife of almost 70 years, Patricia (nee Dewan); and his nine children, Sheila Hoo (George), Brian (Doretta Sabucco), Barbara Poggi (Rick deceased), Patricia Lang (Michael), Margaret Gregg (Steve), Mary Lou Hurley (Bill), John (Maureen Vella), David (Nancy Hurley), Gregory (Sheila McKee); 38 grand-children; and 17 greatgrandchildren. Predeceased by infant daughter, Mary Catherine; his parents, William and Teresa Wilson; and his nine brothers and sisters.

John was a proud graduate of St. Michael's College School in 1943 and achieved his medical degree from the University of Toronto (U of T) in 1948, having been elected to the AOA Honour Medical Society. After 6 years post graduate study in Internal Medicine and Cardiology - the last year in London UK, on an RS McLaughlin Travelling Fellowship - John successfully achieved his FRCPC degree and joined the medical staff at St. Michael's Hospital in addition to the Faculty of Medicine at U of T.

St. Michael's Hospital took a leadership role in the care of cardiac patients. John was an integral part of the team that performed the first successful heart transplantation in Canada in 1968. In 1970, he was appointed the first Chief of Cardiology at the hospital - a position he held for 13 years - and an Associate Professor at U of T. John and Dr.

Clare Baker led a cardiac team to Budapest in 1971 and successfully treated patients by open heart surgery. John was credited with introducing the cardiac condition Mitral Valve Prolapse to the cardiologists of Hungary.

In 1981, he was invested as Knight Commander of the Order of St. Sylvester, a Papal award. In 1999, he received the Order of St. Michael from St. Michael's College School.

John was proud of his medical career, but above all was his love for Patricia and his family.

We wish to thank the staff of St.

Bernard's Senior's Residence and also nurse Joy Campbell at St.

Joseph's Health Centre, for her very compassionate care.

Friends may call at the Turner & Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., at Windermere, near the Jane subway on Friday, January 18 from 2-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m.

Funeral Mass will be held on Saturday, January 19 at 11 a.m. at Holy Family Church, 1372 King St.

W., Toronto.

If desired, donations may be made to St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto.

Online condolences may be made through http://www.turnerporter.ca


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MUSICIAN CO-FOUNDED SCHOOL FOR CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
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The bold, brassy-voiced singer-songwriter also released a handful of albums featuring R&B-inspired rock and introspective poetry
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By BRAD WHEELER
  
  

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Saturday, January 12, 2019 – Page B22

Pegi Young, who died on New Year's Day at the age of 66, was a singer-songwriter, a rock star's muse and the catalyst behind the Bridge School, a private organization based in Northern California for children with severe speech and physical impairments. Ms. Young, diagnosed with uterine cancer in the fall of 2017, was known for her free spirit, devoted motherhood, indomitable activism and the ability to fill a room as easily with her laugh as with the music of her band, the Survivors.

Her fifth and final album in 2016 was titled Raw, an unambiguous description of her emotional state at the time. She penned the record's confessional lyrics during her separation (and eventual divorce) from Neil Young, the iconic Canadian musician to whom she had been married 36 years.

A cathartic exercise, the songwriting with band members guitarist Kelvin Holly and the legendary keyboardist Spooner Oldham produced expressions of anger (Why), regret (Too Little Too Late) and profound hurt. If a cover version of the 1966 Nancy Sinatra hit These Boots are Made for Walkin' conveyed sassy resiliency, an album-closing update of Don Henley's The Heart of the Matter was a public announcement of forgiveness.

"She was at peace," said Survivors' bassist Shonna Tucker, who toured with Ms. Young on the band's final run of shows in 2016 and 2017. "She was shining - we laughed, we danced, we shopped.

To see her evolve and go through the phases of healing, and for her to come out the other end so strong and beautiful was truly inspiring."

On his website, Mr. Young published a public statement following his ex-wife's death: "Thanks Pegi, for being such a wonderful mother to our children. You live on inside of them and the many you have touched." The message also referenced Mr. Young's song Such a Woman, a piano-based devotion from his 1992 album Harvest Moon.

The couple married in 1978 and raised a family at Broken Arrow Ranch, a sprawling 57-hectare compound in the hills above Woodside, Calif. They had two children - first a son, Ben; then a daughter, Amber Jean. Mr. Young also had shared custody of his son Zeke, the product of an earlier relationship with actor Carrie Snodgress.

Ben lives with cerebral palsy.

Finding the local school system wanting when it came to meeting the needs of a severely impaired son, Ms. Young (with Jim Forderer, a fellow parent of a child with specialized educational needs, and speech-language pathologist Dr.

Marilyn Buzolich) co-founded Bridge School. "She realized that if the schools weren't good enough for her son, they couldn't be good for anybody else," said Paul Morton, younger brother to Ms. Young.

"So, she decided to do something about it."

In his 2012 memoirs Waging Heavy Peace, Mr. Young described his former wife's Bridge School spearheading and the annual music festival which helped sustain the institution financially. "It was her idea," he wrote. "She just blurted out, 'Why don't we just call your friends and put on a concert to raise money and start a school? We could get Bruce Springsteen.' " They could, and did. In 1986, Mr.

Springsteen (along with Tom Petty, Robin Williams, Mr. Henley and an unannounced Crosby, Stills, Nash and Mr. Young) headlined a fundraising show at Shoreline Amphitheater in Mountain View, Calif. The annual Bridge School Benefit, which over the years brought to stage such diverse acts as Arcade Fire, Cheech Marin, Tony Bennett, John Lee Hooker, Alanis Morissette, Elton John, Pearl Jam, Paul McCartney, Sheryl Crow and The Who, continued until 2016.

To Mr. Young, the sheer boldness of the out-of-the blue idea behind the school and the concerts by his then-wife was striking. "I just looked at her," he would later write, "dumbfounded by this audacious idea."

It was not the first time someone close to Ms. Young was surprised by her, and it would not be the last.

The daughter of Tom Morton and Margaret Foley, Margaret Mary Morton was born on Dec. 1, 1952.

When she was growing up with her five siblings in San Mateo, Calif., her nickname Peggy was eventually stylized as Pegi. She wrote poetry, but kept the journals to herself.

"She wrote down her thoughts and always had a guitar," Paul Morton said. "She was a free spirit, emblematic of her time."

In 1971, the teenaged Ms. Young embraced the freewheeling era by hitchhiking across the country and into Canada, with only a large pet for companionship. "Of course she got stuck in Wawa, Ont.," Mr.

Young, who did not know her at the time, once quipped to a journalist. "And the dog didn't help." By 1972, Ms. Young and said dog made it back to Northern California, where she lived in a tepee she bought for $200. Two years later, while working as a hostess at Alex's Mountain House she met her future husband, a frequent customer at the restaurant situated near his ranch.

"I loved her instantly," Mr.

Young recalled in Waging Heavy Peace," referring to the young, blonde Californian. "In [her] eyes I saw myself and a life I hoped I would be able to hold together," wrote the previously-married musician whose various romantic relationships had not endured.

Despite Mr. Young's rapid infatuation, the pair's initial friendship took years to develop into something more serious. They would marry on Aug. 2, 1978, at Mr.

Young's beach home in Malibu, Calif. Ms. Young had kept the courtship private. "Our family's awareness of Pegi and Neil's emerging relationship was almost non-existent," Ms. Young's brother said. "It wasn't until they married before Pegi brought him home. My mother called me and said that my sister had married Neil Diamond. I told her I didn't think that sounded right."

The married couple settled into Broken Arrow, which Ms. Young transformed into a family home she fell in love with.

According to his longtime friend and manager, being married to Mr. Young was no easy proposition. "Neil is a very, very difficult man," Elliot Roberts told the musician's biographer Jimmy McDonough in 2002. "He's very self-absorbed. He's a true artist. It's a very hard balance, their life and their family - and I think Pegi has done a heroic job of handling pressure. She's done it with great grace."

In addition to her deep involvement with the Bridge School, Ms.

Young performed with the Survivors at the annual Farm Aid benefit festivals and was involved with Rainforest Connection, an international group dedicated to the prevention of illegal deforestation.

Ms. Young's musical aspirations remained untapped for years. "She felt raising her family and being a guiding force in their lives was her job," said Bill Bentley, a friend and former publicist for Pegi Young and the Survivors. "But she approached life as an art project. She saw herself as a musical artist, and eventually she began making the music she'd waited her whole life to share with the world."

Beginning with her eponymous solo debut in 2007 and finishing with 2016's Raw with the Survivors, the brassy-voiced Ms. Young released five albums of R&B-influenced rock and introspective singer-songwriter fare. With family commitments lessened, she toured regularly.

After her 2014 divorce, Ms.Young remained at Broken Arrow.

She modernized the ranch's recording studio in hopes of inviting other artists to make music on site.

It was there she recorded one of her final songs: You Won't Take My Laugh Away From Me, a scathing folk-rock articulation of betrayal and defiance.

Those who knew her remember Ms. Young as a joyful soul. "She laughed and smiled with her whole face and her whole body," band-member Ms. Tucker said. "It was the most infectious and wonderful laugh you've ever heard.

She was a rock star on the last tour.

It was special to see her be so free and doing what she loved."

Ms. Young leaves her two children with Mr. Young, Ben and Amber Jean; stepson, Zeke; two grandchildren; five siblings; and two step-siblings.

Associated Graphic

Pegi Young plays her guitar and sings in Marin County, Calif., in October, 2016. Ms. Young and her band, the Survivors, completed their final run of shows in 2017.

JAY BLAKESBERG


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In 'China's first yoga village,' a novel approach to fighting poverty
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Government official Lu Wenzhen's mission was to help a tiny community of aging farmers improve their economy - but exercising their minds and spirits yielded better results
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Friday, January 11, 2019 – Page A10

YUGOULIANG, CHINA -- Barely 100 people live in Yugouliang, but one morning, more than 30 of them walked to the village square, bundled in jackets against the chill as the sun cleared the horizon.

They assembled in a line around the edges of the square and then, for an hour, crouched and bent, extending their hands and balancing on concrete blocks in a yoga routine that most complete twice each day.

It's an exercise that some of the villagers credit with helping aging bodies.

But it's also one of the more unique features of an anti-poverty campaign being conducted across China under President Xi Jinping, who has pledged to rid his country of the most extreme destitution by 2020. Lu Wenzhen, the man who brought yoga to Yugouliang and leads the classes, was dispatched here not to promote exercise, but to excise penury. He and two other officials arrived in 2016 with what he says were simple instructions: "I was told that my ultimate goal was to raise household income and eradicate poverty."

Yugouliang is in Zhangbei County, which the State Council Leading Group Office of Poverty Alleviation and Development named among China's 10 poorest. Mr.Lu was told to raise incomes in the village by 20 per cent, to about $600 a year.

His turn toward yoga came as he sought to take the villagers beyond bare economic indicators - although the aging farmers who make up most of the population say the regular exercise has also given their work in the fields a boost.

Yugouliang's embrace of yoga is an example both of the inventiveness that has emerged in China's anti-poverty drive, and the degree to which the authoritarian country has given surprising freedom to develop local solutions.

Not only has China's anti-poverty spending grown quickly in recent years - roughly doubling between 2014 and 2017 to $16-billion - but the percentage accessible to county-level governments has also risen, from 70 per cent in 2014 to 95 per cent in 2017, state media have reported. China has claimed success, saying the number of people living in the most abject conditions has fallen by more than two-thirds, to 30 million, in the past half-decade.

The Chinese government has been criticized for setting a poverty threshold that is too low, ignoring urban poverty, using unsustainable short-term methods and employing hard-handed tactics - such as forcing people to relocate, eroding their ability to earn an income from rural work. Between 2016 and 2020, China expects to relocate nearly 10 million people. The anti-poverty campaign, too, is set against a broader picture of widening income inequality.

But across China, attempts are nonetheless under way to improve the livelihoods of the least well-off.

Governments have given cash subsidies.

The state-owned sector has been conscripted into "industrial poverty relief," with officials encouraging companies to invest in poor areas. Government incentives have been used to encourage tourism and local investment. Officials have promoted selling products online and planting crops used for traditional Chinese medicine.

And teams have been dedicated to address the problem. Mr. Lu and two fellow officials live in spartan Yugouliang housing.

