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Do better business, virtually

You may not have time to play Second Life if you’re already busy with your first one, but technology experts suggest the two may eventually blur into the same thing.

Second Life, where people create online versions of themselves called avatars and explore a digital world that mimics this one, has had a lot of interest from the business community. The idea is to use these games as a platform for doing useful work. Some have begun referring to these worlds as “multiuser virtual environments,” or MUVEs. Although much of the interest in MUVEs has come from educational institutions, here are a few resources to help you think about an approach for your own organization.

Don’t mimic your website: On placeofsocialmedia.com, Eric Gordon published a post titled The Geography of Virtual Worlds, in which he contrasts MUVEs with a regular, two-dimensional website.

“Many of the companies and services that initially rushed to build virtual stores and offices have failed to bring people to their sites,” he said, noting the difference between surfing a Web page and managing an avatar. “Instead of searching for a product, clicking on it, reading reviews and then purchasing, my avatar has to first walk through a space and find the product. … MUVEs reintroduce space into digitally mediated communication.” You’d best live in these worlds a while before you move in.

Focus on relationships: “Organizations [using MUVEs] will be able to achieve the fastest return on investment by focusing initially on interpersonal skills development and social interactions, which are multiuser in nature,” writes Kaye Vivian on Dove-Lane.com, who cited Caterpillar’s use of virtual mining sites to train dump truck drivers in operational hazards and vehicle controls.

“Virtual worlds provide excellent opportunities to recreate a historical period or travel virtually to places they have never seen, making them come alive to learners.”

Spare us the pitches: On the social networking site LinkedIn, Dave Elchoness, founder of a consulting firm called VRWorkplace, suggested it’s important to recognize where MUVEs are not appropriate as well as where they’re useful.

“To be frank, I do not think marketing is best achieved in Second Life because the medium is (1) not populated enough to make marketing valuable, and (2) much more like a telephone than a billboard,” he wrote.

Consider long-term MUVEs: Victor Rozek, writing on ITJungle.com, said we may have to wait for the next generation of knowledge workers to bring their Second Life expertise with them.

“Regardless, virtual worlds are guaranteed to have widespread business impacts, if for no other reason than that U.S. video game sales soared to $17.9-billion (U.S.) last year,” he said. “That’s a lot of kids spending a lot of time kung-fuing and shooting each other’s avatars. When they eventually enter the business world, the only unusual thing about a virtual trade conference will be the lack of gunfire.”

Upgrade your PR

You’d think in this age of electronic communication, someone would have come up with a better way to tell a business story than a press release. A Dundas, Ont.-based firm called Social Media Group has created a concept called “Digital Snippets,” which offers a platform to add photos, videos and other elements, making the press release a work-in-progress.

“Like a print publication, once the [traditional] release is issued, it’s finished. There is no ongoing story,” Social Media Group principal Maggie Fox blogs on Socialmediagroup.ca. “In many ways we have cut the cord to the model of the traditional press release.” Worth a look.

A second look at 2.0

Dr. Todd Stephens, senior technical architect for collaboration and online services at AT&T Corp., recently offered a checklist that companies can use to review their use of so-called enterprise 2.0 technologies:

  1. Were the right people involved? While you may have great performers on the team, do you have the right people engaged to take you to the next level?
  2. Is the strategy clearly communicated across the organization? Remember, the biggest obstacle to communication is the illusion that it has actually happened.
  3. Can you execute in 2008? Maybe you need bigger clients like executive bloggers to get involved with the effort.
  4. What was your “drop rate” when it comes to engagement? When a person created a collaborative environment for the first time, did you follow up with some type of “Welcome Neighbour” greeting? Now might be the time.

Oracle, BEA and middleware’s future

Most business people don’t even know what middleware is, let alone how often they use it every day.

If you’re trying to pull information out of a database, for example, you need a software program that allows you to access the database. If you work in a company with multiple databases, though, you would need a different software program to access each database unless you had some middleware – technology that sits in the middle of applications and “glues” them together.

