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New rules for carry-on available on the Web

Wednesday, March 6, 2002
PATRICK DINEEN

Q

Is there a site or documentation on what airline passengers are allowed to carry on a plane? We seem to be hearing many conflicting reports since Sept. 11.

Cyril Hopkins
Lumby, B.C.

A.

I checked with the Air Transport Association of Canada (ATAC), which sent out one million copies of a brochure entitled Do You Really Need to Take it With You? It outlines what you can and cannot carry on board. This is available at airline ticket offices and some travel agencies. Transport Canada has also put this information on its Web site. Check http://www.tc.gc.ca. Click on information for travellers and then on travel tips. You can also check the Web site of the carrier you are flying with. An ATAC spokesperson suggests that if you are carrying anything unusual, you should check in advance with your carrier.

Q.

I am a diabetic and must travel with a syringe. What must I do to be able to take this on board with me?

B. Kirby
Toronto

A.

As a result of increased security at Canadian airports, the Canadian Diabetes Association and the Air Transport Association of Canada are advising people with diabetes to obtain a letter from their doctor before travel. Passengers with diabetes carrying insulin, syringes or other diabetes-related material must present a doctor's letter describing the medications and medical devices in their possession. These items may include insulin, syringes, insulin pens, glucose meters, insulin pumps and lancets. Before boarding an aircraft, passengers will be required to present this letter as well as their medication at security-screening points at Canadian airports. For more information, check http://www.diabetes.ca.

Q.

We will be travelling with our 13-year-old grandson this summer. The following are the places we are intending to visit: Budapest, Vienna, Venice and Rome. We would like to take a tour or go by train or bus to see the countryside. Do you have any suggestions?

Vera Kramer
Toronto

A.

Travelling by train would probably be the most convenient way and Rail Europe is now offering a new pass valid for three adjoining countries, which would fit your plans. The Eurail Selectpass Saver requires a minimum of two people travelling together at all times. There is now a discounted Eurail Selectpass Saver allowing five days of travel within two months for $329 (Canadian), approximately 32 per cent off, if it is purchased by April 30. The Eurail Selectpass Saver offers unlimited first-class travel on the national rail networks of any adjoining Eurail countries (Hungary, Austria and Italy in your case) that are connected by train or ship.

Q.

What are the skiing conditions in Innsbruck this year? We want to plan a trip to Austria in late March/early April and are concerned about snow conditions and the number of runs that will be open.

Robert Jackson

A.

One of the best places to check is the Austrian National Tourist Office Web site http://www.austriatourism.at. It is in both English and German and the introductory page allows you to view the ski resorts through TV Panorama Cameras. You can check ski conditions by clicking on snow report. Skiing is fine in the numerous ski areas around Innsbruck at the moment.

Patrick Dineen is editor of Travelweek. He can be reached by fax at (416) 365-1504. Please give your hometown.
pdineen@conceptstravel.com

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