stats
globeinteractive.com: Making the Business of Life Easier

   Finance globeinvestor   Careers globecareers.workopolis Subscribe to The Globe
The Globe and Mail /globeandmail.com
Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space


Search

space
  This site         Tips

  
space
  The Web Google
space
   space



space

  Where to Find It


Breaking News
  Home Page

  Report on Business

  Sports

  Technology

space
Subscribe to The Globe

Shop at our Globe Store


Print Edition
  Front Page

  Report on Business

  National

  International

  Sports

  Arts & Entertainment

  Editorials

  Columnists

   Headline Index

 Other Sections
  Appointments

  Births & Deaths

  Books

  Classifieds

  Comment

  Education

  Environment

  Facts & Arguments

  Focus

  Health

  Obituaries

  Real Estate

  Review

  Science

  Style

  Technology

  Travel

  Wheels

 Leisure
  Cartoon

  Crosswords

  Food & Dining

  Golf

  Horoscopes

  Movies

  Online Personals

  TV Listings/News

 Specials & Series
  All Reports...

space

Services
   Where to Find It
 A quick guide to what's available on the site

 Newspaper
  Advertise

  Corrections

  Customer Service

  Help & Contact Us

  Reprints

  Subscriptions

 Web Site
  Advertise

  E-Mail Newsletters

  Free Headlines

  Globe Store New

  Help & Contact Us

  Make Us Home

  Mobile New

  Press Room

  Privacy Policy

  Terms & Conditions


GiveLife.ca

    

PRINT EDITION
Canada's duties force shoppers to smuggle, Trump wrongly accuses
space
space
By STEVEN CHASE
  
  

Email this article Print this article
Wednesday, June 20, 2018 – Page B1

U.S. President Donald Trump has unleashed another attack against Canada, accusing this country of so unfairly charging duties on U.S. goods that Canadians are driven to smuggle consumer items across the border between the two countries.

Speaking to a gathering of small-business owners in Washington, the President painted a picture of how he believes Canadian protectionism has turned its citizens into scofflaws.

"The tariffs to get common items back into Canada are so high that they have to smuggle them in," Mr. Trump told the National Federation of Independent Business on Tuesday.

"They buy shoes, then they wear them. They scuff them up. They make them sound old or look old," he explained. Mr. Trump cited an unidentified "major newspaper" as the source of this information.

He did not indicate how this harms U.S. businesses.

However, he went on to link this conduct to negotiations on the North American free-trade agreement (NAFTA), saying the United States will not be treated poorly by Canada any longer. "Canada is not going to take advantage of the United States any longer."

Mr. Trump appears to be referring to duty-free exemption rules affecting Canadian travelers who visit the United States. Canadians are eligible for duty-free exemptions only if they have been out of Canada for at least 24 hours. If they visit the United States for a few hours of shopping, they must pay duties, where applicable, and Canadian sales taxes. If the goods are manufactured in the United States, then only sales taxes apply.

By comparison, Americans returning to the United States from Canada are granted duty-free exemption of US$200 for any absence from their country of less than 48 hours.

Cyndee Todgham Cherniak, a trade expert, said Mr. Trump is wrong to suggest border charges are anti-American. Canadians do not pay duties on U.S.-made goods when they bring them back to Canada; they merely pay the harmonized sales tax or goods and services tax. The duties charged at the border are for imports of goods manufactured offshore.

Separately, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland told MPs she believes a deal to renegotiate NAFTA is still possible despite the punitive tariffs the Trump administration has slapped on Canadian steel and aluminum in the name of national security.

She confirmed that the United States is still insisting a new NAFTA deal have a fiveyear expiry clause.

But Ms. Freeland said NAFTA talks are on a separate track from the trade war over steel and aluminum.

Starting on June 1, the Americans imposed import taxes of 25 per cent on Canadian steel and 10 per cent on Canadian aluminum, using a national security provision of U.S. trade law that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Ms. Freeland called ridiculous and insulting treatment of a close military ally.

Canada is still preparing dollar-for-dollar retaliation on $16.1-billion of U.S. goods to take effect on July 1. "We know that no one will benefit from this beggar-thyneighbour approach to trade," Ms. Freeland said. "The price will be paid, in part, by American consumers and by American businesses. And I think we all agree that it is important for Canada to stand up in defence of the international rules-based order, and we will do so."

Ms. Freeland told the Commons international trade committee on Tuesday that Canada is still revising the list of possible retaliatory targets based on feedback from businesses.

The list includes U.S. steel and aluminum and goods from sailboats to whisky, plywood to refrigerators and washing machines to herbicides.


Huh? How did I get here?
Return to Main Heather_Mallick Page
Subscribe to
The Globe and Mail
 

Email this article Print this article

space  Advertisement
space

Need CPR for your RSP? Check your portfolio’s pulse and lower yours by improving the overall health of your investments. Click here.

Advertisement

7-Day Site Search
    

Breaking News



Today's Weather


Inside

Rick Salutin
Merrily marching
off to war
Roy MacGregor
Duct tape might hold
when panic strikes


Editorial
Where Manley is going with his first budget




space

Columnists



For a columnist's most recent stories, click on their name below.

 National


Roy MacGregor arrow
This Country
space
Jeffrey Simpson arrow
The Nation
space
Margaret Wente arrow
Counterpoint
space
Hugh Winsor  arrow
The Power Game
space
 Business


Rob Carrick arrow
Personal Finance
space
Drew Fagan arrow
The Big Picture
space
Mathew Ingram arrow
space
Brent Jang arrow
Business West
space
Brian Milner arrow
Taking Stock
space
Eric Reguly arrow
To The Point
space
Andrew Willis arrow
Streetwise
space
 Sports


Stephen Brunt arrow
The Game
space
Eric Duhatschek arrow
space
Allan Maki arrow
space
William Houston arrow
Truth & Rumours
space
Lorne Rubenstein arrow
Golf
space
 The Arts


John Doyle arrow
Television
space
John MacLachlan Gray arrow
Gray's Anatomy
space
David Macfarlane arrow
Cheap Seats
space
Johanna Schneller arrow
Moviegoer
space
 Comment


Murray Campbell arrow
Ontario Politics
space
Lysiane Gagnon arrow
Inside Quebec
space
Marcus Gee arrow
The World
space
William Johnson arrow
Pit Bill
space
Paul Knox arrow
Worldbeat
space
Heather Mallick arrow
As If
space
Leah McLaren arrow
Generation Why
space
Rex Murphy arrow
Japes of Wrath
space
Rick Salutin arrow
On The Other Hand
space
Paul Sullivan arrow
The West
space
William Thorsell arrow
space





Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space

© 2003 Bell Globemedia Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Help & Contact Us | Back to the top of this page