That’s why middleware is such a hot market, and why database firm Oracle’s acquisition of middleware specialist BEA Systems last week for $8.5-billion (U.S.) was such a hot topic among IT professionals. BEA was considered the last of the big firms that focused exclusively on middleware, and there’s a lot of speculation over what the deal means for customers.

Here are a few experts’ predictions to keep in mind if your IT department is working on anything involving middleware.

Biggest potential impact: Dan Foody, a vice-president of Progress Software, echoes the thoughts of many observers that Oracle and BEA face significant product overlap, which may mean users will face a tough upgrade decision before long. “Like it or not, it would be bad business for Oracle to have two application servers,” he writes, referring to a category of middleware product. “Oracle is going to have to pick one to go forward. Because of this, customers that made a different choice will end up with legacy SOA infrastructure products that they will have to deal with.”

Key industries affected: James Governor, an industry analyst writing at RedMonk.com, says the BEA middleware products Oracle has bought will likely appeal to telecommunications firms, which Oracle has struggled to win over in the past. “Oracle also gains a far stronger presence in financial services, a market that proved surprisingly hard to crack,” he writes. “Many banks still use [databases from] Sybase and Informix. [BEA’s middleware product] WebLogic is often found alongside these databases.” Other competitors include IBM and SAP, Mr. Governor notes.

What it will cost: While some BEA users have already expressed fears over price hikes, Eric Newcomer writes on blogs.iona.com that whoever’s left in the market should be focused on saving customers’ money. “It should be clear by now that customers have enough of the old expensive middleware,” he writes. “What they need now are lightweight, less expensive products that will help them extend applications into the modern world at an appropriate price point. It should not cost as much to improve an application as it did to create it in the first place.”

The timeline: “I predict that it will take years for Oracle to have a middleware stack that incorporates BEA’s value,” writes enterprise and infrastructure consultant Judith Hurwitz at jshurwitz.wordpress.com, suggesting that most companies have some time on their hands before they feel the full effects of the merger. “At least where Oracle is concerned, we won’t be bored.”

Make Macs useful

Last week’s Macworld Conference & Expo showcased a lot of new Apple products, including its superlight and thin MacBook Air laptop computer. In most companies, however, IT departments stick to Windows-based machines, but Simone Chiaretta may be able to change that. Mr. Chiaretta, an Italian .Net developer, recently published “18 (almost) free applications” for the Mac, which includes text editors, FTP software, spreadsheets and a lot more.

Surf like a pro

As more companies adopt Web-based applications, it’s going to become more important for business users to know how to manage their features on their browsers – such as Internet Explorer or Firefox – as well as they manage the various folders on their PCs. On CodingHorror.com, Jeff Atwood offers a top five list of shortcuts you can use to get around your browser more efficiently.

“I apologize if you feel I’ve insulted your intelligence with such basic shortcuts. But realize that not everyone knows what you know,” he writes.

  • Set up a keyboard shortcut to launch your browser
  • Alt+D to navigate to the browser address bar
  • Ctrl+E to navigate to the browser search box
  • Alt+Enter to open searches or websites in a new tab
  • The middle mouse button opens links in a new tab, and also closes tabs

 

Ideas for today, 2017

Vaughn Merlyn is a management consultant and researcher who focuses on technology-driven business strategies among Fortune 500 companies. While the name of his blog, IT Organization Circa 2017, may convey the impression he’s into prognostication, in fact Mr. Merlyn’s ideas are applicable today.

Bring back the Info Centre: Mr. Merlyn harkens back to a concept used in many firms during the 1980s. “Information Centres (ICs) comprised a small group of IT professionals, a suite of tools and, especially early in the IC movement, a place for end users to go to get access to these tools … and the mainframe computers they ran on – often a room with computer terminals, reference materials, a printer or two, photocopier, and so on.” With all the Web 2.0 technologies bombarding enterprise employees, Mr. Merlyn suggests it may be time to resurrect ICs.

