stats
globeinteractive.com: Making the Business of Life Easier

   Finance globeinvestor   Careers globecareers.workopolis Subscribe to The Globe
The Globe and Mail /globeandmail.com
Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space


Search

space
  This site         Tips

  
space
  The Web Google
space
   space



space

  Where to Find It


Breaking News
  Home Page

  Report on Business

  Sports

  Technology

space
Subscribe to The Globe

Shop at our Globe Store


Print Edition
  Front Page

  Report on Business

  National

  International

  Sports

  Arts & Entertainment

  Editorials

  Columnists

   Headline Index

 Other Sections
  Appointments

  Births & Deaths

  Books

  Classifieds

  Comment

  Education

  Environment

  Facts & Arguments

  Focus

  Health

  Obituaries

  Real Estate

  Review

  Science

  Style

  Technology

  Travel

  Wheels

 Leisure
  Cartoon

  Crosswords

  Food & Dining

  Golf

  Horoscopes

  Movies

  Online Personals

  TV Listings/News

 Specials & Series
  All Reports...

space

Services
   Where to Find It
 A quick guide to what's available on the site

 Newspaper
  Advertise

  Corrections

  Customer Service

  Help & Contact Us

  Reprints

  Subscriptions

 Web Site
  Advertise

  E-Mail Newsletters

  Free Headlines

  Globe Store New

  Help & Contact Us

  Make Us Home

  Mobile New

  Press Room

  Privacy Policy

  Terms & Conditions


GiveLife.ca

    

PRINT EDITION
British Open may be Woods's best chance to win another major
space
After three back surgeries, 42-year-old has been feeling better as the year has gone on, and is excited to play links golf
space
By DOUG FERGUSON
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
  
  

Email this article Print this article
Wednesday, July 18, 2018 – Page B13

CARNOUSTIE, SCOTLAND -- Tiger Woods doesn't feel as old at the oldest championship in golf.

Back at the British Open for the first time in three years, Woods broke from his tradition on Tuesday morning. Instead of being among the first on the tee for practice, he didn't show up at Carnoustie until his news conference just before lunch. Then, he played nine holes with Masters champion Patrick Reed and Bryson DeChambeau.

This was not a case of a 42-year-old needing his rest.

Entering the year having not played any major since the end of 2015 and the start of three back surgeries, Woods has been feeling better as 2018 has gone on. And there's something about links golf that inspires him.

"It's my favourite type of golf to play," Woods said. "I love playing here, this type of links golf, or a style of links golf down on the Aussie sand belt ... because it is creative. We're not going to get the most perfect bounces. And I think that's the fun challenge of it."

He made his links debut at Carnoustie in 1995 as an amateur at the Scottish Open, a week before his British Open debut at St.

Andrews. He hasn't contended on the back nine in the previous Opens at Carnoustie, in 1999 and 2007, though he wasn't far from a playoff.

Might this be his best shot at winning another major?

"Not to be smart, but it is the next major I'm playing," Woods said with a laugh.

But over time, he thinks it might be his best chance because of history. Woods recalls 53-year-old Greg Norman playing in the final group at Royal Birkdale in 2008, a major Woods missed because of knee surgery. The following year, Woods missed the cut for the first time at the British Open when 59-year-old Tom Watson was one putt away from winning at Turnberry.

"You don't have to be long to play on a links-style golf course," Woods said. "You get to places like Augusta National, where it's just a big ballpark, and the golf course outgrows you, unfortunately. That's just the way it goes. But a linksstyle golf course, you can roll the ball. Distance becomes a moot point."

That said, distance is everything at Carnoustie this year, which Woods discovered when he arrived on Sunday.

How far the ball travels in the warm, dry air is not the issue. It's how far it travels once it gets on the baked turf.

Dustin Johnson discovered that when he arrived on Saturday and reached the 499-yard 18th hole, with a stiff breeze at his back and fairways running only slightly slower than they did on the weekend at Shinnecock Hills.

He hit driver into the burn. The next day, his drive was a few yards short of the burn.

"I hit some irons, and depending on the wind, I'll probably hit anywhere from ... I've hit 3-wood, 3-iron and 4-iron off the tee," Johnson said. "I like all of them."