They sleep, work and cook their food in adjoining rooms, with beds standing next to desks.

When Mr. Lu arrived, he was worried nothing could improve Yugouliang. The village is in the Zhangjiakou region, a place of military importance that Chinese authorities kept closed to the outside world until 1995, nearly two decades after reform and opening up took place elsewhere.

Yugouliang also suffers from a shortage of water "so everything - plant growth, yields - it all depends on the emotions of God. If it rains, people will have food to eat," Mr. Lu said. In the village, "everything seemed so hopeless."

Such a situation is not uncommon in the anti-poverty drive. "For some rural areas, there's just no way to increase their wellbeing," said Terence Chong, executive director of the Lau Chor Tak Institute of Global Economics and Finance at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. "People are not that well educated and what they know may not be marketable." Another problem lies in the officials tasked with raising incomes. "Those people are not experts. They don't know how to solve economic problems," Prof. Chong said.

Mr. Lu had been a university administrator, with a love of music and singing.

Still, he came to Yugouliang with an ambition to get things done.

He experimented first with selling local potatoes on WeChat, the Chinese socialmedia app. He found buyers, but not a business he could maintain. Transportation costs were punishing for a heavy product grown 310 kilometres by road from Beijing.

He first encountered yoga as a way to solve an unexpected problem: He could not sit cross-legged in the fashion of local villagers.

He wanted to boost his flexibility, and soon began to see yoga exercise as a salve for local ills, too - although that suggestion was initially met with hostility. "Since we were sent here to reduce poverty, some people were unhappy because they wondered why I didn't just give them money," he said. "Some even suspected I had joined some kind of evil cult."

But he promoted yoga as a way to improve health.

It was only later that he came to believe that "doing yoga can help reduce poverty."

Many people have left Yugouliang to seek work, and 60 now counts as young in the village. Those that remain often have health issues. Zhang Zhiying, 67, was hunchbacked and experienced regular pain, frequent dizziness and trouble sleeping.

"After General-Secretary Lu came here and taught us yoga, my life changed," she said. Her breathing was better, her body more flexible. "In the past, I could only eat one steamed bun a day. Now I can eat two," she said. After yoga, "my body no longer aches, and I feel happier, too," said Wu Qilian, 75. Yoga has bred fervent adherents: "We do it outdoors in winter, too. Snow or rain, nothing stops us," said Chang Shumei, 82.

The health improvements have paid dividends in the fields, with people feeling more productive in their labours - the villagers who spoke to The Globe and Mail are still working - and in other, unexpected ways. The General Administration of Sport of China, a government body, recognized Yugouliang as "China's first yoga village."

The designation carried no financial value, but the ensuing attention brought the villagers into the news - and then online.

Some acquired smartphones from their children who now live elsewhere because "they want to see their own photos in the news coverage," Mr. Lu said.

He hopes village yoga can bring tourists and, with them, improved fortunes.

Meanwhile, he has sought new ways to wring cash from the area's arid soil. Last year, he persuaded villagers to plant quinoa, hoping the more-expensive grain can triple the income from a given piece of land.

"I believe the goal of poverty elimination will be achieved. There's no doubt," he said.

At the same time, he's trying to shift the way people think about hardship. In China, people generally prioritize "material life over spiritual life. What I am doing is to change that order," he said.

With a report from Alexandra Li

Associated Graphic

Lu Wenzhen inspects a field of quinoa, a crop he recommended villagers in Yugouliang plant in hopes of raising local incomes as part of an anti-poverty campaign. PHOTOS BY NATHAN VANDERKLIPPE/ THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Perched on concrete blocks, village residents extend their arms during yoga exercises in Yugouliang, China, one of the country's most impoverished regions.

JOHN SOPINSKI/THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: TILEZEN; OPENSTREETMAP

Ge Luyun, left, and Zhang Zhihai practise yoga in Yugouliang in June, 2018. Since she started doing yoga two years ago, Ms. Ge no longer needs to take medication to treat pain in her shoulder and elbow. LAM YIK FEI/THE NEW YORK TIMES

Mr. Lu, who introduced and leads the yoga classes, arrived in Yugouliang in 2016 with two other officials.

Some of Yugouliang's residents credit the communal yoga with helping aging bodies, of which there are many - 60 now counts as young in the village as many people have left in recent years to seek work elsewhere.

Most of the villagers who participate complete Mr. Lu's routine twice a day.


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TOM AGAINST TIME
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At the age of 41, Brady's legendary longevity is being questioned. On Sunday, the Patriots quarterback will once again look to prove his doubters wrong
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By CATHAL KELLY
  
  

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Saturday, January 12, 2019 – Page S1

TORONTO -- Former New England safety Rodney Harrison likes to tell a story that explains Tom Brady.

When Harrison first got to the Patriots, he showed up at the practice facility one morning to lift weights at 6:30 a.m. As he arrived, Brady looked over and said, "Good afternoon."

The next morning Harrison showed up at 6:15 a.m.

"Good afternoon!" Brady said.

6 a.m.

"Good afternoon!"

Eventually, Harrison arrived at 5:30 in the morning, a time when roosters are still flat on their backs. Harrison ran over to Brady before he had a chance to say anything.

"I looked at him and said, 'Man, I don't give a damn what you say, Tom, I'm not coming in earlier than 5:30,' " Harrison told ESPN. "We both laughed at that."

Of course they did, because Brady had won.

When people talk about Brady, now 41 years old and still playing quarterback in the National Football League, they concentrate on his alien physicality. A body this age is not meant to do this work, and yet Brady has rarely been injured over his 18-year career. By the eye test, he stopped aging at 25.

Brady didn't have to address this sort of thing until recently, but now does it non-stop.

Last month, he upset a few of his colleagues by saying that his brain is "wired for contact" - suggesting that others' aren't.

This isn't bragging. It's marketing. Brady is monetizing his longevity through his TB12 brand - "a comprehensive approach to health and wellness," according to the literature.

Amidst that comprehensive approach are "brain exercises" (I don't know, brain in, brain out?) which don't claim to mitigate concussions, but nudge, nudge, wink, wink.

"I'm never sore," Brady said during training camp a couple of years ago. "I could practise every day. I could practise twice a day if they let us do that."

(Brady forgot to mention that, as quarterback, no one is allowed to touch him during practice.)

We once admired athletes for their effortlessness, even their loucheness. Smoking in the shower between periods, scoring the winning goal and then off to the bar. But as our society tilts once again toward puritanism, we've begun valourizing those qualities in our heroes. They ought to be in the gym at 4 a.m.

and tucked up in bed before sundown. The more robotic this obsession, the purer it must be.

No one has shown himself more committed to the Holy Rites of Fitness than Tom Brady. As he ages without consequence, his place in the wellness firmament becomes more central.

As Harrison found out, Brady isn't competing against himself or another team. He gets his pleasure from being better than you. You, personally, regardless of which side you're on.

That's why Brady keeps on keeping on. It isn't money. He has plenty. It isn't legacy or Super Bowls because ditto. Who could argue with a straight face that Brady - the sixth-round draft pick who won five titles - isn't the greatest ever?

Since he's achieved so much and is, you know, old, we think of Brady as at the end.

In fact, he is at a sort of beginning. He has recently become the greatest middle-aged team athlete in history. The longer he manages to do it, the more likely he will remain the best in perpetuity.

For him, just continuing to play has become a species of winning.

Brady has already said he will "not only next year, but beyond that." Now that's what we're going to figure out in the next four weekends. Because while Brady may still see himself at the top of his game, some doubt is seeping into the minds of the proles.

Brady was good this past season. Occasionally great, and occasionally a lot less than that. He was a mess during the two-minute drill against the Steelers a month ago, chucking balls 10 feet over the heads of his receivers. It was the first time in a long time you thought to yourself, "Tom Brady is fidgety."

The Patriots had two gimmes to end the year - Buffalo and the Jets - so we haven't seen Brady needing to be trademark-Tom Brady since.

The Patriots meet the L.A. Chargers on Sunday. It's an "end of an era" sort of game.

On the visitors' side, Chargers QB Philip Rivers gets to relive the defining moment of his own long, frustrating career. In 2008, while suffering through an ACL tear, Rivers almost managed to get his Chargers through Brady's Patriots in the AFC Championship game. Brady won. Rivers never got that far again.

One wonders if, despite all his money, Rivers, 38, ever looks over at Brady and thinks, "You're living my life."

Should Rivers lose, his somewhat fluid reputation becomes ossified - "great tactician, but not a winner."

Brady's reputation as a closer is unassailable, but his status as starter-for-life is, for the first time, in doubt. Should New England lose badly, there will be extreme pressure on the team to identify Brady's successor. The current back-up, 33-year-old Brian Hoyer, has thrown eight passes in the past two years.

He's about as likely to start for the New England Patriots as I am.

So the team has yet to draft whomever they want to replace Brady. There will have to be a lengthy period of transition. It's not clear if Brady - the guy who expects you to show up so early it's functionally the day before - has the ego-lessness necessary to groom his own heir.

This could all - and probably will - go pearshaped. The only thing you can say with any certainty is that this will happen at some point. The questions yet to be answered are "When?" and "What say will Tom Brady have in all of this?" In a perfect world, win or lose this year, Brady quits. What a statement that would be. The Rocky Marciano or Don Bradman of the gridiron; the one guy with the self-confidence to walk away without needing to take a victory lap around the league.

It would show that Brady is bigger than football.

It'd be more legendary than any game he won.

Of course, that won't happen. There are sponsors to think of.

The middle route is announcing an exit date and sticking to it, à la Derek Jeter. The NFL would absolutely love him for it. It would give the flailing league an entire year of inspirational headlines; allow them to prepare an orderly coronation for football's current college obsession, Clemson University quarterback Trevor Lawrence; and give the game a sense of purpose beyond crushing skulls and cashing cheques. The only thing with more news value than a great entrance is a dignified leave-taking.

Since Brady has no love of the suits in charge, that all seems unlikely. Brady's M.O. from the start has been showing up people who underrate him. Eventually, the only ones left were the men in charge of the league. Deflategate, driven by NFL boss Roger Goodell, has been the only sustained attack on his legacy.

Brady can still rhyme off without thinking the names of the six quarterbacks who were drafted before him. He hasn't forgotten, so it's doubtful he is in the mood to do favours.

The worst option is the Peyton Manning route: You play until you are broken and borderline incapable and then quit by necessity.

That's where Brady's headed. We all know it.

Losing Sunday's game would set this all down one path. At that point, Brady's decline can't be denied.

His well-earned reputational forcefield gets shut off.

People will begin coming at him, pushing him to think about quitting.

If it gets to that, we'll see just how driven Tom Brady is to play professional football. Because nobody gets in early enough to beat his doubters to work.

Associated Graphic

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady will take to the field on Sunday against the Los Angeles Chargers. After late-season struggles, many are wondering how much longer Brady will play.

MADDIE MEYER/ GETTY IMAGES


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Did the Flintstones have it right?
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Meat-centric meals are making a return, and if you size it right, most of the week's protein can be cooked in one go
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Saturday, January 12, 2019 – Page P8

Vegetable-forward and plant-based dishes are undeniably a new norm in contemporary cooking, both at home and in restaurants.

That said, every action has an equal and opposite response, and confidently meat-centric mains are returning to menus with old-school appeal.

These feasts inspire convivial, family-style eating, and in some ways, the over-the-top plenitude provides an unexpected comfort.

Of course, large-format servings are a standard.

And then there are dishes such as David Chang's iconic Bo Ssam at Momofuku, which stars 10 pounds of pork. But even Chang's collection has grown, now including steamed and fried Koreaninspired chicken, a whole brined-smoked-roasted seven-spice brisket and a rotisserie chicken with the legs fried and finished with a ginger glaze and the breasts stuffed with herb butter (all of these require 24-hour advance notice).

In Los Angeles last year, Adam Perry Lang, deemed "the man who mastered cooking over fire" by the Barbecue Hall of Fame, opened APL, his temple to Flinstonian cuts. The accolades followed quickly, with breathy, tantalizing descriptions of handsome slabs of protein on offer. Lang upped the ante this holiday season with APL's Beef Club: US$1,800 for an astounding 45- to 50-pound rib roast (tomahawk chop). Lang personally selects each roast for aging, then monitors its progress in the 1,000-square-foot bespoke room below the restaurant. The roast can either be enjoyed over time, experiencing the maturation as it develops, or as a single, all-out event with a crowd around the table.