Learn from capital markets colleagues: According to Mr. Merlyn, IT organizations in capital markets tend to have a central IT infrastructure/operations group and decentralized business unit groups organized around product lines, such as equity trading. They also tend to show more maturity in their use of technology and achieve great results, he adds, which could be a lesson for others. “I can’t think of many businesses today where highly leveraged IT opportunities don’t exist [even if they have not yet been identified]; where speed [time to value] is not critical; where innovation would not have significant implications for competitiveness and profitability; and where competition isn’t a constant challenge,” he says.

Use some imagination: As a visioning exercise, Mr. Merlyn suggests asking a group of technology workers to write a short play or video about a day in the life of the IT professional in 2012. “Ask another group to meet with business stakeholders and to come back with ‘voice of the customer’ findings – what our customers would like to see from the IT organization five years from now,” he says. “For the truly creative, write an imaginary Fortune magazine feature story about how IT transformed an organization.”

Examine your archetype: Mr. Merlyn uses the image of a gangly teenager to describe the way technology works in many companies. “Perhaps such an organization would have mature physical networking capability, but poor business-IT strategic alignment, and low innovation capabilities. “Imagine the archetype of the ‘child prodigy,’ with high cognitive maturity relative to physical, social and economic maturity – what would the analogous IT organization look like?” It could be the first step toward getting your IT organization to grow up.

Vaughn Merlyn is a management consultant and researcher who focuses on technology-driven business strategies among Fortune 500 companies. While the name of his blog, IT Organization Circa 2017, may convey the impression he’s into prognostication, in fact Mr. Merlyn’s ideas are applicable today.

Bring back the Info Centre: Mr. Merlyn harkens back to a concept used in many firms during the 1980s. “Information Centres (ICs) comprised a small group of IT professionals, a suite of tools and, especially early in the IC movement, a place for end users to go to get access to these tools … and the mainframe computers they ran on – often a room with computer terminals, reference materials, a printer or two, photocopier, and so on.” With all the Web 2.0 technologies bombarding enterprise employees, Mr. Merlyn suggests it may be time to resurrect ICs.

Learn from capital markets colleagues: According to Mr. Merlyn, IT organizations in capital markets tend to have a central IT infrastructure/operations group and decentralized business unit groups organized around product lines, such as equity trading. They also tend to show more maturity in their use of technology and achieve great results, he adds, which could be a lesson for others. “I can’t think of many businesses today where highly leveraged IT opportunities don’t exist [even if they have not yet been identified]; where speed [time to value] is not critical; where innovation would not have significant implications for competitiveness and profitability; and where competition isn’t a constant challenge,” he says.

Use some imagination: As a visioning exercise, Mr. Merlyn suggests asking a group of technology workers to write a short play or video about a day in the life of the IT professional in 2012. “Ask another group to meet with business stakeholders and to come back with ‘voice of the customer’ findings – what our customers would like to see from the IT organization five years from now,” he says. “For the truly creative, write an imaginary Fortune magazine feature story about how IT transformed an organization.”

Examine your archetype: Mr. Merlyn uses the image of a gangly teenager to describe the way technology works in many companies. “Perhaps such an organization would have mature physical networking capability, but poor business-IT strategic alignment, and low innovation capabilities. “Imagine the archetype of the ‘child prodigy,’ with high cognitive maturity relative to physical, social and economic maturity – what would the analogous IT organization look like?” It could be the first step toward getting your IT organization to grow up.

Get more out of e-mail

If your company uses Microsoft Outlook, it might be a good time to start paying attention to Xobni.com, which is making an add-on piece of software that brings some business intelligence to e-mail.

The product, which is still in beta, has already been getting rave reviews from technology sites such as TechCrunch, which admires the side panel it adds to the Outlook Window that gives information on the person who sent you a message.

This could include their contact information such as a phone number, how they’re related to other contacts in your network, conversations you’ve had via Outlook and other analytics.