With the wind at his back on the 513-yard 14th hole, Johnson hit 3-iron and wedge.

One thing hasn't changed about links golf - it's best to keep the ball out of the pot bunkers, which effectively are a one-shot penalty. The question for so many players is whether that means going down to as little as a 7-iron off the tee (such as the 350yard third hole) or smashing driver over all the trouble.

Johnson figures he'll hit driver on half of the holes. U.S. Open champion Brooks Koepka might hit as many as nine drivers.

The conditions are as brittle as Muirfield in 2013, though most comparisons are with Hoylake in 2006, when Woods won the Open for the second straight time by hitting driver only one time all week.

"There's not a lot of opportunities to hit the driver just because the ball is going to be rolling 80 yards," Woods said. "It's just hard to keep the ball in play. Even hitting sometimes 4- and 5-irons, they've been running 50, 60 yards. It's going to be an interesting test to see which clubs we're going to be using off the tees, and a lot of it is dependent on which way the wind blows."

Woods had a 2-iron built for him specifically for the British Open, and he wonders how much he'll even use it. That has been too much club off the tee. Instead, most of his shots are with a 3-iron or 4-iron.

Reed was familiar with conditions the year Woods won at Hoylake, even though he was only 15. Reed won the Junior British Open that summer at Heswall, not far from Royal Liverpool. It was not only dry but extremely hot, and Reed was in rain pants because he didn't like wearing shorts.

"I'll never forget hitting the first tee shot and being as young as I was, getting up there, and it was 308," Reed said. "And I was just like, 'Wow, I just hit a drive over 300 yards.' And now I'm hitting 2-irons over 360."

Associated Graphic

Tiger Woods hits the ball during Tuesday's practice round for the British Open in Carnoustie, Scotland. Woods made his links debut at Carnoustie in 1995 as an amateur at the Scottish Open, a week before his British Open debut at St. Andrews.

PAUL CHILDS /REUTERS


Return to Main Andrew_Willis Page
Subscribe to
The Globe and Mail
 

Email this article Print this article

space  Advertisement
space

Need CPR for your RSP? Check your portfolio’s pulse and lower yours by improving the overall health of your investments. Click here.

Advertisement

7-Day Site Search
    

Breaking News



Today's Weather


Inside

Rick Salutin
Merrily marching
off to war
Roy MacGregor
Duct tape might hold
when panic strikes


Editorial
Where Manley is going with his first budget




space

Columnists



For a columnist's most recent stories, click on their name below.

 National


Roy MacGregor arrow
This Country
space
Jeffrey Simpson arrow
The Nation
space
Margaret Wente arrow
Counterpoint
space
Hugh Winsor  arrow
The Power Game
space
 Business


Rob Carrick arrow
Personal Finance
space
Drew Fagan arrow
The Big Picture
space
Mathew Ingram arrow
space
Brent Jang arrow
Business West
space
Brian Milner arrow
Taking Stock
space
Eric Reguly arrow
To The Point
space
Andrew Willis arrow
Streetwise
space
 Sports


Stephen Brunt arrow
The Game
space
Eric Duhatschek arrow
space
Allan Maki arrow
space
William Houston arrow
Truth & Rumours
space
Lorne Rubenstein arrow
Golf
space
 The Arts


John Doyle arrow
Television
space
John MacLachlan Gray arrow
Gray's Anatomy
space
David Macfarlane arrow
Cheap Seats
space
Johanna Schneller arrow
Moviegoer
space
 Comment


Murray Campbell arrow
Ontario Politics
space
Lysiane Gagnon arrow
Inside Quebec
space
Marcus Gee arrow
The World
space
William Johnson arrow
Pit Bill
space
Paul Knox arrow
Worldbeat
space
Heather Mallick arrow
As If
space
Leah McLaren arrow
Generation Why
space
Rex Murphy arrow
Japes of Wrath
space
Rick Salutin arrow
On The Other Hand
space
Paul Sullivan arrow
The West
space
William Thorsell arrow
space





Home | Business | National | Int'l | Sports | Columnists | The Arts | Tech | Travel | TV | Wheels
space

© 2003 Bell Globemedia Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Help & Contact Us | Back to the top of this page