At home, preparing a large-format joint of meat or bird is usually relegated to holidays. However, with the start of the new year and its associated resolutions, as many set off on a goal of meal planning or advanced prep, I urge the consideration of a larger cut of meat as a component to a strategy of leftovers.

This pork roast, and most of its ilk, requires the investment of time rather than hands-on effort. If the oven is already heated, it's as easy to prepare two chickens as it is one. A roast of any sort takes the same amount of attention, no matter the size.

And, as an additional boon, those larger cuts are often more cost-effective than portions. Roast it on Sunday and feast for the days following, or stash individual meals in the deep freeze for later.

That extra chicken can be used in pot pie or stew.

Brisket braised to succulence is my dream for nextday hash, or layered with sautéed onions, wilted greens and gossamer-thin potatoes in a creamy gratin. Cook a lamb leg with confidence, a side of salmon or a whole turkey breast - maybe even two - knowing your future self will be thankful.

My route with the pork roast here is meant to lead to enchiladas in the future, or maybe a tamale pie, and most definitely a medianoche (a pressed Cuban sandwich with cheese and pickles). It begins with a dazzling marinade inspired by Mexico and Cuba, one full of floral-sharp citrus, blistered chilies and robust herbs. Speaking of the herbs, the recipe mentions cilantro and Mexican oregano, but those seeking an extra zing might want to sneak in fresh mint as well.

I refer to this as my low-ish and slow-ish pork roast, because four-ish total hours of cooking is hardly quick, it is comparatively modest to the patience-wearing six to eight hours it would require at the most gentle heat. Those who have such commitment, I salute. Even with that slight compromise of hastening the process, the shoulder emerges from the oven fragrant and melting. Taking a cue from Adam Perry Lang's expertise, I crib his technique of a "board dressing" to finish the roast - here, a gutsy second dousing of the flavours with which we began. It's a last-minute flourish that makes all the difference. One day's cooking and the week is set.

CITRUS AND HERB PORK SHOULDER INGREDIENTS

(SERVES 8 TO 10)

For the marinade and pork

1 large onion, peeled and quartered through the root

2 jalapenos Zest from

1 orange, cut in large strips with a peeler Zest from

1 lime, cut in large strips with a peeler

2 dried bay leaves

1/2 cup orange juice, from about

2 oranges ¼ cup lime juice, from 2 to 3 limes

1/2 cup fruity olive oil 1 cup chopped cilantro stems (the stems from about a medium bunch)

1 head of garlic, cloves separated and peeled

1 tablespoon fresh oregano leaves, preferably Mexican, or 11/2 teaspoons dry

11/2 teaspoons ground cumin

1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 6- to 7-pound pork shoulder, rind removed, boneless and tied For the dressing Medium bunch cilantro, leaves only (stems used above)

2 teaspoons fresh oregano leaves, preferably Mexican, optional 1 jalapeno, stemmed and seeded

2 garlic cloves, peeled

¼ cup orange juice, from

1 orange 2 tablespoons lime juice, from 1 lime

1 /3 cup fruity olive oil Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste Options to serve Sliced radishes Raw or pickled onions Shredded cabbage Pico de gallo or salsa roja Tortillas, warmed Limes Preferably the day before you want to eat, preheat a seasoned cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat.

Without oil, blacken the onion wedges and jalapenos on all sides. Alternatively, blister all on an open gas flame, using tongs to turn. Set aside to cool.

Pop the onions, strips of citrus zest and bay leaves into a zip-top bag large enough to accommodate the pork.

Pour the juices and olive oil into the carafe of a blender. Drop in the cilantro stems, peeled garlic cloves, oregano, cumin, kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper. Stem and seed the blistered jalapenos, and add to the carafe. Blend until smooth.

Taste, and adjust as needed - keeping in mind that the pork can handle an enthusiastic seasoning. The marinade should taste brightly acidic but not harsh; add more olive oil to round it out if needed, or more citrus if not sharp enough. When satisfied, tuck the pork shoulder into the bag, and pour the marinade over. Seal and massage the liquid into the shoulder, making sure it's coated well on all sides. Place in a baking dish or similar and refrigerate for six hours or preferably overnight, turning periodically.

To prepare the shoulder, preheat an oven to 325 F with a rack in the lower third. Line a quarter sheet pan or large shallow roasting tin with a double layer of foil. Place the shoulder into the centre of the foil, fat side up, then decant the marinade and onions on top. Pluck out the zest strips and discard. Loosely bring the edges of the foil up around the pork. Place in the preheated oven and cook for three hours. Pull back the foil, increase the temperature to 425 F and roast for around 90 minutes more, or until the internal temperature reaches 185 F at the centre and the exterior is well browned and cracked. If the roast is browning too quickly, re-cover with foil. Remove the shoulder to a board and rest for 30 minutes.

As the shoulder sits, make the dressing. On a board, pile the cilantro, oregano, jalapeno and garlic. Run your knife through all until finely minced.

Scrape the resulting confetti into a medium bowl.

Stir in the citrus juices and olive oil. Season to taste with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper.

If enjoying the shoulder as tacos, untie and either slice against the grain as needed or shred with two forks. Anoint the sliced or shredded meat with some of the dressing. (As pictured, baste with dressing, present the roast in its entirety, and carve at table.)

Serve with lots of sliced radish, pickled onions, shredded cabbage, salsa roja and lime wedges. Offer warm tortillas alongside. Leftover shoulder can be stored whole, bathed in some of the dressing, which will keep it the most lush (store the remaining separately). Or, portion and freeze the shoulder in smaller portions, each with a pour of dressing as lubricant.

Associated Graphic

TARA O'BRADY/THE GLOBE AND MAIL


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Food industry outcry recasts ad rules for kids
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Newly obtained documents reveal details of backlash that prompted Health Canada to change proposed regulations
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By SUSAN KRASHINSKY ROBERTSON
  
  

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Monday, January 14, 2019 – Page B1

Health Canada is revamping regulations that will restrict food and beverage marketing to children after its initial proposals provoked an outcry from the industry.

Documents obtained by The Globe and Mail through Access to Information legislation provide insight into the extent of criticism that Health Canada has faced from representatives of the food and beverage, retail, advertising and media industries - including labelling its proposed regulations "unrealistic," "punitive" and "commercially catastrophic." The federal department has been developing new marketing rules for more than a year and a half.

At the heart of the debate is a Senate bill to amend the Food and Drugs Act introduced in September, 2016, intended to limit unhealthy food and beverage ads aimed at children. In June of 2017, Health Canada conducted consultations on proposed regulations that it would enforce once the amendment took effect, applying restrictions to ads for foods that contained more than a certain daily threshold of salt, sugar and/ or saturated fats. It received more than 1,100 responses, including objections that the rules would have several unintended and negative effects on companies' ability to do business. Media buying firm GroupM estimated that $350-million in TV ads and $600-million in digital ads could be affected by the proposals.

The pushback has already prompted Health Canada to make a number of changes to proposals it put forward during those consultations, including dropping a prohibition against sponsorship of children's sports. Also, it will restrict ads only in TV programs where children make up a certain percentage of the audience, rather than broadly restricting TV ads by the time of day when kids are likely to be watching.

Both of those proposals were points of contention in industry submissions. Advertisers including Unilever Canada, Nestlé Canada and Dairy Farmers of Canada objected to the idea to restrict sports sponsorships, emphasizing the financial support they provide for physical activity.

The time-based approach to restricting TV ads would by default restrict companies' ability to advertise to adults as well, some submissions argued. General Mills Canada called the plan "overbroad" and "unjustifiable," while the Canadian Beverage Association called it an "enforcement nightmare" and a "massive overreach." Some raised the point that under such rules, children might be exposed to beer and lottery ads during an evening hockey game but not ads for such things as a steak dinner - because it had more than a certain percentage of daily recommended salt, sugar or fat.

The Canadian Association of Broadcasters suggested the impact of the regulations on children would be "negligible," because although the restrictions would directly affect TV broadcasters in this country, the rules would be difficult to enforce on foreign-owned websites such as YouTube, where kids spend so much of their time.

It wasn't just restrictions on TV ads that raised concerns: IAB Canada (the Interactive Advertising Bureau) pointed out that limiting ads to children would require websites and apps to track minors in a way that could violate data protections under Canadian privacy law.

Furthermore, some submissions, including those from the Association of Canadian Advertisers and Food & Consumer Products of Canada, suggested that the proposals would restrict advertisers' freedom of expression, which extends to commercial speech; this raised the spectre of a challenge to the rules under Canada's Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Some submissions flat-out objected to restricting ads based solely on levels of nutrients such as salt, fat, or sugar. Dairy Farmers of Canada pointed out that the nutrient-level approach would "erroneously categorize several milk products as unhealthy." And the Grocery Manufacturers' Association argued that, for example, "a saturated fat level appropriate for nuts or nut butters would not be appropriate for other food categories."

Some argued that it should be left to industry to self-regulate; many major advertisers participate in the Canadian Children's Food & Beverage Advertising Initiative, which limits advertising to kids 12 and under for foods that do not meet the group's own nutritional criteria. Advertising Standards Canada, which oversees the program, wrote that it has found broad compliance among members. Some companies that are members argue their products are not inherently bad for children, as long as they are consumed in moderation. Confectionery company Ferrero Canada Ltd.

noted in its submission that its "philosophy is that there no such thing as good foods and bad foods; instead there are good diets and bad diets," and that treats like the ones it sells can be "part of a balanced diet" when enjoyed from time to time.

While the rules are still under development, Health Canada has now heeded some of the other advice it received from Corporate Canada. Following the consultations, this past May, it provided an update to the regulatory approach that included the sponsorship exemption, as well as defining "child directed media channels" as those where children form a "significant portion of the audience." It is considering a threshold of 15 per cent, while many industry submissions proposed 30 per cent to 35 per cent.

"We would have challenged it under the Charter," Ron Lund, president and chief executive of the Association of Canadian Advertisers, said in an interview, referring to the time-based restrictions.

One particular point of contention in industry submissions was the proposal to restrict advertising to children under 17. The bill itself has since been amended to change the age restriction to children under 13. After this and other amendments, the bill passed its third reading in the House of Commons this September, and is now back before the Senate.

Health Canada has also made an effort to meet with industry, including attending an event in Ottawa on Nov. 5 with roughly 50 representatives of sectors that could be affected by the new rules. Multiple industry submissions had complained of feeling shut out of the process of developing regulations.

At the November meeting, Health Canada heard concerns that by evaluating products based on certain nutrient levels, they'd be labelling many foods as unhealthy. In early December, its director-general responsible for health products and food appeared before the standing committee on agriculture and forestry to explain how the regulatory approach has changed. Karen McIntyre said the intention is to define a food as either permitted for marketing to children, or not. "We are not categorizing foods as being unhealthy or healthy," she said, adding that more meetings with industry are planned.

"Things have changed," Mr. Lund said, adding that he has noticed an uptick in consultations with industry particularly since November. "We hope it's withheld [from final Senate approval] until we see where the regulatory side might go." Not everyone was critical of Health Canada's approach, however. In the summer consultations, organizations such as the Dietitians of Canada, the Canadian Cancer Society, Diabetes Canada, and others, agreed with many of the proposed measures, and even encouraged Health Canada to go further, broadening timebased advertising restrictions on television to encompass wider swaths of the day and evening.

More recently, the Heart and Stroke Foundation - which is a leading member of the Stop Marketing to Kids Coalition - has raised concerns about "delay tactics" by industry, said Manuel Arango, the Foundation's director of policy, advocacy and engagement.

However, Mr. Arango said that he agreed with some of the changes Health Canada has made, such as exempting certain dairy products that contain important nutrients from marketing restrictions. "I think so far we're on the right track," he said. "We would have preferred to have adolescents [up to age 17] covered, but Rome wasn't built in a day."

Health Canada's development of the regulations is continuing, spokesman Eric Morrissette said in an e-mailed statement, adding that it has held numerous discussions with industry and with public health experts over the past year.