Consider yourself warned

Computer Associates recently published its Internet Security Report listing the top threats of the year. Among the most important areas of risk:

  1. Botnets, a large number of computers that have been infected by a piece of malicious software, are decentralizing via peer-to-peer architectures and using instant messaging to spread.
  2. Now that companies are using virtualization software to get more out of their IT infrastructure, malware makers are aiming at them, CA researchers say.
  3. Social networking sites like Facebook could offer a “windfall” to cybercriminals, according to CA, because there are so many potential victims in the same place. Keep this in mind if you allow the use of such services in the office.
  4. Although Microsoft says it has never designed a safer OS than Vista, CA points out there have been 20 vulnerabilities announced so far.
  5. Most likely moments for a cyberattack include the U.S. election and the Beijing Olympics.

IT doublethink

Even IT gurus have the right to think twice.

This year the online salon Edge.org has drawn a lot of attention for the annual question it put out to a mixture of scientists and artists: What have you changed your mind about?

Contributors range from actor Alan Alda to folk singer Joan Baez, but some of the real gems came from technology visionaries who decided to take a second look at their original visions.

Teach technology if you want to learn: Seth Loyd is a quantum mechanical engineer at MIT, which sounds intimidating, but the author of Programming the Universe admits he didn’t really gain self-confidence about IT until he became an instructor for students who are probably as smart as he is. “In my feverish attempt to understand analog computers, I constructed a model for a quantum-mechanical analog computer that would operate at the level of individual atoms. This model resulted in one of my best scientific papers,” he says. Even if it’s daunting, assist others with their IT challenges in order to master your own.

Calm down at the keyboard: Linda Stone, a former Microsoft VP, has been doing a lot of research on how users interact with technology and she realized that their attention span had a lot to do with what was going on in their lungs. “In observing others — in their offices, their homes, at cafes — the vast majority of people hold their breath, especially when they first begin responding to e-mail. On cell phones, especially when talking and walking, people tend to hyper-ventilate or overbreathe. Either of these breathing patterns disturbs oxygen and CO2 balance,” she writes. “I’ve changed my mind about how much attention to pay to my breathing patterns and how important it is to remember to breathe when I’m using a computer, PDA or cell phone.”

No application is eternal: As much as we might like our IT problems to end, software designer Karl Krause says applications are temporary solutions. “I used to think ‘software design’ is an art form. I now believe that I was half-right: it is indeed an art, but it has a rather short half-life. Software is merely a performance art – a momentary flash of brilliance, doomed to be overtaken by the next wave, or maybe even by its own sequel. Eaten alive by its successors. And time.”

Don’t treat the world like a computer: Rodney Brooks, the CTO of iRobot Corp. and author of Flesh and Machines, says we have a tendency to think of business problems as though they were broken PCs. That’s not always the best approach. “We can think about human memory as data storage and retrieval. And we can think about walking over rough terrain as computing the optimal place to put down each of our feet. But I suspect that somewhere down the line we are going to come up with better, less computational metaphors,” he says. “The entities we use for metaphors may be more complex but the useful ones will lead to simpler explanations.”

 

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javax.servlet.ServletException: Processing template "document/v5/templates/blog" with config "tgamv3/generic.cfg"
	at GIS.Servlets.HTMLTemplate.processRequest(HTMLTemplate.java:231)
	at GIS.Servlets.HTMLTemplate.doGet(HTMLTemplate.java:137)
	at javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet.service(HttpServlet.java:126)
	at GIS.Common.Servlet.service(Servlet.java:106)
	at javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet.service(HttpServlet.java:103)
	at com.caucho.server.http.FilterChainServlet.doFilter(FilterChainServlet.java:95)
	at com.caucho.server.http.Invocation.service(Invocation.java:291)
	at com.caucho.server.http.CacheInvocation.service(CacheInvocation.java:132)
	at com.caucho.server.http.RunnerRequest.handleRequest(RunnerRequest.java:341)
	at com.caucho.server.http.RunnerRequest.handleConnection(RunnerRequest.java:271)
	at com.caucho.server.TcpConnection.run(TcpConnection.java:136)
	at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:662)

