stats
globeinteractive.com: Making the Business of Life Easier

   Finance globeinvestor   Careers globecareers.workopolis Subscribe to The Globe
The Globe and Mail /globeandmail.com
Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space


Search

space
  This site         Tips

  
space
  The Web Google
space
   space



space

  Where to Find It


Breaking News
  Home Page

  Report on Business

  Sports

  Technology

space
Subscribe to The Globe

Shop at our Globe Store


Print Edition
  Front Page

  Report on Business

  National

  International

  Sports

  Arts & Entertainment

  Editorials

  Columnists

   Headline Index

 Other Sections
  Appointments

  Births & Deaths

  Books

  Classifieds

  Comment

  Education

  Environment

  Facts & Arguments

  Focus

  Health

  Obituaries

  Real Estate

  Review

  Science

  Style

  Technology

  Travel

  Wheels

 Leisure
  Cartoon

  Crosswords

  Food & Dining

  Golf

  Horoscopes

  Movies

  Online Personals

  TV Listings/News

 Specials & Series
  All Reports...

space

Services
   Where to Find It
 A quick guide to what's available on the site

 Newspaper
  Advertise

  Corrections

  Customer Service

  Help & Contact Us

  Reprints

  Subscriptions

 Web Site
  Advertise

  E-Mail Newsletters

  Free Headlines

  Globe Store New

  Help & Contact Us

  Make Us Home

  Mobile New

  Press Room

  Privacy Policy

  Terms & Conditions


GiveLife.ca

    

PRINT EDITION
NOW PLAYING
space
REVIEWS OF RECENT RELEASES, RATED ON A SYSTEM OF 0 TO 4 STARS
space
By ANDREW PARKER, ALEX BOZIKOVIC, BARRY HERTZ, JOHANNA SCHNELLER
Special to The Globe and Mail
  
  

Email this article Print this article
Saturday, April 29, 2017 – Page R11

Born in China

The latest in the series of yearly Disney nature documentaries travels to the mountains of China to spend time with the likes of cranes, golden snub-nosed monkeys, chiru, snow leopards and, of course, pandas. Clocking in at barely 75 minutes (including credits that are worth sticking around for), Born in China doesn't reinvent or improve on the nature documentary form in any way. It's a dedicated delivering of educational basics geared toward a younger audience, wrapped in made-up stories about real animal families, replete with corny narration warmly delivered by John Krasinski. There's a little bit of peril and mayhem, but mostly of the variety that won't give kiddies nightmares. As always with these Disney docs, the cinematography is patient and resplendent, and for once there's even a bit of tragedy that's well-handled. (G)

Citizen Jane: Battle for the City 3½

Jane Jacobs versus Robert Moses. It's a David-and-Goliath story from 20th-century New York that defines contemporary urban debates and Matt Tyrnauer tells the tale well in this gorgeous, tightly written and entertaining film. Moses personified the alliance of big government, business and modernist planning called "urban renewal." Jacobs, of course, was the writer-activist who opposed it all. Her book The Death and Life of Great American Cities in 1961 revealed the value of informal community and "the sidewalk ballet." As a history of this war of ideas and as an introduction to Jacobs, the film is essential. But it also pivots toward a great challenge: today's global urbanization. The towersand-highways thinking that failed in North America is being reenacted. "China today is Moses on steroids," academic Saskia Sassen says. But Jacobs's bottom-up approach offers no clear answers about how to house and serve tens of millions of people in short order, and neither, really, does the film. (G)

Colossal 3

There are some movies whose premises defy simple description. But here goes: In this half-comedy, half-drama, half-sci-fi epic, an alcoholic named Gloria (Anne Hathaway) discovers she has a strange connection to a giant Godzilla-like monster wreaking havoc on Seoul. To say any more would ruin the wonderful surprises writer-director Nacho Vigalondo has delicately peppered within his film. But it is no spoiler to say the film is simply unlike anything else to play theatres this year. The Spanish filmmaker Vigalondo, who attempted similar genre deconstructions before with the nicely twisted Timecrimes and the not-so-successful Open Windows, delivers an unexpected and singular ride, even if it occasionally stumbles on its own premise.