"We will continue to consult with Canadians, stakeholders and experts as we bring forward proposed regulations."

Associated Graphic

The Canadian unit of the Interactive Advertising Bureau has highlighted that limiting the number of food ads to which children are exposed would require websites - such as foreign-owned YouTube, where children spend a considerable amount of their viewing time - to track minors in a way that could violate data protections under domestic privacy law.

HEART AND STROKE/YOUTUBE


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Superheroes and franchise extensions will be impossible to avoid this year. Here, we offer our guide on how to prepare for the onslaught
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Wednesday, January 9, 2019 – Page A14

In the waning days of 2018, Hollywood received a welcome surprise: Worldwide box-office revenue for the year is set to hit a historic high of US$41.7-billion (including a record US$11.9-billion in North America alone).

Across the globe, that means an uptick of 2.7 per cent compared with 2017. The cause? That'd be the approximately 50 sequels, reboots, remakes, spinoffs and franchise-launchers that dominated studio slates all year long.

Expect more of the same for 2019 - especially as studios prepare to consolidate (farewell, 20th Century Fox), further arm themselves against Netflix and each do their best to bust through the boxoffice milestone the industry just hit. To prepare for the big-budget onslaught, I presents my guide to the 10 potential blockbusters that will dominate the next 12 months - for better, and for worse. (All release dates subject to change.)

THE LEGO MOVIE 2: THE SECOND PART The Lego Movie's original co-directors, Phil Lord and Chris Miller, are too busy with approximately three dozen other projects (including the excellent Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse) to return for this sequel, but they did have a hand in the screenplay. So, that's reassuring, right? And there's a fine enough Jurassic World joke in the trailer? But just as it was so easy to approach the first film with skepticism, I'm willing to give the maybe-unnecessary The Second Part the benefit of the doubt.

There's a chance the animated film may turn out to be as funny and subversive as the original.

Even if it will be impossible to top Everything Is Awesome.

(Feb. 8) CAPTAIN MARVEL After 20 films, Marvel Studios is finally putting a female superhero front and centre with Captain Marvel. And you can be sure that Marvel Cinematic Universe landlord Disney will attempt to wring as much gender-parity applause from the long-delayed move as possible.

But if late is better than never, at least the always stellar Brie Larson gets the largest spotlight of her career as the title character.

And hey, Jude Law is in this film, too, and he's reliable in a skeezygrubby-fun kind of way. It's just hard to get too excited when Marvel's rival, Warner Bros.' DC division, produced Wonder Woman as its third superhero film - and they usually have no idea what they're doing. (March 8) AVENGERS: ENDGAME Speaking of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, prepare your watercooler conversations accordingly, as Avengers: Endgame will be all anyone can talk about this spring.

Will Earth's mightiest heroes defeat Mad Titan Thanos? Will Spider-Man come back from the dead? (Hint: Spider-Man: Far From Home opens July 5.) Will Disney make approximately three-gillion dollars? The suspense, it's killing me - and my water-cooler etiquette, too. (April 26) GODZILLA: KING OF THE MONSTERS Given that audiences have faced several unrelated giant-monster versus giant-other-thing movies between the time the "original" Godzilla came out in 2014 and today, King of the Monsters arrives as a kind of "oh yeahhhh, that franchise" movie. I suppose the excitement around Japan's biggest and baddest large adult son is eternal - and director Michael Dougherty's new movie cannot be worse than something like Pacific Rim: Uprising (or can it?).

Plus, the human cast here is impressive (Vera Farmiga, Kyle Chandler, Stranger Things breakout Millie Bobby Brown). And Godzilla's nemeses Mothra, Rodan and Ghidorah all make appearances, suggesting a certain level of enjoyable cinematic madness. Or maybe it is me who is just being the real monster? (May 31)

DARK PHOENIX Suspiciously delayed from its original fall 2018 release date, this new X-Men movie is guaranteed to at least not be so bad as to kill the franchise. (But that's only because its spinoff, The New Mutants, also originally destined for release last year, is opening Aug. 2.)

But X-fanatics are still advised to soak up all that Dark Phoenix has to offer, given that its studio, 20th Century Fox, is soon to be swallowed whole by Disney, and it's anyone's guess as to what the Mouse House might do with the property. Jennifer Lawrence, Michael Fassbender and James McAvoy all return (probably unrelated: contractual obligations are awesome!), as they watch Sophie Turner's Jean Grey go through the same Dark Phoenix shenanigans that Famke Janssen already endured in X-Men: The Last Stand 12 long years ago. (June 7) TOY STORY 4 I'm still recovering from the final act of Toy Story 3, so you'll have to excuse me if I'm still not ready to return to the world of Buzz, Woody and, oh God, that incinerator scene! Sorry, I'll compose myself. It's been fun to doubt the Toy Story sequels since the first follow-up arrived way back in 1999, but somehow Pixar has consistently managed to live up to the spirit of the original, and then some. (Maybe they could also work that magic on the Cars and Incredibles series, hmm?) Joining the adventures this time are a handful of new playthings, including Forky (voiced by Tony Hale) and a pair of quick-witted stuffed animals voiced by former brothers-in-sketch-comedy Jordan Peele and Keegan-Michael Key. (June 21) THE LION KING If this list seems heavy on Disney titles, that's only because the studio is going to dominate your 2019 movie calendar - and you'd better like it. Not only with its superhero and animated fare (Frozen 2 is coming Nov. 22, and don't even try to let it go), but with its relatively new product stream dedicated to "liveaction" reimaginings of its classic cartoons.

Aladdin is up first May 24, but the real juggernaut will be Jon Favreau's The Lion King, featuring the voices of Donald Glover, Seth Rogen and Beyoncé. Still, the marketing of the film as "live-action" is confusing at best, given that nearly every animal onscreen will be computer-generated. At least Favreau's similar spin on The Jungle Book had a flesh-andblood human Mowgli at its core. Let's just call The Lion King 2.0 a "differently animated" reimagining. It will still make a billion dollars.

(July 19) FAST AND FURIOUS PRESENTS: HOBBS & SHAW As much fun as it is to bemoan all these soulless studio productions, I am unreservedly excited for Hobbs & Shaw, the first spinoff in the increasingly ludicrous (in a good way!) Fast and Furious franchise. Certainly, it will be dumb. Most definitely, it will be loud. But it will also feature Dwayne Johnson homoerotically tussling with Jason Statham, a villainous turn from Idris Elba, ridiculously stupid cars and Vin Diesel pouting off-screen, a single tear rolling down his cheek. I am buckled up. (Aug. 2) IT:

CHAPTER TWO To most everyone's surprise, director Andy Muschietti's 2017 take on Stephen King's classic horror novel was a massive success. At least this sequel arrives not as a superfluous cash-in, but a necessary follow-up to the first, as the original film only covered half the territory of King's book. In Chapter Two, we catch up with the Loser's Club (now played by Jessica Chastain, Bill Hader and James McAvoy, among others) as they're all grown up, and still battling demons both metaphorical and real. (Sept. 6) STAR WARS: EPISODE IX The only things known about J.J. Abrams' still untitled Star Wars movie are as follows: a) It's intended to close out the "Skywalker" storyline for good; b) Carrie Fisher will have a decently sized role, despite the fact that she died a year before The Last Jedi opened; c) Everyone will be mad about the film in some way or another. (Dec. 20)

Associated Graphic

Lizards, Larson and Legos will dominate the multiplex this year via, clockwise from left, Godzilla: King of the Monsters, Captain Marvel and the Lego Movie 2: The Second Part.

Jon Favreau's computer-generated retelling of The Lion King, set for release in July, is a surefire hit in the making, even if its marketing as a 'live-action' version is confusing.


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'I've come a long way': Aymen Derbali and his family find a new life after Quebec's mosque tragedy
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Two years ago, a gunman's rampage left six worshippers dead and a further 19 injured. Now, perseverance and the kindness of others have brought one man a new home and renewed hope
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By INGRID PERITZ
  
  

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Thursday, January 10, 2019 – Page A8

The nightmares have stopped for Aymen Derbali. He no longer hears the screams of his friends falling to a shooter's bullets. Instead, Mr. Derbali now has a recurring dream.

"In my dream, I can walk," he says from his wheelchair. "I don't remember the dream, but in it, I am the way I was before."

Mr. Derbali sits in the January light of his spacious bungalow, purchased through the kindness of 4,800 strangers. His wife and three children surround him. He can watch soccer on TV with his older son and uses his pinky finger to type messages on his iPhone.

Walking again may just be a dream: Bullet fragments lodged in his spinal cord mean his legs remain paralyzed. But the fact Mr.Derbali has made it this far, with the help of so many, is a small symbol of triumph over the violence inflicted by a gunman at the Islamic Cultural Centre in Quebec City. Two years after the attack that left six Muslim men dead, Mr.Derbali has returned to family life in a new home and a broken, but healing, body.

"Sometimes I have to fight the sorrow I feel, but I compare my situation to how I was in hospital and it comforts me," he says. "I came out of a coma and I couldn't eat or drink. I couldn't speak. I've come a long way."

Two milestones now approach: the anniversary of the Jan. 29 attack, followed by the sentencing of shooter Alexandre Bissonnette 10 days later. Mr. Derbali, 42, knows he might not have survived to witness them.

On that frigid night in 2017, he was carried out of the mosque and into an ambulance with seven bullets in his body and such a massive amount of blood loss that his family prepared for the worst. "I said that for sure, my father is dead," his now 10-yearold son, Ayoub, recalls. "I was sad."

Doctors put him into an artificial coma. At one point, they told his wife she could consider taking him off life support, she says.

"They said there was no hope," Nedra Zahouani says. "A bullet has exploded in his spine. They said he wouldn't be able to move his four limbs, and it would be hard to live at home, or even in the hospital."

She refused. She vowed to her husband she would remain by his side, even as he lay in a coma.

"You'll stay with us and as long as you go down this road, I'll be with you," she told him. "Even if you never come to live at home with us, I'll always stay with you. I'll take you as you are."

Seven days later, her husband moved his hand, a flutter that became a miracle in her eyes.

He woke up after two months and only then discovered the massacre's horrific toll. In all, he spent six months in hospital and another year in a rehabilitation centre, fighting to regain some control over his wounded body.

Medical staff said he couldn't return to the family's fourth-floor apartment because it wasn't adapted for his wheelchair: The family would need a new home.

His story prompted a Toronto group, DawaNet, to launch a fundraising campaign that collected more than $400,000. Last August, a year and a half after he fell to the mosque floor and prepared to die, Mr. Derbali rolled his wheelchair into the family's newly bought home in the Quebec City suburb of Sainte-Foy. Its rooms and doorways are wide enough to accommodate his motorized wheelchair, which he can propel by moving the joystick with his nerve-damaged right hand.

His days bring new rewards. For months, he feared he would never be able to hold his children again.

Now, the couple's two younger children - two-year-old Maryem and six-year-old Youssouf - clamber onto his lap. With fragile hands, he lightly strokes their hair.

He is grateful to those who made contributions from the four corners of the world. Donations came from across Quebec and Canada and as far away as Ireland, Germany and Kuwait.

"People of all religions gave - Jews, Christians, Buddhists," Mr.Derbali says. "It proves that deep down, most people want good, and evil is marginal. A lot of people have good hearts."

Mr. Derbali was a forceful presence during Mr. Bissonnette's trial at the Quebec City courthouse last year, an embodiment of the mosque tragedy and the human cost of hatred. After Mr. Derbali testified from his wheelchair at Mr. Bissonnette's sentencing hearing, Superior Court Justice François Huot praised him for his "incredible demonstration of courage" during the shooting. Mr.

Derbali had deliberately stood in the line of fire to try to distract the gunman, saying he preferred to be paralyzed for life than to flee.

Now, Mr. Derbali is eager for the court case to close, ending what prosecutor Thomas Jacques called one of the worst hate crimes in Canadian legal history.

Mr. Bissonnette pleaded guilty to six counts of first-degree murder and is awaiting a sentence that could reach an unprecedented 150 years in jail.

"We're eager to move on so we can stop talking about it," Mr. Derbali says.

An IT specialist with two master's degrees from Laval University, Mr. Derbali has had some job offers and hopes to return to work part-time. He would also welcome the chance to speak to students about the dangers of extremism. He worries about the presence of far-right groups in Quebec City, even if he knows they are marginal.