Nested exception: GIS.Common.GICheckedException: Other exception in file: '/usr/local/web_htdocs/tgamv3/v5/templates/blog.html'  while processing select element with added parms:{}
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:1511)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:782)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:945)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:782)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.parse(HTMLTemplateParser.java:751)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:476)
	at GIS.Servlets.HTMLTemplate.generate(HTMLTemplate.java:316)
	at GIS.Servlets.HTMLTemplate.processRequest(HTMLTemplate.java:222)
	at GIS.Servlets.HTMLTemplate.doGet(HTMLTemplate.java:137)
	at javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet.service(HttpServlet.java:126)
	at GIS.Common.Servlet.service(Servlet.java:106)
	at javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet.service(HttpServlet.java:103)
	at com.caucho.server.http.FilterChainServlet.doFilter(FilterChainServlet.java:95)
	at com.caucho.server.http.Invocation.service(Invocation.java:291)
	at com.caucho.server.http.CacheInvocation.service(CacheInvocation.java:132)
	at com.caucho.server.http.RunnerRequest.handleRequest(RunnerRequest.java:341)
	at com.caucho.server.http.RunnerRequest.handleConnection(RunnerRequest.java:271)
	at com.caucho.server.TcpConnection.run(TcpConnection.java:136)
	at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:662)

Nested exception: GIS.Common.GICheckedException: Other exception  while processing transformation element with added parms:{cacheTime=5000, type=xsl, url=/usr/local/web_htdocs/tgamv3/v5/includes/content/blogs/blogroll-gam.opml}
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:1625)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:782)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.parse(HTMLTemplateParser.java:751)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:476)
	at GIS.Jel.JELSelectProducer.emitChoiceNode(JELSelectProducer.java:48)
	at GIS.Jel.JELSelectOneProducer.generate(JELSelectOneProducer.java:92)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:1502)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:782)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:945)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:782)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.parse(HTMLTemplateParser.java:751)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:476)
	at GIS.Servlets.HTMLTemplate.generate(HTMLTemplate.java:316)
	at GIS.Servlets.HTMLTemplate.processRequest(HTMLTemplate.java:222)
	at GIS.Servlets.HTMLTemplate.doGet(HTMLTemplate.java:137)
	at javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet.service(HttpServlet.java:126)
	at GIS.Common.Servlet.service(Servlet.java:106)
	at javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet.service(HttpServlet.java:103)
	at com.caucho.server.http.FilterChainServlet.doFilter(FilterChainServlet.java:95)
	at com.caucho.server.http.Invocation.service(Invocation.java:291)
	at com.caucho.server.http.CacheInvocation.service(CacheInvocation.java:132)
	at com.caucho.server.http.RunnerRequest.handleRequest(RunnerRequest.java:341)
	at com.caucho.server.http.RunnerRequest.handleConnection(RunnerRequest.java:271)
	at com.caucho.server.TcpConnection.run(TcpConnection.java:136)
	at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:662)