Clearly a movie designed for niche audiences, it will not strike everyone the same way. But for those who embrace Vigalondo's wild wavelength, the rewards are innumerable. (R)

The Lost City of Z 3½

Across five acclaimed features, director James Gray has never left the suffocating comfort of New York. Yet, here the filmmaker is, braving the terrors of the Amazon (well, Colombia), to tell the tale of real-life 1900s explorer Percy Fawcett in The Lost City of Z.

The change in scenery for Gray may be jarring on paper, but the never-ending jungle proves perfectly suited to the filmmaker's lush, operatic aesthetic, as does the film's central theme of escaping one's background, through whatever means necessary. As Gray follows Fawcett up and down the river across decades - interspersed with his stifling existence back home in Britain - he delivers a visually stunning, poetic treatise on the folly of adventure and the toxicity of colonialism. Slipping in references to everyone from Kubrick to Fellini, Gray creates a truly intoxicating experience. It is this close to being an all-time classic, if only Charlie Hunnam's central performance as Fawcett didn't slip out of Gray's period trappings every now and then (you can't help but wonder what Gray's long-time collaborator, Joaquin Phoenix, would have done with the role).

The Promise 2

Sweeping historical romance epics. Who doesn't love them? Casablanca, Doctor Zhivago, Reds, The Year of Living Dangerously - there's nothing sexier than a love that defies urgent current events.

The catastrophe of contemporary cinema is that our only epics come clad in spandex. Writerdirector Terry George (Hotel Rwanda, Reservation Road) is hoping to change that here. His backdrop is a worthy one: the Armenian genocide of 1915, when Turkey tried to wipe a nation from the face of the Earth. His love triangle is promising: an American journalist (Christian Bale) and an Armenian medical student (Oscar Isaac) fall desperately in love with the same woman (Quebec actress Charlotte Le Bon). Bale and Isaac even have fantasy-franchise cred (Batman and Star Wars, respectively). But their noble intentions can't disguise their epic failure: The love story fails to ignite. No disrespect to Le Bon, who is pleasant enough, but this kind of part should be a career-definer. Where is today's Ingrid Bergman, Julie Christie or Diane Keaton? Blame those damned superhero pics, which, in appealing only to adolescent boys, have cost us a generation of actresses.

Associated Graphic

Anne Hathaway stars in Colossal.


Huh? How did I get here?
Return to Main Johanna_Schneller Page
Subscribe to
The Globe and Mail
 

Email this article Print this article

space  Advertisement
space

Need CPR for your RSP? Check your portfolio’s pulse and lower yours by improving the overall health of your investments. Click here.

Advertisement

7-Day Site Search
    

Breaking News



Today's Weather


Inside

Rick Salutin
Merrily marching
off to war
Roy MacGregor
Duct tape might hold
when panic strikes


Editorial
Where Manley is going with his first budget




space

Columnists



For a columnist's most recent stories, click on their name below.

 National


Roy MacGregor arrow
This Country
space
Jeffrey Simpson arrow
The Nation
space
Margaret Wente arrow
Counterpoint
space
Hugh Winsor  arrow
The Power Game
space
 Business


Rob Carrick arrow
Personal Finance
space
Drew Fagan arrow
The Big Picture
space
Mathew Ingram arrow
space
Brent Jang arrow
Business West
space
Brian Milner arrow
Taking Stock
space
Eric Reguly arrow
To The Point
space
Andrew Willis arrow
Streetwise
space
 Sports


Stephen Brunt arrow
The Game
space
Eric Duhatschek arrow
space
Allan Maki arrow
space
William Houston arrow
Truth & Rumours
space
Lorne Rubenstein arrow
Golf
space
 The Arts


John Doyle arrow
Television
space
John MacLachlan Gray arrow
Gray's Anatomy
space
David Macfarlane arrow
Cheap Seats
space
Johanna Schneller arrow
Moviegoer
space
 Comment


Murray Campbell arrow
Ontario Politics
space
Lysiane Gagnon arrow
Inside Quebec
space
Marcus Gee arrow
The World
space
William Johnson arrow
Pit Bill
space
Paul Knox arrow
Worldbeat
space
Heather Mallick arrow
As If
space
Leah McLaren arrow
Generation Why
space
Rex Murphy arrow
Japes of Wrath
space
Rick Salutin arrow
On The Other Hand
space
Paul Sullivan arrow
The West
space
William Thorsell arrow
space





Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space

© 2003 Bell Globemedia Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Help & Contact Us | Back to the top of this page