Statistics Canada reported that hate crimes against Muslims nearly tripled in Quebec in 2017, peaking the month after the mosque shooting. Mr. Derbali says he's troubled by anti-Muslim invectives spread through social media. Yet he insists he will not leave Quebec City, the place he came to from Tunisia 18 years ago.

"We're talking about a very small minority," he says. "The proof is that I didn't think of moving."

Mostly, Mr. Derbali wants to continue to bear witness. He wants to speak for the six men who have been silenced. On the 29th, he will return to the mosque in a personal act of defiance. He'll see the reminder of his own brush with death: A square of carpeting has been removed from the mosque prayer space and replaced. The carpet was thoroughly cleaned after the massacre, but some stubborn spots wouldn't come out. One of them was the stain of Mr. Derbali's blood.

"I want to send a message to the extremists on the right: We're not worried about returning [to] where we were killed and injured.

I'm returning to say that maybe [the shooter] succeeded in injuring me, but he didn't succeed in weakening my faith," he says.

The visit will also be a marker on his path to recovery. "I'm returning to the mosque to say that, mentally, I'm getting over it," he says. "It's not causing me nightmares any more."

Associated Graphic

Aymen Derbali, who survived the Quebec City mosque shooting in 2017, navigates a hallway with his wife Nedra Zahouani in their new home in Quebec City on Jan. 2. The home was purchased for the family through charitable donations to accommodate Mr. Derbali's accessibility needs, as a spinal injury sustained in the shooting has confined him to a wheelchair.

Mr. Derbali points to scars on his arm, tangible reminders of the damage his body sustained when he chose to place himself in the line of fire to distract the shooter in January, 2017.

PHOTOS BY DARIO AYALA

For months after the shooting, Mr. Derbali says, he feared he would never be able to hold his children again. Now, he plays with his 10-year-old son, Ayoub, and two-year-old daughter, Maryem, in their new home.

On the evening of Jan. 29, 2017, a gunman entered the Islamic Cultural Centre of Quebec City and opened fire on congregants shortly after the end of evening prayers.

PHOTOS BY FRED LUM


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Breaking the silence on infertility
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Programs for couples undergoing treatment aim to heal damage to relationships
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By ZOSIA BIELSKI
  
  

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Tuesday, January 15, 2019 – Page A13

Helplessness and hell: That's how Mike Clabby describes the three years he and his wife, Lyndsey, spent trying to conceive. Both in their early 30s, they had been given the frustrating diagnosis of "unexplained infertility." Three rounds of intrauterine insemination and two rounds of in vitro fertilization (IVF) followed, as well as a miscarriage.

There were tears and anger, with the two blaming themselves for not trying for a baby when they were younger. The agonizing experience tested their marriage.

"It's the emotional trauma of your relationship going from two people in love who go for dinner and have fun, to having sex on a time clock," said Mike Clabby, a senior bank executive in Mississauga, Ont., who is now 39. "It can make or break you."

A 2012 study estimated that between 11.5 per cent to 15.7 per cent of Canadians experience infertility, with up to 508,000 couples affected in this country. Relationship distress often comes with the territory, according to a wide body of international research. Even so, few mental health supports exist for Canadians who turn to assisted reproduction. The Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association counts just 93 counsellors who list infertility as an area of specialization. Many couples are unwilling to confide in family or friends who may be having their own children with ease.

Partners struggling emotionally often remain silent in the face of a persistent myth that tells women all they need to do to get pregnant is to "stop stressing out" - a claim researchers argue does not bear out scientifically.

Now, several Canadian initiatives are emerging to improve the quality of these couples' lives as they embark on expanding their families.

In Quebec, researchers recently developed an innovative couples' therapy model for those using fertility clinics. A team from the University of Montreal and Sherbrooke University offered 29 heterosexual couples cognitive behavioural therapy in group sessions with a psychologist and an infertility nurse. The 90-minute sessions highlighted issues such as stress, loss of control and relationship strain, as well as coping mechanisms. Afterward, participants reported that their depression had lessened. They grew closer to their partners and their relationships felt stronger. The promising research has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy.

At Montreal's Jewish General Hospital, researchers have developed a new mobile app for people going through fertility treatment.

Infotility includes resources on mental well-being and a message board monitored by peer supporters who have also undergone treatments. The app is now being tested at fertility clinics in Montreal and Toronto.

In Prince Edward Island, the province approved coverage for infertility counselling with social workers and registered nurses trained in mental health in late 2017.

And in Mississauga, 36-yearold senior brand manager Lyndsey Clabby and her collaborator Michelle Strong recently launched myMindBodyBaby, an online community for women that features experts' advice for managing anxiety and a forum connecting would-be mothers to others who "get it."

The new initiatives recognize that infertility challenges every aspect of couples' lives, including their unions.

"People don't understand how all-encompassing infertility is," said Jan Silverman, a Toronto infertility counsellor who runs a free, monthly support group at Create Fertility Centre. "It's a stranglehold on your life."

Visits to the fertility clinic take over: couples miss work, cancel vacations and step away from their social lives to make it to their numerous appointments. Partners are forced to weigh substantial life decisions with no guarantee that they will have a child. Do they look for new jobs with better family benefits and parentalleave plans? Do they scout for a bigger home and buy an SUV, or hold still?

Marital tension rises from the sheer expense of fertility treatments, which often run in the tens of thousands of dollars. Silverman said financially strained couples often overlook their own mental health needs because they're penny pinching for the next IVF cycle. This, even as many become increasingly self-critical: "Our friends are making babies in bed. They're not spending $60,000," Silverman said, describing clients' complaints.

For some partners determined to have a baby, the entire marriage can become a question mark - a reality underscored in the recent Netflix drama Private Life, about a husband and wife in their 40s desperately trying to have a child.

"Infertility poses a significant threat to the relationship because staying with this partner means there's a possibility that you may not be able to have children, even with treatment," said Katherine Péloquin, a co-author of the Quebec group-therapy study.

Couples can experience shock, grief, anxiety and anger throughout the fertility process, said Péloquin, who is an associate professor of psychology at the University of Montreal. Prior research from the Quebec team found that gender stereotypes deal another blow to spouses staring down infertility. Women whose self-worth remains wrapped up in motherhood feel that their bodies have failed them. Infertile men often become distressed about their masculinity.

"This is supposed to be very innate and second nature to humans. You're wondering, 'What's wrong with me?' " said Carolynn Dubé, the Moncton-based executive director of Fertility Matters Canada, which has 60 supportgroup leaders who run in-person sessions across the country and moderate online groups.

Counselling is not legally required under Canada's federal Assisted Human Reproduction Act, according to Sara Cohen, a Toronto lawyer who founded Fertility Law Canada. Cohen said many clinics require counselling when third-party reproduction is involved; surrogates and gamete donors are routinely reimbursed for psychological assessments and therapy. When it comes to couples themselves, support is more hit and miss. Patient advocates believe more fertility clinics should offer on-site therapy, rather than referring people out after they're worn out and distraught by the invasive treatments. "It shouldn't take weeping in a doctor's office," Silverman said. "It should be a part of the process."

Group therapy is critical for these couples, experts say, because infertility can be an isolating experience. They are pushing for more mental health professionals to get trained in infertility issues, especially in remote areas.

For now, Silverman and other infertility counsellors use Skype to connect with couples struggling in far flung towns across Canada.

For some spouses, the reality is they will never have a child. Silverman tries to guide them to envision other ways of connecting.

She asks them, "If you're not going to be parenting at this moment together, what is going to keep you growing as a couple?" On the prospect of childlessness, Quebec's Péloquin found that 10 weeks of group therapy shifted some couples' attitudes.

They no longer felt as pressured by the cultural push toward parenthood, or as devastated by the possibility of no baby. "The point was to reduce their stress going through infertility and the treatment, giving them access to other couples who experience the same thing," Péloquin said.

Lyndsey and Mike Clabby were down to one last embryo when they got the news: She was pregnant, with a baby boy born in 2016. As they set out to a fertility clinic again for baby No. 2, they received an even bigger surprise: Lyndsey was already pregnant.

The couple's second son was born in May.

The spouses believe their three-year struggle ultimately strengthened their marriage, teaching them how to read each other and speak more honestly.

"The silver lining is that I think it's made me a better husband and father," Mike Clabby said.

"Your toddler is having a tantrum and it's upsetting. Then you think, 'I really wanted this - I'm okay with this.' It creates a different level of love and patience, if you can endure it."

Associated Graphic

Mike and Lyndsey Clabby play with their children Bronsen, 2, and six-month-old Sawyer at their home in Mississauga, Ont., on Dec. 20, 2018. Mike says dealing with 'unexplained infertility' in his relationship made him a better husband and father.

PHOTOS BY TIJANA MARTIN/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

After struggling with infertility, Lyndsey and a collaborator launched an online community called myMindBodyBaby to help would-be mothers.


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China detains Canadian family as Huawei spat escalates
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By ROBERT FIFE, STEVEN CHASE, NATHAN VANDERKLIPPE, BILL CURRY
  
  

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Thursday, January 17, 2019 – Page A1

BEIJING SHERBROOKE -- A Canadian woman whose prodemocracy father is imprisoned in China was detained and intimidated by Chinese security authorities while transiting through Beijing International Airport on Wednesday.

The detention of Ti-Anna Wang and her infant daughter and husband appears to be the latest reprisal against Canadians in a Chinese campaign to force Canada to allow a senior executive of Huawei Technologies Co.

Ltd. to return home. Ms. Wang's family was en route from Seoul to Toronto on a connecting flight through Beijing International Airport when six police officers boarded the aircraft.

"I was escorted off, detained with my daughter and separated from my husband for almost two hours," Ms. Wang said in an email to The Globe and Mail. "It was a shocking, terrifying and senseless ordeal with no purpose but to bully, punish and intimidate me and my family."

In a phone call with The Globe from Seoul, Ms. Wang described the Chinese authorities as "unnecessarily cruel," saying they wouldn't even allow her to get the diaper bag from her husband to change her 11-month-old daughter.

Her detention follows the Dec.

1 arrest of Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou at the request of the United States on allegations of banking fraud related to U.S. sanctions against Iran.

China has now held two Canadians, Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, for more than a month on allegations of endangering national security and sentenced Canadian Robert Schellenberg on Monday to death for drug smuggling. China has interrogated Mr. Kovrig, a former diplomat, about his past work in China, prompting a protest from Ottawa that Beijing is violating the rules of diplomatic immunity.

Canadian teacher Sarah McIver was also detained, but has been released.

Calling China's behaviour "a threat to all countries," Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said Wednesday she welcomes the support Canada is receiving from allies as it opposes China's treatment of Canadian citizens.

"Our government has been energetically reaching out to our allies and explaining that the arbitrary detentions of Canadians are not just about Canada. They represent a way of behaving which is a threat to all countries," Ms. Freeland said.

The Chinese government has discounted Ottawa's efforts to marshal international support against Beijing's treatment of the Canadians.

"I can tell you for sure that we are not worried at all," Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said in Beijing on Wednesday. Although most Group of Seven countries, and the European Union, have issued statements supportive of the Canadian position, that doesn't amount to much, she said.

"You can count by the fingers of your hand the few allies of Canada that chose to side with it on this issue. These several countries can by no means represent the entire international community." Ms. Wang, who wasn't allowed to use her phone or computer or to contact the Canadian embassy, said Chinese officials told her she was not allowed to return to Canada and put her on a flight back to South Korea.

"I asked repeatedly why I couldn't just return to Canada, as I had no intention of staying in China and [was] simply transiting," she said.

"They said they were investigating my case but they wouldn't give me any information."

Ms. Wang was barred from entering China last week when she arrived at Hangzhou airport even though she had obtained a visa in August to visit her dissident father, who is in serious ill health from several debilitating strokes suffered while in solitary confinement. Her father is a Chinese national who was kidnapped in Vietnam in 2002 and smuggled to China, where he was sentenced to life in prison on espionage and terrorism charges.

Ms. Wang said she believes China was punishing her in retaliation for the dispute with Canada and the fact that she had spoken to The Globe last week about being denied into the country to visit her father.