Nested exception: java.lang.ClassCastException: org.apache.xerces.dom.ElementNSImpl cannot be cast to com.caucho.xml.QElement
	at com.caucho.xsl.Generator.getXslLocal(Generator.java:2141)
	at com.caucho.xsl.Generator.generate(Generator.java:294)
	at com.caucho.xsl.AbstractStylesheetFactory.generate(AbstractStylesheetFactory.java:819)
	at com.caucho.xsl.AbstractStylesheetFactory.newTemplates(AbstractStylesheetFactory.java:437)
	at com.caucho.xsl.AbstractStylesheetFactory.newTransformer(AbstractStylesheetFactory.java:312)
	at GIS.Universal.XMLTransformer.transform(XMLTransformer.java:262)
	at GIS.Universal.XMLTransformer.transform(XMLTransformer.java:166)
	at GIS.HTMLComments.HTMLProducers.XSLProducer.generate(XSLProducer.java:85)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:1615)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:782)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.parse(HTMLTemplateParser.java:751)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:476)
	at GIS.Jel.JELSelectProducer.emitChoiceNode(JELSelectProducer.java:48)
	at GIS.Jel.JELSelectOneProducer.generate(JELSelectOneProducer.java:92)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:1502)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:782)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:945)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:782)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.parse(HTMLTemplateParser.java:751)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:476)
	at GIS.Servlets.HTMLTemplate.generate(HTMLTemplate.java:316)
	at GIS.Servlets.HTMLTemplate.processRequest(HTMLTemplate.java:222)
	at GIS.Servlets.HTMLTemplate.doGet(HTMLTemplate.java:137)
	at javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet.service(HttpServlet.java:126)
	at GIS.Common.Servlet.service(Servlet.java:106)
	at javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet.service(HttpServlet.java:103)
	at com.caucho.server.http.FilterChainServlet.doFilter(FilterChainServlet.java:95)
	at com.caucho.server.http.Invocation.service(Invocation.java:291)
	at com.caucho.server.http.CacheInvocation.service(CacheInvocation.java:132)
	at com.caucho.server.http.RunnerRequest.handleRequest(RunnerRequest.java:341)
	at com.caucho.server.http.RunnerRequest.handleConnection(RunnerRequest.java:271)
	at com.caucho.server.TcpConnection.run(TcpConnection.java:136)
	at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:662)

Nested exception: java.lang.ClassCastException: org.apache.xerces.dom.ElementNSImpl cannot be cast to com.caucho.xml.QElement
	at com.caucho.xsl.Generator.getXslLocal(Generator.java:2141)
	at com.caucho.xsl.Generator.generate(Generator.java:294)
	at com.caucho.xsl.AbstractStylesheetFactory.generate(AbstractStylesheetFactory.java:819)
	at com.caucho.xsl.AbstractStylesheetFactory.newTemplates(AbstractStylesheetFactory.java:437)
	at com.caucho.xsl.AbstractStylesheetFactory.newTransformer(AbstractStylesheetFactory.java:312)
	at GIS.Universal.XMLTransformer.transform(XMLTransformer.java:262)
	at GIS.Universal.XMLTransformer.transform(XMLTransformer.java:166)
	at GIS.HTMLComments.HTMLProducers.XSLProducer.generate(XSLProducer.java:85)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:1615)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:782)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.parse(HTMLTemplateParser.java:751)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:476)
	at GIS.Jel.JELSelectProducer.emitChoiceNode(JELSelectProducer.java:48)
	at GIS.Jel.JELSelectOneProducer.generate(JELSelectOneProducer.java:92)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:1502)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:782)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:945)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:782)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.parse(HTMLTemplateParser.java:751)
	at GIS.Common.HTMLTemplateParser.generate(HTMLTemplateParser.java:476)
	at GIS.Servlets.HTMLTemplate.generate(HTMLTemplate.java:316)
	at GIS.Servlets.HTMLTemplate.processRequest(HTMLTemplate.java:222)
	at GIS.Servlets.HTMLTemplate.doGet(HTMLTemplate.java:137)
	at javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet.service(HttpServlet.java:126)
	at GIS.Common.Servlet.service(Servlet.java:106)
	at javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet.service(HttpServlet.java:103)
	at com.caucho.server.http.FilterChainServlet.doFilter(FilterChainServlet.java:95)
	at com.caucho.server.http.Invocation.service(Invocation.java:291)
	at com.caucho.server.http.CacheInvocation.service(CacheInvocation.java:132)
	at com.caucho.server.http.RunnerRequest.handleRequest(RunnerRequest.java:341)
	at com.caucho.server.http.RunnerRequest.handleConnection(RunnerRequest.java:271)
	at com.caucho.server.TcpConnection.run(TcpConnection.java:136)
	at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:662)