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Canada's Apartheid, by John Stackhouse
Stories
Introduction
  Nov. 3

Welcome to Harlem on the Prairies
  Nov. 3 (Saskatoon, SK)

Crystal's choice: The best of both worlds
  Nov. 5 (Mississauga, ON)

How the Mi'kmaq profit from fear
  Nov. 6 (Cape Breton, NS)

The healing power of hockey
  Nov. 7 (The Pas, MB)

Norma Rae of the Okanagan
  Nov. 8 (Westbank, BC)

Comic genius or 'niggers in red face'?
  Nov. 9 (Regina, SK)

Praying for a miracle
  Nov. 10 (Lac Ste. Anne, AB)

To have and to have not
  Nov. 12 (Moosonee, ON)

Trouble in paradise
  Nov. 19 (Tofino, BC)

A cut of the action
  Nov. 26 (Wabigoon, ON)

The young and the restless
  Dec. 3 (Ashern, MB)

The wireless warrior's digital dream
  Dec. 10 (Ottawa,ON)

'Everyone thought we were stupid'
  Dec. 14 (Salluit, QC)

First step: End the segregation
  Dec. 15 (Last in the series)

 
Photo Essays

Globe and Mail photographers Patti Gower, Tibor Kolley, John Lehmann, Fred Lum and John Morstad have captured visual images to accompany reporter John Stackhouse's words.

The link to each photo essay will be archived here as it appears over the course of the series, slated to conclude on Dec. 15.

There is a link to the story and an e-mail link if you wish to send a comment on the photos to the photographers.


Two worlds - photo essay
December 14, 2001


Segregation must end
John Stackhouse writes: "At one point in my cross-country exploration of how natives and non-natives get along, I felt I was witnessing a scene straight out of the Deep South, with aboriginal Canadians taking the place of blacks. Only a radical change in thinking will make any real difference."
CONTACT THE PHOTOGRAPHER

Heavy mettle - photo essay
December 14, 2001
Salluit, QC

'Everyone thought we were stupid'
Rome wasn't built in a day. The massive, high-tech Raglan mine promised to help the Inuit of northern Quebec leap into the modern age. Instead, they found themselves stuck in low-level jobs, working with outsiders they didn't like and whose language they couldn't understand. But the seeds of equality have begun to take root.
CONTACT THE PHOTOGRAPHER


The Internet Indian
December 10, 2001
Ottawa, ON


The wireless warrior's digital dream
John Bernard sees cyberspace as the promised land for his troubled people. After all, computers have made him a millionaire and national role model. But will the Internet really help far-flung native communities band together, as he imagines, or will it, as his critics fear, suck aboriginal Canada into the global cultural vortex?
CONTACT THE PHOTOGRAPHER

Home and school - photo essay
December 3, 2001
Ashern, MB

The young and the restless
They live on a reserve they feel can't teach them how to make their dreams come true. Meet Roseanna Anderson and the other youngsters who have given up on the school run by Manitoba's Fairford First Nation. Every day their thirst for knowledge takes them away from home to a world where they exist on the margins. Does it have to be this way?
CONTACT THE PHOTOGRAPHER


Sowing and reaping
November 26, 2001
Wabigoon, ON


A cut of the action
For decades, the people of the Wabigoon First Nation lived in poverty as outsiders harvested a fortune from the Northwestern Ontario woodlands they call home. Don't hire Indians, white people said, they don't know how to work. Now, thanks to modern technology, millions of dollars and a change in attitude, they may have to eat those words.
CONTACT THE PHOTOGRAPHER

The salmon people - photo essay
November 19, 2001
Tofino, BC

Haunted by the call of the wild
On an outer reach of Clayoquot Sound, past the snow-capped peaks and cathedral groves of cedar that run down to the water's edge, the Ahousat are enjoying another day in paradise. It's the sort of lazy day that used to draw the salmon people, as the Ahousat are known, to the water to scoop what they could of the West Coast's bounty - herring, crab and the tenacious fish from which they take their name.
CONTACT THE PHOTOGRAPHER


Gateway to the arctic
November 12, 2001
Moosonee, ON


To have and to have not
Moosonee and Moose Factory are historic northern neighbours separated only by a bit of open water. But that's where the similarity ends. One community is thriving and enjoying excellent health care. The other is not. Guess which one's a native reserve
CONTACT THE PHOTOGRAPHER

Cross purposes - photo essay
November 10, 2001
Lac Ste. Anne, AB

Praying for a miracle
Every year, a crowd of 40,000 that's almost entirely native journeys to a lake in northern Alberta to seek salvation. Old age and the residential-schools scandal have driven the Catholic order behind the pilgrimage to the verge of extinction. Not that the pilgrims are too worried. Their ancestors gathered here long before any priest appeared on the scene. They'll keep the tradition alive
CONTACT THE PHOTOGRAPHER


Backstage pass - photo essay
November 9, 2001
Regina, SK


Comic genius or 'niggers in red face'?
Never before has Canadian radio seen anything quite like the biting satire of the Dead Dog Café, a program not afraid to train its sights on native shortcomings. Listeners eat it up but at least one cast member wonders whether fans are really laughing with natives or at them.
CONTACT THE PHOTOGRAPHER

Westbank and the union - photo essay
November 8, 2001
Westbank, BC

Norma Rae of the Okanagan
The workplace was tense, rumours swirled about a secret list of people to be fired and one woman even said her mother's water supply was being cut off. Evelyn Lube decided the chief had to be reined in, even enlisting big white labour risked a racial conflict.
CONTACT THE PHOTOGRAPHER


A sporting chance - photo essay
November 7, 2001
The Pas, MB


The healing power of hockey
Not that long ago, The Pas was about as close as Canada could come to passing for the Deep South. Native and non-native had always lived on separate planets, but the Helen Betty Osborne atrocity had left them hating each other. Still, there was one thing the two camps had in common . . .
CONTACT THE PHOTOGRAPHER

Mining in Membertou - photo essay
November 6, 2001
Cape Breton, NS

How the Mi'Kmaq profit from fear
Meet the people of Membertou, traditional second-class citizens of downtrodden Cape Breton. Their community is best known as the home of pain, poverty and courtroom star Donald Marshall, but now its fortunes are on the rise. What would possess a huge multinational to sign a costly deal with natives covering a mine site they don't even own?
CONTACT THE PHOTOGRAPHER



November 5, 2001
Mississauga, ON


Crystal's choice: The best of both worlds
When it hits Toronto, Canada's capital of ethnic diversity, native heritage can look like just another brick in the wall. But young Crystal Samms refuses to lose sight of her goals and her identity amid the bright lights of the big city. She's determined to cling to her roots, conquer the urban demons that prey on her people and climb the ladder of success.
CONTACT THE PHOTOGRAPHER

On the Beat - photo essay
November 3, 2001
Saskatoon, SK

Welcome to Harlem on the Prairies
Welcome to Saskatoon, where the police are vilified as racists who run drunks out of town and leave them to freeze. But this is also home to the nation's highest crime rate and a burgeoning, troubled native population that accounts for more than half of all arrests. What's it really like to uphold the law in Harlem on the Prairies? Let's spend 12 hours . . .
CONTACT THE PHOTOGRAPHER


 
 

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Introduction
John Stackhouse

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