"It felt like a very deliberate retaliation," she said. "I was terrified because this is a country with no rule of law and I had no idea what was going to happen to me."

Times Wang, Ti-Anna's brother who was allowed to enter China on a U.S. passport and visit his father, said the Chinese authorities "were intimidating and aggressive, unlike last week."

"It seems clear that something changed since last week and that they are trying to send a message," he said. It had the air of reprisal, he said, for the public criticism directed at China after Ms. Wang described her eviction from the country.

China has taken issue with the arrest last month of Ms. Meng, who was released on bail in Vancouver and is facing an independent judicial hearing. China called her detention "vile, unconscionable and evil."

But former Liberal justice minister Irwin Cotler said those words "define and describe China's hostage diplomacy ever since - including its detention of Canadians Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor and the arbitrarily cruel death sentence of Robert Schellenberg."

"But nothing exposes and unmasks China's contempt for the rule of law, in China as well as in Canada, and its own 'vile, unconscionable and evil' conduct than its cruel and inhumane treatment of Ti-Anna Wang and her infant daughter," Mr. Cotler, now the head of Montreal-based Raoul Wallenberg Centre for Human Rights, said in an e-mail to The Globe.

Conservative foreign affairs critic Erin O'Toole said the treatment of Ms. Wang is "very, very concerning because it is now a pattern."

He urged Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to phone Chinese President Xi Jinping and attempt to resolve the diplomatic dispute. He noted that Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei, the father of Ms. Meng, has said his daughter was treated "kindly" by Canadians.

"These are the things the Prime Minister could be making in a person-toperson discussion of the situation with the President," Mr. O'Toole said. "Even to the point of saying that he will personally keep a watching brief on the process in Canada and that he can be assured our justice system is the most fair in the world."

Mr. Trudeau and his cabinet met privately with six senior ambassadors Wednesday evening as Canada mounts an international campaign to gain global allies in its diplomatic battle with China.

John McCallum, Canada's ambassador to China and a former member of the Trudeau cabinet, said Wednesday evening that he has been in contact with Chinese authorities and his focus is on the safety of the three Canadians.

"My first priority by far is to do everything in my capacity to secure the release of the two Michaels as quickly as possible and to help to save the life of Mr. Schellenberg," he said.

Federal ministers are gathered in Sherbrooke for three days of meetings ahead of Parliament's return on Jan. 28.

Ms. Freeland addressed Canada's strained diplomatic relations Wednesday during a stop in Repentigny, Que. "This is a difficult moment in our relationship with China," she told reporters.

Ms. Freeland said Canada is grateful for the support it has received in recent days from Germany, Estonia, France, Latvia, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Britain and the United States. She said she will be raising China's actions with international political and business leaders next week when she attends the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

Australia, too, has spoken out on multiple occasions, with acting foreign minister Simon Birmingham commenting this week on the death sentence for Mr. Schellenberg. "We expect at a level of principle that not only the death penalty should not be applied but also wherever people are in trouble the rule of law ought to be applied fairly," he said.

Ms. Hua, the Chinese spokesperson, took aim at those comments, pointing out that the Chinese court found Mr. Schellenberg guilty of attempting to smuggle drugs to Australia.

"I find it rather odd," Ms. Hua said. "Does the Australian side wish to see this large batch of drugs arrive in its land and endanger its people? This Australian official owes an explanation to his people."


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Inadequate fundraising complicates VAG relocation
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Gallery faces Dec. 31 deadline to raise $150-million from private sector or risk losing the land set aside for new building
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By MARSHA LEDERMAN
  
  

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Saturday, January 12, 2019 – Page R5

VANCOUVER -- Rihanna wore a magnificent yellow gown and cape to the Met Gala in 2015, and a star was born. Not the singer herself - she was already A-List - but the voluminous cloak's designer, Guo Pei.

Since October, visitors to the Vancouver Art Gallery have been able to see that 55-pound cape (One Thousand and Two Nights, 2010) and dozens of other intricate and spectacular designs by the Beijing-based designer at the exhibition Guo Pei: Couture Beyond.

It is the VAG's first fashion exhibition and it appears to be a success. Each time I've stopped in, the space has been buzzing with visitors. While the gallery can't yet provide hard statistics, it says the show is doing well, both in terms of attendance and engagement.

This exhibit featuring glittery, opulent dresses for the very wealthy comes as the VAG is urgently working to raise money to build a new gallery. It has been a years-long pursuit with an estimated project cost of $350-million that has produced a conceptual design but, in the absence of the required funding, no actual construction. Private donations have not yet hit the mark, according to a board member.

One of the chief problems with the current location, a renovated courthouse, is its size. It's simply too small. So, back to Guo Pei, why give up the entire first floor - maybe a quarter of the gallery - for a show about fashion, when exhibition space is so limited?

"I think the idea of showing a diverse range of visual culture is our priority, and fashion [is] part of that," says Rochelle Steiner, the gallery's chief curator and associate director.

"And Guo Pei just seemed so fitting to us, not just because of where she's from, but because of her practice," says Steiner, who joined the gallery last year.

The exhibition seems to appeal to a wider demographic, including a younger audience. Steiner says there has been more demand for tours in Mandarin and the show has seen more traffic on social media, including the Chineselanguage platform WeChat. The wall labels - the few that are there (I would have appreciated more individual information about each garment) - are in English and Chinese.

I ask Steiner whether the show is perhaps part of an effort to reach out to the Lower Mainland's significant Asian population - and potential donor base - as the VAG works to raise money for the new building.

Steiner says no, that programming endeavours are separate from development efforts.

But it can be difficult to separate anything that happens at the VAG from its continuing campaign for a new gallery, which dates back more than a decade.

A conceptual design for a new 310,000-square-foot building was unveiled in 2015, years after talk of a new space for the gallery began.

There haven't been many developments since that big reveal. No splashy announcements, no novelty-sized cheque presentations, no capital campaign launches.

The city has set aside land for the VAG a few blocks east of the current gallery; a surface parking lot (where temporary modular housing for homeless people was recently erected).

But the city has ordered the VAG to meet certain conditions by Dec. 31, 2019 - the second extension it has given the gallery. The original conditions included raising $100-million from the federal government and $50-million from the province (in addition to the $50-million the former BC Liberal government granted the project in 2008). The other $150million is supposed to come from the private sector. The VAG has raised about $45-million in private funds to date.

"The site won't necessarily be there forever. So there's a terrific time urgency on things," VAG board member Phil Lind told me in late November.

Lind, a Rogers broadcasting executive, was in town to speak to the Canadian Club about his recently published memoirs.

He is a passionate contemporary art collector; his Toronto home is filled with it. Lind joined the VAG board of trustees specifically because of the new gallery project, he told me. But during our interview, he didn't sound overly optimistic. He says the VAG has not yet raised enough private money.

"I think part of it is that the givers in Vancouver haven't been sufficiently enticed at the moment," Lind says.

B.C. Minister of Tourism, Arts and Culture Lisa Beare told the VAG board in December, 2017, that the government would consider the gallery's additional $50million funding request based on its progress raising private funds.

The hope had been that revealing an exciting design would provoke donations.

But Swiss-based architects Herzog & de Meuron's conceptual design - stacked boxes with a wood exterior - received mixed reviews.

(The Globe and Mail's architecture critic, Alex Bozekovic, loved it.)

"It may not be my cup of tea," Lind says of the design, "but it is distinctive. ... If it gets built, it will be a knockout." It will attract more visitors to the gallery and add to Vancouver's overall tourist appeal, he adds.

"Is the design your cup of tea?" I ask him.

"I think it's okay. I think it's fine," he says.

When I ask if he thinks the project will be built, Lind says he really doesn't know.

"Certain things have to happen and if they don't happen, it won't be built, that's for sure. And one of them is that a major amount of money has to be raised in a very short period of time privately. If that comes to pass, if there's another $40- or $50-million dollars raised in the next while, I think it's got a chance."

When the design was revealed in September, 2015, the projected opening date was 2021. In March, 2017, the VAG told me the project was on track for a groundbreaking in 2017 and that 2021 opening.

Heading into 2019, the VAG was sticking with that timeline - although now they're saying it could creep into 2022.

Without a single shovel in the ground, that seems hard to imagine.

(VAG director Kathleen Bartels was not available for an interview in late December and Steiner was not able to speak about this subject. When I recently tried to click on the "timeline" link on the VAG website's "future gallery" portal, nothing came up.)

The $350-million project cost ($300-million for construction plus $50-million for an endowment) remains the VAG's projection.

It is unclear what might happen on the new building front in 2019. But inside the current gallery, visitors can look forward to the exhibitions French Moderns: Monet to Matisse, 1850-1950, which opens in February; and Moving Still: Performative Photography From India, opening in April. And, not yet announced, an Alberto Giacometti show opening in June and a retrospective of photographer Vikky Alexander's work in July.

One of the points the gallery has stressed in its quest for a new building is that because of space constraints, so much of its collection remains confined to the vault. There's no new gallery yet to rectify this, but this year, the fourth floor of the current space will be devoted to shows made up of works from the permanent collection.

The next show to open in that space will focus on the concept of the street. The exhibition, still being put together and as yet unnamed, will look at the idea of the street as a central space, a public space, a private space. It seems like a good theme to ponder as the VAG continues its efforts to move to a new one.

Associated Graphic

Guo Pei: Couture Beyond is the Vancouver Art Gallery's first fashion installation, celebrating the works of a Beijing-based designer. The gallery's chief curator Rochelle Steiner denies that the exhibit is an attempt to reach out to the Lower Mainland's significant Asian population - and potential donor base - as the VAG struggles to raise private funds for its relocation efforts.

RACHEL TOPHAM

Tuesday, January 15, 2019
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Green yet affordable? Yes it can be done
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The multitenant building is the first to meet zero-carbon design standards, yet it won't charge tenants a premium
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By JENNIFER LEWINGTON
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Tuesday, January 1, 2019 – Page B5

WATERLOO, ONT. -- Long before construction began on a new commercial office in Waterloo, the project's participants met monthly over breakfast to figure out how the proposed multitenant building could set new standards for environmental sustainability and generate surplus energy yet not charge a lease premium.

The discussions - unusual for the diversity of the parties and a commitment to solve design issues early on - culminated in the opening in late November of a 110,000-square-foot building that ticked all the boxes. The Canada Green Building Council has recognized the office, dubbed Evolv1, as the first of its kind to meet the organization's new zero-carbon design standards.

"We wanted to ensure what we were designing was going to do what we wanted it to do," says Adrian Conrad, chief operating officer of Cora Group, the Waterloo-based developer of the threestorey building, now 95-per-cent leased. "It is a no-compromise solution and we are delivering it at market rates."

The project's origins date to 2013 when Cora, with a history of clean technology in its projects, responded to an industry challenge from Sustainable Waterloo Region, a non-profit that works with local firms on climate change issues, to build an environmentally sustainable, multitenant office at market rates.

A key consideration, says SWR executive director Tova Davidson, was that the proposed office be replicable. "Creating one building does not change green building standards and organizational sustainability," she says.

"But if you can do one and it is scalable financially in a replicable model then you have a foundation to build something much bigger on."

What followed was a Cora-led project with eclectic partners: Sustainable Waterloo Region; the University of Waterloo's innovation-focused David Johnston Research and Technology Park, where the new building is located and holds a long-term lease; and Ernst & Young (EY Canada), a then-prospective anchor tenant with a corporate focus on climate change and sustainability.

Stantec Inc., a global engineering and design firm already located in the research park, later joined as consultants.

"One of the key success factors for us is that we did a lot of the design upfront," says Mr. Conrad.

"We knew we could not make it up as you go along, as you can in typical construction."

The regular check-ins paid unexpected dividends, says Michael Pereira, the research park's manager of business development.

"We started to see there are all these interesting things, discussions and resources we can tap into and take something that seems very difficult to do and then ground it in practicality and make it very possible."

Some of the building's sustainable features are obvious, such as solar panels on the roof and over sections of the parking lot, which also has 28 electric vehicle charging stations. The building is expected to produce 50,000 kilowatt hours a year of surplus energy for the local grid.

Unusual for a building of this size is a dramatic three-storeyhigh living wall of 4,000 plants in the foyer. Mr. Conrad lobbied to extend the wall, initially one storey, to 12 metres in height, hiring consultants to solve potential building code issues and calculate the requisite LED lighting for the plants.

"A living wall can temper humidity in the building and clean air but there is also a human element - we do better when we see plants," he says. "It has sustainability features but it is more the effect of someone coming in the lobby and looking up. It instantly tells you as you walk in the door that there is something different here."

A floating staircase in the wood-trimmed foyer promotes walking and people interaction, with the elevator deliberately tucked behind the stairs. A new light-rail transit stop, 80 metres from the building, is expected to open this year.

Less visible features contribute significantly to a zero-carbon rating for the building, now a candidate for platinum Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification from the Canada Green Building Council.

The roof and walls are heavily insulated, with close attention paid to sealing large triple glazed windows that supply natural light. A south-side solar wall brings in fresh air that, in shoulder seasons or on a sunny winter day, enters at close to room temperature. Also on the south side, horizontal solar shades above the windows mitigate the sun's midday heat, while vertical shades on the east and west side capture some of its warmth.

Instead of natural gas, the building is heated and cooled through a geothermal system buried 150 metres in the ground.

The building is LED-lit for extra energy savings and its indoor temperatures are balanced through a "variant refrigerant flow" heating and cooling system.

Last year, the Canada Green Building Council named Cora as one of 16 pilots to test new zerocarbon standards. Mark Hutchinson, council vice-president of green building programs, describes Cora's Evolv1 "as a real milestone and it represents the future of construction in Canada."

With climate change, he says, "we have to build buildings and retrofit them to operate without any net emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. This building has done that using a commercial model."

Mr. Conrad estimates the projected energy savings offset additional capital costs, with lease rates around $20 to $22 per square foot for Class A space, the going rate for similar space in the region.

Meanwhile, sustainable buildings have become a recruitment tool for employers to attract a new generation of socially conscious workers, says David Hearn, a regional real estate services leader at Ernst & Young who oversees real estate and design construction in Canada and the U.S. Midwest.

The auditing firm has relocated its 185-person branch in the Waterloo region, leasing 25,000 square feet in the new office.

"Finances are always important to us, but if we can put a value statement on having this netpositive-energy building and having our staff proud of being in this environment, that is a huge value for us," says Mr. Hearn.

With the average age of his firm's work force estimated at 27 years, he says "it is not just getting them [new hires]; it is keeping them, beyond just the dollars and cents of rent."

He now hopes to apply sustainability lessons from the Waterloo project to others in his portfolio.

As participants look back on the project, they credit Mr. Conrad of Cora for holding firm to the goal to create a model for others.

"Adrian was very clear right from the start that it ultimately had to make sense in the market so it could be repeated," says Richard Williams, a partner at Stantec. "He threw down the gauntlet to the market and said, 'We can do this.'" One of Stantec's contributions was the application of so-called parametric modeling to assess the building's energy performance and likely energy consumption by tenants. "You are able to use the power of computing to model a couple of thousand different variations of the parameters to come up with what is the most effective [option] for energy performance and cost," he says.

The result, he adds, is a project that is "very doable."

To that end, Mr. Conrad expects this spring to begin construction on a new office right across the road, applying lessons learned from Evolv1.

PROPERTY METRICS 5.1% Biggest one-week gainer among REITS: European Commercial 5.4% Biggest one-week gainer among real estate operating companies: Altus Group 4.1% Biggest one-week decliner among REITs: Slate Office 6.3% Biggest one-week decliner among real estate operating companies: Wall Financial Corp.

CIBC

Associated Graphic

'It is a no-compromise solution and we are delivering it at market rates,' Cora Group chief operating office Adrian Conrad says of Evolv1, an environmentally sustainable office building in Waterloo, Ont., whose green features include a 12-metre-high living wall in the foyer and a parking lot partly covered with energy-collecting solar panels.

JENNIFER LEWINGTON/THE GLOBE AND MAIL


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Most police officers live outside the city, study says
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After pledging to hire hundreds, TPS faces call for more local representation amid renewed debate on 'commuter cop' trend
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Wednesday, January 9, 2019 – Page A7

As the Toronto Police Service faces a formal call to hire more local officers, an analysis of the service's ranks shows that threequarters of its uniformed officers live outside the city.

The majority of the force's roughly 5,000 uniformed members live in surrounding outer suburbs such as Halton, Peel and Durham, according to analysis by The Globe and Mail of partial postal-code data obtained through a Freedom of Information request - but many also live in communities as far away as Barrie, Ont., and Lincoln, Ont.

The debate over the "commuter cop" trend - whether it creates a disconnect between officers and the communities they are sworn to serve, or whether there are valid reasons to keep some distance between the two - was revived this month, after a recommendation by a prominent appeal court judge to boost local representation on police forces across Ontario.

In his Independent Street Checks Review released last week, Justice Michael Tulloch said he heard "from many stakeholders that they were concerned that police officers did not live within the communities they served, resulting in a lack of strong direct links to or deep knowledge of the communities they police."

"Given the emphasis on community-based policing," he wrote, "I believe it is beneficial to have police officers hired to work in the community in which they live, and I make a recommendation that efforts be made by police services to hire people who live within the city or region they will serve."

Although there are legal challenges that could make such a directive difficult to enforce, the call comes at a crucial juncture for TPS, after a pledge by Chief Mark Saunders to hire hundreds of new Toronto police officers in 2019.

Chief Saunders (who does live in Toronto) has emphasized the service's renewed commitment to neighbourhood policing, in an effort to strengthen fractured relationships with some of the city's most vulnerable communities.

But despite those efforts, with less than one-quarter of Toronto's uniformed officers calling Toronto home, critics question the service's ties to the community.

Mayor John Tory said he "would love for as many officers as possible to live here in Toronto, but generally in Canada we don't mandate where public employees live. Even if they don't live in the city, what is important is that the officers have a genuine connection to the neighbourhoods they serve and the city that they serve.

Encouraging that connection is the whole philosophy behind the creation of neighbourhood officers and why I support that program."

Michael Kempa, a University of Ottawa professor who specializes in policing, says it is reasonable to expect that some police officers will live outside the community.

"But at a certain point there is a tipping point, where the police become less a part of the community and more like a well-intentioned occupying force," he said.

"I'd say once you get over half you're likely to start encountering problems."

According to The Globe's analysis, 75.3 per cent of uniformed TPS members resided outside Toronto as of Dec. 10, 2018.

Comparatively, in the country's capital, the Ottawa Police Service said 27 per cent of its police officers live outside its jurisdictional boundary. But in Vancouver - where real estate is notoriously expensive - approximately 83 per cent of sworn officers live outside the city.

A challenge for Canadian police services is that under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, people have a right to the freedom of movement - meaning they cannot be told where to live.

Across the border, the New York Police Department has a policy requiring officers to live either in one of the city's five boroughs or in one of the surrounding counties. Of the NYPD's 36,376 uniformed members, 49.9 per cent live within the city limits.

The other 50.1 per cent live in the surrounding counties. But the NYPD has an additional rule that prohibits officers from living in their assigned precinct, both for safety reasons (what if they run into an angry person they previously arrested?) and in an effort to avoid potential conflicts (what if they are tasked with investigating a neighbour?).

In his carding report, Justice Tulloch acknowledges that these concerns could apply to officers in Toronto but adds that "while those concerns are understandable, they should not overwhelm the benefit of having locallybased policing."

In Toronto, in an effort to build trust and relationships with some of the city's most vulnerable neighbourhoods, TPS launched an "enhanced" neighbourhood policing strategy this fall, in which officers will hold their posts for a minimum of three years.

John Sewell, former mayor of Toronto and co-ordinator of the Toronto Police Accountability Coalition, argues that relationships with residents undoubtedly suffer when police live outside the city.

"We don't know very many of them as our neighbours, which is an important thing at the end of the day - knowing people casually apart from what they do in work," he said.

Prof. Kempa offers a political analogy. "For me it's a lot like members of Parliament. You can have a few star candidates that are parachuted into safe ridings ... to perform a particular function - ... finance minister or something - but you obviously can't have that for all your MPs," he said.

Meaghan Gray, a spokesperson for TPS, said that Justice Tulloch's report and recommendations were directed to the province, so TPS will wait to see how it responds. "As far as looking at a Toronto residency as a preference or a beneficial aspect to someone's application, we've been doing that for a couple of years now," she said.

"Certainly I know that's looked upon favourably when people apply, along with a number of other things ... experience working in the community, or experience in dealing with mental-health issues or challenges. Those are all aspects that we consider to be valuable, but they're not mandatory."

Paul Cavalluzzo, a Toronto labour lawyer, says that while a formal residency requirement would violate the Charter right to freedom of movement, a violation can be justified if it is reasonable. In this case, he said a solid argument could be made - but it would likely require the service to reach an agreement with the police association.

"I think we need to concentrate on getting the best candidates we can," Toronto Police Association president Mike McCormack says.

"But to say someone who lives in Toronto is going to be a better candidate than someone in Whitby or Peel, I don't think that's the case."

In his view, the root of the problem is financial. Ms. Gray, too, said the high cost of living is a common theme she's heard from officers who live outside the city.

Mr. McCormack notes that many metropolitan cities that require officers to live locally provide subsidies or financial incentives. London's government, for example, has previously compensated "key workers" - including police - with housing subsidies.

And while Mr. McCormack said he'd welcome such a program in Toronto, he acknowledges it's unlikely to happen - particularly when the service is supposed to be trimming its $1-billion budget, and when salaries for first-class constables are set to surpass $100,000 this year.

"The bottom line is: Are you going to tell people ... that they have to stay in a two-bedroom home in Toronto?" Mr. McCormack says.

"That's the challenge."

Regardless of the root causes, a suburban-dwelling frontline also poses retention challenges for an urban service. As reported by The Globe last year, the Toronto Police Service has been struggling with the issue of officers fleeing for forces closer to home. Between 2008 and 2017, more than 250 officers left TPS for other services.

With files from Tom Cardoso and Michael Pereira

Associated Graphic

Toronto police Chief Mark Saunders, seen at a news conference at police headquarters in December, has said the service is committed to neighbourhood policing. FRED LUM/THE GLOBE AND MAIL


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From blockade to showdown
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Wednesday, January 9, 2019 – Page A1

HOUSTON, B.C. VANCOUVER VANCOUVER OTTAWA -- After RCMP moves in to arrest 14 members of the Wet'suwet'en Nation, support spreads across the country for a group opposing a natural gas pipeline that would run through its traditional territory Opposition to a natural gas pipeline running through northern British Columbia is surging, with dozens of rallies halting traffic in Vancouver and city centres, and one group of protesters forcing Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to change venues for a meeting with Indigenous leaders.

The 670-kilometre pipeline would ship natural gas from northeast B.C. to a liquefied natural gas terminal in Kitimat, on the coast. It is a crucial link in the $40-billion LNG project the B.C. and federal governments announced amid much fanfare last fall.

Elected representatives of all 20 Indigenous bands along the pipeline route have signed project agreements with the company. Five of those bands belong to the Wet'suwet'en Nation: Wet'suwet'en First Nation (formerly known as the Broman Lake Indian Band), Burns Lake, Nee Tahi Buhn, Skin Tyee and Witset.

Although elected officials have backed the project, some hereditary chiefs have opposed it, with some saying the pipeline runs through the traditional territory of B.C.'s Wet'suwet'en Nation.

TransCanada Corp. subsidiary Coastal GasLink was granted a court injunction in December to remove obstructions protesters had placed in Wet'suwet'en territory to proceed with construction for the $6.2-billion pipeline.

On Monday, Mounties enforcing the injunction arrested 14 people; that action, and images of heavily armed officers climbing gates and handcuffing civilians, escalated tensions and galvanized support for the Wet'suwet'en across the country.

On Tuesday, hundreds of people marched through Vancouver's downtown core and gathered at Victory Square, where Grand Chief Stewart Philip , president of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, delivered a message to uproarious applause: "I want to say to Prime Minister [Justin] Trudeau: Welcome to battleground British Columbia."

In Ottawa, demonstrators burst through the doors of a conference centre where Mr. Trudeau and members of his cabinet were scheduled to meet with chiefs of self-governing First Nations and modern treaty holders, forcing the group to relocate to a government building a few kilometres away.

In opening his discussions with the chiefs, Mr. Trudeau said "there are still many hurdles to overcome, many challenges we will work on together, and you know, in this government, you have a partner willing to figure out the path forward..." He did not address the pipeline issue, despite the disruption.

Instead, the office of Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale reissued a statement saying the government remains committed to a renewed relationship with Indigenous peoples based on the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership, and that the RCMP respects and protects the right to peaceful demonstrations.

The protesters in Ottawa joined those in cities across the country. They shouted "protect the sacred, water is life," as they marched through the main hall of the convention centre.

Joyce Eagle, a member of Treaty Four, which is based in the central prairies, said she joined the demonstration because she believes Canada is robbing land and resources from Indigenous people.

"Our law trumps Canada's law and [Mr. Trudeau] should honour what he promised," Ms. Eagle said, pointing out that the government has signed the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which says Indigenous people should not be forcibly removed from their land.

Outside the Supreme Court of B.C., Vancouver supporters marched carrying drums, flags, signs and a model pipeline more than five meters long.

"Look at us, we are fierce and empowered," said Audrey Siegl, a Musqueam First Nations member who helped lead the march.

"We are uniting and rising to save Indigenous people across Canada."

Smaller demonstrations also took place in the United States and abroad.

Wet'suwet'en member Jennifer Wickham said she was happy about the scale of these rallies, but not surprised.

"We've received a lot of support from Canadians and those living abroad. I think people are beginning to recognize that Wet'suwet'en have distinct rights," Ms. Wickham said.

On Tuesday, a convoy of police vehicles trailed behind a road grader that cleared the snowy path at the site southwest of Houston, B.C. As dusk fell, Corporal Madonna Saunderson, spokeswoman for the RCMP's north district, said police would likely resume the journey on Wednesday.

About 30 Unist'ot'en supporters huddled around a campfire at a checkpoint leading to the site.

Ian Michell and his wife, Arlene, helped set up a large tent with a pot-bellied stove inside for warmth and a propane bar-

becue to heat up a vat of chili for the Wet'suwet'en members who shrugged off temperatures that dipped to -13.

Mr. Michell said he is unhappy that the RCMP has said Indigenous title to the traditional territory of the Wet'suwet'en still needs to be determined by a court.

"Some people have bought into the process of elected bands and their jurisdiction over reserves. But hereditary chiefs have jurisdiction over the Wet'suwet'en territory," Mr. Michell argued.

Ms. Michell said it's unfortunate to see the RCMP show up on unceded territory.

"The police should be working with our people rather than being aggressive and forcing their way through," she said.

The Office of the Wet'suwet'en is the umbrella group for 13 hereditary house groups, which fall under five clans. "By no means have we ever given Coastal GasLink or the B.C. government any environmental permission," said Debbie Pierre, the office's executive director. "Our hereditary chiefs cannot support this pipeline."

In downtown Calgary, about 60 people who attended a rally in support of the First Nation outside the headquarters of TransCanada Corp. were greeted by about the same number of pipeline supporters who were encouraged to come out by Canada Action, a Calgary-based lobby group.

Stephen Buffalo, CEO of the Indian Resource Council of Canada, which represents oil-andgas producing First Nations, took part in the pro-pipeline part of the rally.

"The big thing is we've got to be able to support our communities that said yes to this [project] because it's their community that needs that financial benefit," he said. "It's about getting out of poverty and finding a way for our people."

Coastal GasLink said police action was not an outcome the company ever wanted.

"Instead, we have always strived for opportunities to have an honest, open discussion about how to resolve this issue," it said in a statement.

"It is unfortunate that the RCMP must take this step so that lawful access ... can be re-established."

Among those arrested Monday was Delee Nikal's 72-year-old mother.

"When I spoke with her after her release, she said it really hurt her heart to see people that were just asserting their rights, their ability to be on their territory, to have that ripped away and be forcibly removed," said Ms. Nikal, a Wet'suwet'en community member from the Gidimt'en clan and the Casyex House.

But Ms. Nikal was heartened by the solidarity actions.

"The biggest thing right now," she said, "is that people are waking up and taking notice."

With a report from The Canadian Press

Associated Graphic

RCMP have set up a security checkpoint at Mile Marker 27 to block further access to the protest site near Houston, B.C. JIMMY JEONG/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

RCMP officers congregate at a security checkpoint at Mile Marker 27, where further access to the Unist'ot'en camp is blocked, near Houston, B.C., on Tuesday.

From left: Supporters of the Unist'ot'en set up a small camp at Mile Marker 27; A Logging road leading to the Unist'ot'en blockade. TOP PHOTOS: JIMMY JEONG/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

People gather as First Nations drummers play at a rally in Vancouver in support of pipeline protesters on Tuesday. BOTTOM PHOTOS BY DARRYL DYCK/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Tuesday, January 15, 2019
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BIRTH AND DEATH NOTICES
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Tuesday, January 1, 2019 – Page B15

MARGUERITE RUTH GALL

"Marny" / (née Hall)

February 1, 1931 December 20, 2018 Visionary, Mover and Shaker, and Supreme Matriarch. An amazing life with accomplishments too numerous to mention is gone. Left behind, a reverent family and a bevy of adoring friends. No one will be missed more.

At her request, no public service will be held. Please have a nice dinner with a glass of wine and toast your loved ones.

WILLIAM PICKERING JONES III

On Tuesday, December 25, 2018, William Pickering Jones III, of Darien, CT, lost his valiant battle with addiction and passed away at the age of 27. William was born on December 12, 1991, to William P. Jones Jr. and Elizabeth Higgins Jones (Betsy and Bill) in Greenwich, CT. He was the beloved big brother of Julia, Catherine, and Elizabeth Jones.

He was the grandson of late Dr.and Mrs. H.P. Higgins of Toronto, Canada, and the late Mr. and Mrs.

William P. Jones of Darien, CT.

William was part of a large and loving family and will be dearly missed by his many aunts, uncles and 36 cousins.

William was a second-year law student at Fordham University see: (https://news.law.fordham.

edu/) and received his BA from McGill University. He had a beautiful mind and was passionate about everything he did, whether it was his work on legal initiatives, or just making his little sisters a new music playlist. William was loving and compassionate to his family and friends, but also to anyone he met. He was truly one of a kind and will be dearly missed by those who were lucky enough to know him.

In lieu of flowers, please consider donating to http://www.Shatterproof.

org in William's memory. "Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle."

GORDON KENNETH MARTIN MD, DPH

November 15, 1925 December 29, 2018 Gordon K. Martin passed away peacefully on December 29, 2018 in Burlington, Ontario.

An only child, Gord married Dorothy Lorraine Reed in 1949.

He completed his medical degree in 1948 (University of Toronto) at age 22 and earned his Diploma in Public Health (DPH) in 1949.

In 1950, he became the first Medical Officer of Health (MOH) for Muskoka District. They started their family in Bracebridge, moving to Richmond Hill when he began working for the Ontario Department of Health. In 1963 they moved to Willowdale, their home for 37 years. In 2000 they moved to Burlington.

Gord played a significant role in the modernization of Ontario's public health system. As executive director of public health programs and then as Ontario's Chief Medical Officer of Health, Gord and his team consolidated local health units, built modern public laboratories, started the under-serviced area physician program, and oversaw stronger home care, anti-smoking and immunization programs. He was particularly proud of being awarded the Canadian Public Health Association's Honorary Life Membership in 1980 and seeing the Health Protection and Promotion Act enacted in 1983.

He ended his professional career as MOH for the City of North York from 1982 to 1990.

Gord was active in the church, from his youth at Fairlawn United Church and continuing at OrioleYork Mills in North York. He was a life-long Rotarian; he served as president, Don Valley Club, was twice Rotarian of the Year and was named a Paul Harris Fellow. He was an early and long-time volunteer at the Toronto Distress Centre and later with Burlington Telecare.

Gord and Dorothy loved to travel, starting with camping trips with their young family. They travelled throughout Canada, the USA and to more than 20 other countries, including trips to west China, led by Dorothy. Gord was a talented musician. He paid his way through medical school as a church organist and was an accomplished flute and piccolo player in many concert bands. He also sang in the church choir. His favourite way to unwind, however, was to spend time at the family cottage on Twelve Mile Bay in Georgian Bay, which he loved.

Predeceased by Dorothy, Gord is survived by his five children: David (Elizabeth), Bruce (Moni Fricke), Anne Wilcox (Wayne), Cathy Fairley (Craig) and Keith (Jackie Hatherly). Gord will be missed by his 16 grandchildren and their partners: Jennifer Martin (Lewis), Ian Wilcox (Mary), Christopher Flavelle (Laura), Kathleen Martin, Scott Fairley (Alissa), Andrew Martin, Michael Wilcox (Ashley), Brianne Evans (Blair), Jared Wilcox, Matt Fairley (Abby), Jessica Myers (Tim), Jon Fairley (Carly), Lindsay Gingrich-Martin (Trevor), Emily Martin, Alexander Martin and Stefanie Martin. He was the proud great-grandfather to Hannah, Leo, and Benjamin Flavelle; Morgan and Annika Fairley; Aubrey and Ellis Evans; River Myers; and Stella Wilcox.

Special thanks to the caring staff at Burloak Long Term Care and Gord's "Dream Team" of caregivers.

A celebration of Gordon Martin's life will be held at Dodsworth and Brown Funeral Home, 2241 New Street, Burlington, on Saturday, January 5 at 5:00, with visitation at 4:00. Reception to follow.

Private interment at Prospect Cemetery to be held at a later date. Donations in Gord's name to the Georgian Bay Land Trust (gblt.org) or Distress Centres (t o r o n t o d i s t r e s s c e n t r e . co m) would be greatly appreciated.

ANDREA MAZZOLENI

Passed away peacefully at her home in Weymouth, England on December 12, 2018. She is lovingly remembered by her husband Brian Gibbons and his son Jeffrey; her mother Joanne; her sister Gina; her five nieces and nephews Erika, Christiaan, Erinn, Steven, and Kyle. She is predeceased by her loving parents Ettore and Winifred (MacMillan), and her sister Clare.

Andrea was a busy world traveler splitting her time between Toronto and the south coast of England, where she was an active participant in both church communities. She was a caring humanitarian that treated everyone equally and with dignity, often encouraging the giving of one's time as equally important as any monetary contribution.

Regardless of whether Andrea was off travelling or at home, she could always be found working hard on her latest crossstitch or knitted garment for a new godchild, or one of her six grandnieces and grandnephews Lara, Nathan, Matteus, Felix, Grayson and Clare.

There will be a funeral held in Weymouth, England on January 8th and a gathering of family and friends to celebrate Andrea's life at the Temerty Theatre, Royal Conservatory Of Music, 273 Bloor Street West on Wednesday, January 23rd, at 2:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to either the Sir Ernest MacMillan Foundation or the Royal Conservatory of Music, would be greatly appreciated.

BERTHA ROWENA SHVEMAR (nee Grossman)

Monday, December 24, 2018 Bertha Shvemar was the beloved wife of Leslie (deceased). Loving mother and mother-in-law of Suzanne Dennison and Peter Cauchi, and Janet-Lee and George Nadas. Much-loved grandmother of David Nadas, Sarah and Ohad Zofy, Lauren and Josh Broder, and Erin Cauchi. Great-grandmother to Dainy and Briel Zofy. Dear big sister to Vicky and Sid Goldhart, the late Anne Harris and the late Murray Grossman. To many nieces and nephews, she was a very special aunt and doppelganger to the queen.

First a pharmacist and later a psychologist, Bertha was also a proud and active member of Temple Sinai and her community at large. She was awarded the Ontario Medal for Good Citizenship for her efforts establishing Canada's first Forensic Clinic (of its kind) and for her work with First Nations people.

The family wishes to express their appreciation to the staff at L'Chaim Residence for coming together with such warmth and caring, especially in recent weeks. To Esther, Anne, Evelyn, Elizabeth and so many others, we are grateful.

Funeral services were held at Temple Sinai on Wednesday, December 26, 2018. Memorial donations may be made to Rabbi Dolgin's Discretionary Fund, Temple Sinai, 416-487-4161 or to Friends of the Simon Wiesenthal Centre for Holocaust Studies, 416-864-9735.